In Business

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2003051520030518

Despite the potential, Turkey's economy is on the verge of chaos.

Peter Day looks at how to conduct business in a country with ties to the EU and the Middle East.

2005051220050515

The Spanish economy has been booming and flexing its muscle internationally.

But now it faces the growing threat of competition from all sides.

Presenter Peter Day travels from Madrid to Barcelona to see how Spain is confronting that challenge, including how the city of Zaragoza is trying to turn CHINA's manufacturing prowess to its own advantage.

2006060820060611

The computer guru James Martin has made the biggest donation to a British university: £60 million for Oxford to fund a new school designed to tackle the big new problems of the 21st Century.

He tells Peter Day what's behind this significant slice of philanthropy, and why he believes it's so important to think hard about the way technology is changing our world.

2006062920060702

Peter Day goes behind the headlines to look at the long-running battle that has been going on between the world's two giant airplane manufacturers, Airbus and Boeing.

In Business reports on the dogfight in the global aircraft industry as the European group Airbus seems to be on its knees.

There are reports of rows between French and German owners, production difficulties and delays to the double-decker super jumbo A380, which has been failing to win long hoped-for orders for what the makers insisted was a new way of flying.

Instead, Boeing has grabbed the attention of the industry with the success of it yet-to-fly 787, called the Dreamliner.

Only two significant players remain in the industry that shaped the 20th century more than almost any other.

What's gone wrong and why? Using material gathered for programmes made over over the past five years, Peter Day examines the great battle of the skies.

2006102620061029

The rise of a new army of investors is changing the way high finance works.

Companies are finding that their destinies are being shaped by secretive and powerful hedge funds.

Is big business getting ever riskier - and does it matter? Peter Day investigates.

20070520
2007092020070923

Peter Day examines bubbles and bursts in the financial industry, their causes and why they always take the public by surprise.

*2008122820090101

Corporate change expert John Kao shows how jazz improvision can help companies innovate.

John Kao, one of the world's leading experts on corporate change, shows Peter Day how jazz improvision can help companies learn how to innovate.

*2009010820090111

Business models that challenge conventional wisdom about charging for goods and services.

Peter Day hears from two advocates of business models that challenge the conventional wisdom about charging for goods and services.

* Adventure Capitalist2008050820080511

Peter Day talks to Welsh-born Michael Moritz, one of the venture capital stars of Silicon Valley USA.

A partner in Sequoia Capital, Moritz successfully invested in start-ups such as Yahoo, Google and YouTube.

Peter asks him how it all happened and gets some advice about how to make a high-tech fortune.

* All Join In2008011720080120

Social networks such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Bebo and YouTube are revolutionising the way people use the internet.

Peter Day asks how businesses need to respond.

* How To Be Top2008010320080106

Peter Day gets some unorthodox advice and guidance on how to inspire awe and become a corporate leader.

* Men In White I2007122020071223

Peter Day presents the first of two special reports on company laboratories.

He visits Xerox's Palo Alto Research Centre in California, where the scientists hope their inventions will lead to the next wave of technological innovation.

* Men In White Ii2007122720071230

Peter Day presents the second of two special reports on company laboratories.

He visits the giant labs of General Electric in upstate New York and Philips at Eindhoven in the Netherlands.

* Monopoly Money2008012420080127

The European Union Competition Commission has become a global force in setting the rules for the way multinational companies behave.

Commissioner Neelie Kroes talks to Peter Day about her power and influence on takeovers and cartels and the benefits to consumers.

* Team Spirit2008020720080210

In an era when business is increasingly conducted globally and in cyberspace, Peter Day asks what it takes to build and manage effective teams.

21st Century Unlimited20111222

The American business guru Joe Pine thinks we have moved into an era of what he calls "Infinite Possibility".

Peter Day finds out what he is talking about and what the ideas mean for conventional 20th-centuy-style corporations.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal

Editor: Stephen Chilcott.

Joe Pine discusses his idea of Infinite Possibility and what it means for modern business.

21st Century Unlimited20150104

New ways of doing business are making people think hard about how companies function. Peter Day hears how these alternative economies work, and what they might do.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

A Glass Of Its Own2011122920120101

For decades now, gin has been regarded as an old-fashioned drink for old fashioned drinkers. But now that may be changing, thanks in part to the efforts of some tiny new British drinks entrepreneurs with big ideas.

After centuries of decline, London's distilling industry is picking up again, fuelled by small-scale producers and European rules changes that recognise London dry gin as a distinct drinks category. At a festive time of the year, Peter Day meets some of the entrepreneurs behind the trend and raises a glass or two to home-grown UK businesses.

Producer: Mike Wendling

Editor: Stephen Chilcott.

Peter Day looks at the boom in small-scale spirits companies.

A Great Disruption2012090620120909

Series about the world of work, from vast corporations to the modest volunteer.

A New Capitalism2011012020110123

In Business

A NEW CAPITALISM

One of the world's most influential business professors thinks it is time for companies completely to redefine their relationship with society.

Prof Michael Porter of Harvard Business School tells Peter Day about the radical changes in corporate operations and responsibilities he is calling for.

Producer : Sandra Kanthal.

Peter Day talks to Harvard Business School Professor Michael Porter.

In this week's In Business one of the world's best-known management gurus issues a challenge to the way capitalism works.

Professor Michael Porter from Harvard Business School tells Peter Day about the radical changes he thinks companies have to make in order in order to survive.

A Night At The Opera2015081320150816 (R4)

Opera is an expensive art form. It receives millions of pounds of public money. Can that be justified? Peter Day gets a range of operatic experiences - from top opera companies, to pub performers and a country house summer festival. The first opera was performed 400 years ago in Italy; how does the future look?

Producer: Penny Murphy.

A Tale Of Two Sanctions2014112720141130 (R4)

Peter Day talks to companies affected by economic sanctions imposed against Russia, and by retaliatory sanctions imposed by Russia, and asks how they cope when they suddenly lose a key market. He also asks how effective sanctions are and who they hit the hardest.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

Africa Calling2005060920050612

Even in AFRICA, technology is touching the lives of the poor and bringing new opportunities to exiles returning home.

Peter Day reports from KENYA and Ghana.

Age Rage2006090720060910

From October 1, 65 is the new nationwide retirement age in Britain, the age when employers can legally force workers to retire whether they want to or not.

Peter Day finds out what it means for employees, for companies - and for people like him on the verge of being retired.

All Aboard2003110620031109

The world's biggest ocean liner is being prepared for its maiden voyage.

Peter Day hears from the people who are creating a new community on the waves.

All At Sea2011011320110116

It is a long time since Britain ruled the maritime world, and North Sea oil has peaked.

But ocean transport is still a vital UK activity and wind and water power are making big waves around our shores.

Peter Day takes the helm of a container ship to find out what British seapower means today.

Producer : Jo Mathys.

ALL AT SEA

This week's In Business is all at sea.

Peter Day reports on the great boom in the sea as as real estate: a site for huge arrays of windmills and other sustainable energy devices.

He also has an unfortunate experience in what he thinks might have been Portsmouth harbour.

Peter Day takes the helm of a container ship to find what British sea power means today.

All Change2005022420050227

Peter Day listens to experts who believe that companies still need to undertake some fundamental rethinking about what they do and how they do it.

All New *2009040920090412

Peter Day hears from the business people who, faced with the uncertainties of the global recession, are pinning their hopes for economic recovery on bold new innovation.

All Together Now2012011220120115

In these tough times, are there better ways of doing business: worker cooperatives, for example?

In crisis-battered Spain, Peter Day visits the world's biggest worker coop in Mondragon, to find out what makes it different. And, in the UK where the cooperative movement began, will 2012, designated the year of the cooperative see the rise of the mutual business model?

Producer : Sandra Kanthal.

In these tough economic times, are worker cooperatives a better way of doing business?

Antony Jenkins Talks to Kamal Ahmed20151203

Antony Jenkins Talks To Kamal Ahmed2015120320151206 (R4)

In his first interview since being ousted as Chief Executive of Barclays, Antony Jenkins talks to the BBC's Business Editor, Kamal Ahmed. He discusses the challenges he faced at the troubled bank as he sought to change the culture and behaviour of its staff. And he predicts a worrying future for the banking sector, which he says could see staffing levels halved as technology and financial start-ups transform the industry.

Producer Caroline Bayley.

Antony Jenkins Talks To Kamal Ahmed20151203

Anthony Jenkins, who was sacked as CEO of Barclays in July, talks to the BBC's Business Editor, Kamal Ahmed. They discuss the future of banking, bonuses and the global economy.

Are Ceos Up To The Job?2010081920100822

In the wake of the very personal attacks on former BP boss, Tony Hayward, the programme asks: are chief executives really up to the job in our top companies? Peter Day shines the spotlight on these much praised and vilified high profile leaders.

Producer: Lesley McAlpine.

Are chief executives really up to the job in our top companies?

Asia Bling2010122320101226

New places are leaping to prominence in the pampered world of luxury.

Peter Day hears from some of the people behind the extraordinary hunger for luxury in Asia.

Producer : Sandra Kanthal.

Peter Day hears from some of the leaders in the growing Asian luxury goods market.

Back On The Map2007091320070916

After two centuries of virtual anonymity, Kazakhstan, a big but sparsely populated country with vast oil and mineral reserves, is trying to make a name for itself.

Peter Day reports.

Back On The Road2010123020110102

The United States auto industry has just limped through the biggest industrial car crash in history.

The Ford Motor Company has an industry outsider, Alan Mulally, at the helm as its new chief executive.

He tells Peter Day how he changed the way Ford works and it is now back in the business of selling cars.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

Ford chief executive Alan Mulally talks to Peter Day about reviving the company's fortunes

BACK ON THE ROAD

Back To School20050616

From September, all 14 - 16 year olds in ENGLAND will get lessons in entrepreneurship.

Already, in the UK there are a number of specialist schools and other initiatives to make pupils business-minded.

Peter Day goes back to school to ask whether it's right to try to train young people to be entrepreneurs.

Bad Company2011081120110814

Business leaders make a lot of fuss about corporate governance, but the scandals keep on coming.

Peter Day asks what's wrong with the way companies are run.

Producer: Ben Crighton.

Peter Day asks what's wrong with corporate governance.

Baltic Frontier2004021920040222

: Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania are lining up to join the EU in May.

Peter Day looks at what they can do for Europe - and what Europe can do for them.

Bank To Basics2012051020120513

Britain's big four banks are being challenged by newcomers. Peter Day investigates.

Britain's big four banks are being challenged by newcomers. Peter Day asks what new arrivals on the high street have to do to prize customers away from their traditional loyalties.

The Government wants more competition in banking with the aim of getting a better deal for customers who have been complaining about the service they receive in record numbers. There are key developments taking shape but will they be enough to create bigger banks to compete with the big boys?

Well, Virgin Money has bought Northern Rock and Lloyds is currently negotiating to sell more than 630 branches, possibly to Co-Op Bank. Meanwhile, newer banking players like Handelsbanken and Metro are expanding, promising better local customer service and in some cases, that elusive thing - a bank manager. Big retail names like Tesco and Sainsbury's have banking licences and hope to grow the business from the financial products they currently offer. Shawcross Bank and Aldermore Bank aim to take small business customers away from the high street banks.

But there are big stumbling blocks to competition. The big four - Lloyds Banking Group, RBS/Natwest, Barclays and HSBC have an eye watering 77% market share of personal current accounts, and 85% of Small and Medium Enterprises current accounts.

There are other factors too which complicate the picture. While the technology may be cheaper to create a new banking platform, banks will shortly have to hold more ready capital to prevent any future financial crises.

So can the newcomers really make a dent in the big four's domination of UK banking?

Producer Lesley McAlpine

Editor Stephen Chilcott.

Battery Matters2014050120140504

What are businesses doing to reinvent the battery?

Out of juice?

Perhaps the biggest problem facing makers of new technology is battery power....or lack of it. The battery is so critical that engineers design handheld devices around the battery, rather than the other way round. It's not just mobile phone and wearable technology manufacturers that are striving for longer lasting batteries, the electric vehicle is stalling (so to speak) because of the short distances between recharging and a limited service life of the battery.

So what are businesses doing to reinvent the battery? Is an average annual gain in capacity of 6% really the best we can do?

