Lent Talks

Six people well known in their fields reflect on the story of Jesus' ministry and Passion from the perspective of their own personal and professional experience.

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
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20140319

The novelist Catherine Fox looks at this year's theme of The Power and the Passion by reflecting on the power of Christ's submission. How can you rally to the cause of a man who won't fight, forbids you to defend him and lets himself be killed? After all, we've learned to dislike 'victim mentality', haven't we?

Producer: Peter Everett.

Andrew Adonis20140402

The Power and the Passion: Andrew Adonis reflects on people power.

Anouchka Grose - Destiny And The Psyche20170308

The writer and psychoanalyst Anouchka Grose explores the force of destiny in our lives and as Jesus contemplates his future in his 40 days in the wilderness.

Producer: Phil Pegum.

Ben Judah - Destiny And The Migrant20170322

Ben Judah, the journalist and author of "This is London" talks about his family's journey over the centuries from the Jewish Quarter of Baghdad, to India and finally London.

Producer: Phil Pegum.

Bonnie Greer20140312

The American writer Bonnie Greer begins this year's series of Lent Talks, where six prominent writers reflect on the Christian season of Lent and how the story of Christ's passion continues to impact on contemporary society.

This year's theme is looks at power and the way the story of the Passion reflects the ways in which power is exercised in today's world. Power can be used for good or bad, to build or destroy, to give or take, to serve or to lead.

In this talk Bonnie Greer reflects on the power of names. Slaves and the descendants of slaves must use the names they were given. Power has the ability to alter other people's reality. It also has the ability to answer, the ability to define yourself. When Pontius Pilate asked Jesus his name, Jesus did not reply.

Producer: Peter Everett.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970220]

Six writers reflect on enduring themes drawn from the narrative of Christ's suffering. 1: Bryan Appleyard , novelist and columnist.

Producer Norman Winter

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970220]

Unknown: Bryan Appleyard

Producer: Norman Winter

James Runcie20150225

Our series begins with the writer and director James Runcie who looks at the Passion through the prism of mystery drama.

Producer: Phil Pegum.

Jim Wallis20140416

The Power and the Passion - Jim Wallis on the power of the cross.

Kate Saunders20150304

Novelist and actor Kate Saunders reflects on the Passion story.

Marina Warner20140409

The Power and the Passion: Marina Warner reflects on the power of places.

Michael Symmons Roberts20150311

reflects on the Passion story.

Nicholas Shakespeare20140326

The Power and the Passion - Worldly Power. Jesus in the wilderness was offered it and turned it down, but most of us think it's worth having. Novelist, biographer and travel-writer Nicholas Shakespeare considers what power can do for us - and to us.

Producer: Peter Everett.

Oliver Mcternan - Destiny And Faith20170315

The former Catholic priest Oliver McTernan talks about how his decision to leave the church shaped his destiny and led him to become the co-founder and director of the conflict resolution charity "Forward Thinking".

Producer: Phil Pegum.

Quentin Letts20150318

Theatre critic and parliamentary sketch writer Quentin Letts reflects on the Passion story

Sarah Perry20150325

Author Sarah Perry reflects on the Passion story.

Sir John Eliot Gardiner20150401

Conductor Sir John Eliot Gardiner reflects on the Passion story.

The City20160224

The Lent Talks are a series of essays on the different perspectives of the passion story. The location for this week's "Lent in the Landscape" talk is the iconic brick-built Victorian Gothic "All Saints Church" just behind Oxford Street in London. Maxwell reflects on Jesus' arrival in Jerusalem and his confrontation at the Temple. Producer: Amanda Hancox.

The Dining Room20160302

The Lent Talks are a series of essays on different perspectives of the passion story. This year the theme is "Lent in the Landscape". Michael Banner visits reflects the famous Dining Hall at Trinity College Cambridge to reflect on the Last Supper and betrayal. Producer: Phil Pegum.

The Dove Descending1999022419990329

`The Dove Descending'.

Writers from a variety of religious perspectives offer their views on the Easter story.

In this programme, left-wing playwright David Edgar talks movingly about the story of his wife's illness and death during Lent last year and relates this time to Gospel accounts of the Passion.

The Dove Descending1999030319990405

`The Dove Descending'.

Writers from a variety of religious perspectives offer their views on the Easter story.

In this programme, Daily Mail columnist Angela Lambert squares up to death - her own, her friend Ruth Picardie's and that of a young man who was crucified 2,000 years ago.

The Dove Descending1999031019990412

`The Dove Descending'.

