Jazz File

Saturdays 18:00 - 18:30

Jazz File is the documentary strand of Radio 3's jazz programming.

It covers aspects of jazz in-depth, presented by voices familiar to the network including Jez Nelson, Alyn Shipton and Brian Morton.

Episodes

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JF

Saturdays 18:00 - 18:30

Jazz File is the documentary strand of Radio 3's jazz programming.

It covers aspects of jazz in-depth, presented by voices familiar to the network including Jez Nelson, Alyn Shipton and Brian Morton.

JF

Saturdays 18:00 - 18:30

Jazz File is the documentary strand of Radio 3's jazz programming.

It covers aspects of jazz in-depth, presented by voices familiar to the network including Jez Nelson, Alyn Shipton and Brian Morton.

JF20040508

Chameleon: The Herbie Hancock Story

2/4. The Sorcerer

Jez Nelson presents the second in a four-part series profiling one of Jazz's greatest living superstars, pianist and composer, Herbie Hancock.

He caught Miles Davis' attention, and the trumpeter recruited him to take the piano chair in what would become arguably the greatest acoustic jazz group of all time - Davis' '60s quintet with Wayne Shorter. Hancock stayed with Miles for most of the decade during which he, along with drummer Tony Williams and bassist Ron Carter, helped revolutionise traditional jazz concepts of the rhythm section and its relation to the soloists.

The series features new contributions from musical greats including Donald Byrd, Bill Laswell, Michael Brecker, Wynton Marsalis and the Grammy-winning, Oscar-winning man himself.

JF20040515

Chameleon - The Herbie Hancock Story

3/4. Headhunting

Jez Nelson profiles one of Jazz's greatest living superstars, pianist and composer, Herbie Hancock.

Hancock was a pivotal figure in the move to incorporate the use of electronic instruments in jazz, and in the fusion of rock and funk rhythms and textures with more traditional styles in the music.

After making moves in this direction with Miles Davis in the late 1960s, Hancock left the trumpeter, to explore electric jazz with his own bands, first the esoteric Mwandishi group, then with a new quartet, Headhunters. Taking inspiration from Sly Stone and James Brown, Headhunters made the biggest selling jazz album to date, but it was a controversial move.

The series features new contributions from musical greats including Donald Byrd, Bill Laswell, Michael Brecker, Wynton Marsalis and the Grammy-winning, Oscar-winning man himself.

JF20040605

Jazz from Hell

Programme Two: Make a Jazz Noise Here

Charles Shaar Murray continues his Jazz File series, which celebrates and explores the relationship between jazz and the music of Frank Zappa. The series was made to coincide with the tenth anniversary of Zappa's death (4th December 2003).

Frank Zappa is usually thought of first and foremost as a rock musician and band leader, albeit a pretty unusual one! Zappa said he didn't like jazz; he complained of its endless 'noodling' and famously said that 'jazz is not dead, it just smells funny!'. However, much of his music shows a jazz influence, his recorded work features some of the most dazzling improvisers of their time (Ian Underwood, Sugar Cane Harris, George Duke, Bruce Fowler, Mike Brecker etc) - not to mention the virtuosic guitar playing of Frank himself, and his music has in turn influenced contemporary jazz.

Shaar Murray (an acknowledged expert on the subject, and regular presenter of Jazz File) is joined by a host of the bandleader's ex sidemen to take an entertaining look at Zappa and jazz. The following Zappa alumni have been interviewed exclusively for this series: Arthur Barrow, Adrian Belew, Mike Brecker, George Duke, Bruce Fowler, Ralph Humphrey, Tommy Mars, Patrick O'Hearn and Don Preston. Plus there are archive recordings of Zappa himself.

This second programme focuses on the role Zappa's star sidemen played in creating his unique music. As a bandleader Zappa was like Ellington in the way he assembled groups of virtuoso musicians and then wrote compositions for them to play which would highlight their individual strengths. He always wrote pieces which allowed his sidemen to shine.

JF20040612

Jazz from Hell

Part 3: Air Sculpture

Charles Shaar Murray concludes his Jazz File series, which celebrates and explores the relationship between jazz and the music of Frank Zappa.

Frank Zappa is usually thought of first and foremost as a rock musician and band leader, albeit a pretty unusual one. Zappa said he didn't like jazz; he complained of its endless 'noodling' and famously said that 'jazz is not dead, it just smells funny!'. However, much of his music shows a jazz influence, his recorded work features some of the most dazzling improvisers of their time (Ian Underwood, Sugar Cane Harris, George Duke, Bruce Fowler, Mike Brecker etc) - not to mention the virtuosic guitar playing of Frank himself, and his music has in turn influenced contemporary jazz.

Shaar Murray (an acknowledged expert on the subject, and regular presenter of Jazz File) is joined by a host of the bandleader's ex sidemen to take an entertaining look at Zappa and jazz. The following Zappa alumni have been interviewed exclusively for this series: Arthur Barrow, Adrian Belew, Mike Brecker, George Duke, Bruce Fowler, Ralph Humphrey, Tommy Mars, Patrick O'Hearn and Don Preston. Plus there will be archive recordings of Zappa himself.

The final programme in the series considers Zappa himself as an improviser. Arguably more than any other guitarist Zappa changed and developed over time. As an soloist, he was always stretching himself; in live performance, each extended solo was an opportunity to create something new.

JF20040626

Blues To Be There

Part 1

The Newport Jazz Festival is 50 years old this year. Alyn Shipton presents the first of three programmes telling the story of this Rhode Island institution.

JF20040703

Blues to Be There

Part 2

Alyn Shipton continues his overview of The Newport Jazz Festival, which is fifty years old this year.

This second programme examines some of the challenges experienced by the festival organisers, such as street riots in Newport and the establishment of Charles Mingus's Newport Rebel Festival, as well as recalling classic performances from

the likes of Dizzy Gillespie, Anita O'Day and John Coltrane, with contributions from George Wein, Benny Golson, Don

Alias, Cleo Laine and Archie Shepp.

JF20040724

Lullaby of Birdland: The George Shearing Story

In the second part of his 'aural scrapbook' of reminiscences with Alyn Shipton, George Shearing recalls his arrival in America, and his playing on 52nd Street with Ella Fitzgerald. He encounters such great fellow pianists as Erroll Garner and Bud Powell, and in 1949, launches his famous Quintet.

JF20040731

Lullaby of Birdland: The George Shearing Story

3/4. What was the basis of the famous 'Shearing Sound'? In this programme George Shearing deminstrates to Alyn Shipton how vibes player Marge Hyams and guitarist Chuck Wayne were vital to his hits such as Autumn Leaves. He also explores baroque sounds with Gary Burton, and begins his partnership with the great Mel Torme.

JF20040814

Anglo Sax - The Music of John Surman

1/4. Marking his 60th birthday, this new four part Jazz File series profiles perhaps the only musician to have successfully created a truly English jazz music - saxophonist and composer John Surman.

Today at the height of his powers as a composer and improviser, Surman gives the lie to the old adage that there is no English jazz, only American jazz played by English musicians. Brought up steeped in English Church and folk music, his work is an entirely natural mix of his childhood influences with his mature years as a world class jazz musician.

Writer and jazz critic John Fordham talks to Surman and traces how he got to his position today as a performer and composer of major works like 1996's Mercury Music prize nominated Proverbs and Songs and 2001's Free and Equal.

As well as an in depth interview with Surman himself, the series features new contributions from Mike Westbrook, Alan Skidmore, John Marshall, Karin Krog, Howard Moody, Barre Phillips and Jack DeJohnette.

The first part looks at his early years growing up in Plymouth, his work with the Mike Westbrook orchestra as a dazzling baritone saxophonist and his rise to prominence in the sixties as one of the leaders of a new generation in British jazz.

JF20040821

Anglo Sax - The Music of John Surman

2/4.

John Fordham profiles perhaps the only musician to have successfully created a truly English jazz music - saxophonist and composer John Surman. The series marks Surman's 60th birthday this month.

