Law In Action

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20020405

Marcel Berlins explores the legal issues of the day.

As the House of Lords prepares to review religious offences, this edition asks whether a law of blasphemy is still necessary.

20021122

The cases, the courts and the lawyers - Marcel Berlins's weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

20021129

The cases, the courts and the lawyers - Marcel Berlins's weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

20030131

Marcel Berlins and guests debate David Blunkett's proposed legislation which would allow juries to be told about a defendant's previous convictions.

20030214

With Marcel Berlins.

As the prospect of human cloning draws closer, science is racing ahead of current law.

What legal gaps have opened up and how important is it to fill them?

20030221

Marcel Berlins explores the legal issues of the day.

The US fast food industry is facing multiple lawsuits from people alleging that it is responsible for making them fat.

20030314

Convicted criminals have won compensation in courts for injustices they have suffered.

Marcel Berlins asks if the law is becoming too concerned with offenders rather than victims.

20030328

Marcel Berlins explores the legal issues of the day.

Is our criminal justice system concentrating too much on the victim, and is this leading to miscarriages of justice?

20030530

The legal series returns in which Marcel Berlins tackles the big legal issues and the everyday ones without long words, small print or expensive fees.

20030606

Marcel Berlins takes a lively look at the legal affairs of the moment.

20030613

The cases, the courts and the lawyers: Marcel Berlins' weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

20030627

Another edition of the legal series in which Marcel Berlins tackles the big legal issues and the everyday ones, without the small print or expensive fees.

20030725

The cases, the courts and the lawyers.

Marcel Berlins' weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

20031003

The cases, the courts and the lawyers - Marcel Berlins's weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

20031010

Marcel Berlins takes a lively look at the legal affairs of the moment.

20031017

The cases, the courts and the lawyers - Marcel Berlins's weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

20031024

Another edition of the legal series in which Marcel Berlins unpicks the complexities of the law and examines its impact.

20031031

Another edition of the legal series in which Marcel Berlins unpicks the complexities of the law and examines its impact.

20031107

Another edition of the legal series in which Marcel Berlins unpicks the complexities of the law and examines its impact.

20031114

Is treatment better than punishment? In this special edition, Marcel Berlins visits Liverpool to examine the ideas behind Britain's first Community Justice Centre.

20031121

Marcel Berlins takes a lively look at the legal affairs of the moment.

20031128

The cases, the courts and the lawyers - Marcel Berlins's weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

20050128

Radio 4's weekly cross examination of the law and legal system returns for a brand new series.

Each week, presenter Clive Coleman looks behind the headlines to analyse the major legal stories.

20050527

Clive Coleman takes a lively look at the legal affairs of the moment.

20050603

Clive Coleman analyses the major legal stories and uncovers the ones that haven't yet hit the headlines.

20050610

Presenter Clive Coleman analyses the major legal stories and uncovers the ones that haven't yet hit the headlines.

20050617
20050624
20050701
20050708
20050715
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20051007

Clive Coleman takes a lively look at the legal affairs of the moment.

20051014
20051021
20051028
20051104
20051111

Clive Coleman analyses the major legal stories and uncovers the ones that haven't yet hit the headlines.

20051118
20051125

Clive Coleman takes a lively look at the legal affairs of the moment.

20060131

Barrister Clive Coleman cuts through the legal jargon to explain what's really happening with the law - and how it affects our everyday lives.

20060207

Barrister Clive Coleman cuts through the legal jargon to explain what's really happening with the law - and how it affects our everyday lives.

20060214
20060221
20060228

Clive Coleman takes a lively look at the legal affairs of the moment.

20060307

Clive Coleman takes a lively look at the legal affairs of the moment.

20060314

Clive Coleman takes a lively look at the legal affairs of the moment.

20060321
20060328
20060530
20060606
20060613
20060620

Clive Coleman analyses the major legal stories and uncovers the ones that haven't yet hit the headlines.

20060627

Clive Coleman analyses the major legal stories and uncovers the ones that haven't yet hit the headlines.

20060704

Clive Coleman analyses the major legal stories and uncovers the ones that haven't yet hit the headlines.

20060711

Clive Coleman analyses the major legal stories and uncovers the ones that haven't yet hit the headlines.

20060718
20060725
20060801
20061003

Clive Coleman takes a lively look at the legal affairs of the moment.

20061010
20061017
20061024
20061031
20061107
20061114
20061121
20061128
20070130

As Tony Blair prepares to leave office, David Blunkett, Dominic Grieve, Lord Goodhart and Baroness Kennedy join presenter Clive Coleman to assess the Prime Minister's legal legacy.

He's brought us ASBOs, the Human Rights Act and more than 1,000 new criminal offences.

Has any of it made a difference?

20070206

This week, how changes to the law are making it more difficult for unmarried couples who live together to avoid some of the rights and obligations of marriage.

20070213

Clive Coleman looks at how the law on children's evidence has changed in the 20 years since the Cleveland scandal.

20070220

Clive Coleman visits new community criminal courts in Liverpool and Salford and asks Lord Falconer about his plan to extend the model to other parts of England and Wales.

20070227
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20070327

Clive Coleman presents a special programme recorded in front of an audience at Queen Mary, University of London.

He is joined by Andrew Gowers, former editor of the Financial Times and the author of the government's review of intellectual property law, to discuss theft of music, pictures and ideas, one of the fastest growing areas of crime and legal disputes.

20070529

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

20070605

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

20070612
20070619
20070626

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

20070703
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20070724
20070731

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

20070925
20071002
20071009
20071016

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

20071023

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

20071030

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

20071106

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

20071113

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

20080122
20080129
20080205

Clive Coleman reports on the tension between government and judiciary in Pakistan.