We'll ask whether Lithium-Air batteries can revitalise the electric car market, explore whether flexible graphene batteries and solar cells hold the key to enhancements in mobile phone battery life and look at the 3D printing of micro batteries the size of a grain of sand.

Battery Power * *2009082020090823

The world may soon need huge supplies of the lightest metal, lithium, if plug-in cars really are a future replacement for the internal combustion engine.

Half the world's supplies of lithium are high up in the Andes in the landlocked country of Bolivia.

Peter Day asks if Bolivia really could become what experts are calling 'the Saudi Arabia of lithium'.

Battle Of Hastings2003020620030209

What does it take to arrest a town's decline? Peter Jay reports from the Sussex coast.

Battle Of The Business Schools20130512

Two of the world's most acclaimed business schools are engaged in fierce rivalry across

the Charles River in Boston, Massachusetts. Harvard Business School and MIT's Sloan School of

Management are both making significant changes to the way teach in order to continue

to attract the best and the brightest. Peter Day wonders whether it is still worth becoming

a Master of Business Administration.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

Battle Of The Chips2004110420041107

Two American companies dominate the industry that makes the ever more powerful silicon chips at the heart of the desk top computer revolution, the giant Intel and the much smaller AMD, founded by Jerry Sanders.

He tells Peter Day about the extraordinary rivalry between the two of them and why they need each other.

Two American companies dominate the silicon chip industry - the giant Intel and the much smaller AMD, founded by Jerry Sanders.

Beyond The Boom2007083020070902

The British economy has been growing for a record-breaking 15 years.

Reporting from the city of York, a place selected at random, Peter Day asks how much longer the expansion can go on, as seen through local eyes.

Big Ideas2006101220061015

Nathan Myhrvold was a leading light at software giant Microsoft.

Now he has set up on his own, creating a new kind of company to exploit ideas and patents.

Peter Day meets him in Seattle.

Big Spenders20080504

Oligarchs are not the only people making money in the new Russia.

The country's new prosperity, fuelled by the oil and gas industries, is creating a nation of middle-class consumers for the first time.

Peter Day reports on the hopes and fears of the new Muscovites.

Biotech Battle *2008082820080831

Britain's world-class pharmaceutical industry fears that it is failing to keep pace with biotechnology, the latest development in medicines.

Industry leaders held an elaborate business war game in London to find out how to catch up.

Peter Day reports on the how the game was played and the lessons they learned.

Bitter Pill2011080420110807

The pharmaceutical giant Pfizer is closing most of its giant research facility at Sandwich in Kent, the place where Viagra was developed, putting two thousand science jobs at risk.

Peter Day asks what the surprising decision means for an important UK industry.

Producer : Sandra Kanthal.

What does the closure of the giant Pfizer facility in Kent mean for the UK's R&D future?

Bitter Pills2010120920101212

Britain's pharmaceutical companies have invested hundreds of millions of pounds in a search for new drugs and treatments which has not delivered the breakthroughs that were promised when the money was spent.

It's a problem for the whole global industry, too.

Peter Day asks if there are better ways of undertaking this quest for a cure.

Producer : Sandra Kanthal.

Britain's pharma giants invest millions in the search for better cures but has it worked?

It is a problem for the whole global industry, too.

Peter Day talks to GlaxoSmithKline CEO Andrew Witty about the ways he is changing the company's quest for drug discovery and discusses the way ahead for big pharma.

Blank Screens2015040920150412 (R4)

Peter Day on how companies struggle to keep their computer systems fit for purpose.

The Information Technology department used to be a mysterious backroom operation, but has become the vital component of a successful company. With relentless technical developments businesses are facing a constant risk of their computer systems being past their sell by date.

Peter Day explores how companies are wrestling with the increasing demands of keeping their I.T fit for purpose.

Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane.

Body Talk2005012720050130

Your body says far more about you than your speech.

Experts claim they can analyse which job suits you just by watching how you move.

Peter Day investigates.

Brand New2004061020040613

Peter Day reports on how Chinese companies are learning to transform themselves from suppliers into makers of their own trusted branded products.

Brand Wagon *2008092520080928

Companies are obsessed with creating and nurturing their brands, but what is the business of branding all about? Peter Day visits a museum of brands that failed and talks to the people trying to revive old brands from the dead.

Bright Young Things2006022320060226

Britain is bubbling with tiny young companies with bright ideas and big ambitions.

Their proprietors seem to have an instinct for business and no fear of taking great big risks.

They tell their stories to Peter Day.

Guests:

Charles Orton-Jones, Real Business Magazine

Paul Sheedy and Has Dosanjh, Engage Your Customer

Guy Weaver and Peter Brazier, Premium Appliance Brands

Simon Tate and Dominic McVey of Kew Health and Beauty

Dr Adrian Woolfson, Chief Executive, Proteinlogic.

Bring On The Bandwidth * *2008090420080907

An ever-expanding internet needs more and more bandwidth to provide the services that users are demanding.

But can the system cope? Peter Day asks experts including writer George Gilder, who has been predicting what is now happening for over 20 years.

Brought To Book20150517

Kevin Ashton is a businessman who has just written his first book, about innovation and creativity, with the intriguing title 'How to Fly a Horse'.

Charles Handy is an experienced and acclaimed management guru, who has just published a new book, called The Second Curve. Its focus is the big life changes business and individuals need to make to find fulfilment at work.

Peter Day hears the ideas behind their books

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

Building Sight2004060320040606

Experts say that half the cement used in the whole world was poured in CHINA last year, and, as the country's economy grows, the skyline of many Chinese cities testifies to the fact.

In the first of two programmes from CHINA Peter Day asks: will the construction boom end in bust?

But Wait...there's More!2005090820050911

Peter Day looks at the world of infomercials, those compelling sales pitches disguised as television shows on fringe TV stations across America, and, increasingly, in Europe too.

Peter hears from the pioneers who invented the industry 20 years ago, an industry now worth over $200 billion.

But Wait...There's More!

Cabin Fever2014121120141214 (R4)

Finding your comfort zone can be difficult at 35,000 feet. As cash strapped carriers try to put more passengers on each plane, flyers are feeling the squeeze. But there are innovations and advancements being made in aircraft design and London is leading the way with a cluster of firms in this specialist market. Peter Day asks about the width and breadth of these changes and when they will start to make some difference to air travellers everywhere.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

California - Agriculture And Migration2016011420160117 (R4)

Peter Day travels to California to discover how migrant workers have transformed farming and agriculture. He speaks to families from Japan and Mexico - who've made California their home and learns about the history of mass migration and its impact on the land.

Producer: Rosamund Jones.

Called To Account2012052020120527

The global Big Four accountancy groups are under sharp scrutiny from the authorities in Britain, Europe and the USA. Peter Day finds out why they are getting such close official attention..and why it matters to the rest of us.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

Can Internet Shopping Transform Rural China?2015112620151129 (R4)

Can the internet shopping industry transform China's rural communities?

In some areas of rural China, traditional farming communities are transforming into something very 21st Century: internet shopping hubs.

Leading the way is the village of Qing Yan Liu where, four hours south of Shanghai, local residents have created a world of bubble wrap and sticky tape.

In the eyes of the Chinese Premier Xi Jinping this could be the future of rural China. He hopes that more and more small communities will copy what's happened in Qing Yan Liu - now dubbed 'China's No. 1 E-Commerce village'. It's hoped this will halt the flow of young people from rural China to the nation's cities, as they go in search of employment.

Turning more small towns and villages into online shopping hubs would provide much needed jobs, and a reason for young people to stay at home, ensuring communities continue to survive rather than disappear.

Producer: Charlotte Pritchard.

Can The Co-op Cope?2012122020121223

What is the Co-op's place in the retail world of the 21st century? Peter Day investigates.

The Cooperative movement is 168 years old and the Co-op brand is a presence in food, funerals, travel and banking. Peter Day reports on its relevance to the 21st century consumer.

Car Crash2007062820070701

The US automobile industry, which changed the world during the last century, is in deep trouble.

Peter Day talks to an expert who has followed the long decline of American cars for decades.

Casino Capitalism * *2008091820080921

What can financiers learn about risk management from gambling and the casinos who do it every day of the week? Peter Day asks the experts.

Caught In The Web2007061420070617

Bold companies are launching new technology over the Internet, delivering computer services on demand.

Peter Day investigates the trend.

Changing Places20090104

Peter Day asks why, in an interconnected world, it still matters where we live and work.

In Toronto, Peter Day finds out from author and urban studies expert Prof Richard Florida why, in an interconnected world, it still matters where we live and work.

China Dispossessed20110106

The vast national urbanisation plan to take Chinese people out of poverty leaves behind many who are dispossessed of land and homes, or see their farms drowned by huge new water and power projects.

Peter Day hears about some of the problems caused by China's rush for prosperity.

Producer: Julie Ball.

Peter Day looks at China's vast urbanisation plan to take Chinese people out of poverty.

China Going Green20150917

China Going Green2015091720150920 (R4)

Peter Day reports from China on the country's efforts to reduce pollution and go green.

China Going Green20150917

China Going Green20150917

China is the world's largest emitter of greenhouse gases.

Many Chinese dream of seeing blue skies and white clouds but rarely do because of the smog. Often the daily routine is to wake up and check the pollution levels to decide if it is safe for children to play outside, or if a filter mask should be worn for protection.

Ahead of December's UN Climate Change summit, Peter Day reports on the Chinese ambitions to make China 'go green'. Many people say the Chinese aren't given enough credit for their efforts and argue the West will be shocked when it realises the extent of their actions. But can that ambition become reality? Peter Day reports from Beijing and beyond and asks when will the Chinese be able to breathe more easily?

Producer: Charlotte Pritchard.

China Going Green20150917

China is the world's largest emitter of greenhouse gases.

Many Chinese dream of seeing blue skies and white clouds but rarely do because of the smog. Often the daily routine is to wake up and check the pollution levels to decide if it is safe for children to play outside, or if a filter mask should be worn for protection.

Ahead of December's UN Climate Change summit, Peter Day reports on the Chinese ambitions to make China 'go green'. Many people say the Chinese aren't given enough credit for their efforts and argue the West will be shocked when it realises the extent of their actions. But can that ambition become reality? Peter Day reports from Beijing and beyond and asks when will the Chinese be able to breathe more easily?

Producer: Charlotte Pritchard.

China's Economic Crossroads2013092620130929

Peter Day travels to China to ask why so many graduates are having difficulty finding jobs

The Chinese government plans to have 200 million graduates by 2020. Although this number still needs to be seen in its context of the 1.3 billion Chinese population, it is still a large increase in skilled workers from the 1 million graduates in 2000. But cracks in the plan are being shown by the class of 2013. Seven million people finished university this year and many are finding that the types of job they want aren't available. Many employers also can't find the workers they want to fill their jobs. This is an illustration of China's economy at a turning point in its development. The rapid economic expansion of the past thirty years, based on cheap labour making goods for export, is slowing down and something needs to come and fill the gap it is leaving behind. In this week's In Business, Peter Day travels to the centre of China, the city of Zhengzhou in Henan province. For centuries the city has been known as the crossroads of the country, situated on the Yellow River and where the north-south and east-west railways meet. It's an apt place perhaps to investigate China's economy at its own crossroads.

Producer: Charlotte Pritchard.

Christmas, Made In China20151224

Peter Day visits the Chinese city which makes most of the world's Christmas decorations

Producers: Charlotte Pritchard and David Rhodes.

Circular Economy2015042320150426 (R4)

Peter Day talks to Dame Ellen MacArthur about the so-called 'circular economy'.

As Dame Ellen MacArthur circumnavigated the globe she got first-hand knowledge of the finite nature of the world's resources. When she retired from sailing she created a foundation to promote the concept of a 'Circular Economy' - where resources are re-used and waste reduced to zero. Many companies around the world - including some of the biggest, like Unilever - are responding to her ideas.

Peter Day talks to the record-breaking sailor, to Unilever, and to the creators of an innovative urban farm in New Jersey about why these concepts are so important and how businesses can take them on board.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

Civilian Drones2013090520130908

Peter Day investigates the business use of what some call, with a shiver, drones.

For decades, unpersoned planes have been used by the military in places such as Afghanistan and Pakistan to watch the ground and deliver weapons controlled by remote pilots thousands of kilometres away. But now companies and experts are putting their minds to turning military drones into civilian vehicles that can do things cheaper and better than piloted planes. Peter Day investigates unmanned aerial vehicles and how they are already being used by farmers and the police. Also, could a drone be delivering your pizza in the not too distant future?