Today at the height of his powers as a composer and improviser, Surman gives the lie to the old adage that there is no English jazz, only American jazz played by English musicians. Brought up steeped in English Church and folk music, his work is an entirely natural mix of his childhood influences with his mature years as a world class jazz musician.

Writer and jazz critic John Fordham talks to Surman and traces how he got to his position today as a performer and composer of major works like 1996's Mercury Music prize nominated Proverbs and Songs and 2001's Free and Equal.

As well as Surman himself, the series features new contributions from Mike Westbrook, Alan Skidmore, John Marshall, Karin Krog, Howard Moody, Barre Phillips and Jack DeJohnette.

The second part in the series looks at Surman's early seventies work in a now legendary band with Barre Phillips and Stu Martin - The Trio, and the period of creative turmoil that followed.

JF20040904

4/4. The Music of John Surman

John Fordham concludes his profile of perhaps the only musician to have successfully created a truly English jazz music - saxophonist and composer John Surman. The series marks Surman's 60th birthday at the end of August.

Today, at the height of his powers as a composer and improviser, Surman gives the lie to the old adage that there is no English jazz, only American jazz played by English musicians. Brought up steeped in English Church and folk music, his work is an entirely natural mix of his childhood influences with his mature years as a world class jazz musician.

Writer and jazz critic John Fordham talks to Surman and traces how he got to his position today as a performer and composer of major works like 1996's Mercury Music prize nominated Proverbs and Songs and 2001's Free and Equal.

As well as Surman himself, the series features new contributions from Mike Westbrook, Alan Skidmore, John Marshall, Karin Krog, Howard Moody, Barre Phillips and Jack DeJohnette.

The fourth and final part in the series looks at Surman's work in recent years with his longstanding English quartet and his series of major works including his 1996 work for choir, organ and saxophone Proverbs and Songs.

JF20040911

Sketches of Gil

1. The Birth of the Cool

A three part series telling the story of one of the most important composers, arrangers and bandleaders in modern jazz, Gil Evans.

"I don't play jazz music" Gil once said, "I play popular music: the music of the times".

Looking back over a career that spanned six decades, it's clear to see Gil never stood still but continued to make vibrant, imaginative music throughout.

A self-taught pianist, Gil helped revolutionise the sound of the big band in the 1940's through his work with the Claude Thornhill orchestra. After a key meeting with Miles Davis, he then masterminded the sessions now known as

"The Birth of the Cool" and went on to record a series of classic collaborations including "Miles Ahead", "Porgy and Bess" and "Sketches of Spain". Always on a quest for new musical colours, his latter day big band embraced electronics readily and even recorded an album of Jimi Hendrix songs.

'Sketches of Gil' is presented by saxophonist and Evans collaborator David Sanborn and features exclusive interviews with the following Evans alumni: Lee Konitz, Gunther Schuller, Wayne Shorter, Creed Taylor, Howard Johnson, Billie Harper, Anita Evans and Maria Schneider. Plus there will be archive interview material of Gil Evans himself.

The first programme examines Gil's early years and shows what you get when you cross an obsession with Louis Armstrong with a close study of Ravel, and then add bebop.

JF20040918

Sketches of Gil

2. Miles Ahead

A three part series telling the story of one of the most important composers, arrangers and bandleaders in modern jazz, Gil Evans.

In episode two we focus on Gil's work with Miles Davis. With the help of composer and Gil Evans protege Maria Schneider we read between the staves on classic big band recordings like Miles Ahead, Porgy and Bess and Sketches of Spain. We also learn that for a jazz pianist with no formal training, conducting a 19-piece orchestra is no simple task.

JF20041002

Cry Freedom

Kevin Le Gendre presents the first of a four part series that celebrates jazz artists who have used their music to protest.

There is a canon of resistance songs in jazz that stretches through Billie Holiday's Strange Fruit, and Duke Ellintgon's Black, Brown And Beige in the 50s via Max Roach and Oscar Brown Jnr in the 60s, Archie Shepp in the 70s and into the present with artists like Craig Harris, Denys Baptiste and Kip Hanrahan.

The Civil rights struggle of the 1960s produced anthemic music but many jazz artists have continued to champion human rights issues including homelessness, poverty and women's equality. The brave activism of the civil rights era, through to bold critiques of contemporary governments are discussed by musicians who are not afraid to speak their minds. Contributors include Archie Shepp, Max Roach, Hugh Masekela, Jayne Cortez, Don Byron, Dave Douglas and Gary Crosby.

JF20041009

Cry Freedom

Part Two

Kevin Le Gendre presents the second of a four part series that celebrates jazz artists who have used their music to protest.

The 1960s saw political turmoil and upheaval across the world from the Civil Rights movement in the US to independence struggles throughout Africa and student uprisings in Europe. While these events unfolded, a new sound ignited jazz. Known as free jazz or simply, the New Music, it saw artists release themselves from the constraints of melody and rhythm in favour of energetic and at times volcanic expression.

As well as developing 'New Music' some players also adopted a DIY approach, forming independent labels, finding new venues and founding collectives such as the Jazz Composers Guild in New York and AACM in Chicago. In the subsequent decades organisations such as DAAGNIM would also spring up and in Britain we saw the Jazz Warriors and more recently F-IRE. To what extent do these collectives uphold the revolutionary spirit of their '60s forebears? Have they found the ultimate artistic and political freedom?

Contributors include Peter Brotzman, Bill Dixon, Don Byron, Archie Shepp.

JF20041016

Cry Freedom

Part Three

Kevin Le Gendre presents the third of a four part series that celebrates jazz artists who have used their music to protest.

When singer Miriam Makeba addressed the United Nations General Assembly in 1963 about the plight of her home land, she did more to raise awareness of the horrors of apartheid on both sides of the Atlantic than mere politicians had achieved. German saxophonist highlighted the same issue with his coruscating F**k De Boer, Mile Davis did the same with Tutu and Wayne Shorter raised awareness of the unjust treatment of the Burmese people and their democratically elected leader with his recent Aung San Suu Kyi.

In part three of Cry Freedom Kevin Le Gendre explores the ways that jazz musicians have both celebrated their African roots and spoken out against oppression around the globe.

Contributors include Wayne Shorter, Hugh Masekela, Marcus Miller, Peter Brotzman, Abbey Lincoln, Gilad Atzmon.

JF20041023

Cry Freedom

Part Four

Kevin Le Gendre presents the third of a four part series that celebrates jazz artists who have used their music to protest.

In the late fifties Sonny Rollin's Freedom Suite was withdrawn from the market due to Sonny's controversial sleeve notes and retitled Shadow Waltz. It took a switch from multi-national label Columbia to independent Candid to get Charles Mingus' Fables Of Faubus released in its coruscating entirety and artists like Vijay Iyer and Mike Ladd would struggle to release their music on a major label today. Many jazz artists have used their music to express protest but they must still confront censorship by the music industry and media. What kind of risk does a musician run if he decides to speak out on a controversial subject and does the internet age give new opportunities for freedom of expression?

Contributors include Billy Bang, Dave Douglas, Vijay Iyer and Mike Ladd, Don Byron, and MeShell Ndege Ocello.

JF20041113

Body and Soul

Part One

Alyn Shipton presents the first in a three-part profile of the American tenor saxophonist Coleman Hawkins, who was born 100 years ago this month. Hawkins was the first musician to turn the saxophone from a novelty instrument to a powerful jazz solo vehicle and he became one of the most influential soloists of the swing era. This first programme includes

some of the early recordings he made with the Fletcher Henderson Orchestra and with British bandleaders Spike Hughes and Jack Hylton. Contributions from drummer Eddie Locke, trumpeter Joe Wilder, biographer John Chilton and an archive interview with Hawkins himself.

JF20041120

Body and Soul

Alyn Shipton continues his series on the pioneering tenor saxophonist Coleman Hawkins, who was born 100 years ago this month. This programme includes music from his period in Europe during the 1930s, his celebrated recording of Body and Soul, and his role in the early development of bebop alongside Dizzy Gillespie and Thelonious Monk.

Contributors include jazz historian Dan Morgenstern, pianist Billy Taylor and an archive interview with Hawkins himself.

