In Doubt We Trust

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01

0120110306

Are we fooled into thinking we know it all? Has the immediacy of information and knowledge created an illusion that we have all the answers and therefore don't want or feel the need to challenge or doubt our actions and the world around us?

Mark Vernon came face to face with these issues having studied physics, become ordained in the Church of England and then lost his faith.

In this two part series he examines how our lust for certainty has affected our ability to ask questions and to doubt.

He will look at how our attitudes to doubt and certainty have shaped the way we live and created an illusion that we can have certainty in our lives and how this has detrimentally coloured our attitudes towards politics, the financial world and religion.

But could it be that the worlds of science, religion and philosophy which appear today to be in opposition to one another have one fundamental aspect in common - the ability to doubt well? Mark Vernon looks at what they can teach us about the art of doubting and how the ability to doubt and question well can help us to be more fully human.

Producers: Amanda Hancox and Rosie Dawson.

Mark Vernon asks whether we have lost our ability to doubt well.

0120110306

Are we fooled into thinking we know it all? Has the immediacy of information and knowledge created an illusion that we have all the answers and therefore don't want or feel the need to challenge or doubt our actions and the world around us?

Mark Vernon came face to face with these issues having studied physics, become ordained in the Church of England and then lost his faith.

In this two part series he examines how our lust for certainty has affected our ability to ask questions and to doubt.

He will look at how our attitudes to doubt and certainty have shaped the way we live and created an illusion that we can have certainty in our lives and how this has detrimentally coloured our attitudes towards politics, the financial world and religion.

But could it be that the worlds of science, religion and philosophy which appear today to be in opposition to one another have one fundamental aspect in common - the ability to doubt well? Mark Vernon looks at what they can teach us about the art of doubting and how the ability to doubt and question well can help us to be more fully human.

Producers: Amanda Hancox and Rosie Dawson.

Mark Vernon asks whether we have lost our ability to doubt well.

0120110306

Are we fooled into thinking we know it all? Has the immediacy of information and knowledge created an illusion that we have all the answers and therefore don't want or feel the need to challenge or doubt our actions and the world around us?

Mark Vernon came face to face with these issues having studied physics, become ordained in the Church of England and then lost his faith. In this two part series he examines how our lust for certainty has affected our ability to ask questions and to doubt. He will look at how our attitudes to doubt and certainty have shaped the way we live and created an illusion that we can have certainty in our lives and how this has detrimentally coloured our attitudes towards politics, the financial world and religion. But could it be that the worlds of science, religion and philosophy which appear today to be in opposition to one another have one fundamental aspect in common - the ability to doubt well? Mark Vernon looks at what they can teach us about the art of doubting and how the ability to doubt and question well can help us to be more fully human.

Producers: Amanda Hancox and Rosie Dawson.

Mark Vernon asks whether we have lost our ability to doubt well.

02 LAST20110313

"We take things very personally at the moment. People get very disturbed and angry when their certainties about themselves and their world are questioned." So says the philosopher Angie Hobbs. But why? In this programme the writer Mark Vernon, who himself had a crisis of faith, looks at our attitudes towards doubt and certainty.

In conversations with David Jenkins, the former Bishop of Durham, Karen Armstrong, Ann Widdecombe and a variety of scientists and philosophers, he explores the art of doubting and our the ability to question well. He discovers that if we can master this art, it can help us to flourish and become more fully human.

Producers: Amanda Hancox and Rosie Dawson.

Mark Vernon asks whether we have lost our ability to doubt well.

02 LAST20110313

"We take things very personally at the moment.

People get very disturbed and angry when their certainties about themselves and their world are questioned." So says the philosopher Angie Hobbs.

But why? In this programme the writer Mark Vernon, who himself had a crisis of faith, looks at our attitudes towards doubt and certainty.

In conversations with David Jenkins, the former Bishop of Durham, Karen Armstrong, Ann Widdecombe and a variety of scientists and philosophers, he explores the art of doubting and our the ability to question well.

He discovers that if we can master this art, it can help us to flourish and become more fully human.

Producers: Amanda Hancox and Rosie Dawson.

Mark Vernon asks whether we have lost our ability to doubt well.

02 LAST20110313

"We take things very personally at the moment.

People get very disturbed and angry when their certainties about themselves and their world are questioned." So says the philosopher Angie Hobbs.

But why? In this programme the writer Mark Vernon, who himself had a crisis of faith, looks at our attitudes towards doubt and certainty.

In conversations with David Jenkins, the former Bishop of Durham, Karen Armstrong, Ann Widdecombe and a variety of scientists and philosophers, he explores the art of doubting and our the ability to question well.

He discovers that if we can master this art, it can help us to flourish and become more fully human.

Producers: Amanda Hancox and Rosie Dawson.

Mark Vernon asks whether we have lost our ability to doubt well.