20080212

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

In an age of proliferating blogs and podcasts, he looks at what the law permits the media to report and asks if the law on contempt should now be scrapped.

20080219

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

As ministers pledge to review the laws on coroners and their courts, he asks how inquests today should work.

20080226

As celebrities trade more on their private lives and fears grow about the security of personal data, Clive Coleman asks where the law on privacy is heading.

20080304

As courts take more notice of pre-nuptial agreements, he asks if they are now essential for everyone, however wealthy.

20080311

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

He examines the process of judicial review, how it works and how it will change our lives in the future.

20080318

Clive Coleman looks at the legal issues in the news.

He asks how the prosecution of sexual offences can be made more effective and what changes to the law are needed.

20080325

He explores the law on defamation.

20080527

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

He asks if forensic scientific evidence is given too much weight in prosecuting crime.

20080603

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

He asks why universities and students are using the law on everything from attendance at lectures to what clothes are worn to seminars.

20080610

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

The legal process depends upon accurate recollection of events, but just how reliable are our memories? Clive asks whether we need to reform the law to allow for human fallibility.

20080617

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news.

He asks what the police and prosecutors can do to get frightened witnesses to give evidence in court.

20080624

Points of law in criminal cases are often decided in the absence of jurors.

Clive explores what goes on before a trial and what prosecution and defence reveal to one another.

20080701

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at the legal issues in the news and tackles the issue of who should be allowed to plead insanity.

As more mentally ill people enter the justice system, Clive asks if the law is as up-to-date and fair as it should be.

20080708

Our senior judges may be independent, but are they sufficiently in touch with public opinion? How are they perceived by the public and what changes may be necessary?

20080715

In an exclusive interview, he talks to Lord Bingham, former Lord Chief Justice and Master of the Rolls, the judge who has perhaps done more than any other person in the past 15 years to shape British law.

20080930
20081007

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at legal issues.

20081014
20081021

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at legal issues.

20081028

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at legal issues.

20081104

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at legal issues.

20081111
20081118
20090120

Clive Coleman discusses the idea that human rights might extend beyond humans, asking whether rights exist for animals, the environment and even robots.

He is joined by the writer Kenan Malik, philosopher Jo Woolf and lawyer Christopher Stone, who discuss propositions put forward by philosopher Peter Singer and environmental lawyer Cormac Cullinan.

Clive Coleman discusses the idea that human rights might extend beyond humans.

20090127

Clive Coleman investigates the future of the legal profession, faced with the twin threats of new technology and the credit crunch.

Will the familiar figure of the high street solicitor disappear, to be replaced by clever software that can draft complex documents, and by offshore lawyers working in India?

Clive Coleman investigates the future of the legal profession.

20090203

Lucy Ash reports on how the US is trying to cut re-offending and meets the killers and gang bosses who are now learning business skills from top CEOs.

She also asks whether communing with nature can soften the hard hearts of the toughest convicts.

Lucy Ash reports on how the US is trying to cut reoffending.

20090217

After winning his case against the News of the World, FIA president Max Mosley says he wants the law changed so that journalists who breach privacy could face jail.

He tells Clive Coleman how he is pursuing cases through the courts across Europe and about the idea of a fighting fund to help individuals do battle with the newspapers.

Private Eye editor Ian Hislop responds.

Clive Coleman talks to FIA president Max Mosley about privacy laws.

20090224
20090310

Reporting on the problems faced by governments prosecuting pirates captured at sea.

The world's navies have joined forces to fight piracy off the coast of Somalia but cannot agree what to do with the pirates they catch.

Reporting on the problems faced by governments prosecuting sea pirates.

20090317

Clive Coleman explores the acute knife crime problems on the streets and how both young people and the police want to tackle them.

20090324

Would it be a good idea if there was a halfway house between marriage and living together? In France couples can sign Civil Solidarity Pacts, while in Scotland cohabitants can have a claim on each other if they split up.

Clive Coleman asks which example England and Wales should follow.

20090331

Clive Coleman asks why the government wants radical changes to the law on murder and on inquests in cases where the state is involved.

2009061620090618

Clive Coleman explores the age of criminal responsibility.

In most European countries this ranges from 12 to 18 years old, but in England, Wales and Northern Ireland 10-year-old children can be prosecuted.

Clive asks if criminalising young people at such an early age is the best response to child crime.

2009062320090625

Clive Coleman examines the law governing what happens to your body when you are dead.

With a report due on the findings of an inquiry into the nuclear industry's use of organs from dead workers for medical research, Clive Coleman examines the law governing what happens to your body when you are dead and what it means for people who want to give away - or even sell - bits of themselves.

Who owns your body - you or the state?

2009063020090702
2009070720090709

Examining compensation for victims of child abuse by religious institutions in Ireland.

As more evidence emerges of child abuse by religious institutions in Ireland, Clive Coleman examines a scheme set up to provide justice and compensation for victims.

What lessons does it offer in dealing with institutional abuse - and why does it insist on protecting the identity of alleged abusers?

2009102720091029

Clive Coleman talks to the Lord Chief Justice, Lord Judge, about the key issues currently facing the criminal justice system.

2009110320091105

Clive Coleman interviews Ken MacDonald, the former Director of Public Prosecutions, about his five years in the position from 2003 to 2008.

Clive Coleman interviews Ken MacDonald, the former Director of Public Prosecutions.

20100608

1/4.

Top legal journalist Joshua Rozenberg returns to present the first in a new series of the legal affairs magazine.

More than two decades after he first presented Law in Action", Joshua Rozenberg, the doyen of legal reporters, returns to the programme to investigate the issues which influence and determine our law.

Later in this series, he reveals what the new UK government's approach to the law is likely to be, its priorities and how its policies will change our system of justice.