JF20041127

Body and Soul

Part Three

Alyn Shipton concludes his three-part profile of American saxophonist Coleman Hawkins, who was born 100 years ago this month. This last programme focuses on Hawkins' collaborations with younger musicians such as Max Roach and Sonny Rollins, his involvement in Jazz at the Philharmonic, and his partnership with trumpeter Roy Eldridge.

With contributions from bassist Bob Cranshaw, pianists Billy Taylor and Marian McPartland and excerpts from an archive interview with Hawkins himself.

JF20041204

In the Mood: Guy Barker introduces the first of a 4-part series celebrating bandleader Glenn Miller. Guy looks at Miller's early days before he formed his own band in 1937.

JF20050108

Anything you Can Do: In the first of two programmes, Julia McKenzie investigates all-female jazz and dance bands.

JF20050115

Anything You Can Do: In the second of two programmes, Julia McKenzie investigates all-female jazz and dance bands.

JF20050122

The World is Falling Down: The Abbey Lincoln Story

Part 1

Jez Nelson presents the first part of the story one of the most formidable jazz vocalists of our age based around a rare and extensive interview with Abbey Lincoln.

Now in her eighth decade, Abbey reflects on a jazz life fully lived; a life that took her from supper club chanteuse to post-bop days with Mingus, Monk and Roach; fame and fortune as a Hollywood actress; and struggle and infamy as a political activist.

Contributors include Steve Coleman, Cedar Walton, Orrin Keepnews, Nat Hentoff and Jean-Philippe Allard.

First broadcast in November 2001.

JF20050129

The World is Falling Down: Jez Nelson presents the second part of the story of the great jazz vocalist Abbey Lincoln.

JF20050205

2, 3, 4 The Art of Arranging

Part One

In this new six-part series, John Dankworth sets out to demistify the art of writing for jazz ensembles large and small. In his first programme, John considers the overall skill of the arranger, using his own band to show how the same tune can be made to sound entirely different using a variety of arranger's "tricks". He considers the arranging of Dizzy Gillespie, Bob Haggart and Eddie Sauter among others.

Playing in the studio with him are Guy Barker (trumpet), Mark Nightingale (trombone), Jimmy Hastings and Andy Panayi, reeds, John Horler, piano, Alec Dankworth, bass and Allan Ganley drums.

JF20050212

2, 3, 4 The Art of Arranging

Part Two

John Dankworth continues his exploration of writing for jazz ensembles with a look at the reed section. In the studio, the Dankworth Seven play excerpts from Duke Ellington's music to show how an arranger builds up the sound of the saxophones, and also explore how Glenn Miller achieved his distinctive style. John considers the arranging of Don Redman, Benny Carter, Billy May, and Jimmy Giuffre. In the Seven are Guy Barker (trumpet), Mark Nightingale (trombone), Jimmy Hastings (clarinet and tenor saxophone), Andy Panayi (alto and baritone saxophones), John Horler (piano), Alec Dankworth (bass) and Allan Ganley (drums).

JF20050219

2,3,4 The Art of Arranging

Part Three

Today, John Dankworth looks at the role of the brass section, With the Dankworth Seven, he shows how skillful use of mutes can completely change the atmosphere of a piece, and later the band builds up its own head arrangement of Count Basie's Jumpin' At The Woodside. Joining him in the studio are Guy Barker (trumpet), Mark Nightingale (trombone),

Jimmy Hastings (clarinet and tenor saxophone), Andy Panayi (alto and baritone saxophone), John Horler (piano), Alec Dankworth (bass) and Allan Ganley (drums).

JF20050226

2,3,4 The Art Of Arranging

Part Four

John Dankworth explores how arrangers have written for small groups, from the Miles Davis nonet to the bands of Gerry Mulligan and John Lewis. In the studio he demonstrates how the Benny Goodman Quartet and the John Kirby Sextet achieved their unique sounds.

With him in the Dankowrth Seven are Guy Barker (trumpet); Mark Nightingale (trombone); Jimmy Hastings (clarinet and tenor saxophone); Andy Panayi (alto and baritone saxophones); John Horler (piano); Alec Dankworth (bass); and Allan Ganley (drums); plus their special guest Anthony Kerr (vibraphone).

JF20050305

2, 3, 4 - The Art Of Arranging

5/6. John Dankworth looks at how arrangers from Nelson Riddle to Quincy Jones have written for singers and instrumental soloists, including examples of his own work with Dame Cleo Laine, Gerry Mulligan and Dizzy Gillespie.

In the studio, the Dankworth Seven are joined by Jacqui Dankworth. In the band are Guy Barker (trumpet), Mark Nightingale (trombone), Jimmy Hastings (clarinet/tenor saxophone), Andy Panayi (alto and baritone saxophones), John Horler (piano), Alec Dankworth (bass) and Allan Ganley (drums), with special guest Anthony Kerr.

JF20050312

2,3,4 The Art of Arranging

6/6. In the final programme of his six-part series on the arranger's role in jazz, John Dankworth looks at how jazz writing has spread into the world of films and television, and presents his five golden rules for any would-be arranger.

With the Dankworth Seven, he shows how his own theme from the film Saturday Night and Sunday Morning could be rewritten to show a range of emotions.

With him in the studio are Guy Barker (trumpet), Mark Nightingale (trombone), Jimmy Hastings (clarinet/tenor saxophone), Andy Panayi (alto/baritone saxophones), John Horler (piano), Alec Dankworth (bass), and Allan Ganley (drums).

JF20050326

1/3. The Joy of Sax

Courtney Pine explores the history of one of the most recently invented instruments in western music, which was created for the symphony orchestra but found its authentic voice in jazz.

After its invention by Adolphe Sax in the 1840s, the saxophone languished in obscurity until its fortunes were transformed by the genius of Sidney Bechet, Coleman Hawkins and Lester Young.

JF20050402

2/3. The Joy of Sax

Courtney Pine continues to explore the history of one of the most recently invented instruments in Western music, which was created for the symphony orchestra but found its authentic voice in jazz.

With the Bebop revolution, the saxophone emerged as the most important front line instrument in jazz.

JF20050409

The Joy of Sax

3/3. Courtney Pine continues to explore the history of one of the most recently invented instruments in Western music, which was created for the symphony orchestra but found its authentic voice in jazz.

The saxophone was ideally suited to freeform jazz and its fluid stream of consciousness improvising. At the same time by finding itself through jazz it has now firmly established its voice in popular music and culture.

JF20050416

Significant Others: Booker Little

Jez Nelson looks at the life and work of trumpeter Booker Little. Although he was a connoisseur's favourite, his promising career was cut short by a early death.

JF20050430

1/4. Never Let Me Go. The Musical World of Keith Jarrett

Alyn Shipton begins a series of conversations with pianist and composer Keith Jarrett, who celebrates his 60th birthday next month.

In this first programme, Jarrett talks about his current trio, about free improvisation, and about his early career in the 1960s as a member of Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers and the Charles Lloyd Quartet.

JF20050507

2/4. Never Let Me Go. The Musical World of Keith Jarrett

Alyn Shipton continues his series of conversations with pianist Keith Jarrett, who celebrates his 60th birthday tomorrow.

In this second programme, Jarrett talks about his brief stint playing electric keyboards with Miles Davis, his quartet with saxophonist Dewey Redman, and the first of his celebrated solo piano concerts.

JF20050514

The Musical World of Keith Jarrett

3/4. Never Let Me Go

Alyn Shipton continues his series of conversations with pianist Keith Jarrett. In this third programme, Jarrett talks about his European quartet featuring saxophonist Jan Garbarek, his experiments with the church organ, and his first major recitals as a classical performer.

JF20050528

Brilliant Corners: The Story of Riverside Records

John Fordham looks at one of the unsung heroes of modern jazz recording - Riverside Records. In conversation with legendary record producer and label owner Orrin Keepnews, they chart how the label came to record some of the key jazz albums of the fifties and early sixties.

1/3. Keepnews tells how he dealt with the sometimes difficult Thelonious Monk in the studio, signed pianist Bill Evans and recorded one of jazz's first statements on civil rights, Sonny Rollins' Freedom Suite.