Writers from a variety of religious perspectives offer their views on the Easter story.

Controversial novelist and journalist Will Self considers the story of the Passion and Resurrection from a secular point of view, and discovers a striking resemblance to science fiction.

The Dove Descending1999031719990419

`The Dove Descending'.

Writers from a variety of religious perspectives offer their views on the Easter story.

Novelist and critic Andrew O'hagan reflects on one of the season's hidden themes - doubt.

Could Jesus have had more in common with his own disbelievers than they imagine?

The Dove Descending1999032419990426

`The Dove Descending'.

Writers from a variety of religious perspectives offer their views on the Easter story.

Actress Imogen Stubbs offers a personal reflection on the meaning of Easter, recalling a childhood that filled her with a love of church music, but not much belief.

The Dove Descending1999033119990503

`The Dove Descending'.

Writers from a variety of religious perspectives offer their views on the Easter story.

In the last of the series, novelist Rhidian Brook relates how a sun-drenched, drug-hazed trip to Trinidad caused him to question accounts of the Resurrection.

The Execution - The Chapel Royal Of St Peter Ad Vincula, At The Tower Of London20160316

In the fifth edition of "Lent in the Landscape", a series of talks on different perspectives of the passion story, Cristina Odone visits the Chapel Royal of Saint Peter Ad Vincula at the Tower of London. She reflects on the figure of Mary, the mother of Jesus, at the foot of the cross as her son is crucified. Producer: Phil Pegum.

The Garden20160309

Madeleine takes a night-time walk along the River Lea and the "edgelands" of the Hackney Marshes in east London as she reflects on Jesus' last night in the garden of Gethsemane for "Lent in the Landscape" a series of talks from six writers on different aspects of the passion story. Producer: Phil Pegum.

The Tomb20160323

Dr Julian Litten is author of "The English Way of Death: The Common Funeral Since 1450". This final "Lent in the Landscape" is from one of Britain's greatest Victorian cemeteries - Kensal Green in north-west London. It contains a host of memorials of the great and good and is still a working cemetery. Dr Litten will take us to the site of his last resting place which he has reserved there. Producer: Phil Pegum. Series Producer: Amanda Hancox.

The Wilderness20160217

The Christian season of Lent is traditionally a time for self-examination and reflection on the events leading up to Jesus' crucifixion. Throughout Lent six writers will reflect on these events through a variety of locations as they explore the theme of "Lent in the Landscape". This week Emma Loveridge, who used to run excursions to the Sinai Desert, takes us to her own private wilderness which she has created in Devon to reflect on Jesus' forty days and forty nights in the wilderness. Producer: Phil Pegum.

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`Faith in the Future'.

Six eminent speakers explore the direction of faith in the 21st century, considering its impact on society and the individual.

With commitment to organised religion in decline, there has been a growing interest in personal spirituality.

Many see this as their personal hope for the new millennium.

1: Don Cupitt, Fellow of Emmanuel College, Cambridge.

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Six eminent speakers explore the direction of faith in the 21st century.

They approach spirituality from contrasting perspectives, considering its impact on society and the individual.

2: Professor Ursula King of the University of Bristol.

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Six eminent speakers explore the direction of faith in the 21st century.

They approach spirituality from contrasting perspectives and consider its impact on society and the individual.

3: Bob Holman.

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Six eminent speakers explore the direction of faith in the 21st century.

4: Professor Mary Grey.

A look at spirituality which speaks to all life forms.

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Six eminent speakers explore the direction of faith in the 21st century.

5: Donah Zohar.

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In the last of six programmes in which six eminent speakers explore the direction of faith in the 21st century, Professor Philip Sheldrake asks whether the Christian faith can respond to the individualistic nature of faith in the 21st century.

200501Temptation. Becoming2005021320050219

Fiona Shaw reads Ruth Scott's short story.

200502Temptation. Firestarter2005022020050226

The second of Jean Alexander reads Richard Cameron's short story.

200503Arise Jones2005022720050305

Michael Maloney reads Jim Burke's short story on the temptation to be too religious.

2005042005030620050312

Miriam Margolyes is Miss Munday in Charlotte Cory's short story on the desire for revenge.

200505The Miracle Worker2005031320050319

Siobhan Redmond reads Jeanette Winterson's story about a life ruled by things to do.

200506 LASTExpectations2005032020050326

Monologues for Lent inspired by ideas of temptation.

Patrick Malahide reads Ruth Scott's story about a man tempted to make his fantasies reality.