Class Struggle2012010520120108

In nearly every country in the world, there's one sector that everyone seems to think is in crisis: education. America produces legions of Nobel laureates and has the best universities in the world - and yet faces an epidemic of failing state-run schools. India churns out vast numbers of engineers ready for the modern economy, and yet its business leaders yearn for the kind of creative thought that is taught in the Anglo-Saxon system. In the UK we worry about discipline and standards, while at the same time welcoming thousands of foreigners anxious to get qualifications and training that are non-existent in their home counties.

Peter Day asks why everyone thinks education is so bad and what schools and businesses are doing to try to improve it.

Producer: Mike Wendling.

All around the world, people think education is in crisis. Peter Day asks why.

Coal Comfort2012081620120819

Peter Day looks at the insatiable demand for coal and asks if it can ever go green.

Coal is the most abundant fossil fuel, and the dirtiest, despite talk of "clean coal". It is the single biggest emitter of the greenhouse gas CO2. But with reserves of over 100 years, much more than for oil and gas, it's here to stay. In the US, almost half of all electricity comes from coal, about double the rate of the UK. With China and India fuelling their economic growth with coal, demand will stay high. So will we have to live with the environmental consequences or can coal become green? Peter Day travels to the US to find out.

In North Dakota coal is mined in a modern, open pit operation using electric draglines. One of the biggest hopes for minimising the impact of coal burning on climate change is to capture and store the resulting carbon dioxide. Peter visits the Great Plains Synfuels plant in North Dakota which burns coal to turn it into synthetic natural gas and captures about half of the resulting CO2 to pipe it to Canada for underground storage in a depleted oil field. Adjacent to the Synfuels plant is a coal-fuelled electricity power station, Antelope Valley. Unlike their neighbours, Antelope Valley decided against carbon capture and storage because adapting the plant would cost hundreds of millions of dollars. But if even a place like Antelope Valley, that could benefit from their neighbour's pipeline and other infrastructure can't do CCS in an economically viable way, what chance is there for other coal-burning power plants? While coal remains king, its status is being challenged not just by those concerned about climate change, but also by other fossil fuels such as shale gas and new oil fields. How will coal fight back? Or does it not need to, as the world cannot do without it anyway?

Producer Arlene Gregorius

Editor: Stephen Chilcott.

Colorado's Big Marijuana Experiment2016042820160501 (R4)

Marijuana is now legal in some US states. How is the experiment working in Colorado?

Colorado's Big Marijuana Experiment20160428

Marijuana is now legal in some US states and a fast-growing industry has emerged, especially in Colorado which was the first state to embrace the drug. But according to federal law marijuana is still illegal. This means that many companies can't get banking services, advertise their wares or pay tax in the way that other companies do.

So how do they survive and thrive? And in what direction is the US moving? Will marijuana soon become a legal drug, like alcohol, across the US? Or will law-makers decide that Colorado's big marijuana experiment has gone too far? And what is it like to run a company in one of the world's riskiest business sectors?

Presenter : Peter Day

Producer : Rosamund Jones.

Colorado's Big Marijuana Experiment20160428

Coming Soon2010072220100725

What happens next as the Credit Crunch crisis continues? Peter Day gets the long view from a clutch of the distinguished economists including Kenneth Rogoff, Raghuram Rajan and Sushil Wadhwani.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

What happens next as the Credit Crunch crisis continues?

Companies Without Managers20150827
Companies Without Managers2015082720150830 (R4)

Who is your boss? Peter Day asks how three companies, without managers, do business.

Who's your boss? Peter Day explores how three different companies, in three different countries, do business without managers. Who hires and fires? And how do you get a pay rise? He asks how these radical organisations emerged, and whether other companies may follow their lead.

Producer: Rosamund Jones.

Computers Chipped2007090620070909

For 40 years, computer chips have doubled in speed and power every two years.

But maintaining the pace of improvement is becoming more difficult.

Peter Day investigates.

Conference Call20030601

Every spring a select group of global corporate leaders gather in the comfortable Swiss city of St Gallen for an intensive interchange of views about the future.

The event is unique because it's organised by students from the city's international business school.

Peter Day reports from last week's conference on the mood of the multinationals at a time of great uncertainty.

Connections2004093020041003

Joining the internet with phones and home computers produces a new wired-up world.

Wireless, on the other hand, removes the wires.

Peter Day investigates.

Continental Drift2011052620110529

As the sovereign debt crisis continues what next for the Euro? What next for Europe? Peter Day asks the experts.

What is next for the Euro and for Europe as the sovereign debt crisis continues?

Cork2014012320140126

Peter Day travels to Cork in Ireland to find out what life is really like in a country just recently realised from the constraints of an EU bailout.

Corruption2003062620030629

International business is still disfigured by corruption, even though companies deny they take part.

Peter Day asks what's needed to make a clean-up happen.

Cracked China *2009011520090118

Peter Day reports from China's heartland manufacturing cities on the global strains in the world's most vibrant economy, as hundreds of factories close and workers are laid off.

Peter Day reports from China's industrial cities on the economic strains they are facing.

Craig Barrett Interview20090524

Peter Day talks to the outgoing chairman of Intel, Craig Barrett, about receiving the largest fine ever imposed by the European Union and the other challenges of running a company on the cutting edge of modern technology.

Peter Day talks to the outgoing chairman of Intel, Craig Barrett.

Crossroads2004062420040627

Formula 1 is going east by holding the first Chinese Grand Prix in Shanghai this autumn.

The British motor racing industry is a remarkable centre of excellence, but, asks Peter Day, is it now under threat from overseas influences as F1 flexes its muscles?

Crunching The Crisis2011082520110828

Series of programmes about the whole world of work, public and private, from vast corporations to modest volunteers.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers.

Cuba Now2011121520111218

After 53 years of revolution, President Raul Castro is trying to change the state-controlled Cuban economy with moves to promote private employment, and an open market in secondhand cars and home.

Peter Day reports from Havana on an island where in many ways time has been standing still for half a century.

Producer Julie Ball

Editor Stephen Chilcott.

Peter Day reports from Cuba on the economic changes introduced by President Raul Castro.

Curtain Up2013121920131222

Pantomime is a very British tradition, still as popular as ever with audiences. But it's also an important annual cash cow for regional theatres and big production companies. In Business goes to Nottingham to follow the progress of the city's two rival pantomimes: one made in-house at the Nottingham Playhouse, with a much-loved dame on his thirtieth (and last) pantomime and the other at the Theatre Royal, bought in from a big pantomime making production company starring the American Baywatch actor, known as "The Hoff". Peter Day finds out what's involved and why pantomimes matter so much to regional theatres.

(Image Robert Day).

Peter Day goes behind the scenes at the pantomime to find out why it matters financially.

Cyber Town Malvern2014011620140119

Peter Day visits Malvern to find out why it is a hub in the fight against cyber crime.

The historic spa town of Malvern in Worcestershire is rapidly becoming the centre of a hub of small companies specialising in a very 21st century occupation: defending people from Internet crime. Unlikely as it sounds, Malvern has been a centre of science expertise for decades. Now it's a place where innovation thrives outside big corporate labs. Peter Day finds out why.

Dates With Destiny2004101420041017

Without much oil wealth, tiny Dubai has been trying to turn itself into the business and tourist crossroads of the Middle East.

Peter Day reports.

Dc Rider2005102020051023

What does it take to get an electric car off the ground? Lots of effort and endless patience, explains California-based inventor Lon Bell.

He talks to Peter Day about his vision of transforming city life with the introduction of a new breed of electric vehicle.

The all-electric, battery-powered car that Lon Bell has designed is called the G-Wiz.

Interviewees:

Keith Johnston, Managing Director, GoinGreen

Mark Duvall and Robert Graham, Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, California.

Lon Bell, Vice-Chairman, REVA Electric Car Company, Bangalore, India.

Dr John Wormald, Managing Partner, Autopolis

California-based inventor Lon Bell talks to Peter Day about his vision of transforming city life with the introduction of a new breed of electric vehicle.

DC Rider

Deep Thoughts2014073120140803

It sounds abstruse, but clever people argue that commercial companies have a lot to learn from great philosophers and the academics who spend their lives studying them.

Peter Day meets some of the business people inspired and influenced by highbrow philosophy.

Produced by David Edmonds.

Peter Day meets business people inspired and influenced by highbrow philosophers.

Design Thinking20130822

There's a certain magic when a product you've bought just simply works, when a company's customer service satisfies instead of frustrates, or when a website gives you exactly the right information you need, exactly when you need it. But these seemingly serendipitous moments might actually be the result of exact planning and customer research. The technical term is 'design thinking' and with the help of designers eager to break out of the lab and into the real world, it's a movement that's catching on in all sorts of unlikely places.

This week Peter Day talks to the people behind an award-winning government website, agencies that are creating whole companies from scratch, and finds out about other ways that innovative designers are intruding into the real world like never before.

Producer: Mike Wendling.

Diaspora Bonds20120617

Developing countries need all kinds of facilities that most cannot afford, facilities that meet absolutely basic human needs: roads, bridges, railways, water supplies, power, sewerage, street lighting.

Many of them have little of the cash it needs to get big public investment programmes started. Overseas aid can help, and so can official borrowing from the big international institutions such as the World Bank.

But there's another pool of potential investment money that has so far been used mainly informally and only in very limited circumstances. Peter Day reports how developing governments, mostly in Africa, are waking up to the investment possibilities of the money diaspora send back to their own countries.

Producer: Richard Berenger.

Digital Treatment2004051320040516

The NHS is spending billions on computer power.

Peter Day finds out what the money will buy and asks if healthcare is ready to respond to the digital revolution.

Digital Treatment The NHS is spending billions on computer power.

Do It Like Deming2005063020050703

W Edwards Deming died in 1993, but his ideas live on.

He is the quality guru whose analysis transformed Japanese business after the Second World War, and then took the rest of the world by storm decades later.

But, as Peter Day discovers, Deming's ideas are about more than mere quality: they try to transform the organisations that drive so many workers and customers to daily frustration.

W Edwards Deming died in 1993, but his ideas still live on.

Do It Like Deming

Do It Yourself Jobs2012011920120122

If times are hard, why not set up your own business rather than try to find a job somewhere else? Peter Day hears from young entrepreneurs who think that one way of beating recession is to start from scratch.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

Peter Day meets young people trying to beat the recession by setting up their own business

Dogfight2004102120041024

The two giants of plane-making, Boeing and Airbus, are engaged in their fiercest battle ever.

Each accuses the other of receiving unfair levels of government aid.

At the same time, the two companies are sharply divided over the future of aviation itself.

Next year, Airbus launches the largest passenger plane the world has yet seen.

Boeing's approach is radically different - it says airlines want smaller planes which can be flown more frequently.

Peter Day asks who's right.

Doing It Wrong2010011420100117

The late business rebel Russell Ackoff's thoughts on how to get things done.

Russell Ackoff was a great subversive - a business school professor who thought that business schools were a block on management thinking and who delighted in pointing out the flaws in the way companies work. Before he died at the age of 90 in October 2009, this business rebel gave Peter Day some insights into his unconventional approach to getting things done.

Doing It Wrong * *2010011420100117

Russell Ackoff was a great subversive - a business school professor who thought that business schools were a block on management thinking and who delighted in pointing out the flaws in the way companies work.

Before he died at the age of 90 in October 2009, this business rebel gave Peter Day some insights into his unconventional approach to getting things done.

The late business rebel Russell Ackoff's thoughts on how to get things done.

Don't Cry For Me, Argentina2011120120111204

Is there life after a sovereign debt default such as Greece is now facing ? Peter Day reports from Argentina, a country which went through a similar sort of crisis ten years ago.

You can subscribe to "Peter Days World of Business" podcast, via the Radio 4 website.

The podcast brings you both the "In Business" programme, which broadcasts twenty six times a year and also "Global Business" which broadcasts every week of the year on the BBC World Service.

Producer: Richard Berenger Editor Stephen Chilcott.

Is there an 'Argentine Solution' for Europe? Peter Day reports from Argentina.

Down Japan *2009012920090201

After Japan's property bubble burst in 1990, the country was pitched into 10 years of economic depression, from which the world's second largest economy may not yet have fully recovered.

Peter Day asks what the rest of the world can learn from the now familiar-sounding Japanese experience.