Presented by John Fordham.

JF20050604

Brilliant Corners. The Story of Riverside Records

John Fordham looks at one of the unsung heroes of modern jazz recording - Riverside Records. In conversation with legendary record producer and label owner Orrin Keepnews, they chart how the label came to record some of the key jazz albums of the fifties and early sixties.

2/3. Keepnews talks about Cannonball Adderley's first hit record, signing guitarist Wes Montgomery in a late night roadhouse and his experiences with musicians who were addicted to drugs.

JF20050611

Brilliant Corners. The Story of Riverside Records

John Fordham looks at one of the unsung heroes of modern jazz recording Riverside Records. In conversation with legendary record producer and label owner Orrin Keepnews, they chart how the label came to record some of the key jazz albums of the fifties and early sixties.

3/3. Orrin Keepnews talks about pianist Bill Evans' classic series of albums for Riverside, some of the lesser known musicians who were integral to the label and how the label came to an end.

JF20050618

Cooke's Jazz Tour: First of two programmes in which Michael Pointon remembers Alistair Cooke's broadcasts on jazz, featuring Cooke's account of a meeting with Jelly Roll Morton.

JF20050625

Cooke's Jazz Tour: The second of two programmes in which Michael Pointon remembers Alistair Cooke's broadcasts on jazz, featuring a 1945 recording of a Duke Ellington rehearsal.

JF20050702

Art Blakey. Jazz Messenger

In the first of two programmes, Jez Nelson explores the musical journey of drummer and bandleader, Art Blakey. From the 1950s to the 1980s Blakey's band, The Jazz Messengers served as a finishing school, inspiring hundreds of talented young players to carry the flame of modern jazz.

In this first part, we hear how Art Blakey helped bring the drums into the frontline of small band jazz, and in so doing played a key role in the development of Hard Bop.

We also examine the controversial issue of African drums in Blakey's rhythmic conception. How true was Blakey's claim that Africa doesn't have a damn thing to do with jazz?

Contributors include pianist Horace Silver, ex-Messenger John Ramsay, and critic, Ira Gitler.

JF20050709

Art Blakey, Jazz Messenger

Jez Nelson explores the musical journey of drummer and bandleader, Art Blakey. In this final part of the series, Branford Marsalis and Terence Blanchard describe what it was like to be members of what was the premier finishing school for jazz musicians - Blakey's Jazz Messengers.

JF20050716

1/2. Staying On

Michael Pointon presents a two-part series celebrating the South African jazz musicians who turned their backs on the prospect of international fame and plied their trade at home. Featuring rare archive material of South African jazz and jazz-related music, including one piece recorded as early as 1931.

JF20050723

Staying On

Michael Pointon presents a two-part series celebrating the South African jazz musicians who eschewed the prospect of international fame and plied their trade in their home country.

In this programme he considers the fate of jazz under Apartheid and since its demise, and plays some live tracks which are not commercially available.

JF20050730

Rhythm 'n' Jews

A series on the history of Jewish Klezmer music.

1/4. Between Heaven and Earth

Linton Chiswick traces Klezmer's journey from its shtetl origins to America, with the turn-of-the-century Jewish immigrants. US 'race labels' recorded the music as it arrived, providing the rarest and most tantalising glimpse of a pre-Holocaust Jewish Eastern Europe.

JF20050806

Rhythm 'n' Jews. The Hidden Light. 2/4: The series on the history of Jewish Klezmer music looks at the time it arrived in America and encounted jazz.

JF20050813

Rhythm 'n' Jews. The story of Klezmer

3/4. Songs of our Fathers

As the great American melting pot ideal faltered, US citizens of diverse origins went in search of their roots. In California's Bay Area some 1970s Jewish students discovered some old 78 recordings of Klezmer music and began working on piecing the music back together.

The Klezmorim, the Klezmer Conservatory Band in California and Andy Statman and Zev Feldman in New York began rediscovering klezmer, combining academic investigation with hippy anarchism and creativity.

Presented by Linton Chiswick.

JF20050820

Rhythm 'n' Jews. The story of Klezmer

4/4. Jews and the Abstract Truth

Charting the reinvention of Klezmer, one of the world's most lively and evocative folk forms, through its contemporary fusion with soul, punk, rock and jazz. In the US for example, one of the best-selling Klezmer musicians is the African-American jazz clarinetist Don Byron, and this programme examines how such radical fusions reflect and inform global changes in Jewish identity.

Presented by Linton Chiswick.

JF20050827

1/2. A Hundred Years from Today. The Genius of Jack Teagarden

Born 100 years ago this week, Jack Teagarden was the first truly great jazz trombone soloist whose unorthodox technique and astonishing virtuosity quickly established him as a true jazz legend.

In the 1920s Jack played and sang in his lazy Texan drawl with everyone who was anyone: Red Nichols, Benny Goodman, Eddie Condon and Louis Armstrong, before joining Paul Whiteman as the star soloist for five years in the 1930s. Alongside archival interviews with Jack and Charlie Teagarden, Geoffrey Smith is joined by trombonists Roy Williams and Scott Stroman to look at Jack's early work and examine what made up that unique sound.

JF20050903

2/2. A Hundred Years from Today. The Genius of Jack Teagarden

The second programme marking the centenary of one of jazz's true giants, trombonist and singer Jack Teagarden. Following the demise of his own big band in the early 1940s, Jack returned to his preferred style of jazz - small group playing.

After teaming up with Bud Freeman, Rex Stewart and Eddie Condon, Jack joined Louis Armstrong's All Stars and enjoyed several wonderful years with Louis before leaving to lead a succession of small groups with Bobby Hackett, Erroll Garner, Earl 'Fatha' Hines and Don Goldie.

Geoffrey Smith is joined by trombonists Scott Stroman and Roy Williams to look at Jack's later career and at how, despite various setbacks, Jack secured his name as jazz's number one trombonist.

JF20050910

1/4. Arrangers Anonymous

For decades now, arrangers in music have traditionally been undervalued, in many cases underpaid or not even identified, and certainly under appreciated in terms of an understanding of the complexity of what they do. They are the unsung heroes of the music world, all members of Arrangers Anonymous.

In this new series, Russell Davies is joined by arranger/composer/conductors Barry Forgie and Steve Gray, to analyse and deconstruct a collection of outstanding jazz scores, discovering how each arrangement actually works and what was in the mind of the arranger when the piece was conceived. Features Billy May's 1956 arrangement of Say It Isn't So.

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2/4. Arrangers Anonymous

For decades now, arrangers in music have traditionally been undervalued, in many cases underpaid or not even identified, and certainly under-appreciated in terms of an understanding of the complexity of what they do. They are the unsung heroes of the music world, all members of Arrangers Anonymous.

Russell Davies is joined by arranger/composer/conductors Barry Forgie and Steve Gray to analyse a collection of jazz scores, discovering how each arrangement actually works and what was in the mind of the arranger when the piece was conceived.

This programme features Bill Potts' 1959 score of I Got Plenty O' Nuttin from his best known work, The Jazz Soul of Porgy and Bess, an album recorded in 1959.

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3/4. Arrangers Anonymous

For decades now, arrangers in music have traditionally been undervalued - the unsung heroes of the music world, all members of Arrangers Anonymous.

Russell Davies is joined by arranger/composer/conductors Barry Forgie and Steve Gray, to analyse a collection of jazz scores, discovering how each arrangement actually works and what was in the mind of the arranger when the piece was conceived. They feature My Ship - a Kurt Weill melody from the Broadway musical Lady In The Dark - arranged in 1956 by Gil Evans for the Miles Davis album, Miles Ahead.

JF20051001

4/4. Arrangers Anonymous

For decades now, arrangers in music have traditionally been undervalued - the unsung heroes of the music world, all members of Arrangers Anonymous.

Russell Davies is joined by arranger/composer/conductors Barry Forgie and Steve Gray, to analyse a collection of jazz scores, discovering how each arrangement actually works and what was in the mind of the arranger when the piece was conceived. They feature a composition which seems to have survived all changes in fashion and renew itself in any new style that comes along.