In this opening programme, he examines an issue that looks set to prompt widespread debate among the public as well as among those working in the criminal justice system.

Increasingly the police are using digital cameras and intelligence tactics to create image libraries of campaigners and protesters.

These are designed, senior officers say, to help the police prevent criminal acts from being committed.

But critics see the creation and development of the photographic databases as potentially sinister, claiming that ever larger numbers of images are being added.

Joshua Rozenberg investigates how the police, the courts and those responsible for protecting personal data strike a balance between the need to safeguard civil liberties and the police's responsibility to prevent crime.

Are there enough safeguards to protect the public from being unfairly linked with criminals? Is maintaining public order being used as an excuse to engineer a surveillance society? Or are the authorities simply taking the minimum steps to ensure a determined and well-organised minority of protesters bent on disruption do not wreck the lives of the law-abiding majority?

Producer: Simon Coates.

Joshua Rozenberg asks if the police's use of cameras endangers civil liberties."

20100615
20100622

At the half way stage of the World Cup, police forces across the UK are paying unsolicited visits to men with a record of domestic violence.

It's a strategy recommended by the Association of Chief Police Officers.

According to ACPO, research shows that domestic violence peaks during big sporting events like the World Cup.

Many police forces have therefore concluded that it makes sense to let potential perpetrators know they are being watched.

Joshua Rozenberg visits Nottinghamshire to see how such a strategy works in practice and investigates whether it is the best way to protect potential victims.

Joshua Rozenburg investigates an alleged link between the World Cup and domestic violence.

20100629

Joshua Rozenberg investigates the legal issues in the news and explains the law without long words, small print or expensive fees.

20101102

The case of Baha Mousa, an Iraqi hotel worker who died in the custody of British troops in 2003, exposed not just abusive behaviour by some British soldiers but a failure of the military justice system to adequately investigate and punish those responsible.

Joshua Rozenberg asks whether recent reforms to the military justice system are sufficient to restore confidence in the way the armed forces deal with crimes committed by their own troops.

Joshua Rozenberg looks at the issue of military justice.

20101109

Joshua Rozenberg looks at the legal isses behind the headlines.

20110222

Joshua Rozenberg looks at the legal issues behind the Wikileaks story.

20110301

The so-called right to trial by jury is one available in only a small minority of criminal cases in England and Wales.

Yet many people regard it as a fundamental human right.

Recently, a number of our most senior judges have asked what the future role of jury trial should be in the criminal justice system.

As forensic evidence becomes more detailed and the use of - sometimes controversial - expert witnesses grows, do we need to reform our jury system to take account of changing needs and practices? And with strict controls placed on research into how juries work and how well they understand court procedures, do we even know what problems jurors may have with the system we now have? On top of this, politicians and others are concerned about the cost of jury trials.

Joshua Rozenberg considers the pressures on our historic system of trial by jury and how well it seems to be coping with them.

As trials become more complicated, Joshua Rozenberg asks what is the future for juries?

20110308

The result of the referendum in Wales on greater law making powers for the Welsh Assembly could widen the gap between the law in England and that in Wales.

There are already many differences in areas such as planning and health, creating pitfalls for lawyers giving advice on both sides of the border.

In this edition Joshua Rozenberg looks at where devolution is going and the problems and opportunities that a divergence in the law could create.

Joshua Rozenberg looks at whether Wales is on the road to becoming a fourth jurisdiction.

2011031520110317

Joshua Rozenberg considers the UK's relationship with the European Court of Human Rights.

th political pressure mounting for changes to the UK's relationship with the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg, Joshua Rozenberg explores what scope there may be for reforms and how far, if at all, they would alter the Court's decisions.

And following recent concern about how the media in Britain reports on witnesses and suspects in high profile criminal investigations, he talks to the Attorney General, the Rt.

Hon.

Dominic Grieve, Q.C., M.P., about the law on contempt of court.

The law in this area was last amended by Parliament in the early 1980s, before the Internet and social networking.

How should we now strike a proper balance between public information on the one hand and reporting which may be prejudicial to future prosecutions on the other?

Producer: Simon Coates.

2011101820111020

The riots which hit England in August of this year presented the legal system with significant challenges.

In this programme, Joshua Rozenberg explores how the state responded to this very unusual situation.

The programme examines the sentences given to those arrested during the riots, and the reasons behind them, and also asks why many people were refused bail.

It looks at the speed at which cases were processed and asks how fast is too fast?

Producer Michael Wendling

Researcher Lucy Proctor.

Joshua Rozenberg explores contentious legal issues which arose from the August riots.

2011102520111027

As the Leveson Inquiry into the culture, practices and ethics of the press takes evidence, Joshua Rozenberg looks at the expanding role of public inquiries and independent reviews, their practices and procedures and how accountable they are.

In his inquiry, Lord Justice Leveson is seeking an inclusive approach, holding open seminars and teach-in sessions and creating a role for "core participants" who have demonstrated a special interest in the Inquiry's work.

The panel of experts working with the judge has been chosen, it is claimed, for its independence.

But just how transparent will the Inquiry be? Joshua Rozenberg talks to those involved in previous high-profile public inquiries to discover what effect they have had on our law and public policy, whether they represented value for money for the taxpayer and whose interests they really served.

Producer: Simon Coates.

Joshua Rozenberg investigates how accountable such reviews as the Leveson Inquiry will be.

2012102320121025

In his first broadcast interview, the brand new chief coroner talks to Joshua Rozenberg.

Earlier this year, in a complete reversal of government policy, ministers decided after all to establish the new post of Chief Coroner. His Honour Judge Peter Thornton formally took up his role in September. The post is a highly visible one in an area of the law that has captured enormous public attention in recent years.