6/6.

Expectations: Monologues for Lent inspired by ideas of temptation.

Expectations: A series of monologues for Lent inspired by ideas of Temptation.

2006012006030820060312

A series of talks for Lent, recorded in Jerusalem.

1/6.

From the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Daniel Rossing reflects on the encounter of Jews and Christians to the Easter story.

200602Via Dolorosa - Jesus Wept2006031520060319

Rev Clarence Musgrave, vicar of St Andrew's Church of Scotland in Jerusalem, reflects on the place where Jesus began his journey to the cross and looked out over Jerusalem and wept.

200603Via Dolorosa - Garden Of Gethsemane2006032220060326

A series of talks for Lent, recorded in Jerusalem.

3/6.

Via Dolorosa - Garden of Gethsemane

Fr Jamal Khada reflects on the two Lenten themes of suffering and reconciliation.

200604Via Dolorosa - Jesus Meets His Mother2006032920060402

Professor Mustafa Abu Sway, Director of the Islamic Research Center at Al-Quds University, reflects on how Muslims have understood the life and death of Jesus; and the co-existence expressed every day between Islam and Christianity on the streets of Jerusalem.

2006052006040520060409

A series of talks for Lent, recorded in Jerusalem.

5/6.

Via Dolorosa - Jesus Meets the Women

A reflection by Fr Michael McGarry, Rector of Tantur Ecumenical Institute, on the significance of women in the Passion of Christ and in the city of Jerusalem itself.

200606 LASTVia Dolorosa - The Church Of The Holy Sepulchre2006041220060416

Dr Maria Khoury, from the Greek Orthodox Church of St George in Taybeh, reflects on the worldwide significance of the empty tomb and the celebration of the Holy Fire witnessed each year on Holy Saturday.

200701Armando Iannucci2007022820070303

Armando Iannucci, writer and comedian, on the devil and temptation.

200702Chas Bayfield2007030720070310

Advertising guru Chas Bayfield takes the story of Jesus overturning the tables in the temple, to ask questions about the relationship between God and commerce, and the true nature of religion.

200703Cherie Booth2007031420070317

Cherie Booth QC reflects on the story of Zacchaeus, and finds in it elements of Restorative Justice programmes which seek to mediate between offenders and their victims.

200704Shami Chakrabarti2007032120070324

Director of Liberty Shami Chakrabarti finds uncomfortable similarities between the trial of Jesus and the treatment of suspects in western democracies.

2007052007032820070331

Douglas Hurd puts himself in the shoes of Pilate, forced to choose between the sacrifice of an innocent man and a mass uprising.

200706 LAST2007040420070407

Jeffrey John, Dean of St Albans, challenges the idea that suffering is God's punishment for sin.

20080120080213

Jude Kelly, artistic director of London's Southbank, puts her case for a mandatory 40 days in the wilderness for the rich and powerful.

200802Terry Eagleton20080220

Professor Terry Eagleton argues that self-fulfilment lies at the heart of the Gospel message.

But that asks more of us than giving up smoking for Lent ever could.

200803Mary Loudon20080227

Writer Mary Loudon challenges society's attitudes to mental illness in her appreciation of Jesus's dealings with the demon-possessed.

20080420080305

Human rights lawyer Clive Stafford Smith draws on his experience of representing prisoners on death row to reflect on the story of Jesus.

20080520080312

Ann Widdecombe MP meditates on the psychological agony of Jesus on the cross in witnessing the suffering of those who had loved him.

200806 LAST*20080319

Tom Wright, Bishop of Durham, reflects on the interval between Jesus's death and resurrection.

200901In No God's Land * *2009030420090308

Six well-known figures explore ideas of the absence of God from their own perspective.

Martin Bell reflects on his experience in war zones.

200902Crave For Less2009031120090315

Six well-known figures explore ideas of the absence of God from their own perspective.

Richard Holloway searches for the reality of God's presence in absence.

200903Does God Make Mistakes? *2009031820090322

Six well-known figures explore ideas of the absence of God from their own perspective.

Sister Frances Dominica, founder and trustee of Helen and Douglas House hospice, reflects on her experiences alongside children and their families.

200904The Eyes Of God * *2009032520090329

George Pattison, Lady Margaret Professor of Divinity at Oxford University, reflects on the benefits of God's absence.

200905A Godless Society? * *2009040120090405

Six well-known figures explore ideas of the absence of God from their own perspective.

Frank Field MP reflects on a society that chooses to root its moral behaviour apart from God.