King Porter Stomp was originally a piano solo by Jelly Roll Morton, written as early as 1906. It went on to be arranged by Fletcher Henderson for his own orchestra and later Benny Goodman's band - and stomped on to be revived by Gil Evans on his late - Fifties LP New Bottles, Old Wine.

Then Evans revisited it in 1975, for his album There Comes a Time, by which stage Evans' tastes had otherwise moved on to the music of Jimi Hendrix and the like. So this piece from the ragtime era is a remarkable survivor.

JF20051008

When Musical Worlds Collide

1/2. Jazz and Hip Hop

Soweto Kinch, the award-winning saxophonist and rapper, looks at the interaction between jazz and hip hop. Is one a Bohemian, intellectual pursuit, while the other caters for gun-toting misogynists?

With the help of music from performers as varied as Cab Calloway, Slim Gaillard, Stetsasonic, Quasimoto and Oliver Lake, Soweto digs deep into the cross-fertilisation of genres, and plays examples live in the studio - with his quartet, including Femi Temowo (guitar), Neil Charles (bass) and Troy Miller (drums).

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When Musical Worlds Collide: Second of two programmes in which award-winning saxophonist Soweto Kinch looks at the interaction between jazz and hip-hop.

JF20051029

Don Cherry - Old and New Dreams

Marking ten years since his death, Jez Nelson revisits the work of avant-garde leader, mullti-instrumentalist and trumpeter Don Cherry. Renowned as the first great free jazz trumpeter, Cherry's lineage stretches from Louis Armstrong and Chet Baker right up through Freddie Hubbard, Lee Morgan and the moderns like Dave Douglas and Wynton Marsalis.

1/2. Cherry helped pioneer the freeing up of harmony in jazz, alongside saxophonist Ornette Coleman in the late 1950s. Afterwards he collaborated with others including Sonny Rollins and Albert Ayler, before forming his own international quintet.

Featuring rare archive material from Don Cherry, plus vibraphonist Karl Berger and critic Ben Young.

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Don Cherry - Old and New Dreams

Marking ten years since his death, Jez Nelson revisits the work of avant-garde leader, mullti-instrumentalist and trumpeter Don Cherry. Renowned as the first great free jazz trumpeter, Cherry's lineage stretches from Louis Armstrong and Chet Baker right up through Freddie Hubbard, Lee Morgan and the moderns like Dave Douglas and Wynton Marsalis.

2/2. In the mid-60s at the height of the free jazz revolution, Don Cherry opted to go on the road in a VW camper van, travelling through Europe exploring the different folk music traditions and learning the instruments he came across along the way. In the decades which followed, he fused the improvising spirit of jazz with the indigenous music of Brazil, Turkey, India, Morocco, China and Indonesia.

JF20051112

100 Years of Tommy Dorsey

1/2. Alyn Shipton celebrates the centenary of the 'Sentimental Gentleman of Swing'. He is joined by trumpeter Zeke Zarchy and drummer Louie Bellson who look back at their time in the Dorsey band.

Meanwhile, jazz historian John Chilton assesses the trombonist's legacy, and arranger Nelson Riddle discusses the music Dorsey played. Unforgettable hits include Dorsey's great recordings of Marie and Song of India.

JF20051119

100 Years of Tommy Dorsey

2/2. Alyn Shipton concludes his centenary tribute to the great trombonist by looking at how the career of Frank Sinatra was launched from the Dorsey band. Songwriter Sammy Cahn explains the unique chemistry between Dorsey and his young vocalist, and Nelson Riddle recalls writing for the pair of them.

Trumpeter Buddy Childers looks back at some roller-coaster adventures on the road with Dorsey, and there are also contributions from Zeke Zarchy, Louie Bellson and John Chilton.

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2/3. Sketches of Gil

David Sanborn presents the story of one of the most important composers, arrangers and bandleaders in modern jazz, Gil Evans.

This programme focuses on Gil's classic Columbia recordings with Miles Davis: Miles Ahead, Sketches of Spain and Porgy and Bess. Miles' cool solos from these albums have become legendary, but taking a closer look at the score sheet reveals his improvisations weren't always as spontaneous as they sound.

JF20051210

Sketches of Gil

The story of one of the most important composers, arrangers and bandleaders in modern jazz, Gil Evans. A self-taught pianist, Gil helped revolutionise the sound of the big band in the 1940s through his work with the Claude Thornhill orchestra. After a key meeting with Miles Davis, he then masterminded the sessions now known as The Birth of the Cool.

3/3. The focus is on the work Gil did in the early 1970s with his electric big band, achieving his trademark rich soundscape using synths and electric guitars where he'd previously used expanded brass sections.

Presented by saxophonist and Evans collaborator, David Sanborn.

JF20051231

1/2. Nuyorican Swing: Latin Jazz in New York

The first of a new two part series looking at the unique contribution of New York Latinos to jazz music. Far from being a footnote in jazz history, Latin jazz has its own strong musical tradition that continues to the present day.

The first part begins with the father of Latin jazz, Mario Bausa and Dizzy Gillespie's epoch-making collaboration with the Cuban drummer Chano Pozo. Continuing with figures like Tito Puente and Ray Barretto, it looks at how Latin jazz influenced the mainstream of jazz, reawakening appreciation of its African roots.

The programme features archive material from Dizzy Gillespie and exclusive interviews with some of the world's top Latin jazz musicians and experts including the leader of the Lincoln Centre Afro-Latin Jazz orchestra, Arturo O'Farrill, founder of the Fort Apache band Andy Gonzalez and musicologist Rene Lopez.

Also featured is a new and rare interview with revered Latin piano master Eddie Palmieri, celebrating his fiftieth year in music.

JF20060107

2/2. Nuyorican Swing: Latin Jazz in New York

The final part in the series looking at the unique contribution of New York Latinos to jazz music. Far from being a footnote in jazz history, Latin jazz has its own strong musical tradition that continues to the present day.

This second part examines the effect the Cuban revolution had on the Latin music scene in New York, the rise of Salsa and the resurgence of Nuyorican Latin jazz in the late seventies. With contributions from Bobby Sanabria, co-founder of the Fort Apache band Andy Gonzalez and revered latin piano master Eddie Palmieri.

JF20060114

Ronnie Scott's

George Melly explores the history of the world's best known jazz club.

1/4. The origins of Ronnie Scott's legendary club as a place for musicians to play, inspired by the clubs of 52nd Street in Manhattan. Featuring the ground-breaking first appearance of an American soloist Zoot Sims, performing with a British rhythm section.

With recordings made at the club in Gerrard Street by Peter King, Tubby Hayes and Ronnie Scott himself.

JF20060121

Ronnie Scott's

George Melly explores the history of the world's best known jazz club.

2/4. From 1961, Ronnie Scott's was able to attract a glittering line-up of American jazz stars - some of whom, like Ben Webster and Roland Kirk, made recordings at the club. Ronnie's proprietor Pete King recalls the negotiations for these appearances and Stan Tracey describes the demands that celebrated soloists such as Stan Getz made on the house musicians.

JF20060128

Ronnie Scott's

George Melly explores the history of the world's best known jazz club.

3/4. By 1965, the success of Ronnie Scott's forced Ronnie and his partner Pete King to find larger premises. One of those who became a regular at the 'new place' in Frith Street was Princess Margaret, a great admirer of Oscar Peterson.

Another was Kenneth Clarke, a fan of hard bop and Ronnie's comedy routines, though he was less taken by the food served at the club. Among the performers who took the stand were Buddy Rich with his big band, Mike Westbrook, Weather Report and Sarah Vaughan - who made a recording at the club in 1977.

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Ronnie Scott's

George Melly concludes his series on the history of the world's best known jazz club.

4/4. In the words of the club's founder, Ronnie Scott's offers nightly masterclasses in the art of jazz. Two British musicians who attended regularly were trumpeter Guy Barker and pianist Django Bates.

Over the years, the club's fortunes have ebbed and flowed, as the proprietor Pete King reveals, but whether the featured act is Dizzie Gillespie, Irakere or the National Youth Jazz Orchestra, Ronnie's remains a club run by musicians for musicians.