The inquest into the 7/7 bombings; the inquest into the death of the newspaper seller, Ian Tomlinson; Hillsborough; deaths in police custody; and deaths on military service abroad - all these have put the spotlight on the inquest system and the role of coroners in unprecedented ways.

In his first broadcast interview since taking up the newly-created post of Chief Coroner, Judge Thornton talks to "Law in Action" presenter, Joshua Rozenberg, about what the public can expect from him and how inquest procedures will be improved.

The programme will also explore the coalition's highly controversial plans for new sentencing rules. First, the proposed new "2-strikes-and-you're-out" rubric for serious violent and sexual criminals. How many offenders will actually be affected by this? And will it mean that such offenders really do serve "life sentences"?

At the other end of the scale, the government also plans a change. This is to give victims the power to choose the form which an out-of-court community sentence will take. Joshua Rozenberg asks if it is a good idea to involve victims in the sentencing process in this way. And, if it is, where might we go next in giving victims sentencing powers?

Producer Simon Coates.

*20080722

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at legal issues.

He looks at the function of county courts, who deal with much of the sharp end of human life, from mortgage repossessions to domestic violence.

*20080729

Clive Coleman takes his weekly look at legal issues.

He asks if there can be a right to food and how might such a right be enforced.

*20080923

Reporter Mukul Devichand investigates the plausibility of the claim that the medieval Islamic world influenced the 13th-century foundations of English common law.

*20090210

Clive Coleman reports on legal issues behind the headlines.

*20090303

Judges now have the power to hand out community service punishments to parents who sabotage contact between their ex-partners and their children.

Will the courts be willing to impose penalties on obstructive parents?

Also a report on how children going through care proceedings are being affected by the shortage of guardians, the professionals responsible for advising the judge on what is in the best interests of the child.

Focusing on some of the ways in which the law affects children.

*2009102020091022

Clive Coleman asks if the Freedom of Information Act has created a more open society and changed the culture of government.

*2009111020091112

The programme visits the mental health court pilot in Brighton and takes a wider look at Mental Health Treatment orders and the problems faced by defendants with mental health problems in the criminal justice system.

The programme visits the mental health court pilot in Brighton.

*2010022320100225
*2010030220100304

Clive Coleman and a panel of politicians examine some of the key policies on justice.

Interviewees:

Charles Falconer QC, the former Lord Chancellor

Edward Garnier QC, the Shadow Attorney General

David Howarth, Liberal Democrat Shadow Justice Secretary.

*2010031620100318

The International Criminal Court has been criticised for lacking teeth, dealing with too few cases and concentrating too much on Africa.

Clive Coleman speaks to the Court's president and others to consider those claims.

The government has finally reacted to widespread criticism of the Dangerous Dogs Act with a consultation.

But how do you balance the rights of animals with the safety of humans?

Plus the surprisingly intense relationship between poetry and the law.

Interviewees include President Sang-Hyun Song, Philippe Sands and Tod Lindberg.

Clive Coleman looks at the International Criminal Court and the Dangerous Dogs Act.

* *2010030920100311

Outdated, inadequate and piecemeal are just some of the criticisms levelled at the UK's current anti-bribery legislation.

Clive Coleman and guests weigh up whether or not the Bribery Bill and proposed reforms are robust enough to achieve their aims.

Penalties, plea bargains and the enforcement role of the Serious Fraud Office are examined in the light of recent cases, such as the BAE Systems settlement.

Interviewees include former Attorney General Lord Goldsmith and Monty Raphael, special counsel at Peters and Peters law firm.

02/11/201020101104

Joshua Rozenberg looks at the issue of military justice.

08/03/201120110310

The result of the referendum in Wales on greater law making powers for the Welsh Assembly could widen the gap between the law in England and that in Wales.

There are already many differences in areas such as planning and health, creating pitfalls for lawyers giving advice on both sides of the border.

In this edition Joshua Rozenberg looks at where devolution is going and the problems and opportunities that a divergence in the law could create.

Joshua Rozenberg looks at whether Wales is on the road to becoming a fourth jurisdiction.

08/06/201020100610

Joshua Rozenberg asks if the police's use of cameras endangers civil liberties.

09/11/201020101111

Joshua Rozenberg looks at the legal isses behind the headlines.

15/06/201020100617

Joshua Rozenberg presents the legal affairs magazine.

22/02/201120110224

Joshua Rozenberg looks at the legal issues behind the Wikileaks story.

22/06/201020100624

Joshua Rozenburg investigates an alleged link between the World Cup and domestic violence.

29/06/201020100701
Britain And Human Rights Law2011110820111110

With political pressure mounting for far-reaching reform to the Human Rights Act, Joshua Rozenberg explores how this might be done.

More than ten years after the incorporation into UK law of the European Convention on Human Rights, how far has the Convention re-shaped our law? How far do the provisions of the Human Rights Act affect the day-to-day decisions of our courts? And if Parliament were to amend the law, what could - and should - be changed and why?

Joshua Rozenberg explores the legal issues underlying this controversial legal and political debate.

Producer Simon Coates.

Joshua Rozenberg investigates how reforming the Human Rights Act would affect UK law.

Crime Stats And False Confessions2011110120111103

In this programme, Joshua Rozenberg reveals new statistics on the use of so-called 'taken into consideration' offences.

After their arrest, some suspects confess to additional crimes to wipe the slate clean.

But with no prosecution or trial, can these admissions of guilt really count as solved crimes?

Law in Action also looks into the issue of false confessions and asks why people admit to a crime they didn't commit.

Some suspects may find themselves convicted of a crime even when they retract their initial statements.

Research from the US indicates that one in five death row inmates exonerated by DNA evidence falsely confessed to murder.

Closer to home, a study shows that false confessions can set off a chain of events that can skew the justice system against an innocent suspect.