Frank Field reflects on a society that chooses to root its moral behaviour apart from God.

200906 LASTGod Present In Absence?2009040820090411

Six well-known figures explore ideas of the absence of God from their own perspective.

Jewish feminist theologian Melissa Raphael wonders what Jesus' cry of abandonment on the cross says about God's absence and how it connects with the experience of many Jews in the Holocaust.

Melissa Raphael considers the idea of God's absence for many Jews in the Holocaust.

201001Will Self *2010022420100228

Series of talks by eminent thinkers exploring how faith and religion interact with a variety of aspects in society.

Novelist Will Self reflects on the relationship between art and religion.

201002Andreas Whittam Smith *2010030320100307

Series of six talks by eminent thinkers exploring how faith and religion interact with a variety of aspects in society.

Financial journalist Andreas Whittam Smith explores the temptations of the financial world.

201003Maajid Nawaz2010031020100314

, co-director of the Quilliam Foundation, reflects on pluralism in society.

Series of six talks by eminent thinkers exploring how faith and religion interact with a variety of aspects in society.

Maajid Nawaz, co-director of the Quilliam Foundation, reflects on pluralism in society.

201004Sr Elizabeth Obbard2010031720100321

Series of six talks by eminent thinkers exploring how faith and religion interact with a variety of aspects in society.

Sr Elizabeth Obbard, a Carmelite solitary at Aylesford Priory in Kent, explores how people's personal faith is affected and shaped by formal religion.

Sr Elizabeth Obbard explores how people's personal faith is shaped by formal religion.

explores how people's personal faith is shaped by formal religion.

201005Rev Prof Alister Mcgrath *2010032420100328

Series of six talks by eminent thinkers exploring how faith and religion interact with a variety of aspects in society.

Rev Prof Alister McGrath reflects on the continuously developing relationship between the natural sciences, faith and religion.

Rev Prof Alister McGrath on the relationship between natural science, faith and religion.

on the relationship between natural science, faith and religion.

201006 LASTRev Dr Giles Fraser2010033120100403

Greater love hath no man"

In the last of six talks by eminent writers and thinkers in the weeks leading up to Easter, The Revd Dr Giles Fraser, Canon Chancellor of St Paul's Cathedral and a Tutor of military ethics at The Defence Academy, reflects on the nature of sacrifice.

The Revd Dr Giles Fraser, Canon Chancellor of St Paul's Cathedral brings our series of Lent Talks to a close, when he will be reflecting on the nature of sacrifice.

As a Tutor of ethics and leadership at The Defence Academy, Dr Fraser has a wide experience of talking to soldiers and military strategists about what sacrifice means in a war zone.

In the light of those insights - and as Christians around the world mark Holy Week - he explores what the concept of sacrifice means in our contemporary culture.

Rev Dr Giles Fraser reflects on the nature of sacrifice."

, Canon Chancellor of St Paul's Cathedral and a tutor of military ethics at The Defence Academy, reflects on the nature of sacrifice.

201101Lord Ian Blair2011031620110320

explores the conflict of religion in the public arena.

This year's Lent Talks sees six well known figures reflect on different elements of conflict found in the story of Jesus' ministry and Passion from the perspective of their own personal and professional experience.

In the first Lent Talk of the series, Former Metropolitan Police Commissioner, Lord Ian Blair, explores the conflict of religion in public life, considering conflict as a force for both good and evil.

The Christian season of Lent is traditionally a time for self-examination and reflection on universal human conditions such as temptation, betrayal, abandonment, greed, forgiveness and love.

The main theme for this year's talks will explore conflict in different forms and how it interacts with various aspects of society and culture.

Lord Ian Blair explores the conflict of religion in the public arena.

201102Austen Ivereigh2011032320110327

reflects on ending the cycle of conflict by becoming the forgiving victim.

This year's Lent Talks sees six well-known figures reflect on different elements of conflict found in the story of Jesus' ministry and Passion from the perspective of their own personal and professional experience.

In the second Lent Talk of the series, Catholic writer and commentator, Austen Ivereigh, explores how we can escape the cycle of conflict by becoming a forgiving victim rather than a vengeful one - whilst at the same time receiving justice.

The Christian season of Lent is traditionally a time for self-examination and reflection on universal human conditions such as temptation, betrayal, abandonment, greed, forgiveness and love.

The main theme for this year's talks will explore conflict in different forms and how it interacts with various aspects of society and culture.