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In the Name of the Fatha - The Great Earl Hines

1/2. Alyn Shipton explores the career of the pianist who revolutionised piano jazz in the 1920s, Earl 'Father' Hines. With archive interviews from Hines himself, and the help of British pianist Martin Litton, Shipton examines Hines' technical innovations. Shipton also sets Hines' eventful life in the vivid context of jazz age Chicago, where Hines worked with Louis Armstrong, was employed by Al Capone, and became a pioneer of acoustic recording.

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2/2. In The Name of the Fatha. The Great Earl Hines

Concluding this brief Jazz File series on Earl 'Father' Hines, Alyn Shipton meets his former sidemen, Jesse Stone, Truck Parham and Franz Jackson, and further explores Hines' keyboard legacy with the help of British pianist Martin Litton.

Hines himself recalls his great days at the Grand Terrace Club in Chicago, the birth of bebop, and his reunion with Louis Armstrong in the globetrotting All Stars.

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Can You Sing Me a Song, the Stan Getz Story

1/4. Helen Mayhew reveals how Stan went from being a child prodigy with Jack Teagarden to the acknowledged poll winner and creator of a new jazz sound in just seven years. In every solo, he and his tenor saxophone sang a song.

Producer Dave Batchelor.

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Can You Sing Me a Song? The Stan Getz Story

2/4. The Fifties was the decade when Stan Getz created a string of great albums with some of the finest jazz performers and, at the same time, wrestled with the demons of drink and drugs, finally fleeing America for the security of Europe. Presented by Helen Mayhew.

Producer Dave Batchelor.

JF20060311

Can You Sing Me a Song? The Stan Getz Story

3/4. If Stan Getz's career has a pinnacle, it's 1961. In that year he recorded Focus, the most challenging and critically acclaimed album of his life. He also had his first encounter with Bossa Nova, the music which turned him into a pop star and gave jazz a new flavour.

Producer Dave Batchelor.

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Can You Sing Me a Song? The Stan Getz Story

Presented by Helen Mayhew.

4/4. After the pop triumph of Bossa Nova, Stan Getz continued to make music his own way, despite flirting with electronic music and a younger sartorial style. His last years saw an increased emotional intensity in his performances, and a general recognition of his status as one of the great jazz musicians.

Producer Dave Batchelor.

JF20060325

Pee Wee's Blues

Michael Pointon marks the centenary of jazz clarinettist Pee Wee Russell's birth.

1/2. From the beginnings to the famous Nicksieland Club years in New York.

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The Joy of Sax

Courtney Pine explores the history of an instrument created for the symphony orchestra, but which found its authentic voice in jazz.

1/3. After its invention by Adolphe Sax in the 1840s, the saxophone languished in obscurity until its fortunes were transformed by the genius of Sidney Bechet, Coleman Hawkins and Lester Young.

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The Joy of Sax

Courtney Pine explores the history of an instrument created for the symphony orchestra, but which found its authentic voice in jazz.

2/3. With the Bebop revolution, the saxophone emerged as the most important front line instrument in jazz.

JF20060422

The Joy of Sax

Courtney Pine explores the history of an instrument created for the symphony orchestra, but which found its authentic voice in jazz.

3/3. The saxophone was ideally suited to freeform jazz and its fluid stream of consciousness improvising. At the same time, by finding itself through jazz, the sax has now firmly established its voice in popular music and culture.

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1/6. Miles Davis at 80

Born 80 years ago this week, trumpeter, composer and musical pioneer Miles Davis remains as one of the most important and influential musicians of the 20th century. In this series first broadcast in 2001, Ian Carr looks at the way Davis continually re-invented himself and his music over his four-decade career.

In the first part, Miles is befriended by fellow trumpeter Clark Terry and, after meeting Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker, moves to New York to play with them. By 1953, Miles has sown his wild oats and is now ready to run his own band.

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Miles Davis at 80

2/6. Ian Carr looks at the years 1954 - 1960, which were tremendously creative for Miles Davis and included the first great quintet with John Coltrane. This group was later expanded to a sextet with Cannonball Adderley producing seminal albums Milestones and Kind of Blue.

In collaboration with composer Gil Evans, Miles created the orchestral masterpieces Miles Ahead, Porgy and Bess and Sketches of Spain.

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Miles Davis at 80

3/6. Ian Carr begins this episode in the early 1960s, with John Coltrane's momentous decision to leave Miles. For his new quintet, Miles assembled a group of gifted young musicians including Herbie Hancock (piano), Ron Carter (bass) and Tony Williams (drums), with George Coleman and then Wayne Shorter on saxophone. Their first album was the forward-looking ESP.

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Miles Davis at 80

4/6. Ian Carr begins this episode in 1969, with the launch of the jazz-rock-fusion movement. For his album In a Silent Way, Miles moved away from acoustic instruments and used three electric keyboards played by Chick Corea, Herbie Hancock and Joe Zawinul, with John McLaughlin's electric guitar. It was a natural progression from this to the controversial Bitches Brew project.

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Miles Davis at 80

5/6. In 1975, chronic illness forced the trumpeter to give up playing for a considerable period. Ian Carr talks to Miles' daughter Cheryl, bassist Dave Holland and to saxophonists Dave Liebman and Bill Evans about this period, and how they helped Miles return to playing in 1981.

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1/2. Let Freedom Ring

Jez Nelson presents a series about the remarkable albums the late jazz saxophonist Jackie McLean recorded for the Blue Note label in the 1960s. The series of classic albums that McLean recorded for Blue Note between 1959 and 1967 (including the landmark LP, Let Freedom Ring) are his crowning achievement, and chart his move from a position as a journeyman to a key creator of the modern sound of jazz.

The programme is based around a series of candid interviews Jez Nelson conducted with McLean over the last few years, and also includes specially-recorded contributions from other well-known musicians associated with McLean, including vibraphone legend Bobby Hutcherson.

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2/2. Let Freedom Ring

Jez Nelson presents a series about the remarkable albums the late jazz saxophonist Jackie McLean recorded for the Blue Note label in the 1960s. The series of classic albums that McLean recorded for Blue Note between 1959 and 1967 (including the landmark LP, Let Freedom Ring) are his crowning achievement, and chart his move from a position as a journeyman to a key creator of the modern sound of jazz.

Jez focuses on McLean's golden era on Blue Note, including the landmark LPs One Step Beyond and Destination Out, and considers why McLean felt compelled to push his playing towards a higher level of expression.

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2/4. Chanson Irresponsable. The Music of Mike and Kate Westbrook

Linton Chiswick continues his exploration of the music of Mike and Kate Westbrook. In this programme, the focus is on their trio with virtuoso saxophonist Chris Biscoe, their ground breaking Dance Band, and the monumental 1988 recording, London Bridge is Broken Down.

Featuring a large ensemble drawn from both classical and jazz worlds, London Bridge marked the Westbrooks' second foray into European literature, as they addressed the horror of two world wars in Europe, the social upheaval of Thatcherism and the pre - Glasnost atmosphere of Eastern Europe.

With contributions from Mike and Kate Westbrook, Art Lange, Paul Nieman, Chris Biscoe and others.

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3/4. Chanson Irresponsable

The Music of Mike and Kate Westbrook

Writer Linton Chiswick looks at the Westbrooks' take on the work of William Blake, Rossini, Shakespeare and The Beatles. The worlds of jazz, classical, popular music and literature all collide to produce compelling and unique music from one of the UK's most creative partnerships.

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4/4. Chanson Irresponsable. The Music of Mike and Kate Westbrook

The series ends by bringing the Westbrooks' music up to date with an account of the origins of their recent BBC commission - a 90 minute song cycle combining contemporary classical, operatic and state of the art jazz. Plus other current works such as the music theatre piece Platterback, Kate Westbrook's new recording Cuff Clout, and a new trio piece recorded exclusively for this show.

JF20060819

Jazz Singers - Jazz Pianists?

1/4. Nat King Cole

Brian Priestley presents the first in a series highlighting the piano work of jazz artists who are better known as singers. He explores the recordings of Nat King Cole, whose success in the mainstream has sometimes obscured his innovations as a pianist and improviser.

