King Solomon's Ring

show more detailshow less detail

Episodes

EpisodeFirst
Broadcast
Comments
0120030804

This summer marks the centenary of the birth of the pioneering Nobel Prize winning scientist, Konrad Lorenz.

To celebrate the anniversary, Nigel Anthony reads from the book which made him world famous, King Solomon's Ring.

Solomon, so the legend goes, had a magic ring which enabled him to speak to the animals in their own language.

Konrad Lorenz was gifted with a similar power of understanding the animal word, though he relied hours of painstaking observation rather than magic.

He shared the grounds of his home in Austria with an assortment of wild birds and other animals, which he allowed to roam freely.

Situated on the banks of the Danube, it was a naturalist's paradise.

Unconcerned at the apparent eccentricity of his behaviour, Lorenz reared mallards, jackdaws and greylag geese.

His entertaining and often humorous accounts of life at Altenberg have inspired countless other scientists to continue the fascinating study of animal behaviour.

0220030805

This summer marks the centenary of the birth of the pioneering Nobel Prize winning scientist, Konrad Lorenz.

To celebrate the anniversary, Nigel Anthony reads from the book which made him world famous.

Solomon, so the legend goes, had a magic ring which enabled him to speak to the animals in their own language.

Konrad Lorenz was gifted with a similar power of understanding the animal word, though he relied not on magic but hours of painstaking observation.

He shared the grounds of his home in Austria with an assortment of wild birds and other animals, which he allowed to roam freely.

Situated on the banks of the Danube, it was a naturalist's paradise and unconcerned at the apparent eccentricity of his behaviour Lorenz reared mallards, jackdaws and greylag geese and then caged in his house to afford the humans a little privacy.

His entertaining and often humorous accounts of life at Altenberg have inspired countless other scientists to continue the fascinating study of animal behaviour.

0320030806

This summer marks the centenary of the birth of the pioneering Nobel Prize winning scientist, Konrad Lorenz.

To celebrate the anniversary, Nigel Anthony reads from the book which made him world famous, King Solomon's Ring.

Solomon, so the legend goes, had a magic ring which enabled him to speak to the animals in their own language.

Konrad Lorenz was gifted with a similar power of understanding the animal word, though he relied not on magic but hours of painstaking observation.

He shared the grounds of his home in Austria with an assortment of wild birds and other animals, which he allowed to roam freely.

Situated on the banks of the Danube, it was a naturalist's paradise and, unconcerned at the apparent eccentricity of his behaviour, Lorenz reared mallards, jackdaws and greylag geese and then caged in his house to afford the humans a little privacy.

His entertaining and often humorous accounts of life at Altenberg have inspired countless other scientists to continue the fascinating study of animal behaviour.

0420030807

Nigel Anthony reads Konrad Lorenz's attempts to communicate with animals.

0520030808

This summer marks the centenary of the birth of the pioneering Nobel Prize winning scientist, Konrad Lorenz.

To celebrate the anniversary, Nigel Anthony reads from the book which made him world famous.

In final episode, Queen Redgold saves the jackdaw colony at Altenberg.

Solomon, so the legend goes, had a magic ring which enabled him to speak to the animals in their own language.

Konrad Lorenz was gifted with a similar power of understanding the animal word, though he relied not on magic but hours of painstaking observation.

He shared the grounds of his home in Austria with an assortment of wild birds and other animals, which he allowed to roam freely.

Situated on the banks of the Danube, it was a naturalist's paradise and unconcerned at the apparent eccentricity of his behaviour, Lorenz reared mallards, jackdaws and greylag geese and then caged in his house to afford the humans a little privacy.

His entertaining and often humorous accounts of life at Altenberg have inspired countless other scientists to continue the fascinating study of animal behaviour.