Austen Ivereigh reflects on ending the cycle of conflict by becoming the forgiving victim.

201103Feisal Abdul Rauf2011033020110403

This year's Lent Talks sees six well known figures reflect on different elements of conflict found in the story of Jesus' ministry and Passion from the perspective of their own personal and professional experience.

In the third Lent Talk of the series, Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf, the chairman of the Cordoba Initiative Islamic Cultural Centre, near Ground Zero in New York, reflects on the conflict between faith and identity.

The Christian season of Lent is traditionally a time for self-examination and reflection on universal human conditions such as temptation, betrayal, abandonment, greed, forgiveness and love.

The main theme for this year's talks will explore conflict in different forms and how it interacts with various aspects of society and culture.

New York Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf explores the conflict between faith and identity.

In the third Lent Talk of the series, Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf, from the Ground Zero Islamic Centre, explores the conflict between faith and national identity.

2011042011040620110410

Well known figures reflect on elements of conflict found in the story of Jesus' ministry and Passion from the perspective of their own personal and professional experience.

A personal reflection on elements of conflict found in the story of Jesus' ministry.

2011052011041320110417

This year's Lent Talks sees six well known figures reflect on different elements of conflict found in the story of Jesus' ministry and Passion from the perspective of their own personal and professional experience.

In the fifth Lent Talk of the series, Guardian columnist, Madeleine Bunting, explores the unmet public appetite for justice in the wake of the financial crisis.

The Christian season of Lent is traditionally a time for self-examination and reflection on universal human conditions such as temptation, betrayal, abandonment, greed, forgiveness and love.

The main theme for this year's talks will explore conflict in different forms and how it interacts with various aspects of society and culture.

Guardian columnist Madeleine Bunting explores the unmet appetite for justice.

201106 LAST20110420

This year's Lent Talks sees six well known figures reflect on different elements of conflict found in the story of Jesus' ministry and Passion from the perspective of their own personal and professional experience.

In the final Lent Talk of the series, the Reverend Mark Oakley, Canon Treasurer at St Paul's Cathedral, talks about the conflict with God - when in the face of disaster and suffering God appears absent.

The Christian season of Lent is traditionally a time for self-examination and reflection on universal human conditions such as temptation, betrayal, abandonment, greed, forgiveness and love.

The main theme for this year's talks will explore conflict in different forms and how it interacts with various aspects of society and culture.

Mark Oakley, Canon Treasurer at St Paul's Cathedral, explores the conflict with God.

2012012012022920120304

The Bishop of Bradford, the Rt Revd Nick Baines begins a new series of Lent Talks where six well known figures from journalism, science, religion and public life reflect on how the Lenten story of Jesus' ministry and Passion continues to interact with contemporary society and culture.

In the wake of political and social reactions to the financial crisis, austerity measures and the riots of 2011, debate continues to determine the role of the individual and society. The 2012 Lent Talks consider the relationship between the individual and the collective. Is each person one alone or one of many? Is it the human condition to be self-contained or to belong to the family, the tribe, the congregation, the nation? We live in groups but our most intense experiences are incommunicable. Jesus shared a communal last supper but he died an outcast, abandoned and rejected by his people, his disciples and (apparently) his Father.

Speakers of this year's talks include the journalist and author Martin Wroe, who will explore humanity being at its most divine when working in community; John Lennox, Professor of Mathematics at Oxford University, explains how his encounter with God is enhanced through science; Dr Gemma Simmonds CJ, explores the agony of the individual in society.

The Christian season of Lent is traditionally a time for self-examination and reflection on universal human conditions such as temptation, betrayal, abandonment, greed, forgiveness and love.

The Rt Rev Nick Baines, Bishop of Bradford, asks if we are 'one alone or one of many'.

201202Prof Linda Woodhead2012030720120311

Linda woodhead explores the emergence of new communities and social groups.

Linda Woodhead - Director of the Religion and Society Research Programme and Professor of Sociology of Religion at Lancaster University - draws from the findings of the Religion and Society research programme to explore the dis-embedding from traditional community relationships to new communities formed from choice rather than inheritance.

In the wake of political and social reactions to the financial crisis, austerity measures and the riots of 2011, debate continues to determine the role of the individual and society. The 2012 Lent Talks consider the relationship between the individual and the collective. Is each person one alone or one of many? Is it the human condition to be self-contained or to belong to the family, the tribe, the congregation, the nation? We live in groups but our most intense experiences are incommunicable. Jesus shared a communal last supper but he died an outcast, abandoned and rejected by his people, his disciples and (apparently) his Father.