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Jazz Singers - Jazz Pianists?

2/4. Jay McShann

Brian Priestley continues a series highlighting the piano work of jazz artists who are better known as singers. He makes the case for Kansas City hero Jay McShann, a master rhythm pianist whose band launched the career of saxophonist Charlie Parker.

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Jazz Singers - Jazz Pianists?

3/4. Ray Charles

Brian Priestley continues a series highlighting the piano work of jazz artists who are better known as singers. He unearths some hidden gems from the late Ray Charles, whose instrumental ability was central to his achievements as a popular singer.

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Jazz Singers - Jazz Pianists?

4/4. Mose Allison

Brian Priestley continues a series highlighting the piano work of jazz artists who are better known as singers. The focus is on Mose Allison, whose distinctive

piano style draws on bebop and Delta blues.

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1/3. Carla Bley

American composer and musician Carla Bley has been one of the most distinctive voices in jazz through the second half of the 20th Century and now into the 21st. For 40 years, her music has moved through different styles and different ensembles - from duos to big band, from free jazz in the 60s to her unique blend of improvisation and composition.

She talks to John Fordham, who is joined during the series by her musical friends and colleagues John Cumming, Andy Sheppard, Steve Swallow and Lew Soloff.

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2/3. Carla Bley

John Fordham continues his journey through the music of leading American jazz composer and pianist Carla Bley. The focus moves away from her early work in the 60s and 70s to her chamber jazz duos with double bass player Steve Swallow and the formation of her Big Band.

Soloists Andy Sheppard (saxophone) and Lew Soloff (trumpet) also talk about their work with Carla Bley.

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3/3. Carla Bley

John Fordham concludes his journey through the music of leading American jazz composer and pianist Carla Bley. He talks to Carla about her smaller scale compositions for Trio and Quartet as well as her commitment to touring with the Carla Bley Big Band. With contributions from soloists Andy Sheppard, Steve Swallow and Lew Soloff.

JF20061007

The Joe Harriott Story

1/2. Featuring the musical career of Jamaican-born alto saxophonist Harriott, who pioneered free jazz in Britain in the late 1950s. Soweto Kinch is passionate about Joe and his music, and he sets out to talk to many of Joe's fellow musicians, including Tony Kinsey, Michael Garrick, Coleridge Goode and Chris Barber; Harriott's biographer Alan Robertson; and bandleader Gary Crosby.

JF20061014

The Joe Harriott Story

2/2. Soweto Kinch profiles the Jamaican-born alto saxophonist who pioneered free jazz in Britain in the late 1950s.

Contributors include Tony Kinsey, Michael Garrick, Coleridge Goode, Chris Barber, biographer Alan Robertson and bandleader Gary Crosby.

JF20061021

Black British Swing

1/3. Michael Pointon three programmes about the little-known tradition of black and mixed British swing bands that prospered from as early as 1917 through to the 1950s.

This first programme recalls some of the early stars on the British scene, including Jamaican pianist Dan Kildare, Leslie Thompson and Dave Wilkins. With contributions from Andy Simons, author of a study of the subject.

JF20061028

Black British Swing

Michael Pointon presents tthree programmes about the little-known tradition of black and mixed British swing bands that prospered from as early as 1917 through to the 1950s.

2/3

This programme recalls the network of after-hours clubs that developed in the 1930s, where bandleaders like Ken 'snake hips' Johnson plied their trade. Johnson moved upmarket to a residency at London's Cafe de Paris, where he was killed on stage by a direct hit from a German bomb in 1941.

JF20061104

Black British Swing

3/3. Michael Pointon three programmes about the little-known tradition of black and mixed British swing bands that prospered from as early as 1917 through to the 1950s.

The BBC Radio Rhythm Club provided broadcasting opportunities for integrated groups during the War. After 1945, Leslie Jiver Hutchinson emerged as the leading UK-based black musician in the swing idiom.

But its days were numbered and it petered out with the downsized version of the genre represented by the Ray Ellington Quartet.

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1/2. Guy Barker explores the love affair between the stage and jazz. Starting in the world of ballet and dance, he traces the story from the early ballets of Milhaud and Ravel to the production musicals of Gershwin and Bernstein, and then into the world of contemporary dance.

Guy is joined by choreographer Siobhan Davies, composer Colin Towns and saxophonist Alan Skidmore as well as members of the original cast of Bubbling Brown Sugar and Ain't Misbehavin.

JF20061118

2/2. Completing his look at the love affair between jazz and the theatre, Guy Barker is joined by Eddie Izzard, star of the West End show Lennie, to discuss what improvising jazz musicians and stand up comedians have in common.

Guy also explores the stage compositions of Duke Ellington, Miles Davis and Gil Evans, as well as setting the stage for his own theatrical composition dZf, which premieres at the London Jazz Festival.

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1/4. Arrangers Anonymous

Russell Davies presents the first of a four-part series in which analyses and deconstructs a selection of outstanding jazz scores, discovering how each arrangement actually works and what was in the mind of the arranger when the piece was conceived. He is joined by Barry Forgie and Steve Gray.

This programme explores Bill Holman's score of I'm Old Fashioned, arranged as a feature for trombonist Mark Nightingale.

JF20061202

2/4. Arrangers Anonymous

Russell Davies presents the first of a four-part series in which analyses and deconstructs a selection of outstanding jazz scores, discovering how each arrangement actually works and what was in the mind of the arranger when the piece was conceived. He is joined by Barry Forgie and Steve Gray.

This programme explores three numbers from the suite Such Sweet Thunder, by Duke Ellington and Billy Strayhorn.

JF20061216

3/4. Arrangers Anonymous

Russell Davies presents a series which analyses and deconstructs a selection of outstanding jazz scores, discovering how each arrangement actually works and what was in the mind of the arranger when the piece was conceived.

JF20061230

4/4. Russell Davies is joined Barry Forgie and Steve Gray to analyse and deconstruct a collection of outstanding jazz scores, discovering how each arrangement actually works and what was in the mind of the arranger when the piece was conceived.

They focus on The Continental, an arrangement by Bill Finegan for the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra of 1949.

JF20070106

1/3. Swing City

Miles Kington presents a series from Kansas City, the centre of a unique jazz style for nearly 30 years. Great artists such as Count Basie and Jay McShann were instrumental in creating a driving, riffing style of music that has continued to influence musicians all over the world.

Miles visits the Jazz Archive at the University of Missouri to talk to its director Chuck Haddix.

JF20070113

Swing City

Miles Kington presents a series from Kansas City, the centre of a unique jazz style for nearly thirty years.

2/3. He visits the famous 18th and Vine crossroads in the heart of the old African American jazz quarter. On the way to meet Jay McShann, the grand old man of the big bands, he stops off for a spot of barbecue and ends the day by the graveside of one of the greatest of all Kansas City jazzmen, saxophone legend Charlie Parker.

JF20070120

Swing City

Miles Kington presents a series from Kansas City, the centre of a unique jazz style for nearly 30 years.

3/3. He visits the Mutual Musicians Foundation and talks to Lucky Wesley from the Scamps and Myra Taylor, the former singer with the Harlan Leonard Rockets who has been performing jazz for 70 years. Miles also meets a city councillor to talk about the redevelopment of the Jazz Quarter.

JF20070127

1/2. The Caribbean Connection

Soweto Kinch explores the relationship between jazz in the West Indies and today's generation of Anglo-Caribbean players. Several major figures in West Indian music had a huge effect on jazz in Britain, from Jamaican saxophonist Joe Harriott to guitarist Ernest Ranglin, who, like his compatriot Monty Alexander, was a major influence in shaping the sounds of ska and reggae. Contributors include Harry Beckett, Bammi Rose and Frank Holder

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2/2. The Caribbean Connection

Soweto Kinch explores the relationship between jazz in the West Indies and today's generation of Anglo-Caribbean players. He traces the story of the musical heirs of Joe Harriott and Harold McNair, in particular the Jazz Warriors. He hears from Courtney Pine, Bammi Rose, Gary Crosby and Jason Yarde about the renaissance in Anglo-Caribbean jazz and looks at how Tomorrow's Warriors and Jazz Jamaica grew out of the active London jazz scene of the 1980s.