The programme also examines proposed anti-sectarianism football legislation in Scotland.

The law is designed to crack down on the kinds of ugly violence that plagued Rangers and Celtic matches last season.

But the one thing that seems to unite the supporters of the two clubs is their opposition to the bill, and few others in Scotland see the need for new legislation to tackle sectarian violence.

In this programme, Joshua Rozenberg explores the roots of Scottish sectarianism and finds out how the law deals with it.

Producer: Mike Wendling

Researcher: Lucy Proctor.

Joshua Rozenberg investigates crime statistics and looks into sectarianism in Scotland.

Diy Law2012103020121101

Joshua Rozenberg asks what it is like to represent yourself in court.

Joshua Rozenberg looks at DIY law - what it is like to represent yourself as a litigant in person and whether the CPS should be allowed to shut down private prosecutions. Producer Wesley Stephenson.

Drug And Alcohol Misusing Families2012031320120315

For the last four years, London's family drug and alcohol court has been trying to get drug and alcohol misusing families back on track. It has done so by following a different approach from the traditional, more punitive measures adopted by the mainstream courts. Joshua Rozenberg visits the court to find out how effective its pioneering work has been and what those who use it think of it. He speaks to those involved in the day-to-day work of the court - including the district judge, the principals of the main charity involved in its creation, legal representatives and others with expert knowledge of the problems which the court's family users must tackle to put their lives back in order - and talks to observers of the court who have reservations about its approach. Law in Action discovers how far this innovative - but expensive - legal model is one which can realistically be emulated elsewhere in the UK when public funds are under such pressure.

Producer Simon Coates.

Joshua Rozenberg visits London's family drug and alcohol court and asks how well it works.

Internet Privacy And Copyright20120228

Joshua Rozenberg asks how the law on privacy and copyright, with different features in different countries, should be adapted for the global internet age? Interview with legal counsel for Google, William Patry. And with growing concerns about the extent of information on users held by Google+ and Facebook, in particular, how robust are the protections in place to protect us and how will they be kept up to date? Joshu Rozenberg reports.

Producer: Simon Coates.

How should laws on privacy and copyright be adapted for the global internet age?

Interview With Rt Hon Kenneth Clarke Mp2010102620101028

Rt Hon Kenneth Clarke MP, the new Justice Secretary, is interviewed in front of an audience at Gray's Inn by presenter Joshua Rozenberg.

Joshua Rozenberg questions Justice Secretary Kenneth Clarke about the government's plans.

Legal Aid Changes: Long Overdue Reform Or Denial Of Justice?2012022120120223

"The single biggest attack on access to justice since the legal aid system was introduced". That's the view of the Law Society on the government's controversial proposals to reform the civil justice system. But the government argue that the legal aid system has become unaffordable and along with no win no fee has helped create a litigious society. They say the current system is a boon for lawyers, while draining resources from organisations like the NHS and leaving many small businesses in fear of legal action. The Government are planning to scrap legal aid in some areas and make fundamental changes to no-win no fee. The aim is to bring down costs and encourage alternatives to going to court. But the bill to introduce these changes has been having a rocky ride in Parliament and there is widespread opposition to the reforms. Advice centres, lawyers and even some from the government's own benches say the changes will deny justice for vulnerable people, and will ultimately end up costing the government more money. In the first programme of a new series of Law in Action, Joshua Rozenberg examines the arguments and the likely impact of the contentious changes.

Producer: Wesley Stephenson.

Joshua Rozenbeerg looks at the government's controversial legal aid proposals.

Privacy And Copyright20120301

Joshua Rozenberg considers the law on privacy in the light of two recent, highly significant - and little-noticed - decisions of the European Court of Human Rights. He talks to the senior appeal court judge, Lady Justice Arden, about what the rulings mean and how they relate to the courts and the press in the United Kingdom. He also considers a decision of the High Court in London last week on the claim for privacy brought by the young international rugby player, Jonathan Spelman - who is also the son of the Cabinet minister, Caroline Spelman. He talks to a leading media lawyer about how the position of young people who are well-known in their own field may be legally affected.

The programme also looks at how, in the internet age, personal privacy is safeguarded and copyright could change. The BBC's technology correspondent, Rory Cellan-Jones discusses how data on computer users is collected and how privacy concerns can be addressed. Simon Davies of Privacy International and Nick Stringer of the Internet Advertising Bureau then debate the issues of personal privacy and targeted advertising. The former Information Commissioner, Richard Thomas, considers how far proposed new EU legal rules on data protection and e-privacy will protect users while enabling search engines and other companies to carry on their legitimate data-gathering activities.

William Patry, senior copyright counsel at Google, Inc., has recently published a book called How to Fix Copyright. Joshua Rozenberg asks him to explain some of his proposed reforms, especially as they relate to copyright procedures in the United States, and how far these might serve the interests of the company for which he works as well as copyright holders in film, music and books.

Joshua Rozenberg asks how laws on privacy and copyright should work in the internet age.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 02 February 199019900202

Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 09 February 1990

Previous in series: 26 January 1990

Broadcast history

02 Feb 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 02 February 199619960202

Producer: S.

COATES

Next in series: 16 February 1996

Previous in series: 19 January 1996

Broadcast history

02 Feb 1996 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 02 March 199019900302

Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 09 March 1990

Previous in series: 23 February 1990

Broadcast history

02 Mar 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 02 November 199019901102

Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 09 November 1990

Previous in series: 26 October 1990

Broadcast history

02 Nov 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 06 July 199019900706

Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 13 July 1990

Previous in series: 29 June 1990

Broadcast history

06 Jul 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 09 February 199019900209

Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 16 February 1990

Previous in series: 02 February 1990

Broadcast history

09 Feb 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 09 March 199019900309

Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 27 April 1990

Previous in series: 02 March 1990

Broadcast history

09 Mar 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 09 November 199019901109

Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 16 November 1990

Previous in series: 02 November 1990

Broadcast history

09 Nov 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 13 July 199019900713

Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 20 July 1990

Previous in series: 06 July 1990

Broadcast history

13 Jul 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 16 February 199019900216

Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 23 February 1990

Previous in series: 09 February 1990

Broadcast history

16 Feb 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 16 February 199619960216

Producer: S.