Down On The Farm *2008091120080914

What has been the effect of rocketing food prices on British farmers? Peter Day reports.

Down With Hierarchies2006011920060122

Feel Jaded? Job getting you down? Perhaps it's not you, but the organisation you work for.

Gerard Fairtlough is a very experienced business leader who thinks the traditional hierarchies of command and control are dysfunctional.

He tells Peter Day about some better ways of getting things done.

Dragon's Den

Dragon's Den2012041920120422

After 30 years of tearaway economic growth, there are fears that China may be rapidly slowing down, putting great strains on their economic system. Peter Day reports on the bursting of the great Chinese housing bubble and the pressures on private businesses and wonders if the Year of the Dragon is going be about hard times not traditional good fortune.

Producer: Julie Ball.

Is China's bubble about to burst? Peter Day reports.

Driverless Cars2015073020150802 (R4)

As the race to develop driverless cars hots up around the world, the UK is determined not to be left in the slow lane. Government money is being invested to help test vehicles and 'pods' over the next three years.

It's not just the robotic technology which is being developed- building the trust of the public in vehicles which eventually won't need drivers behind the wheel is crucial

There's still a long way to go, and Peter Day talks to those involved in this brave new world of transport.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

Peter Day investigates a future of driverless cars - how soon will it come?

Ebay Watch2004052720040530

When the dot com bubble burst four years ago internet auctions went on powering ahead.

People are giving up their day jobs to trade on eBay and now its influence is spreading to big business too.

Peter Day investigates the economics of the eBay effect.

Economic Rebellion2016033120160403 (R4)

Why is there so much dissatisfaction about how economics is taught at universities?

Economic Rebellion20160331

Why is there so much dissatisfaction about how economics is taught at universities? Since the financial crash, many students have been in revolt in the UK and overseas, determined to change the content of their courses. They are not alone. Employers and some economists share many of their concerns. Peter Day explores why the subject has changed over a generation and why that might matter.

Producer: Rosamund Jones.

Economic Rebellion20160331

Eureka Democracy2007101120071014

Business innovation is vital for corporate survival, but is it best left to companies? Some believe that the best ideas stem from the users of goods and services and that now is the time to make innovation a truly open and collaborative process.

Peter Day reports.

Euro Everything2006051820060521

Peter Day asks whether Europe really needs big projects such as the Galileo Satellite System and the Quaero internet research programme to boost innovation.

European politicians are worried about how the continent is falling behind the United States in innovation.

Some of them are placing their faith in big industrial and internet projects to boost the continents ability to compete.

But can taxpayers' money help innovation, or does it actually hinder it? And does Europe really need a European rival to the current American-run Global Positioning System and its own version of Google.

Peter Day interviews:

Kev Collins, Production Manager, EADS Astrium

Richard Peckham, Head of Business Development, EADS Astrium

Philippe de Buck, Secretary General, UNICE

David White, Director of Innovation Policy, European Commission

Francois Bourdoncle, President, Exalead

Loic Le Meur, Executive Vice President, Six Apart

Mike Lynch, Founder, Autonomy

Francois Loos, Frances Minister of Industry

Bernard Benhamou, senior lecturer, Political Studies Institute in Paris.

Euro On The Rocks?2010121620101219

Euroland slides into big trouble as the crisis spreads from one country to another.

In this change to the advertised programme, Peter Day asks a panel of experts what's happening and why it matters.

Producers: Caroline Bayley and Sandra Kanthal.

As crisis spreads from one country to another Peter Day asks if the Eurozone is in crisis.

In Business

EURO ON THE ROCKS?

Euro Peril2012071920120722

Peter Day asks how continental European businesses are surviving the euro crisis.

EURO PERIL

As the euro struggles for survival, continental businesses are caught up in the maelstrom. Peter Day finds out what they make of their plight and what sort of future they see for the single currency and the euro zone.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

Europe On The Edge2011072120110724

The Euro crisis in Greece is creating effects that can be felt across the continent.

Peter Day finds out how this turbulence is affecting businesses in Spain and Poland.

Producers: Sandra Kanthal and Julie Ball.

What is the Euro crisis doing to business in Spain and Poland.

Europe On The Edge * *2009040220090405

Peter Day reports from Spain, Hungary, Ireland and Iceland on the heavy strains being felt by those countries on the fringes of Europe which boomed when they were new recruits to the EU.

In the current economic crisis, however, they are now under heavy pressure, along with the Eurozone and the whole European Union.

Peter Day reports on the heavy strains being felt by countries on the fringes of Europe.

European Unicorns2016041420160417 (R4)

A Unicorn is a mythical animal. But it's also the name now given to private start-up companies, mainly in the tech or internet sector which are valued at a billion dollars or more.

They're extremely fast-growing and are often keener to increase customers rather than make profits at this stage. They rely on private investors to fund their growth and those investors give the companies their valuations.

Through interviews with European unicorns including BlaBlaCar, a ride-sharing service and Hello Fresh which delivers measured fresh ingredients and recipes to your door, Caroline Bayley asks how "real" the tech unicorns are and whether the billion dollar plus valuations are fuelling another tech bubble which could be in danger of bursting.

Producer Anna Meisel.

European Unicorns20160414

European Unicorns20160414

A Unicorn is a mythical animal. But it's also the name now given to private start-up companies, mainly in the tech or internet sector which are valued at a billion dollars or more.

They're extremely fast-growing and are often keener to increase customers rather than make profits at this stage. They rely on private investors to fund their growth and those investors give the companies their valuations.

Through interviews with European unicorns including Blah, Blah Car, a ride-sharing service and Hello Fresh which delivers measured fresh ingredients and recipes to your door, Caroline Bayley asks how "real" the tech unicorns are and whether the billion dollar plus valuations are fuelling another tech bubble which could be in danger of bursting.

Producer Anna Meisel.

European Unicorns20160414

Face The Music2012083020120902

Peter Day explores the impossible economics of the concert hall.

Public spending cuts are putting a big squeeze on orchestras all over the world. Peter Day hears how musicians are trying to find new ways of ensuring that the bands play on.

Producer: Ben Crighton

Editor: Stephen Chilcott.

Fast Boat To China2004011520040118

A huge demand for vessel capacity has sent the cost of shipping rocketing.

World trade is changing rapidly.

Peter Day investigates.

Fighting Fit2007060720070610

Being healthy and staying healthy are increasing preoccupations for companies as well as individuals.

Peter Day finds out how concepts of welfare are changing existing businesses and creating new ones.

Fixing Capitalism2003061920030622

The husband and wife team of Harvard Business School Professor, Shoshana Zuboff, and international businessman, James Maxmin, think that we need a new kind of capitalism to replace the 20th century model based on the male-dominated command and control.

They explain to Peter Day what the new sort of organisations might be like, and how they might happen.

Fixing Germany2003103020031102

With a drifting economy and major social and industrial problems, Germany needs to change the way it works in order to power the new Europe.

Peter Day looks at the issues through the eyes of Germans from both the West and the East, thirteen years after reunification.

Food For Fuel2007020120070204

Peter Day meets the green entrepreneurs who are finding new ways to fuel the energy requirements of tomorrow.

But is it right, in a hungry world, to grow crops to keep Western cars running?

Food For Thought2005102720051030

As the unending superstore war rages on in the shopping mall and the high street, other styles of food retailers are trying to make their presence felt - from overseas.

Peter Day finds out what lessons they might have for retailers here.

For Ever And Ever2014121820141221 (R4)

Britain's cathedrals have defined the landscape for more than 1000 years

as places of worship, tourist attractions, and unrivalled architectural

achievements. But what's their role in the 21st century? Peter Day hears

about the business of running some of the country's most famous places.

Producer : Sandra Kanthal.

For Your Information2011042820110501

Information seems to be moving right to the heart of the 21st century economy but nobody really knows what it is or how it works.

Peter Day talks to pioneers in the field of information management as well as corporate gatekeepers of this valuable commodity we call information to find out what advances are being made with the amount of data we now generate.

Peter Day finds out how we can use the growing amount of information we now generate.

Forty Per Cent Female2008100220081005

This year in Norway it became law that company boards must consist of at least 40 per cent women.

Peter Day asked four years ago why the country intended to take such drastic action.

Now he wonders if other countries may follow suit.

Framed2005020320050206

Peter Day examines the boom in modern art and the threat to the LONDON art market posed by big changes in the rules about arts sales in Europe.

French Lessons2012041220120415

As the EuroZone struggles for survival, France remains at the heart of Europe. Peter Day finds out how French business is faring in an era of huge European uncertainty.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

Peter Day finds out how French business is faring during the euro crisis.

French With Tears2006100520061008

Big social problems, high unemployment, a stuttering economy.

Despite some world class corporations, business in France appears to be in deep trouble.

As next year's Presidential election campaigning gets underway, Peter Day asks whether the French will stick to their model of state intervention - or embrace the Anglo Saxon market forces they have long shunned.

Frugal Feast2012050320120506

A new approach to the business of innovation. Peter Day reports.

Big companies may have lots to learn from the cheap and cheerful improvisation which is commonplace in the developing world, particularly India. Peter Day discovers some of the secrets of what is now being called Frugal Innovation.

Producer Sandra Kanthal

Editor Stephen Chilcott.

Peter Day on how companies can learn from the cheap improvisation of the developing world.

Gas Leak2013011720130120

Russia's giant energy company Gazprom has the biggest reserves of natural gas in the world, and much of the country's new-found prosperity has depended on its exports to Europe. But now global gas prices are tumbling as new supplies come on stream, and the EU has launched a top level investigation of the company's grip on European energy. Peter Day examines Gazprom's future in an uncertain world.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

Gene Patenting2013080820130811

Peter Day asks whether gene patenting is a good or bad thing for medical innovation.

Ever since the mapping of the human genome was completed 10 years ago medical companies have been rushing to patent genes that define all of us for their own exclusive use. Now the US Supreme Court has ruled against patenting things found in nature. Peter Day asks what this means for the biotech business.and for the future of healthcare.

Generation Next2007051020070513

Teenagers are now big spenders, and corporations are waking up to a huge new market.

Peter Day finds out how teenage tastes are shaping businesses across the world.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900306]

Unknown: Carol Leonard

Editor: Rod Pounsett

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900313]

Presenter: Carol Leonard.

Editor: Rod Pounsett

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900321]

Presenter: Carol Leonard.

Unknown: Lorna Murray

Editor: Rod Pounsett

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900327]

Presenter: Carol Leonard

Presenter: Researcher Loma Murray

Editor: Rod Pounsett

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900403]

Presenter: Carol Leonard.

Unknown: Lorna Murrav

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900410]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19900424]

Presenter: Carol Leonard

Editor: Rod Pounsett

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900501]

Presenter Carol Leonard Editor Rod Pounsett

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900501]

Presenter: Carol Leonard

Editor: Rod Pounsett

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900501]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19900502]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19900508]

Last in the present series with Carol Leonard. Research Lorna Murray Editor Rod Pounsett

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900508]

Unknown: Carol Leonard.

Unknown: Lorna Murray

Editor: Rod Pounsett

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900508]

Unknown: Carol Leonard.

Unknown: Lorna Murray

Editor: Rod Pounsett

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900509]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19900829]

Presenter: Peter Day.

Editor: Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900902]

Presented By: Peter Day

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900905]

Editor: Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900912]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19900919]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19900926]
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Genome: [r4 Bd=19901010]
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Genome: [r4 Bd=19910306]

NEW The Credit Strike

Recession is biting and the banks are pulling in their loans - just when business needs their help most. In the first of a new series,

In Business hears from victims of the credit strike and maps out a blueprint for survival.

Presented by Peter Day. Editor Colin Wilde. Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day.

Editor: Colin Wilde.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910306]

Presented By: Peter Day.

Editor: Colin Wilde.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910310]

NEW Recession is

NEW biting and the banks are pulling in their loans. In the first of a new series, the programme hears from victims of the credit strike. Presented by Peter Day.

Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910310]

Presented By: Peter Day.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910313]

Prophets of Change 'Change or die' is the gospel preached to giant companies by business gurus such as Tom Peters. But how do concerns as varied as BP, Courtaulds and Apple Computers put change into practice? And what does change mean for these business leaders fighting to stay in the front line?

Presented by Peter Day. Editor Colin Wilde. Stereo

Contributors

Unknown: Tom Peters.

