The Joy Of 9 To 5

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2015111820160405 (R4)

Lucy Kellaway looks at the UK's long hours office culture and asks what happened to the 9 to 5?

In 1930 John Maynard Keynes predicted that, by 2030, we'd all be working a 15 hour week. And yet, almost half of us in the UK put in over a 40 hour week and most of those who work over 48 hours say they're unhappy.

In part one of a new series on modern work culture, Lucy Kellaway, management columnist for the Financial Times, discovers the origins of the eight hour working day.

She finds out what people are actually up to when they're in the office at all hours and argues much of the typical working day is taken up with time-wasting. For Lucy, our self image has become so intertwined with our job that we bolster it by putting the hours in - even if in doing so we're less happy and productive.

Speaking to business leaders, management researchers, and office workers, Lucy asks whether it's time to re-define our notion of 'hard work', and explores the idea that working less could actually be better for everyone.

Written and presented by Lucy Kellaway

Producer: Gemma Newby

Executive Producer: Russell Finch

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

2015111820160406 (R4)

Lucy Kellaway looks at long hours office culture and asks what happened to 9 to 5?

20151118

20151118

Lucy Kellaway looks at the UK's long hours office culture and asks what happened to the 9 to 5?

In 1930 John Maynard Keynes predicted that, by 2030, we'd all be working a 15 hour week. And yet, almost half of us in the UK put in over a 40 hour week and most of those who work over 48 hours say they're unhappy.

In part one of a new series on modern work culture, Lucy Kellaway, management columnist for the Financial Times, discovers the origins of the eight hour working day.

She finds out what people are actually up to when they're in the office at all hours and argues much of the typical working day is taken up with time-wasting. For Lucy, our self image has become so intertwined with our job that we bolster it by putting the hours in - even if in doing so we're less happy and productive.

Speaking to business leaders, management researchers, and office workers, Lucy asks whether it's time to re-define our notion of 'hard work', and explores the idea that working less could actually be better for everyone.

Written and presented by Lucy Kellaway

Producer: Gemma Newby

Executive Producer: Russell Finch

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

2015112520160412 (R4)

They're overworked, under appreciated, and mostly not very good at their jobs. Lucy Kellaway asks do we really need managers?

In part two of her series on modern work culture, Lucy Kellaway, columnist for the Financial Times, looks at the much-maligned manager. Wouldn't it be better if we just got rid of them altogether?

Lucy explores the extent to which we workers need structure from the top, or would rather have the freedom to get on with our jobs without constant interference.

We hear from the frontline why it's so tough to manage. Could an Al-Qaeda memo prove the key to why hierarchy is necessary to get things done?

From 17th century pirates to 21st century tech-start ups, Lucy looks at alternative ways of managing organisations and asks whether work would be a happier, more grown-up place if we put them into practice.

Written and presented by Lucy Kellaway

Producer: Gemma Newby

Executive Producer: Russell Finch

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

2015112520160413 (R4)

Lucy Kellaway asks if we really need managers.

20151125

20151125

They're overworked, under appreciated, and mostly not very good at their jobs. Lucy Kellaway asks do we really need managers?

In part two of her series on modern work culture, Lucy Kellaway, columnist for the Financial Times, looks at the much-maligned manager. Wouldn't it be better if we just got rid of them altogether?

Lucy explores the extent to which we workers need structure from the top, or would rather have the freedom to get on with our jobs without constant interference.

We hear from the frontline why it's so tough to manage. Could an Al-Qaeda memo prove the key to why hierarchy is necessary to get things done?

From 17th century pirates to 21st century tech-start ups, Lucy looks at alternative ways of managing organisations and asks whether work would be a happier, more grown-up place if we put them into practice.

Written and presented by Lucy Kellaway

Producer: Gemma Newby

Executive Producer: Russell Finch

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

2015120220160419 (R4)

Lucy Kellaway investigates the persistent taboo over salaries, and asks who benefits from this secrecy.

What we are paid is rarely a meritocracy. Studies show that if you are taller, more attractive, have better hair, you're likely to take home a bigger pay packet. Even the most popular way of rewarding extra effort at work - performance related pay - has been shown to demotivate and demoralise workers.

Lucy steps inside at a broad range of offices to investigate - from Suma Wholefoods in Halifax where all 200 employees, whether driving a forklift or trading commodities, earns exactly the same amount, to Gravity Payments, where the CEO has just cut his million dollar salary to fund his promise that no employee will earn less than $70,000.

Speaking to workers and business leaders, Lucy asks whether there is a fairer way of cutting up the cake.

Written and presented by Lucy Kellaway

Producer: Lucy Greenwell

Executive Producer: Russell Finch

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.

2015120220160420 (R4)

Lucy Kellaway asks whether we should be more open about what we are paid.

20151202

20151202

Lucy Kellaway investigates the persistent taboo over salaries, and asks who benefits from this secrecy.

What we are paid is rarely a meritocracy. Studies show that if you are taller, more attractive, have better hair, you're likely to take home a bigger pay packet. Even the most popular way of rewarding extra effort at work - performance related pay - has been shown to demotivate and demoralise workers.

Lucy steps inside at a broad range of offices to investigate - from Suma Wholefoods in Halifax where all 200 employees, whether driving a forklift or trading commodities, earns exactly the same amount, to Gravity Payments, where the CEO has just cut his million dollar salary to fund his promise that no employee will earn less than $70,000.

Speaking to workers and business leaders, Lucy asks whether there is a fairer way of cutting up the cake.

Written and presented by Lucy Kellaway

Producer: Lucy Greenwell

Executive Producer: Russell Finch

A Somethin' Else production for BBC Radio 4.