Landscape Without White Bungalow

Over the last 20 years, the lax planning restrictions in Donegal have resulted in a proliferation of white bungalows across what was once a wild and often uninhabited landscape.

They have been built mainly by local farmers wanting to move out of traditional cottages and by weekending townies looking for cheap countryside idylls.

Early in 2004, a Donegal art gallery, concerned that the traditional landscape was rapidly disappearing, commissioned the artist Janet Ross to paint 'Disappearing Donegal'.

Her paintings will represent a kind of collective memory of how Donegal looked for centuries, but may never look again.

Her journey will take her to such places as Toraigh Island, the most Westerly of the British Isles, where an Irish-speaking fishing and farming community lives in a landscape unchanged for thousands of years.

Donegal has become a very fashionable place to holiday.

Poet and broadcaster Tom Paulin has a holiday home there - how does he square the desire to have a home in this beautiful landscape, with the change that property can make to it?

And Kevin talks to Irish landscape expert Professor Anne Crookshank, who has lived in Donegal for decades, about the relationship between land, memory and painter.

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Over the last 20 years, the lax planning restrictions in Donegal have resulted in a proliferation of white bungalows across what was once a wild and often uninhabited landscape.

They have been built mainly by local farmers wanting to move out of traditional cottages and by weekending townies looking for cheap countryside idylls.

Early in 2004, a Donegal art gallery, concerned that the traditional landscape was rapidly disappearing, commissioned the artist Janet Ross to paint 'Disappearing Donegal'.

Her paintings will represent a kind of collective memory of how Donegal looked for centuries, but may never look again.

Her journey will take her to such places as Toraigh Island, the most Westerly of the British Isles, where an Irish-speaking fishing and farming community lives in a landscape unchanged for thousands of years.

Donegal has become a very fashionable place to holiday.

Poet and broadcaster Tom Paulin has a holiday home there - how does he square the desire to have a home in this beautiful landscape, with the change that property can make to it?

And Kevin talks to Irish landscape expert Professor Anne Crookshank, who has lived in Donegal for decades, about the relationship between land, memory and painter.