Presented By: Peter Day.

Editor: Colin Wilde.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910313]

Unknown: Tom Peters.

Presented By: Peter Day.

Editor: Colin Wilde.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910317]

Prophets of Change 'Change or die' is the gospel preached to giant companies by business gurus. But how do big companies put change into practice? And what does change mean for those business leaders fighting to stay in the front line? Presented by Peter Day. Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910317]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910320]

Something from Nothing

A focus on Britain's unsung heroes - from corner shop to multimillionaire. Penniless and unwelcome, Asian immigrants clawed their way to business success. Plus details of the Business Survivor of the Year competition.

Presented by Peter Day. Editor Colin Wilde. Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day.

Editor: Colin Wilde.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910320]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910324]

Something from Nothing A focus on Britain's unsung heroes - Asian immigrants who fought their way to business success. Plus details of the Business Survivor of the Year competition.

Presented by Peter Day.

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910324]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910327]

The Boys from Down Under

In the 80s, Aussie raiders scared hell out of the Poms, but as the 90s dawned they got their comeuppance. What was so special about them? Why did they fall? And how have they influenced management style? Peter Day reports. Editor Colin Wilde. Stereo

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Day

Editor: Colin Wilde.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910327]

Unknown: Peter Day

Editor: Colin Wilde.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910331]

The Boys from Down Under

In the 80s. Aussie raiders scared hell out of the Poms, but as the 90s dawned they got their comeuppance. What was so special about them? Why did they fall? And how have they influenced management style? Peter Day reports.

Stereo

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Day

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910331]

Unknown: Peter Day

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910403]

Is Service Included?

Are you really being served? The high street boomed in the 1980s but then went head first into recession, ruining many reputations. Tonight's programme finds out where retailing is heading in the hard times, and in an exclusive interview, hears from Lord Rayner, the retiring chairman of Marks and Spencer.

Presented by Peter Day. Editor Neil Koenig. Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day.

Editor: Neil Koenig.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910403]

Presented By: Peter Day.

Editor: Neil Koenig.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910407]

Is Service Included?

Are you really being served? The high street boomed in the 1980s but then went head first into recession, ruining many reputations. Today's programme finds out where retailing is heading in the hard times and, in an exclusive interview, hears from Lord Rayner, the retiring chairman of Marks and Spencer.

Presented by Peter Day. Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910407]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910410]

The Bank-Busters

For one bank in the USA, Easter was no bank holiday. Instead, the federal authorities moved in to close it down. The bank is one of hundreds to close in the USA this year as the crisis in the country's banking industry gathers pace.

In Business went in with the bank-busters to record this bizarre event.

Presented by Peter Day. Producer Neil Koenig. Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day.

Producer: Neil Koenig.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910410]

Presented By: Peter Day.

Producer: Neil Koenig.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910414]

The Bank-Busters

At Easter the federal authorities moved in to close down one bank in the USA. The bank is one of hundreds to close this year as the crisis in the country's banking industry gathers pace. In Business went in with the bank-busters, the first time a broadcasting team has been allowed to record this bizarre event.

Presented by Peter Day.

Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910414]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910417]

Cheerful Personality Required - Roughly half of UK employers put job applicants through personality, or psychometric, tests. But doubts are being raised about their reliability. In Business reports.

Presented by Peter Day. Producer Stephen Chilcott Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day.

Producer: Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910417]

Presented By: Peter Day.

Producer: Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910421]

Cheerful Personality Required...

Roughly half of UK employers put job applicants through personality, or psychometric, tests. But doubts are being raised about their reliability. In Business reports.

Presented by Peter Day.

Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910421]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910424]

Does Whitehall Mean

Business?

The DTI likes to be known as the Department for Enterprise - but is it clear about its role of encouraging business? Since 1979 it's had 12 different Secretaries of State. Peter Day talks to Sir Leon Brittan , Lord Young, Nicholas Ridley and others, about what the DTI is for.

Editor Colin Wilde. Stereo

Contributors

Unknown: Sir Leon Brittan

Unknown: Nicholas Ridley

Editor: Colin Wilde.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910424]

Unknown: Sir Leon Brittan

Unknown: Nicholas Ridley

Editor: Colin Wilde.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910428]

Does Whitehall Mean

Business?

The DTI likes to be known as the Department for Enterprise - but is it clear about its role of encouraging business? Since 1979 it's had 12 different Secretaries of State. Peter Day talks to Sir Leon Brittan , Lord Young, Nicholas Ridley and others, about what the DTI is for.

Stereo

Contributors

Unknown: Sir Leon Brittan

Unknown: Nicholas Ridley

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910428]

Unknown: Sir Leon Brittan

Unknown: Nicholas Ridley

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910501]

A Seat on the Board

It sounds like the ultimate career step - but what exactly is the role of a company director? Is it a privileged and easy ride - or have the responsibilities begun to weigh heavily around the necks of the fat cats?

Presented by Peter Day. Producer Ann Gilmartin. Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day.

Producer: Ann Gilmartin.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910501]

Presented By: Peter Day.

Producer: Ann Gilmartin.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910505]

A Seat on the Board

It sounds like the ultimate career step - but what exactly is the role of a company director? Is it a privileged and easy ride - or have the responsibilities begun to weigh heavily?

Presented by Peter Day.

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910505]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910508]

Survivor of the Year

The winner of the In Business Survivor of the Year is announced - the business hero or heroine who looked disaster in the face during the past year.... and survived.

The last in the series, presented by Peter Day.

Series editor Alan Griffiths. Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day.

Editor: Alan Griffiths.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910508]

Presented By: Peter Day.

Editor: Alan Griffiths.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910512]

Survivor of the Year The winner of the In

Business Survivor of the Year is announced - the business hero or heroine who looked disaster in the face during the past year... and survived. The last in the present series, presented by Peter Day.

Stereo

Contributors

Presented By: Peter Day

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910512]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910821]

NEW All Going Down

Together

The depositors in BCCI, the scandal-torn bank, include many small businesses. In the first of the new series, Peter Day and Nigel Cassidy find out how these businesses are surviving the fall of the bank - and how much longer they can avoid falling into the hands of the receiver themselves.

Producer Catherine Watt

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Day

Unknown: Nigel Cassidy

Producer: Catherine Watt

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910821]

Unknown: Peter Day

Unknown: Nigel Cassidy

Producer: Catherine Watt

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910825]

All Going Down Together

The depositors in BCCI, the scandal-torn bank, include many small businesses. In the first of the new series, Peter Day and Nigel Cassidy find out how these businesses are surviving the fall of the bank - and how much longer they can avoid falling into the hands of the receiver themselves.

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Day

Unknown: Nigel Cassidy

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910825]

Unknown: Peter Day

Unknown: Nigel Cassidy

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910828]

The Bank That Likes to Say Ja

Peter Day travels to

Ingolstadt in Bavaria, and compares the British and German banking systems through the eyes of the town's inhabitants.

Producer Stuart Maisner

Contributors

Producer: Stuart Maisner

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910828]

Producer: Stuart Maisner

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910901]

The Bank That Likes to Say Ja

Peter Day travels to

Ingolstadt in Bavaria, and compares the British and German banking systems through the eyes of the town's inhabitants.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910904]

Terminal Illness

Healthcare in the United

States is in crisis. Costs have spiralled out of control; companies face enormous costs to protect their employees, and 37 million people have no health insurance at all.

As Britain's health service faces sweeping change,

Richard Quest reports on the American system in chaos, and the search for a solution. Presented by Peter Day.

Producer Colin Wilde

Contributors

Unknown: Richard Quest

Presented By: Peter Day.

Producer: Colin Wilde

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910904]

Unknown: Richard Quest

Presented By: Peter Day.

Producer: Colin Wilde

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910908]

Richard Quest reports on American healthcare in chaos. With Peter Day.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910911]

The Hong Kong of Europe?

Japanese investment in Britain is set to rocket in the 90s, much to the alarm of some of our

European partners.

Peter Day explores the impact of Japan on different British industries and regions, and asks whether Britain is becoming 'the Hong Kong of Europe' or just a giant Japanese screwdriver plant. Producer Stuart Maisner

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910915]

Peter Day explores the impact of Japan on British industries and regions.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910918]

Daddy Breaks

Studies of the strain on working women are now looking at the stress on working men. Should men follow a work pattern which demands long hours away from their family, particularly when their children are young? And who is going to pay for it? Producer Colin Wilde

Contributors

Producer: Colin Wilde

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910918]

Producer: Colin Wilde

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910922]

Daddy Breaks

Studies of the strain on working women have now turned interest onto the stress on working men. Stereo

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910925]

The Channel Tunnel: the Ultimate Pipe Dream? When former Prime

Minister

Margaret Thatcher gave the Channel Tunnel the final go-ahead, she assured the people of Kent and the Nord-Pas de

Calais that the project would encourage new enterprise in their areas. Five years on, Nigel Cassidy reports on who will benefit when the Channel

Tunnel finally opens.

Producer Neil Koenig. Stereo

Contributors

Unknown: Margaret Thatcher

Unknown: Nigel Cassidy

Producer: Neil Koenig.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910925]

Unknown: Margaret Thatcher

Unknown: Nigel Cassidy

Producer: Neil Koenig.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910929]

The Channel Tunnel: the Ultimate Pipe Dream? Nigel Cassidy reports on who will benefit when the Channel Tunnel opens. Stereo

Contributors

Unknown: Nigel Cassidy

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910929]

Unknown: Nigel Cassidy

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911002]

Seconds Out

Time is money, and ever more ferocious competition is forcing firms to slash the amount of time it takes them to bring new products to market. It can mean cramming into a few months a development process that used to take years: experts call the technique 'time compression'. Peter Day reports on a management revolution in the making. Producer Mark Gregory. Stereo

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Day

Producer: Mark Gregory.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911002]

Unknown: Peter Day

Producer: Mark Gregory.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911006]

Seconds Out

Ferocious competition is forcing firms to slash the amount of time it takes them to bring new products to market. Peter Day reports on a management revolution in the making.

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Day

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911006]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19911009]

You Never Got Poor by.... David Sullivan is a press baron with a difference: he and his readers have got sex on the brain. From this week, his paper The Sport is published seven days a week. Is it alien porn, or just pleasing the public? Peter Day finds out. Producer Neil Koenig

Contributors

Unknown: David Sullivan

Unknown: Peter Day

Producer: Neil Koenig

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911009]

Unknown: David Sullivan

Unknown: Peter Day

Producer: Neil Koenig

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911013]

You Never Got Poor by.... David Sullivan is a press baron with a difference: he and his readers have got sex on the brain. From last week his paper The Sport is published seven days a week. Alien porn, or just pleasing the public? Peter Day finds out.

Contributors

Unknown: David Sullivan

Unknown: Peter Day

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911013]

Unknown: David Sullivan

Unknown: Peter Day

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911016]

Quality Street

It sounds obvious: quality matters. Tens of thousands of companies have achieved the national standard for quality systems - BS 5750. But while manufacturing industry has been preaching the lesson for a decade, it's taking much longer for the quality gospel to spread into the service industries and the public sector. Are quality promises worth the paper they're printed on? Peter Day investigates.

Producer Stephen Chilcott. Stereo

Contributors

Producer: Stephen Chilcott.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911016]

Producer: Stephen Chilcott.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911020]

Quality Street

The "quality" gospel is being preached ever louder throughout business. Is the message getting through? Peter Day investigates.

Stereo

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911023]

Grapes of Wrath

Britons drink four billion pounds worth of wine a year - but only one fifth of one per cent is English. The British Government and the EC have radical plans for wine in Europe. Will their ideas wither English wine on the vine? Peter Day and Roger White investigate.

Producer Stephen Chilcott. Stereo

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Day

Unknown: Roger White

Producer: Stephen Chilcott.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911023]

Unknown: Peter Day

Unknown: Roger White

Producer: Stephen Chilcott.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911027]

Grapes of Wrath

The British government and the EC have radical plans for wine in Europe. Will their ideas wither

English wine on the vine? In the last programme of the series, Peter Day and Roger White investigate. Stereo

Contributors

Unknown: Peter Day

Unknown: Roger White

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911027]

Unknown: Peter Day

Unknown: Roger White

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920318]

Bumping Along the Bottom

After the longest recession for 50 years, there's still little sign of an upturn. In the first of a new series,

Peter Day hears the anger and frustration of people who were in business and have seen their companies fail in the last 18 months.

