Letter From Scotland

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
Comments
Genome: [r4 Bd=19971211]

The second of three programmes. Tom Morton reflects on life and times in Shetland, where the sea has always been the key to the community's survival. From his home he can watch Arctic terns sweeping over the shingled beach and giant tankers making their way to the Sullom Voe Oil Terminal. Producer Mike Shaw

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971211]

Unknown: Tom Morton

Producer: Mike Shaw

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971218]

The last of three programmes. On

11 September 1997, Scotland voted to establish its own parliament. Since then, there has been a revival of interest in all things Scottish.

Alan Taylor , deputy editor of The Scotsman. considers the strange effects the prospect of devolution is already having on the psyche of the Scots. Producer Mike Shaw

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971218]

Unknown: Alan Taylor

Producer: Mike Shaw

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940708]

1: A Parcel of Rogues. Robert Burns mocked the Scots

"rogues" who supported the Treaty of Union between Scotland and England in 1707, but also praised the British constitution when it suited him. Scotland today remains clearly different from the rest of the UK- but how different? Are the Scots a proud people denied their birthright, or simply whingeing Jocks? In the first of four programmes, Colin MacKay reflects on the fabric of Scottish life.

Producer Michael Shaw

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940708]

Unknown: Robert Burns

Unknown: Colin MacKay

Producer: Michael Shaw

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940710]

A Parcel of Rogues. In the first of four programmes, Colin MacKay reflects on the fabric of Scottish life.

Scotland today remains clearly different from the rest of the UK-but how different?

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940710]

Unknown: Colin MacKay

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940715]

2: Highland Landscapes. Over the past 30 years, the Highlands have seen more change than they did in the previous century. Martin Macdonald asks what impact this has had on the area's social and cultural values.

Producer Michael Shaw

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940715]

Unknown: Martin MacDonald

Producer: Michael Shaw

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940717]

2: Highland Landscapes. Martin Macdonald reports on the impact 30 years of change has had on the social and cultural values of the Highlands.

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940717]

Unknown: Martin MacDonald

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940722]

3: Scottish Women. Scotland has long been considered a bastion of male chauvinism, but times are changing. Or are they? While cross-party co-operation on political representation for women has been impressive, figures for domestic violence show no signs of improving.

Ruth Wishart reflects on prospects for Scottish women in the 1990s.

Producer Caroline Adam (Repeated Sunday at 6.15pmj

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940722]

Unknown: Ruth Wishart

Producer: Caroline Adam

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940724]

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940729]

4: "I Kent His Faither". Drawing a picture of the Scottish character, especially from the inside perspective, is an activity similar to that of amateur lion taming.... very likely one will get badly chewed. George Hume risks all to reflect on the multiple layers of contradiction that define the Scot in the 1990s.

Producer Michael Shaw

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940729]

Unknown: George Hume

Producer: Michael Shaw

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940731]

4:7 Kent His Faither". George Hume reflects on the many layers of contradiction that define the Scot in the 1990s.

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19940731]

Unknown: George Hume

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960621]

In the first of a four-part series, Colin Bell writes from Edinburgh. Walking around the city, he acknowledges that it possesses all the trappings of a city with capital status.

Producer Michael Shaw. Rptd Sunday 6.15pm

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960621]

Producer: Michael Shaw.

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960623]

The first of a series with Colin Bell. Repeated from Friday

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960628]

In the second of a four-part series, Janice Forsyth , Glasgow born and bred, explores the transatlantic connections between her native city and New York.

Producer Jane Fowler. Rptd Sun 6.15pm

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960628]

Unknown: Janice Forsyth

Producer: Jane Fowler.

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960630]

In the second of a four-part series, Janice Forsyth writes from Glasgow. Repeated from Friday

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960630]

Unknown: Janice Forsyth

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960705]

Gaels have always been extremely reverential about their native tongue, claiming that, among other things,

Gaelic was the language of the Garden of Eden. In the third of four letters from

Scotland, Cailean Maclean , resident of the Isle of Skye, highlights some surprising aspects of this language. Producer Michael Shaw. Rptd Sun 6.15pm

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960705]

Unknown: Cailean MacLean

Producer: Michael Shaw.

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960707]

In the third of four letters from

Scotland, Cailean Maclean highlights some surprising aspects of the ancient Gaelic language. Repeated from Friday

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960707]

Unknown: Cailean MacLean

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960712]

In the last of the series, Kirsty Wark explains why, though she works in London on BBC2's Newsnight, she chooses to keep her home, family and production company in Scotland.

Producer Michael Shaw. Rptd Sun at 6.15pm

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960712]

Unknown: Kirsty Wark

Producer: Michael Shaw.

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19960714]

In the last of the series, KirstyWark explains why she lives in Scotland. Repeated from Friday

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19971211]

The second of three programmes. Tom Morton reflects on life and times in Shetland, where the sea has always been the key to the community's survival. From his home he can watch Arctic terns sweeping over the shingled beach and giant tankers making their way to the Sullom Voe Oil Terminal. Producer Mike Shaw

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19971211]

Unknown: Tom Morton

Producer: Mike Shaw

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19971218]

The last of three programmes. On

11 September 1997, Scotland voted to establish its own parliament. Since then, there has been a revival of interest in all things Scottish.

Alan Taylor , deputy editor of The Scotsman. considers the strange effects the prospect of devolution is already having on the psyche of the Scots. Producer Mike Shaw

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19971218]

Unknown: Alan Taylor

Producer: Mike Shaw

197D0119971204

The first of three programmes.

Award-winning writer A L Kennedy explores the two sides of Scotland in her move from Dundee on the east coast to Glasgow in the west.

`In my youth the cuisine was thin, salt, rigorous.

In the West, lurid and unlikely sources of fat and sugar lurk at every turn and, naturally, the citizens drop like flies - the penalty for pleasure is always death.'.

197D0119971204

The first of three programmes.

Award-winning writer A L Kennedy explores the two sides of Scotland in her move from Dundee on the east coast to Glasgow in the west.

`In my youth the cuisine was thin, salt, rigorous.

In the West, lurid and unlikely sources of fat and sugar lurk at every turn and, naturally, the citizens drop like flies - the penalty for pleasure is always death.'.

197D0219971211

The second of three programmes.

Tom Morton reflects on life and times in Shetland, where the sea has always been the key to the community's survival.

From his home he can watch Arctic terns sweeping over the shingled beach and giant tankers making their way to the Sullom Voe Oil Terminal.

197D0219971211

The second of three programmes.

Tom Morton reflects on life and times in Shetland, where the sea has always been the key to the community's survival.

From his home he can watch Arctic terns sweeping over the shingled beach and giant tankers making their way to the Sullom Voe Oil Terminal.

197D03The Scotsman19971218

On 11 September 1997, Scotland voted to establish its own parliament.

Since then, there has been a revival of interest in all things Scottish - literature, history, identity.

Alan Taylor, deputy editor of `The Scotsman', considers how the prospect of devolution is already affecting the psyche of the Scots.

197D03The Scotsman19971218

On 11 September 1997, Scotland voted to establish its own parliament.

Since then, there has been a revival of interest in all things Scottish - literature, history, identity.

Alan Taylor, deputy editor of `The Scotsman', considers how the prospect of devolution is already affecting the psyche of the Scots.