James And The Giant Tree House

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0120100906

Like many small boys James Aldred loved climbing trees.

Today, he stills loves climbing trees, but as a professional, helping scientists and wildlife filming crews into the canopy to study and film the wildlife here.

As well as climbing trees, he loves building tree houses.

When he isn't climbing trees, he's dreaming about them and scribbling designs for tree houses on scraps of paper or the back of cereal boxes.

So, when he received a phone call inviting him to build a tree house which would be large enough to accommodate at least 4 people for over a month whilst they filmed Red-capped Mangabey monkeys in the forests of Gabon in Central West Africa, he didn't hesitate in accepting the challenge.

This is the story of what happened; a terrific Boy's Own Adventure high above the ground in the forest canopy!

The first challenge was to find a suitable tree.

After several days searching in an area called Petit Luango, James finally finds a suitable tree.

With microphones attached to his helmets, he uses ropes to climb up into the canopy to get a better look at the tree.

Before he reaches the top though, he is attacked by a swarm of aggressive honey bees.

High above the forest floor, he has to stay calm and transfer onto his abseil ropes, whilst receiving some 60 or more bee stings.

Fortunately he makes it safely back down to the ground.

But once back in camp, his entire face and head swell up like a football.

Shaken but not deterred, James is determined to continue his search for a suitable tree and build the giant treehouse!

James Aldred builds a giant tree house in the rainforest in Gabon in Central West Africa.

0220100907

Like many small boys James Aldred loved climbing trees.

Today, as a professional tree climber, he helps scientists and wildlife film crews up into the canopy to study and film the wildlife there.

As well as climbing trees, James loves building tree houses in them.

And when he isn't climbing trees, he's dreaming about them and scribbling designs for tree houses on scraps of paper or the back of cereal boxes.

So, when he received a phone call inviting him to build a tree house which would be large enough to accommodate at least 4 people for over a month whilst they filmed Red-capped Mangabey monkeys in the forests of Gabon in Central West Africa, he didn't hesitate in accepting the challenge.

This is the story of what happened; a terrific Boy's Own Adventure high above the ground in the forest canopy!

The first challenge was to find a suitable tree.

After several days searching in an area called Petit Luango, James finally finds a suitable tree.

With microphones attached to his helmets, he climbs up into the canopy to get a better look at the tree.

As he approaches the top, he is suddenly attacked by a swarm of aggressive honey bees.

High above the forest floor, he has to stay calm and transfer onto his abseil ropes, whilst receiving some 60 or more bee stings.

Back in camp, his entire face and head swells up like a football.

He's probably lucky to be alive.

Shaken but not deterred, James is determined to continue his search for a suitable tree and build the giant tree house!

But things don't get much easier when James and Nick are chased by one large and very fast bull elephant!

James and Nick are chased by a large and very fast bull elephant.

0320100908

Like many small boys James Aldred loved climbing trees.

Today, he stills loves climbing trees, but as a professional, helping scientists and wildlife filming crews into the canopy to study and film the wildlife here.

As well as climbing trees, he loves building tree houses.

When he isn't climbing trees, he's dreaming about them and scribbling designs for tree houses on scraps of paper or the back of cereal boxes.

So, when he received a phone call inviting him to build a tree house which would be large enough to accommodate at least 4 people for over a month whilst they filmed Red-capped Mangabey monkeys in the forests of Gabon in Central West Africa, he didn't hesitate in accepting the challenge.

This is the story of what happened; a terrific Boy's Own Adventure high above the ground in the forest canopy!

Having overcome lots of problems in the first weeks of work, including angry honey bees and a stampeding elephant - they are faced with a new one; A dead tree is leaning against their tree house tree, and the only way to remove is, it to take down a live tree as well.

As they are working in an area of conservation they have to seek consul and advice before they can proceed.

More problems follow: their chainsaw and drill both prove temperamental, and then when their boat runs out of fuel and they try to get some more, they discover the fuel station has also run dry!

A dead tree causes problems as James Aldred tries to build a giant tree house.

0420100909

Like many small boys James Aldred loved climbing trees.

Today, he stills loves climbing trees, but as a professional, helping scientists and wildlife filming crews into the canopy to study and film the wildlife here.

As well as climbing trees, he loves building tree houses.

When he isn't climbing trees, he's dreaming about them and scribbling designs for tree houses on scraps of paper or the back of cereal boxes.

So, when he received a phone call inviting him to build a tree house which would be large enough to accommodate at least 4 people for over a month whilst they filmed Red-capped Mangabey monkeys in the forests of Gabon in Central West Africa, he didn't hesitate in accepting the challenge.

This is the story of what happened; a terrific Boy's Own Adventure high above the ground in the forest canopy!

James, his friend Nick Dunbar and their team face numeorus problems and delays during the construction, but they keep going.

Now, with time running out, James, Nick and the team work furiously to get the tree house completed on time.

This means early starts and long days.

Everyone is getting tired, and as James and Nick swing in mid-air on their ropes hauling up and manipulating heavy timbers between them, below in the lagoon a crocodile launches out of the water after prey.

This is not the time for making mistakes!

James Aldred and friends work furiously to finish their rainforest tree house on time.

05 LAST20100910

Like many small boys James Aldred loved climbing trees.

Today, he stills loves climbing trees, but as a professional, helping scientists and wildlife filming crews into the canopy to study and film the wildlife here.

As well as climbing trees, he loves building tree houses.

When he isn't climbing trees, he's dreaming about them and scribbling designs for tree houses on scraps of paper or the back of cereal boxes.

So, when he received a phone call inviting him to build a tree house which would be large enough to accommodate at least 4 people for over a month whilst they filmed Red-capped Mangabey monkeys in the forests of Gabon in Central West Africa, he didn't hesitate in accepting the challenge.

This is the story of what happened; a terrific Boy's Own Adventure high above the ground in the forest canopy!

After a catalogue of disasters, delays, excitements and unique experiences, the last day arrives.

After a mammoth effort by everyone involved, work on the tree house is finally finished.

Their first visitor is one of the scientists (Richard Ibessa) who is studying the Red-capped Mangabey monkeys in this area.

He tells James and Nick that the monkeys have changed their daily routines and begin each morning with a visit to the tree house! James and Nick are sure that as soon as they move out, the monkeys will move in.

After all, the tree house could make the perfect luxury nest; complete with a roof! There's just one last ceremony before James and Nick leave the rainforest, involving a whistle, a pair of dancing feet and some reflective thoughts.

Having faced endless problems, James and his team finally complete the tree house.