It'll Never Last 70 Years Of British Television

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Episodes

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0101A Lovely Piece Of Furniture20010227

Alan Whicker presents a six-part series tracing the evolution of television.

1: A Lovely Piece of Furniture.

This edition examines how in the 1930s and 1940s new ground was broken every day by the pioneering engineers and programme-makers at Ally Pally.

0102The 1950s - Coming To You Live20010306

Alan Whicker presents a six-part series tracing the evolution of television. 2: The 1950s - Coming to You Live. After the 1953 Coronation, the number of TV licences had doubled, and by the end of the decade the new medium was delivering entertainment, news, sport and information to the masses. With Sue Cook

0103The 60s - And Now In Colour20010313

Alan Whicker presents a six-part series tracing the evolution of television. 3: The 60s - and Now in Colour. This edition looks back at the great wealth of much-loved and innovative programmes from a colourful decade. Featuring a look at why Harold Wilson persuaded the Director General to move `Steptoe and Son', and how the Clangers were banned for swearing. With Sue Cook

0104The Big Show Hits The Small Screen20010320

Alan Whicker presents a six-part series tracing the evolution of television. 4: The Big Show Hits the Small Screen. In this edition, how the 70s saw the rise and rise of the situation comedy, with massive hits like `The Good Life', `Dad's Army' and `Porridge'.

0105And Then There Were Four20010327

Alan Whicker presents a six-part series tracing the evolution of television. 5: And Then there Were Four. This edition charts the turbulent times for television in the 80s, looking back at the launch of Channel 4, as well as programme highlights like `Brideshead Revisited' and `Only Fools and Horses'. And Sue Cook reports from her former beat on `Crimewatch'.

0106 LASTMulti-choice And Multi-channel20010403

Alan Whicker presents a six-part series tracing the evolution of television. 6: Multi-choice and multi-channel. This final edition asks whether, with more choice, are viewers getting a better deal, or is television as we know it in terminal decline?