Intruder In The Dust

Episodes

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Broadcast
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19980811

To mark the centenary of the birth of the great American writer William Faulkner, Diane Roberts travels to the heart of Mississippi to investigate the man and his work.

When Faulkner became a Nobel laureate in 1949, he was simultaneously a outcast and a hero to the American Deep South.

His greatest novels preyed upon the innermost values of a white society that still believed in its own supremacy.

His family disowned him, yet his stance on race was ambivalent, even reactionary.

Including interviews with Faulkner's nephew, with the writer Fred D'Aguiar, and with Prof Henry Louis Gates.

19980811

To mark the centenary of the birth of the great American writer William Faulkner, Diane Roberts travels to the heart of Mississippi to investigate the man and his work.

When Faulkner became a Nobel laureate in 1949, he was simultaneously a outcast and a hero to the American Deep South.

His greatest novels preyed upon the innermost values of a white society that still believed in its own supremacy.

His family disowned him, yet his stance on race was ambivalent, even reactionary.

Including interviews with Faulkner's nephew, with the writer Fred D'Aguiar, and with Prof Henry Louis Gates.

The Sound And The Fury19970921

When William Faulkner became a Nobel laureate in 1949, he was both an outcast and a hero to the American Deep South.

His greatest novels - `The Sound and the Fury', `Intruder in the Dust' and `Absalom, Absalom' - preyed upon the innermost values of a white society that still believed in its own supremacy.

His family disowned him, yet his stance on race was ambivalent, even reactionary.

In the centenary year of his birth, Diane Roberts travels to the heart of Mississippi to investigate this man of contradiction.

She talks to his nephew, to the writer Fred D'Aguiar, and to Professor Henry Louis Gates about Faulkner and his literary legacy.

The Sound And The Fury19970921

When William Faulkner became a Nobel laureate in 1949, he was both an outcast and a hero to the American Deep South.

His greatest novels - `The Sound and the Fury', `Intruder in the Dust' and `Absalom, Absalom' - preyed upon the innermost values of a white society that still believed in its own supremacy.

His family disowned him, yet his stance on race was ambivalent, even reactionary.

In the centenary year of his birth, Diane Roberts travels to the heart of Mississippi to investigate this man of contradiction.

She talks to his nephew, to the writer Fred D'Aguiar, and to Professor Henry Louis Gates about Faulkner and his literary legacy.