How can businesses survive, and what is preventing this recession from ending?

Producer Colin Wilde Editor Alan Griffiths

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920318]

Unknown: Peter Day

Producer: Colin Wilde

Editor: Alan Griffiths

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920322]

Bumping Along the Bottom

In the first of a new series, Peter Day hears the anger and frustration of people who were in business and have seen their companies fail in the recession of the last eighteen months.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920322]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920325]

Take a P45, Ms Jones In Sweden they promote them, in Britain we make them redundant.

Nigel Cassidy discovers why the office secretary is fast becoming an endangered species.

Producer Neil Koenig. Stereo

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920325]

Unknown: Ms Jones

Unknown: Nigel Cassidy

Producer: Neil Koenig.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920329]

Take a P45, Ms Jones Nigel Cassidy discovers why the office secretary is fast becoming an endangered species.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920329]

Unknown: Ms Jones

Unknown: Nigel Cassidy

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920401]

Trainer

Presented by Peter Day.

It's dark, you are cold and damp, sheltering as best you can under some plastic sheeting. But this is not some army exercise - just part of the very latest in management training. From assault courses to role-playing, such training is now big business. But how useful is it, and which approach really challenges your executives' way of thinking?

Producer Tim Bowler

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920401]

Presented By: Peter Day.

Producer: Tim Bowler

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920405]

Trainer

Peter Day investigates the latest techniques in management training.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920408]

After the boom that dramatically changed city skylines in the 1980s, commercial property is undergoing the worst slump this century. But it's less than 20 years since the last property crisis. Why do the banks who lend the money and the property developers who borrow it have such short memories?

Peter Day finds out.

Producer Melanie Fanstone

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920408]

Unknown: Peter Day

Producer: Melanie Fanstone

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920412]

It's less than 20 years since the last property crisis. Why do the banks who lend the money and the property developers who borrow it have such short memories?

Peter Day finds out.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920412]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920415]

1992: Old Customs Die

Hard

Balloonists think the single European Market is all hot air. To the drug companies, cough mixture is nothing to sneeze at. Lightning conductor makers aren't struck by it. Bee-keepers are still getting stung by trade barriers. Peter Day investigates the Uncommon Market.

Producer Neil Koenig. Stereo

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920415]

Producer: Neil Koenig.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920419]

1992: Old Customs Die Hard

Balloonists think the single European Market is all hot air. To the drug companies, cough mixture is nothing to sneeze at. Lightning-conductor makers aren't struck by it. Bee-keepers are still getting stung by trade barriers. And recyclists can't pedal hard enough to keep up with the new

German packaging rules. Peter Day investigates the Uncommon Market.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920422]

Grantrepreneurs? Northern Ireland's businesses are accused of absorbing huge public subsidies but showing few returns. Roger White investigates.

Producer Ann Gilmartin. Stereo

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920422]

Unknown: Roger White

Producer: Ann Gilmartin.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920426]

Grantrepreneurs?

Roger White reports on the strengths and flaws of the Northern Ireland economy.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920426]

Unknown: Roger White

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920429]

Dial "F" for Fraud

Telephone pirates are tapping into the networks in America and running up a multi-billion-dollar fraud. How soon will it be before they cross the Atlantic? Peter Day follows hard on the heels of the hackers, their trackers and the telephone 'phreaks' who don the names of comic-book heroes and villains in their battle with the organisations.

Producer Colin Wilde. Stereo

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920429]

Producer: Colin Wilde.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920503]

Dial 'F' For Fraud

Peter Day reports on the American problem of telephone fraud that may soon arrive here.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920503]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920506]

The prospects for business after the election.

Presented by Peter Day. Producer Mark Gregory. Stereo

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920506]

Presented By: Peter Day.

Producer: Mark Gregory.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920510]

Is the new political environment helping firms to beat the recession?

Peter Day reports.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920510]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920517]

Public or Private?

In the last programme of the series Peter Day explores the pros and cons of becoming a public company.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920826]

"If ifs not hurting, it's not working...." said John Major of his economic policy when he was Chancellor. Three years later, it's still hurting, and the business outlook is grim. Recession is expected to stretch out well into next year - possibly even longer. How does a company survive? In Business returns with three case histories and a panel of experts taking a long look at the current agony of British business. Presented by Peter Day. Editor Stephen Chilcott Producer Caroline Bayley

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920826]

Unknown: John Major

Presented By: Peter Day.

Editor: Stephen Chilcott

Producer: Caroline Bayley

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920830]

The business outlook is grim.

Recession is expected to stretch out into the next year. In Business returns with three case histories and a panel of experts looking at the current agony of British business. Presented by Peter Day

Stereo (Broadcast fast Wednesday;

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920830]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920902]

The New Age Auditors Just like everyone else, businesses are under pressure to conform to fashionable trends.

Nigel Cassidy follows a group of consultants around a Manchester paint company as they examine new management skills from ethics to the colour of clothes. But can these New

Age Auditors increase profitability?

Producer Robert McKenzie

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920902]

Unknown: Nigel Cassidy

Producer: Robert McKenzie

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920906]

The New Age Auditors Nigel Cassidy investigates new management skills in a Manchester paint company.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920906]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920909]

California - Running on Empty

For generations, it's been a place of dreams: a place where the 21st century arrived early. But now the Golden State is tarnished.

Its economy is in trouble, its government hugely overspent. Even the lowest American interest rates for

40 years are failing to get business going again in time for the presidential election. Californians have seen the future - and it's faltering.

Peter Day reports on the lessons the rest of the world can learn from

California.

Producer Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920909]

Unknown: Peter Day

Producer: Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920913]

California - Running on Empty

For generations, it's been a place of dreams: a place where the 21st century arrived early. But now the Golden State's economy is in trouble, its government hugely overspent. Even the lowest American interest rates for 40 years are failing to get business going again in time for the presidential election. Peter Day reports on the lessons the rest of the world can learn from California.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920913]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920916]

Watching the Workers Every day fraudsters get away with pilfering the profits. They are employees who find hundreds of different ways to steal from their company. But now the firms are fighting back with increasingly sophisticated ways of catching the culprits. Peter Day investigates.

Producer Melanie Fanstone

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920916]

Producer: Melanie Fanstone

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920920]

Watching the Workers Peter Day investigates how firms are fighting back against office fraudsters.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920923]

Dear Boss. You're Fired - The radical process where staff are asked to rate their managers' performance has been in use in the US since the 60s - and now it's catching on in Britain. Peter Day meets the workers who are now able to tell their bosses what they think of them, and he asks the bosses how brave companies need to be to introduce the scheme. Editor Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920923]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920927]

"Dear Boss, You're Fired...."

Peter Day meets the workers who are now able to tell their bosses what they think of them... and he asks the bosses how brave companies need to be to introduce the scheme.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920927]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920930]

The Intensive Care Unit

Corporate casualties have reached epidemic proportions as the plague of the recession continues.

Banks are trying to stop the infection but only a few firms can be nursed back to health. Peter Day goes into a bank's intensive care unit with the man who has the power of business life and death in his hands. Producer Colin Wilde

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920930]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19921004]

The Intensive Care Unit with Peter Day.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921004]

Unknown: Peter Day.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921007]

Who Needs Unions?

As trade unions face up to another round of legal curbs on their power, Peter Day reports on whether there is still a role for organised labour in a radically changed business climate.

Producer Mark Gregory

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921007]

Unknown: Peter Day

Producer: Mark Gregory

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921011]

Who Needs Unions?

Peter Day asks whether there is a role for organised labour in a radically changed business climate.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921014]

"Dear Boss... You're

Fired...."

Peter Day meets the workers who are now able to tell their bosses what they think of them... and he asks the bosses how brave companies need to be to introduce the scheme. Editor Stephen Chilcott

(Postponed from 23 September)

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921014]

Unknown: Peter Day

Editor: Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921018]

"Dear Boss, You're Fired...."

Peter Day examines the radical process where staff evaluate their managers.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921018]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19921021]

Dealing with the Bear Why has Littlewoods set up shop in St Petersburg? What's behind a Welsh company baking bread on a Moscow housing estate? Caroline Bayley reports on how well British business is overcoming the problems of dealing profitably with the Russian bear.

Editor Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921021]

Unknown: Caroline Bayley

Editor: Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921025]

Dealing with the Bear Caroline Bayley reports on how well British businesses are dealing with Russia.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921025]

Unknown: Caroline Bayley

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921028]

There Are Bad Times

Just Around the Comer - Noel Coward 's song of 40 years ago poked fun at doom-mongers, but these days it's not so amusing. With still no end to the recession in sight, is recession about to turn into a 1930s-style slump? Have politicians failed the economy - and can industry pull off a recovery in spite of them? Peter Day reports.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921028]

Unknown: Noel Coward

Unknown: Peter Day

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921101]

There Are Bad Times Just Around the Comer

Have politicians failed the economy and can industry pull off a recovery? Peter Day reports.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921101]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930310]

NEW Export or Die?

The Prime

Minister says it's time to start selling Britain abroad - but is British business up to the challenge?

Devaluation has given us a chance to steal a competitive advantage overseas, but are we sinking beneath the waves of imports rolling into the country? Peter Day asks if Britain PLC can export its way out of recession. Producer Robert McKenzie

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930310]

Producer: Robert McKenzie

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930314]

Export or Die?

Peter Day asks if Britain PLC can export its way out of recession.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930317]

The BBC is being shaken up, as market forces are applied to public services which have never had to face them before. The

BBC's market-place revolution is called

Producer Choice. From

April 1, programme makers will choose whether they want to pay for BBC resources, or go outside to buy from independent suppliers.

How big a change is this for a public organisation? Peter Day investigates. Producer Caroline Bayley

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930317]

Producer: Caroline Bayley

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930321]

At the BBC, "producer choice" is applying market forces to programme making. How big a change is this for a public organisation? Peter Day investigates.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930324]

Business in Handcuffs

Fraud is a high-profile crime, but prosecuting fraudsters has brought big problems for the authorities - especially the Serious Fraud Office. Can juries cope? Is a trial that lasts more than a year a worse punishment than a conviction? Peter Day investigates how to lock up the fraudsters.

Producer Nicholas Kochan

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930324]

Producer: Nicholas Kochan

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930328]

Business in Handcuffs

In view of the problems caused by big fraud cases, Peter Day investigates how to lock up the fraudsters.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930328]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930331]

Prize Performance

Companies large and small are waking up to the cult of quality, now seen as the essential ingredient in business success. The new glittering prize in the quality race is the award from the European

Foundation for Quality Management.

Peter Day finds how Rank Xerox Limited went about winning it, and what the company learned about itself during the arduous process.

Editor Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930331]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930404]

Prize Performance

Companies large and small are waking up to the cult of quality, and the new glittering prize in the quality race is the award from the European

Foundation for Quality Management. Peter Day finds how Rank Xerox Limited went about winning it, and what the company learned about itself in the process.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930404]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930407]

Bad Company

Commercial skulduggery has focused attention on ethics in business. Peter

Day examines the gap between the promises companies make and what they do in practice. Editor Neil Koenig

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930407]

Editor: Neil Koenig

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930411]

Bad Company

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930414]

Arrivederci Roma

For years, the Italian economic miracle has been a patchwork quilt of wonder growth and inpenetrable corruption.

But now it's coming apart at the seams, as scandal unravels the system. Peter Day investigates whether Europe's third largest economy can pull itself back from the brink.

Producer Mark Gregory

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930414]

Producer: Mark Gregory

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930418]

Arrivederci Roma

Peter Day examines the state of the Italian economy.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930421]

Turning Up the Heat The last ten years have seen the creation of a new breed of people: the regulators who intervene to control the activities of the privatised monopolies. They have got power without precedent, and they have provoked sharp reactions from the industries they preside over. Peter Day asks how the regulators are measuring up.

Producer Robert McKenzie

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930421]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930425]

Turning Up the Heat The last ten years have seen the creation of a new breed of people: the regulators who intervene to control the activities of the privatised monopolies. Peter Day asks how they are measuring up.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930428]

with Peter Day. Producer Tim Bowler

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930428]

Unknown: Peter Day.

Producer: Tim Bowler

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930502]

with Peter Day.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930502]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930505]

BS 5750 - Dream or Nightmare?

The quality standard BS 5750 is now being widely adopted by service industries. Many companies are proud of their new kitemark: but many others are in revolt at the requirement to get one in order to remain in business.