JF20070217

It Don't Mean a Thing (1/2). Russell Davies examines the history of gay jazz. He talks to some modern players whose honesty transcends their personal and musical lives.

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It Don't Mean a Thing (2/2). Russell Davies examines the history of gay jazz. He talks to some modern players whose honesty transcends their personal and musical lives.

JF20070303

Grand Union Orchestra: In conversation with founder and director Tony Haynes, Alyn Shipton explores the work of this innovative and cross-cultural group of musicians, now in its 25th year. Contributors include trumpeter Claude Deppa and sitar player Baluji Shrivastav.

JF20070317

The Shape of Jazz Today

The programme seeks answers to some of modern jazz's most perplexing questions, ones that animate jazz fans in clubs the world over. What is the state of jazz music today? Where are its top practitioners heading, musically and philosophically? And - perhaps most importantly - are they getting it right? Each week, Jez Nelson introduces one heavyweight jazz thinker, and invites them to put forth their expert - and often controversial - opinions on such matters, elucidating a unique perspective on the shape of jazz today.

1/3. British jazz critic and author Stuart Nicholson explores jazz as a global phenomenon. He argues that although the music was born in America, it has since been taken up by players all around the world. They have infused it with their own local musical traditions to create jazz that is arguably more exciting than the more conservative music played by traditionalists in America.

JF20070324

The Shape of Jazz Today

2/3. The programme seeks to answer some of modern jazz's most perplexing questions, ones that animate jazz fans in clubs the world over. What is the state of jazz music today? Where are its top practitioners heading, musically and philosophically? And, perhaps most importantly, are they getting it right? Each week Jez Nelson introduces one heavyweight jazz thinker and invites them to put forth their expert, and often controversial, opinions on such matters, elucidating a unique perspective on the shape of jazz today.

Gary Giddins, a regular columnist for the New York weekly Village Voice and author of Visions of Jazz, discusses how New York's 'loft scene' of the 1970s marked the end of the 'linear' history of jazz and ushered in a new era dominated by post-modernist eclecticism, a transition which Giddins belives ensured America remained the global centre for jazz innovation.

JF20070331

The Shape of Jazz Today

The programme seeks answers to some of modern jazz's most perplexing questions, ones that animate jazz fans in clubs the world over. What is the state of jazz music today? Where are its top practitioners heading, musically and philosophically? And - perhaps most importantly - are they getting it right? Each week, Jez Nelson introduces one heavyweight jazz thinker, and invites them to put forth their expert - and often controversial - opinions on such matters, elucidating a unique perspective on the shape of jazz today.

3/3. Expect to hear forthright views from the likes of Stanley Crouch, Stuart Nicholson and Greg Tate.

JF20070407

Kings of Swing

Linton Chiswick presents a new three-part series examining the music and careers of two giants of the swing era: clarinetists and bandleaders Benny Goodman and Artie Shaw.

Dubbed the 'King of Swing' and the 'King of Clarinet' respectively, Goodman and Shaw played down their rivalry, suggesting they were two very different musicians seeking very different results. A close look at their recordings and careers, however, reveals musicians astonishingly similar in background and aspiration. Linton tells the story of a fascinating musical rivalry threaded through radio orchestras, powerhouse big bands, innovative small bands, the first racially integrated line-ups in American music and a jazz scene unprecedented in its popularity and commercialism.

1/3. When Artie Shaw knocked the Benny Goodman Orchestra off the number one spot in the annual Downbeat poll in 1939 by 47 votes, to Shaw's fans, it was the ushering in of a new era. Their man had finally deposed The King of Swing and validated their devotion. But by November, Shaw had left for Mexico, he'd had enough of the chaos, of the fans, of the band. Featuring rarely heard archive interviews with Goodman and Shaw as well as contributions from many of their friends and colleagues.

JF20070414

Kings of Swing

Linton Chiswick presents a series examining the music and careers of two giants of the swing era: clarinetists and bandleaders Benny Goodman and Artie Shaw. Dubbed the King of Swing and the King of Clarinet respectively, Goodman and Shaw played down their rivalry, suggesting they were two very different musicians seeking very different results. But a close look at their recordings and careers reveals musicians astonishingly similar in background and aspiration. Linton tells the story of a fascinating musical rivalry threaded through radio orchestras, powerhouse big bands, innovative small bands, the first racially integrated line-ups in American music and a jazz scene unprecedented in its popularity and commercialism.

2/3. Linton takes a closer look at some of Goodman and Shaw's key big band recordings. And two of the world's greatest clarinetists, Dick Johnson and Ken Peplowski, bring their instruments into the studio to help Linton discuss and deconstruct the two musicians' style and techniques.

JF20070421

Kings of Swing

Linton Chiswick presents a new three-part series examining the music and careers of two giants of the swing era: clarinetists and bandleaders Benny Goodman and Artie Shaw.

Dubbed the 'King of Swing' and the 'King of Clarinet' respectively, Goodman and Shaw played down their rivalry, suggesting they were two very different musicians seeking very different results. A close look at their recordings and careers, however, reveals musicians astonishingly similar in background and aspiration.

Linton tells the story of a fascinating musical rivalry threaded through radio orchestras, powerhouse big bands, innovative small bands, the first racially integrated line-ups in American music and a jazz scene unprecedented in its popularity and commercialism.

3/3. We focus on Goodman and Shaw's highly innovative small group recordings, which, enlivened by their rivalry, pushed swing to its outer limits and laid the foundations for bebop. Linton also examines how both musicians expressed their tenacity by risking their careers to employ and feature black musicians when a rigid colour barrier was still the norm.

JF20070428

Concerts that Changed Jazz

John Fordham presents a guide to jazz performances that had a significance outside jazz, and signalled a change, a beginning or an end of a movement or era.

1/4. From Spiritual to Swing

In 1938 at the Carnegie Hall, John Hammond presented the first jazz concert given in a prestigious concert venue and that was recorded, thus moving the music out of the speakeasy and blazing a trail for the Jazz at the Phil and Ellington Carnegie Hall concerts. It was the first to acknowledge the importance of the black history of jazz and one of the first to flaunt black and white performers on the same stage, at that time a very radical move.

JF20070505

Concerts That Changed Jazz

John Fordham presents a guide to jazz performances that had a significance outside jazz, and signalled a change, a beginning or an end of a movement or era.

2/4. Jazz at the Philharmonic started in 1944 at the LA Philharmonic Hall and by the end of World War II had become a significant presence on the American jazz scene, reflecting founder Norman Granz's enthusiasm for jam sessions and small band swing.

But a session in 1946 was the first to feature new boppers such as Charlie Parker, whose fiery performance of Lady Be Good, a song Lester Young had made his own, was so radically powerful that none of the swing generation musicians would follow him onstage. It was the point at which the jazz mantle was publicly, and embarrassingly, handed on to a new generation.

JF20070512

Concerts That Changed Jazz

John Fordham presents a guide to four jazz performances that had a significance outside jazz, and signalled a change, a beginning or an end of a movement or era.

3/4. Miles at the Isle of Wight

Miles Davis was already making the transition to jazz rock, but the 1970 Isle of Wight Rock Festival was the first time he appeared alongside the big names of rock, such as Jimi Hendrix, The Doors and Joan Baez. He delivered an electrifying set that firmly established him and his new image as a major attraction on the international rock circuit.

JF20070519

Concerts That Changed Jazz

John Fordham presents a guide to four jazz performances that had a significance outside jazz, and signalled a change, a beginning or an end of a movement or era.

4/4. Keith Jarrett: The Koln Concert

Keith Jarrett had been at the heart of the Miles Davis jazz rock revolution but his performance on a substandard piano was to transform the direction of jazz and the fortunes of the tiny record label ECM, making not only acoustic but chamber jazz an acceptable route for improvising musicians. Like Miles Davis's Kind of Blue, the record became a classic that appealed to an audience outside the jazz constituency.