COATES

Next in series: 23 February 1996

Previous in series: 02 February 1996

Broadcast history

16 Feb 1996 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 16 November 199019901116

Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 23 November 1990

Previous in series: 09 November 1990

Broadcast history

16 Nov 1990 19:20-20:05 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 19 January 199019900119

Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 26 January 1990

Previous in series: 08 December 1989

Broadcast history

19 Jan 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 19 January 199619960119

Producer: S.

COATES

Next in series: 02 February 1996

Previous in series: 08 December 1995

Broadcast history

19 Jan 1996 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 1990050419900504

04 May 1990

Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 11 May 1990

Previous in series: 27 April 1990

Broadcast history

04 May 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 1990051119900511

11 May 1990

Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: THE EUROPEAN COURT OF JUSTICE IN LUXEMBOURG

Previous in series: 04 May 1990

Broadcast history

11 May 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 20 July 199019900720

Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 27 July 1990

Previous in series: 13 July 1990

Broadcast history

20 Jul 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 22 June 199019900622

Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 29 June 1990

Previous in series: THE EUROPEAN COURT OF JUSTICE IN LUXEMBOURG

Broadcast history

22 Jun 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 23 February 199019900223

Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 02 March 1990

Previous in series: 16 February 1990

Broadcast history

23 Feb 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 23 February 199619960223

Producer: S.

COATES

Next in series: 01 March 1996

Previous in series: 16 February 1996

Broadcast history

23 Feb 1996 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 23 November 199019901123

Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 30 November 1990

Previous in series: 16 November 1990

Broadcast history

23 Nov 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 26 January 199019900126

Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 02 February 1990

Previous in series: 19 January 1990

Broadcast history

26 Jan 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 26 October 199019901026

Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 02 November 1990

Previous in series: 27 July 1990

Broadcast history

26 Oct 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 27 April 199019900427

Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 04 May 1990

Previous in series: 09 March 1990

Broadcast history

27 Apr 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 27 July 199019900727

Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 26 October 1990

Previous in series: 20 July 1990

Broadcast history

27 Jul 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 29 June 199019900629

Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 06 July 1990

Previous in series: 22 June 1990

Broadcast history

29 Jun 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 30 November 199019901130

Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 25 January 1991

Previous in series: 23 November 1990

Broadcast history

30 Nov 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: The European Court Of Justice In Luxembourg19900518

Producer: G.

BUTLER

Next in series: 22 June 1990

Previous in series: 11 May 1990

Broadcast history

18 May 1990 20:50-21:15 (RADIO 4).

Sorting Out Extradition And Prisoner Voting2012110620121108

Joshua Rozenberg asks how rows over extradition and votes for prisoners can be resolved.

Joshua Rozenberg considers how the tension between politicians' wishes and what the law requires is likely to be resolved in two highly controversial areas of government policy: extradition and prisoners' right to vote.

The Home Secretary's recent decision to prevent the extradition to the United States of Gary McKinnon prompted dismay in Washington. But the US welcomed the much-delayed transfer at around the same time of five suspected terrorists, including Abu Hamza al-Masri. Joshua asks what planned changes to the law of extradition are likely to mean for those UK citizens sought by other countries and how such decisions can be made more quickly in future.

Meanwhile, tensions with the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg have risen after the Prime Minister ruled out votes for prisoners during the life of the present government - a statement which appeared to set the government on a collision course with the court. Ministers have only a few more weeks to respond formally to the court's judgment earlier this year that the United Kingdom would be in breach of its obligations under the European Convention on Human Rights if it continued to operate a blanket ban on prisoners' voting. The Attorney General has now underlined the importance of the issue by telling MPs that the UK should be seen to abide by the judgments of the Strasbourg court. Joshua asks legal experts and politicians if these two seemingly contradictory positions can be reconciled and, if so, how.

Producer Simon Coates.

Sport And The Law2012030620120308

The law is increasingly impacting on sport, with landmark cases being heard in the High Court and European Court of Justice in areas like drugs and employment law. The involvement of lawyers has increased as the professionalism and importantly the money has increased. But when sport ends up in the ordinary courts the cases can be slow and in some cases financially crippling. Governing bodies are often keen to stay out of court, and sport has instituted its own courts, such as the Court for Arbitration for Sport. Many sporting governing bodies write into their constitutions that the CAS be the first port of call in dispute resolution.

The CAS will play a key role at the Olympics, but dispute resolution starts long before the games themselves. Britain's rhythm gymnastics team are already appealing against a decision not to select them for the Olympics and sprinter Dwain Chambers is awaiting a decision by CAS on whether the British Olympic Association rules that currently bar him from competing in an Olympic Games break the international rules on drug bans.

But the move away from the normal courts is not driven by cost alone. There is a debate about how far the law courts should be involved in decisions which impact on sport. The European Union has recognised the special nature of sport, and this has been welcomed by sporting governing bodies. But are we seeing the build up of a body of sports law, which might conflict with law in other areas? How far should sport be special in the eyes of the law? And where should the boundary lie between areas which are decided by traditional courts, sports courts or left up to the sport governing bodies themselves? Joshua Rosenberg talks to those involved with sport and the law.

Producer: Wesley Stephenson.

Joshua Rozenberg investigates how the law is increasingly impacting on sport.