Nigel Cassidy reports. Producer Neil Koenig

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930505]

Unknown: Nigel Cassidy

Producer: Neil Koenig

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930509]

BS 5750 - Dream or Nightmare?

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930516]

Infomania

In the last of the series,

Peter Day reports from the USA on the impact of the communications explosion.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930516]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930825]

Shelf Life. Shopping is in turmoil.

- The fabulous profit margins of the supermarket chains are under attack. From the High Street and out of town, Peter Day reports on the future of shopping, and the new competition from discounters, from high-tech innovation and from home shopping. Producer Colin Wilde

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930825]

Unknown: Peter Day

Producer: Colin Wilde

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930829]

Shelf Life. Peter Day reports on the future of shopping and takes a look at some of the new competitors.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930829]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930901]

Who Needs Managers? Meet the company that's torn up the management rulebook. Where workers set their own hours, and many of them decide on their own pay. Peter Day reports from Brazil on the lessons Semco has to teach businesses around the world.

Producer Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930901]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930905]

Wlio Needs Managers? Meet the company that's torn up the management rulebook.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930908]

TECnophobia. Industry complains of a skills shortage while the Government's network of Training and Enterprise Councils is supposed to provide people to do jobs. Can the TECs cope? Peter Day asks if Britain's idea of training is merely keeping the unemployment queues down.

Producer Robert McKenzie

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930908]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930912]

TECnophobia. Peter Day asks if Britain's idea of training is merely keeping the unemployment queues down.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930915]

Europe Unchained. One year ago, the pound was expelled from the European Exchange Rate Mechanism. At the end of July, continental Europe was shocked by the virtual breakdown of the ERM, but can the rest of Europe imitate Britain and translate monetary disaster into economic recovery? Peter Day asks European business leaders what they want now.

Producer Mark Gregory

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930915]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930919]

Europe Unchained

In the aftermath of the virtual breakdown of the ERM, Peter Day asks business leaders across Europe what they want now.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930919]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930922]

How to Steal the Best Ideas in the World

Business around the globe has discovered a way of plundering the best ideas and practices - legally. Peter Day sizes up the art of "benchmarking" one of the mightiest management tools around.

Editor Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930922]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930926]

How to Steal the Best Ideas in the World

Peter Day looks at "Benchmarking".

Editor Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930926]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930929]

Poisoned Profits. Peter Day investigates whether EC environmental legislation will make Europe a healthier place - or bankrupt the businesses that own land affected by years of drip by drip contamination. Who pays the billions of pounds' clean-up bill?

Producer Robert McKenzie

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930929]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931010]

Presented by Peter Day.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931010]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931013]

Can You Hear Me?

The communications revolution is speeding up and telecoms companies such as BT are busy forming global alliances with which to face the future.

But do they know where they are heading? Presented by Peter Day.

Editor Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931013]

Presented By: Peter Day.

Editor: Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931017]

Can You Hear Me? As the communications revolution speeds up, do telecoms companies knowwhere they're heading? Presented by Peter Day.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931017]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931020]

Most bosses are sure they know best when it comes to running their firm. But what happens when visiting consultants think it's time to make some changes? Nigel Cassidy follows the fortunes of one company as it gets a second opinion. Producer Robert McKenzie

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931020]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931024]

What happens when consultants think it's time to make some changes in a firm? Nigel Cassidy follows the fortunes of one company as it gets a second opinion.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931024]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931027]

IfltAin Broke - Fix It. Re-engineering is the invention of Dr Mike Hammer. He believes it is pointless making small changes to a company. To create big gains, the way the company works must be rebuilt from scratch. Peter Day crosses America looking at companies transformed by Hammer's ideas.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931027]

Unknown: Dr Mike Hammer.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931031]

The last in the series looks at the re-engineering theory of Dr Mike Hammer , who believes that to create big gains companies must be rebuilt from scratch.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931031]

Unknown: Dr Mike Hammer

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970316]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970316]

Knowledge Is Power. Companies are waking up to the power that lies within their own history. Peter Day reports on the rise of the "learning organisation". Producer Neil Koenig

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970316]

Unknown: Peter Day

Producer: Neil Koenig

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970316]

Unknown: Peter Day

Producer: Neil Koenig

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970323]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970323]

Sterling Work. The rapid rise of the pound is putting a perilous squeeze on industry. Peter Day reports on how businesses can cope. Producer Mark Gregory

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970323]

Unknown: Peter Day

Producer: Mark Gregory

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970323]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970330]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970330]

It's New! Small firms need to innovate just like the big ones. Peter Day asks how they can afford to. Editor Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970330]

Editor: Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970330]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970406]

Bosses in Revolt

Sweden's biggest companies are up in arms about the way the country is run. Peter Day finds out why. Producer Niel Koenig

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970406]

Unknown: Peter Day

Producer: Niel Koenig

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970413]

Fired at Fifty. It is something more and more people are experiencing: the career that ends in middle age. Peter Day asks what comes afterwards. Producer Paul Dwyer

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970413]

Producer: Paul Dwyer

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970420]

The Big Picture. Peter Day asks if

Lottery money can boost the British film industry.

Producer Josh de la Mare

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970420]

Unknown: Peter Day

Producer: Josh de la Mare

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970427]

The Crash of 97. Tremors hit the stock markets. Peter Day asks whether business needs to bother about them.

Producer Neil Koenig

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970427]

Producer: Neil Koenig

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970504]

Co-op PLC

Peter Day asks what the Co-operative movement still has to offer. Editor Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970504]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970511]

Uneasy Peasy. Peter Day reports from Tokyo on Japan's problems at home. Editor Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970511]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970518]

Room Service. Peter Day reports on the growth of the hotel industry. Producer Neil Koenig

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970518]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970525]

Coming Home. Peter Day reports on why the Irish are returning home to work. Producer Paul Dwyer

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970525]

Unknown: Peter Day

Producer: Paul Dwyer

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970601]

Caught in the Net. Internet commerce could take over the world. Peter Day asks what is holding it back. Producer Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970601]

Producer: Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970608]

Boom Service. Peter Day reports on the growth of the hotel industry. Producer Neil Koenig

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970608]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970615]

Peter Day reports on events in the business and management worlds. Producer Paul Dwyer

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970615]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970622]

The New Leaders. In the final programme in the series, Peter Day asks what big business can learn from the new breed of entrepreneurs. Producer Janet Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970622]

Producer: Janet Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970907]

Own Goal. Football clubs sack their managers when performance falters. Peter Day asks why ordinary companies are so reluctant to change the management to get results. Producer Paul Dwyer

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970907]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970914]

Nerds on Top. The new world economy is suffering from a crucial shortagebrainpower. Peter Day asks if there are enough computer experts to keep the information revolution rolling. Producer Josh de la Mare

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970914]

Producer: Josh de la Mare

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970921]

Out of Control. Dee Hock built Visa into what he calls the world's largest commercial enterprise. He tells Peter Day why he thinks that his management ideas can save the business world.

Producer Neil Koenig

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970921]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970928]

Her Company

It will soon be commonplace to find women filling the top posts in large companies. Peter Day wonders how different a female company will be. Producer Rosamund Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970928]

Producer: Rosamund Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971005]

Face the Music

Classical music is under pressure.

With CD sales falling, Peter Day asks whether the industry can hit the right note once again.

Producer Josh de ia Mare

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971005]

Unknown: Peter Day

Producer: Josh de Ia Mare

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971012]

Crossed Wires

Europe is being left far behind in the race to make money out of the internet. Peter Day asks what has gone wrong. Producer Neil Koenig

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971012]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19971019]

The Guru's Guru

For more than 40 years, Peter Drucker has been the most respected management expert in the world.

He tells Peter Day what is currently on his mind.

Producer Neil Koenig

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971019]

Unknown: Peter Drucker

Producer: Neil Koenig

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971026]

Not for Profit

Peter Day investigates a new breed of business people -social entrepreneurs. Producer Josh De La Mare

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971026]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19971102]

Whistle Blowers

Peter Day looks at what happens when workers uncover company malpractice. Producer Rosamund Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971102]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19971109]

Fear 2000

Many computer users do not realise that

1.1.2000 could be a disastrous date for their organisation. With Peter Day. Producer Neil Koenig

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971109]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19971123]

Euro Era

Much of Europe is heading for monetary union before the UK. Peter Day finds out where that leaves British companies. Editor Stephen Chilcott

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971123]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19971130]

Survival Instinct

Twenty years is the lifespan of most companies. A few are built to last. Peter Day meets the survivors. Producer Rosamund Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971130]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19971207]

Asian Flu

Bitter winds have chilled the Far East economies this autumn. Peter Day asks if the west will also catch a cold. Producer Mark Gregory

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971207]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19971214]

Rule Britannica

Peter Day asks if the world's best-known encyclopedia can survive in the new era of electronic information. Producer Josh de la Mare

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971214]
GENOME:
[R4 BD=19941002]

Hello Caller. With all eyes on the so-called information superhighway, is the bell tolling for the POT - the plain old telephone? Peter Day investigates. Producer Colin Wilde

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19941002]

Producer: Colin Wilde

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19941009]

Big McK. The McKinsey men are the most influential management consultants in the world. Peter Day reports from Chicago where "the Firm" started almost 70 years ago. Producer Colin Wilde

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19941009]

Unknown: Peter Day

Producer: Colin Wilde

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19941016]

Presented by Peter Day. Editor Stephen Chilcott

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19941016]

Presented By: Peter Day.

Editor: Stephen Chilcott

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19941023]

Peter Day investigates why many large companies lose their innovative edge. Producer Rosamund Jones

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19941023]

Producer: Rosamund Jones

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19941030]

Chips with Everything. As the National Lottery opens, Nigel Cassidy examines the prospects for the gambling industry. Producer Neil Koenig

GENOME:
[R4 BD=19941030]

Unknown: Nigel Cassidy

Producer: Neil Koenig

Going For Growth20101125

In the middle of a recession renewed economic growth is always considered the great panacea that will get us out of the mess we are in.

However, is this really the way to tackle the problems of a finite world? Peter Day wonders if our reliance on growth is not a snare and a delusion.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

Grand Design * *2009042320090426

Designers are getting tired of being pigeon-holed into the role of making products look better and work better.

Peter Day argues that it is high time that designers are given a far larger role in all sorts of organisations.

He hears from some influential people who are convinced that something called Design Thinking can help companies cope with a wide variety of great big business uncertainties, not just the shape of the box they come in.

Peter Day argues that it is time for designers to be given a larger role in organisations.

Grape Expectations2004070120040704

How did upstart newcomers wrench the mystique away from the hallowed French wine trade? Peter Day tells the story of a vintage revolution.

Grapevine2003060520030608

Whispers, amplified by the internet, play a large part in public life.

Peter Day investigates what happens when rumour and gossip mix with business.

Graphene20150820

Graphene2015082020150823 (R4)

It would take an elephant balanced on the tip of a pencil to break through a sheet of graphene the thickness cling film. That's the description those promoting this new wonder material like to use to illustrate the strength of graphene.

The atomic material was isolated by two scientists at Manchester University in 2004. Now, just over a decade and one Nobel prize later, Peter Day visits the newly opened the National Graphene Institute. Its aim is to bring business and science together, to develop potential future uses for graphene. Will this strategy succeed where Britain's past attempts to spin out scientific discoveries have not?

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

(Image credit: The University of Manchester)

Graphene2015082020150823 (R4)

It would take an elephant balanced on the tip of a pencil to break through a sheet of graphene the thickness cling film. That's the description those promoting this new wonder material like to use to illustrate the strength of graphene.

The atomic material was isolated by two scientists at Manchester University in 2004. Now, just over a decade and one Nobel prize later, Peter Day visits the newly opened the National Graphene Institute. Its aim is to bring business and science together, to develop potential future uses for graphene. Will this strategy succeed where Britain's past attempts to spin out scientific discoveries have not?

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

(Image credit: The University of Manchester)

Graphene20150820

It would take an elephant balanced on the tip of a pencil to break through a sheet of graphene the thickness cling film. That's the description those promoting this new wonder material like to use to illustrate the strength of graphene.

The atomic material was isolated by two scientists at Manchester University in 2004. Now, just over a decade and one Nobel prize later, Peter Day visits the newly opened the National Graphene Institute. Its aim is to bring business and science together, to develop potential future uses for graphene. Will this strategy succeed where Britain's past attempts to spin out scientific discoveries have not?