Speakers of this year's talks include the journalist and author Martin Wroe, who will explore humanity being at its most divine when working in community; John Lennox, Professor of Mathematics at Oxford University, explains how his encounter with God is enhanced through science; Tariq Ramadan, Professor of Contemporary Islamic Studies in the Faculty of Oriental Studies at Oxford University, examines the philosophy of the individual and how this is neglected in many areas of Islam; Dr Gemma Simmonds CJ, explores the agony of the individual in society.

The Christian season of Lent is traditionally a time for self-examination and reflection on universal human conditions such as temptation, betrayal, abandonment, greed, forgiveness and love.

Series of talks by well-known figures.

201203Prof John Lennox2012031420120318

describes how God is encountered through science.

John Lennox, Professor of Mathematics at Oxford University, explains how the relationship between God and the individual is enhanced through science.

In the wake of political and social reactions to the financial crisis, austerity measures and the riots of 2011, debate continues to determine the role of the individual and society. The 2012 Lent Talks consider the relationship between the individual and the collective. Is each person one alone or one of many? Is it the human condition to be self-contained or to belong to the family, the tribe, the congregation, the nation? We live in groups but our most intense experiences are incommunicable. Jesus shared a communal last supper but he died an outcast, abandoned and rejected by his people, his disciples and (apparently) his Father.

Speakers of this year's talks include the journalist and author Martin Wroe, who will explore humanity being at its most divine when working in community; Tariq Ramadan, Professor of Contemporary Islamic Studies in the Faculty of Oriental Studies at Oxford University, examines the philosophy of the individual and how this is neglected in many areas of Islam; Dr Gemma Simmonds CJ, explores the agony of the individual in society.

The Christian season of Lent is traditionally a time for self-examination and reflection on universal human conditions such as temptation, betrayal, abandonment, greed, forgiveness and love.

Prof John Lennox describes how God is encountered through science.

201204Martin Wroe2012032120120325

explores the individual being at its most divine when working in community.

Writer and journalist, Martin Wroe, Martin Wroe explores the ethics of virtue where the individual is at its most divine when working in community.

In the wake of political and social reactions to the financial crisis, austerity measures and the riots of 2011, debate continues to determine the role of the individual and society. The 2012 Lent Talks consider the relationship between the individual and the collective. Is each person one alone or one of many? Is it the human condition to be self-contained or to belong to the family, the tribe, the congregation, the nation? We live in groups but our most intense experiences are incommunicable. Jesus shared a communal last supper but he died an outcast, abandoned and rejected by his people, his disciples and (apparently) his Father.

Speakers of this year's talks include Tariq Ramadan, Professor of Contemporary Islamic Studies in the Faculty of Oriental Studies at Oxford University, examines the philosophy of the individual and how this is neglected in many areas of Islam; Dr Gemma Simmonds CJ, explores the agony of the individual in society.

The Christian season of Lent is traditionally a time for self-examination and reflection on universal human conditions such as temptation, betrayal, abandonment, greed, forgiveness and love.

Martin Wroe explores the individual being at its most divine when working in community.

201205Prof Tariq Ramadan2012032820120401

Tariq Ramadan, Professor of Contemporary Islamic Studies in the Faculty of Oriental Studies at Oxford, sets out the philosophy of the individual and its absence in some areas of Islam.

In the wake of political and social reactions to the financial crisis, austerity measures and the riots of 2011, debate continues to determine the role of the individual and society. The 2012 Lent Talks consider the relationship between the individual and the collective. Is each person one alone or one of many? Is it the human condition to be self-contained or to belong to the family, the tribe, the congregation, the nation? We live in groups but our most intense experiences are incommunicable. Jesus shared a communal last supper but he died an outcast, abandoned and rejected by his people, his disciples and (apparently) his Father.

This year's series of Lent Talks concludes with Dr Gemma Simmonds CJ, who will explore the agony of the individual in society.

The Christian season of Lent is traditionally a time for self-examination and reflection on universal human conditions such as temptation, betrayal, abandonment, greed, forgiveness and love.

Prof Tariq Ramadan sets out the philosophy of the individual and its absence in Islam.

201206 LASTSr Gemma Symonds Cj20120404

Six well-known figures reflect on how the Lenten story of Jesus's ministry and Passion.

201301Baroness Helena Kennedy2013022020130224

Leading human rights lawyer, Baroness Helena Kennedy, QC, opens a new series of Lent Talks, where six well known figures from public life, the arts, human rights and religion, reflect on how the Lenten story of Jesus' ministry and Passion continues to interact with contemporary society and culture.