What Next For The Family Courts?20101019

The family justice system has been criticised from all angles.

It's been described as a slow, bureaucratic system that is bursting at the seams leaving families torn apart by its unfriendly and adversarial nature.

In the first of a new series of Law In Action Joshua Rozenberg speaks to the Head of the Family Court Division Sir Nicholas Wall about what the future holds and how the sytem can be changed to help those caught up in it.

Joshua Rozenberg speaks to the head of the Family Court Sir Nicholas Wall.

What Next For The Family Courts?20101021

Joshua Rozenberg speaks to the head of the Family Court Sir Nicholas Wall.

0120021004

The cases, the courts and the lawyers - Marcel Berlins's weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

0120040528

Law in Action returns with a new look.

Taking over the reins from Marcel Berlins is barrister and writer Clive Coleman who brings a lively approach to the week's legal issues and controversies.

Does the law work? What do House of Lords judgments mean? And how does the legal system affect you and me? The series starts by asking is the legal aid system close to collapse?

0120050204

Radio 4's weekly cross examination of the law and legal system returns for a brand new series.

Each week, presenter Clive Coleman looks behind the headlines to analyse the major legal stories.

01Corporate Killing20041001

This week, what's happened to the Government's manifesto pledge to reform the law on corporate killing? Law in Action finds out if worries about government bodies being sued are the source of all the delays.

01Secret Courts, Drones And International Law20120605

In the first of a new series Joshua Rozenberg talks to Sir Daniel Bethlehem the former principal legal advisor at the Foreign Office. He asks him about the changing face of international law and its effect on the making of foreign policy, including the rise in litigation against the government on foreign matters. He also asks about international law and the use of drones, and the government's Justice and Security bill and why Sir Daniel thinks the measures laid out there are necessary.

Producer: Wesley Stephenson.

01Super Injunctions2011060720110609

Celebrities have been taking advantage of new privacy laws to protect their reputations.

Presenter Joshua Rozenberg looks at how and why these new laws have developed.

Presenter Joshua Rozenberg looks at the rise of super injunctions in privacy cases.

01The Data Protection Act20040130

Marcel Berlins returns with the first in a new series of the weekly investigation of our law, and asks if confusion over how the Data Protection Act works can be resolved to ensure fair trials and maintain public confidence.

0220021011
0220040206

Marcel Berlins takes a lively look at the legal affairs of the moment.

0220041008

Clive Coleman takes a lively look at the legal affairs of the moment.

0220050211

Radio 4's weekly cross examination of the law and legal system returns for a brand new series.

Each week, presenter Clive Coleman looks behind the headlines to analyse the major legal stories.

02Clashes Between Us Politicians And Judges20120612

A major confrontation between the courts and the government in the United States is set to ignite with the autumn election campaign about to start.

On health care and immigration - issues of direct concern to tens of millions of voters - the judges of the US Supreme Court will rule on laws that are championed by the leaders of both political parties. These decisions loom just as tensions between elected politicians and appointed judges are mounting in the UK, too, over issues as varied as voting rights for prisoners and the deportation of alleged terrorists.

Joshua Rozenberg discovers why these disagreements are becoming more heated now and how they are being tackled in the two countries.

He considers, in particular, what lessons Britain could learn from the American experience. Should we empower our courts to strike down laws passed by the democratically-elected parliament? If not, what real check exists against the arbitrary use of power by government? Or is tension between different parts of government unavoidable - and perhaps even a good thing?

Producer Simon Coates.

02Good Samaritan' Laws20040604

This week, should citizens have a legal obligation to intervene to try and prevent crimes they witness? Many European countries already have so-called 'Good Samaritan' laws, would similar legislation work in England and Wales?

02The Coalition's Sentencing Reform Plans2011061420110616

The plans of Kenneth Clarke, the Lord Chancellor and Justice Secretary, for changes to sentencing in England and Wales have already proved highly controversial.

But how are they likely to work in practice and what are their effects going to be?

Joshua Rozenberg explores what the thinking behind the reforms is and how the Justice Secretary's plans for higher discounts on sentences for "early pleas" of guilty by offenders came unstuck.

He also talks to a leading criminologist about a radical new approach towards the early identification of potentially serious criminals.

He discovers how reliable the evidence for this strategy is and what benefits it might offer the police, the courts - and politicians seeking to achieve a smaller prison population.

Producer Simon Coates.

Joshua Rozenberg explores the thinking behind the Justice Secretary's sentencing reforms.

0320021018

The cases, the courts and the lawyers - Marcel Berlins's weekly look at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

0320040213

The Home Secretary claims that plans for a national victims' fund will support people whose lives are ruined by crime.

Marcel Berlins asks how victims will be helped and if they will be persuaded to report crime and help secure more convictions.

0320041015

This week, will plans for new environmental courts lead to a change in the legal climate?

0320050218

Radio 4's weekly cross examination of the law and legal system returns for a brand new series.

Each week, presenter Clive Coleman looks behind the headlines to analyse the major legal stories.

03The Future Of The Legal Professions2012061920120621

Joshua Rozenberg asks if reducing costs is affecting the quality of advocacy in the courts

As the lines blur between the work of solicitors and barristers , Joshua Rozenberg asks whether a cheaper service provides better value for money or is it leading to poor advocacy and ultimately miscarriages of justice? Joshua Rozenberg looks at where the legal professions are going and how best to make sure that future legal advocates are up to scratch.

03The Inns Of Court20040611

Clive Coleman presents the series looking at developments in the law and how they affect our lives.

This edition explains the mysteries of the Inns of Court.

03The New Business Of Law2011062120110623

Radical changes to the way in which solicitors firms can operate as businesses come into force in October.