The 2013 Lent Talks consider the theme of "abandonment". In the Lenten story, Jesus is the supreme example of this - he died an outcast, abandoned and rejected by his people, his disciples and (apparently) his Father - God. But how does that theme tie in with today's complex world? There are many ways one can feel abandoned - by family, by society, by war/conflict, but one can also feel abandoned through the loss of something, perhaps power, job or identity.

Speakers in this year's talks include the author Alexander McCall Smith, who explores the sense of being abandoned by society as you grow older; Loretta Minghella, Director of Christian Aid, who considers the abandonment of self and the need to face who we truly are; Imam Asim Hafiz, Muslim Chaplain and Religious Adviser to HM Forces, who has just returned from Afghanistan and who explores the total abandonment experienced by both sides as a result of war; Ben Cohen, journalist and broadcaster, who reflects on his own personal story of religious rejection through being gay, and Canon Lucy Winkett, Rector of St James's Piccadilly, who explores the relationship between abandonment and betrayal.

The Christian season of Lent is traditionally a time for self-examination and reflection on universal human conditions such as temptation, betrayal, greed, forgiveness and love.

201302Alexander Mccall Smith2013022720130303

In the second of this year's Lent Talks, author Alexander McCall Smith considers how you can feel abandoned by society, as you grow older.

The Lent Talks feature six well known figures from public life, the arts, human rights and religion, who reflect on how the Lenten story of Jesus' ministry and Passion continues to interact with contemporary society and culture. The 2013 Lent Talks consider the theme of "abandonment". In the Lenten story, Jesus is the supreme example of this - he died an outcast, abandoned and rejected by his people, his disciples and (apparently) his Father - God. But how does that theme tie in with today's complex world? There are many ways one can feel abandoned - by family, by society, by war/conflict, but one can also feel abandoned through the loss of something, perhaps power, job or identity. The Christian season of Lent is traditionally a time for self-examination and reflection on universal human conditions such as temptation, betrayal, greed, forgiveness and love, as well as abandonment.

Speakers in this year's talks include Baroness Helena Kennedy, QC, who considers what it means to abandon being human; Loretta Minghella, Director of Christian Aid, who considers the abandonment of self and the need to face who we truly are; Imam Asim Hafiz, Muslim Chaplain and Religious Adviser to HM Forces, who has just returned from Afghanistan and who explores the total abandonment experienced by both sides as a result of war; Ben Cohen, journalist and broadcaster, who reflects on his own personal story of religious rejection through being gay, and Canon Lucy Winkett, Rector of St James's Piccadilly, who explores the relationship between abandonment and betrayal.

Speakers in this year's talks include Baroness Helena Kennedy, QC, who considers what it means to abandon being human; Loretta Minghella, Director of Christian Aid, who considers the abandonment of self and the need to face who we truly are; Imam Asim Hafiz, Muslim Chaplain and Religious Adviser to HM Forces, who has just returned from Afghanistan and who explores the total abandonment experienced by both sides as a result of war; Benjamin Cohen, journalist and broadcaster, who reflects on his own personal story of religious rejection through being gay, and Canon Lucy Winkett, Rector of St James's Piccadilly, who explores the relationship between abandonment and betrayal.

201303Benjamin Cohen2013030620130310

In the third of this year's Lent Talks, journalist and broadcaster Benjamin Cohen reflects on the fear of being abandoned by his own Jewish community, for being gay.

The Lent Talks feature six well-known figures from public life, the arts, human rights and religion, who reflect on how the Lenten story of Jesus' ministry and Passion continues to interact with contemporary society and culture. The 2013 Lent Talks consider the theme of "abandonment". In the Lenten story, Jesus is the supreme example of this - he died an outcast, abandoned and rejected by his people, his disciples and (apparently) his Father - God. But how does that theme tie in with today's complex world? There are many ways one can feel abandoned - by family, by society, by war/conflict, but one can also feel abandoned through the loss of something, perhaps power, job or identity. The Christian season of Lent is traditionally a time for self-examination and reflection on universal human conditions such as temptation, betrayal, greed, forgiveness and love, as well as abandonment.

Speakers in this year's talks include Baroness Helena Kennedy, QC, who considers what it means to abandon being human; Alexander McCall Smith considers how you can feel abandoned by society as you grow older; Loretta Minghella, Director of Christian Aid, considers the abandonment of self and the need to face who we truly are; Imam Asim Hafiz, Muslim Chaplain and Religious Adviser to HM Forces, who has just returned from Afghanistan, explores the total abandonment experienced by both sides as a result of war and, finally, Canon Lucy Winkett, Rector of St James's Piccadilly, explores the relationship between abandonment and betrayal.

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In the fourth of this year's Lent Talks, the Director of Christian Aid, Loretta Minghella, considers the abandonment of self and the need to face who we truly are.

 

The Lent Talks feature six well-known figures from public life, the arts, human rights and religion, who reflect on how the Lenten story of Jesus' ministry and Passion continues to interact with contemporary society and culture. The 2013 Lent Talks consider the theme of "abandonment". In the Lenten story, Jesus is the supreme example of this - he died an outcast, abandoned and rejected by his people, his disciples and (apparently) his Father - God. But how does that theme tie in with today's complex world? There are many ways one can feel abandoned - by family, by society, by war/conflict, but one can also feel abandoned through the loss of something, perhaps power, job or identity. The Christian season of Lent is traditionally a time for self-examination and reflection on universal human conditions such as temptation, betrayal, greed, forgiveness and love, as well as abandonment.

Speakers in this year's talks include Baroness Helena Kennedy, QC, who considers what it means to abandon being human; Alexander McCall Smith considers how you can feel abandoned by society as you grow older; the journalist and broadcaster, Benjamin Cohen, reflects on the fear of being abandoned by his own Jewish community, for being gay; Imam Asim Hafiz, Muslim Chaplain and Religious Adviser to HM Forces, who has just returned from Afghanistan, explores the total abandonment experienced by both sides as a result of war and, finally, Canon Lucy Winkett, Rector of St James's Piccadilly, explores the relationship between abandonment and betrayal.

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In the fifth of this year's Lent Talks, Imam Asim Hafiz, Muslim Chaplain and Religious Adviser to HM Forces, who has just returned from Afghanistan, explores the total abandonment experienced by both sides, as a result of war.

The Lent Talks feature six well-known figures from public life, the arts, human rights and religion, who reflect on how the Lenten story of Jesus' ministry and Passion continues to interact with contemporary society and culture. The 2013 Lent Talks consider the theme of "abandonment". In the Lenten story, Jesus is the supreme example of this - he died an outcast, abandoned and rejected by his people, his disciples and (apparently) his Father - God. But how does that theme tie in with today's complex world? There are many ways one can feel abandoned - by family, by society, by war/conflict, but one can also feel abandoned through the loss of something, perhaps power, job or identity. The Christian season of Lent is traditionally a time for self-examination and reflection on universal human conditions such as temptation, betrayal, greed, forgiveness and love, as well as abandonment.

Speakers in this year's talks include Baroness Helena Kennedy, QC, who considers what it means to abandon being human; Alexander McCall Smith considers how you can feel abandoned by society, as you grow older; Benjamin Cohen, journalist and broadcaster, reflects on the fear of being abandoned by his own Jewish community, for being gay; Loretta Minghella, Director of Christian Aid, considers the abandonment of self and the need to face who we truly are and, finally, Canon Lucy Winkett, Rector of St James's Piccadilly, explores the relationship between abandonment and betrayal.

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Canon Lucy Winkett, Rector of St. James's, Piccadilly, ends this year's series of Lent Talks, where six well known figures from public life, the arts, human rights and religion, reflect on how the Lenten story of Jesus' ministry and Passion continues to interact with contemporary society and culture.

The 2013 Lent Talks consider the theme of "abandonment". In the Lenten story, Jesus is the supreme example of this - he died an outcast, abandoned and rejected by his people, his disciples and (apparently) his Father - God. But how does that theme tie in with today's complex world? There are many ways one can feel abandoned - by family, by society, by war/conflict, but one can also feel abandoned through the loss of something, perhaps power, job or identity.

Speakers in this year's talks have included the leading human rights lawyer, Baroness Helena Kennedy, QC, who considered what it means to abandon being human; the author Alexander McCall Smith, who explored the sense of being abandoned by society, as you grow older; Loretta Minghella, Director of Christian Aid, considered the abandonment of self and the need to face who we truly are; Imam Asim Hafiz, Muslim Chaplain and Religious Adviser to HM Forces, who had just returned from Afghanistan, explored the total abandonment experienced by both sides, as a result of war, and Benjamin Cohen, journalist and broadcaster, who reflected on how you can be abandoned by your religion for being gay.