Joshua Rozenberg examines the implications for lawyers and consumers.

Joshua Rozenberg looks at radical changes to the way law firms can be owned and run.

The liberalisation of the legal services market in the autumn has been described as the sectors 'big bang' comparable with the deregulation of financial services in the eighties.

Change might not come overnight but the legal landscape will see a huge shift in the next five to ten years with new players coming into the market and some firms going out of business.

Co-op is already staking it's claim - trialling legal services in branches of Britannia building society and smaller law firms are banding together to form countrywide chains, seeing strength in numbers.

It is the result of the Legal Services Act introduced by the last government and it aims to increase competition, make services better for consumers and improve access to justice.

But those hostile to the changes believe that a drive for profit compromises lawyers professional ethics and will drive down standards.

0420040618

Clive Coleman with Radio 4's analysis of the week's legal issues and controversies with the second in a series of reports looking at how our legal system really works.

This week's programme examines the practice of "Taking Silk," whereby barristers are promoted to Queen's Counsel.

Does the system favour the best and the brightest, or does it encourage favouritism with senior legal appointments being decided on "a nod and a wink"?

0420041022

Another edition of the legal series in which Clive Coleman tackles the big legal issues and the everyday ones - without long words, small print or expensive fees.

0420050225

Clive Coleman looks behind the headlines to analyse the week's major legal stories and controversies.

And also unpicks the complex world of international law.

04Burial Space20040220

Shortage of burial space is intensifying, yet any proposed reforms to the law need to take account of human sensitivities.

Marcel Berlins investigates.

04White-collar Crime2012062620120628

Joshua Rozenberg asks if the government is planning to go easy on white-collar criminals.

The government plans to simplify how serious fraud is prosecuted and punished in the UK.

The costs of bringing complicated cases to trial are growing. But some experts in white collar crime believe that the likelihood is increasing that defendants in such cases may receive only light sentences or fines - even if they are convicted. This state of affairs is prompting a re-think about serious fraud is handled by the criminal justice system.

Ministers are now promoting a less punitive approach. This, they believe, will save money by encouraging those who have committed fraud to own up before a case comes to court. Perpetrators should then receive lower fines or prison sentences.

But Joshua Rozenberg asks if this is the right way to tackle white collar crime. Should those who have swindled companies - and the public at large - out of their money be treated more leniently than other criminals? And will innocent shareholders end up paying for the misdeeds of those who act dishonestly in their name?

Producer Simon Coates.

04 LASTScotland2011062820110630

Joshua Rozenberg examines the relationship between the Scottish legal system and that of the rest of the UK.

Presenter Joshua Rozenberg looks at recent developments in the Scottish legal system.

0520041029

Clive Coleman takes a lively look at the legal affairs of the moment.

0520050304

Clive Coleman looks behind the headlines to analyse the week's major legal stories and controversies.

And also unpicks the complex world of international law.

05Divorce Laws20040625

With Clive Coleman.

As controversy rages over the divorce laws, are Family Courts putting the rights and interests of mothers above those of fathers and children?

05Inquests20040227

are being reopened into a number of high profile deaths - including that of the Princess of Wales - but the way such hearings are conducted and the decisions they can reach have barely changed in modern times.

Marcel Berlins asks if public concern about its scope means the time has come to radically overhaul the inquest system.

0620040305

Animal researchers are seeking a new law to control threatening behaviour by anti-vivisectionists who insist on their right to committed protest.

Marcel Berlins asks if special legislation is the right approach or if it may lead to more problems than it solves.

0620040702

Clive Coleman with the series looking at developments in the law.

This edition looks at the probation service, where staff say that morale is low and the system is in chaos.

0620041105

Clive Coleman takes a lively look at the legal affairs of the moment.

0620050311

Clive Coleman looks behind the headlines to analyse the week's major legal stories and controversies.

0720041112

Clive Coleman takes a lively look at the legal affairs of the moment.

0720050318

Clive Coleman looks behind the headlines to analyse the week's major legal stories and controversies.

07Language Of A Bygone Age20040709

This week, why do Courts still use language of a bygone age when the government says it wants to make the system more accessible? What do those legal professionals who use it in Court think about having to talk in this way? And what do defendants, victims, press and public think?

Should use of language be included in Sir David Clementi's review of our legal system?

07Tradition20040312

Marcel Berlins asks whether we really understand the powerful legacy of tradition in our legal system and how, rightly or wrongly, it influences our courts today.

0820040319

If the effect of reforms to legal aid is to deprive areas of the country of proper cover, do we run the risk of miscarriages of justice? Marcel Berlins investigates.

0820040716

Clive Coleman presents Radio 4's analysis of the week's legal issues and controversies.

With the prisons full to bursting, the Courts are sentencing more people to community service.

For most of us, this conjures up images of people doing public good, helping the needy perhaps or working on under funded public projects.

But what's the reality? Do those serving these sentences actually complete them? And are there real benefits to them and to the community?

0820041119

Another edition of the legal series in which Clive Coleman tackles the big legal issues and the everyday ones - without long words, small print or expensive fees.

0820050325

Clive Coleman takes a lively look at the legal affairs of the moment.

0920040326

As Marcel Berlins bids farewell to the programme he has presented for over 15 years, he considers how the law and its practice have changed and what the future holds for justice.

0920040723

Clive Coleman with Radio 4's analysis of the week's legal issues and controversies.

This week, why have lawyers got such a bad image? Many people think of them as slick, overpaid and manipulative.

Is this perception unfair? If so, what are lawyers doing to try and change it?

0920041126

Clive Coleman takes a lively look at the legal affairs of the moment.

1020040730

Clive Coleman with the series looking at developments in the law and how they affect us.

This edition looks at the forthcoming change in admission policy for secondary schools.