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

Green Machine2006020220060205

Can corporations really clean up their act and improve the world, or do they still believe that it's mainly profits that matter? Peter Day finds out.

Includes a rare interview with Al Gore.

Interviewees: 

Former US Vice President, Al Gore, now Chairman of Generation Investment Management

David Blood, Managing Partner, Generation Investment Management

Jonathon Porritt, Environmental Campaigner and author of 'Capitalism, As if the World Matters'

Ray Anderson, Chairman and Founder, Interface Carpets 

Sarah Severn, Director of Corporate Responsibility Horizons, Nike 

Mike Clasper, Chief Executive, BAA 

Herman Mulder, Head of Risk Management, ABN AMRO.

Growing Old2012040520120408

As Baby Boomers start turning 65, many countries are quite suddenly growing old. The trend means

big changes for the economy, healthcare, social life..and a challenge to the assumptions by which we have

lived life for the past two centuries. Peter Day explains why.

Baby Boomers are turning 65, and many countries will have to face the challanges of ageing

Growing Pains2003061220030615

Peter Day finds out what stops small businesses becoming big.

Growing Pains20101128

In the middle of a recession renewed economic growth is always considered the great panacea that will get us out of the mess we are in.

However, is this really the way to tackle the problems of a finite world? Peter Day wonders if our reliance on growth is not a snare and a delusion.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

Peter Day wonders why economic growth is always considered the great panacea.

Hands On2007092720070930

Neglected skills may be undermining how companies perform.

Peter Day investigates what businesses can learn from people who have learnt their craft the hard way.

Happy Go Lucky2008061920080622

Peter Day asks whether companies ought to pay more attention to how happy their employees are.

Hard To Credit * *2009091720090920

Smaller businesses are still struggling to cope with the impact of the credit crunch as banks stay tough on their customers and vital trade insurance is hard to get, as Peter Day reports.

Smaller businesses are still struggling to cope with the impact of the credit crunch.

Has The Book A Future?2014041720140420

Orange Shortlisted Kamila Shamsie discusses her latest novel A God in Every Stone

International publishing is in the throes of an upheaval it has not faced since the advent of the paperback in the 1930s. Giant publishers are merging to get even bigger in order to square up to new digital media giants. From the London Book Fair Peter Day asks a basic question: Can books survive, and if so, how?

Producer: Kent DePinto.

Can books survive, and if so, how? Peter Day looks for the answer at the London Book Fair.

International publishing is in the throes of an upheaval it has not faced since the advent of the paperback in the 1930s. Giant publishers are merging to get even bigger in order to square up up to new digital media giants. From the London Book Fair Peter Day asks a basic question: Can books survive, and if so, how?

Health Technology2014082120140824

Peter Day reports from Silicon Valley on the cutting-edge innovation that's promising to transform healthcare. From apps which monitor your fitness to phone attachments that diagnose ear infections, the boom in high-tech gadgets is attracting millions of pounds of venture capital money. But can the technology companies really come up with the goods which will make us live longer, healthier lives?

Contributors, in order of appearance:

Ashwin Raut, Samsung

Young Sohn, Samsung

Sam De Brouwer, Scanadu

Eric Douglas, Cellscope

Vinod Khosla, Khosla Ventures

Daniel Kraft, Singularity University

Elizabeth Holmes, Theranos

Esther Dyson, HICCup

Producer: Ruth Alexander.

Heartbeat Economy2005011320050116

Within years, companies will have to offer goods and services that provide seamless, stressless satisfaction.

Peter Day looks at how this might happen.

Hell For Leather * *2009080620090809

How do you manage a traditional family shoe repair firm with 550 outlets all over the country? John Timpson does it by dropping in on them all the time to find out what's going on, day by day.

He calls it 'upside-down management'.

Peter Day went along for the ride.

Hello, Sunshine!2008011020080113

Germany has taken the lead in sustainable energy with the world's biggest solar power station and the beginnings of a significant renewables industry.

Peter Day looks for the secret of German success.

Hero Engineers2005110320051106

At the moment, we are facing problems as huge as climate change, possible future oil shortages and various natural disasters.

Once they were at the heart of social and economic progress, but perhaps it could be the engineers of today that solve these problems in the future, becoming tomorrow's heroes.

Plus, how do we get students interested enough in engineering to tempt more into this important profession?

Peter Day talks to some people in the profession who are already leading the way.

Hidden Depths2010090220100905

London-born Graham Hawkes is the man who has created a submersible vessel that flies through the deepest ocean like a plane.

Peter Day reports from his workshop in California, where he wonders why space exploration makes decades of headlines while it is so hard to get backers for deepsea travel into a world no one has ever seen.

Peter Day meets the man designing a radical new undersea vehicle.

Hive Of Innovation2006062220060625

The Honeybee network is one of the most creative enterprises on earth: helping village inventors in India to share their ideas with a global audience.

But now it is forging an alliance with one of the USA's brainiest universities: Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Peter Day says the results could change the world.

Hot Stuff2008052920080601

Some people think that global warming offers a huge business opportunity for companies who can find new ways of tackling climate change.

Peter Day hears from small start-up companies who seem to have few fears about embarking on projects which may - or may not - have a huge impact on our world.

How To Go Bust *2008121820081221

Peter Day asks if there is a right or wrong way to tackle intractable business problems.

Peter Day asks if there is a right or wrong way to tackle intractable business problems and seeks hints about surviving the current hard economic times.

Hush Hush2006060120060604

The Silent Plane is just one of the projects being pursued by the transAtlantic Cambridge-MIT project.

Peter Day finds out what happens when you put two brainy institutions together.

Iceland - In From The Cold20120913

In 2008 Iceland's three main banks went bust plunging it into financial disaster. In Business reported on the crash in early 2009. Three years later Peter Day returns to Iceland to look at, what many see as its remarkable recovery. New banks have risen out of the ashes of the old, tourism and fishing are booming and the economy is growing again. Peter Day finds out if this small island nation has lessons for other countries caught up in the great Euro crisis.

Iceland Feels The Chill *20090507

The credit crunch has caused big problems to countries round the world, but in Iceland it has been disastrous.

Peter Day finds out what it is like when a whole country goes bust, and what happens afterwards.

Peter Day finds out about the disastrous effects of the credit crunch in Iceland.

Immigration - The Business View2015043020150503 (R4)

Peter Day asks business leaders how important immigration is to their bottom line.

Immigration is one of the key issues of the General Election campaign. Peter Day asks businesses, big and small, what they think about immigration. How dependent is Britain on workers from other countries in Europe, and beyond? What impact have tighter visa restrictions for migrants from outside Europe had on British business?

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

In At The Start2010081220100815

There's a tiny office space in Silicon Valley that has produced a stream of blockbuster companies in recent years, including Google and PayPal.

Peter Day learns how owner Saeed Amidi is now trying to nurture the start-up spirit on a much larger scale.

Producer: Neil Koenig and Sandra Kanthal.

Peter Day talks to Saeed Amidi about nurturing Silicon Valley's start-up spirit.

In The Red2003101620031019

Colour has a huge impact on our lives, thanks to the marketing profession.

Peter Day hears from the people who make decisions about colour.

Indian Identity2013041820130421

The government of India has embarked on a huge programme to give the whole population, 1.2 billion people, a unique identity number backed by fingerprint and eyeball scans. Peter Day

asks whether the ID scheme will cut poverty as it is intended to or, as critics allege, create a

Big Brother state.

India's Supermarket Sweep2008062620080629

Peter Day investigates attempts by western-style supermarkets - both Indian and foreign - to gain a foothold in India's retail sector.

Inside Silicon Valley2014081420140817

Can Silicon Valley's enormous success as the global centre of innovation continue indefinitely? With new challengers popping up all over the world - from Boston to Tel Aviv - will Silicon Valley keep ahead of the game and what seeds need to be sown now to ensure future creativity? Peter Day explores the Valley - past, present and future - with start-ups, entrepreneurs and venture capitalists.

Producer: Ruth Alexander.

Japan Gone Grey20120524

Japan is ageing faster than any other country in the world. In addition young Japanese people are having fewer babies so the population is shrinking too. So what will be the effects on the economy and the prospects for young people in the rigid Japanese work culture if older people are working longer. Peter Day reports from Shikoku in the south of Japan and Tokyo.

Producer Julie Ball.

Japan Gone Grey2012072620120729

Japan is ageing faster than anywhere else. Peter Day reports on how they are coping.

Japan is ageing faster than anywhere else, and the population is shrinking. 2012 is the crunch year as many of their baby boomers reach retirement age. How will Japan manage an economy where their healthy pensioners might survive at least another 20 years and younger citizens don't seem to want to have children? So how will Japan cope and who will pay the bill?

Job Search2013050220130505

Millions of young people want to work but do not know where to find it.

A clutch of them tell their stories to Peter Day, and a panel of experts

weighs in with advice and guidance.

Jobs On The Line2004090920040912

Right in the middle of the original Beetle plant in Germany, Volkswagen have created a revolutionary production line employing only people who were previously unemployed.

Peter Day reports on a project designed to cut costs enough to keep car making alive in the heart of Europe.

Join The Crowd2012082320120826

Peter Day reports on crowdfunding - businesses asking for start-up cash on the internet.

Short of cash to start a business? Instead of going to the bank for a loan, asking for cash from friends or family, or meeting with venture capitalists, how about asking hundreds or thousands of strangers on the internet to buy your product or a share in your company?

It's called crowdfunding, and it's a strategy that was first adopted by filmmakers and musicians. Now more and more businesses are using crowdfunding websites to raise capital.

Peter Day meets some of the businesses turning to this innovative form of fundraising as well as some of the founders of high-tech companies matching up entrepreneurs with investors.

He also finds out more about the potential risks and asks whether crowdfunding will remain a niche business tool or an idea that will transform the way entrepreneurs raise money.

Producer: Mike Wendling

Editor: Stephen Chilcott.

Junk Shopped2004021220040215

Junk mail is breaking out all over, from pop-up ads on the internet to computerised phone calls with nobody on the other end.

Peter Day reports.

Keep It Local2011050520110508

As pubs struggle to survive, Peter Day travels through villages in Yorkshire and Cumbria to talk to local activists and find out how easy it is to buy and successfully run one of the focal points for any community - the village pub.

He looks at the successes and failures and asks whether sheer enthusiasm and community spirit is enough to win through.

Is there an economic case for these sorts of projects or can they only survive through grants and subsidies?

As pubs struggle to survive, local communities are getting involved in keeping them alive.

Keep On Working2004091620040919

Workers with pension problems are facing a future of work beyond the current pensionable age.

Peter Day investigates.

Kenya's Mobile Money Revolution2013122620131229

Peter Day traces the story of how mobile phones kick-started Kenya's tech economy.

Kenya is the surprising world leader in high-tech mobile money. Almost a third of the country's economy now goes through the mobile phone-based system M-Pesa. Even the company that launched it six years ago, Safaricom, didn't anticipate the gusto with which Kenyans would adopt its virtual currency.

In a country with fewer than 10,000 credit cards and where four-fifths of the population does not have a bank account, M-Pesa has emerged as a secure and easy way to pay and transfer money to anyone, anywhere across the country, and even abroad.

Now the system has morphed from a method of payment into a platform for all sorts of businesses. In Nairobi there are startups aiming to boost fundraising for funerals and weddings, help landlords collect rent, loan mobile phone credit, and much more, all based on the M-Pesa system. And alongside the flowering of new businesses, the Kenyan government has pinned its hopes on the high-tech sector for the future of the country's economic growth.

Peter Day talks to traces the story of how a mobile payment experiment kick-started an emerging tech economy.

Contributors:

Bob Collymore - chief executive, Safaricom

David Mark - co-founder, M-Changa

Kamau Wanyoike - director, MoVAS

Nancy Wang - co-founder, M-Kazi

Duncan Muchangi - co-founder, Manyatta Rent

Nikolai Barnwell - director, 88mph Nairobi

Joe Mucheru - Sub-Saharan ambassador, Google

Tony Mwai - general manager, IBM East Africa

Sam Gichuru - co-founder and director, Nailab

Kate Kiguru - co-founder and chief innovator, Ukall

Will Mutua - founder, Afrinnovator.

Kit Of Life2013082920130901

Simon Berry wondered why crates of soft drinks can be found in some of the most remote places in the world, but simple medicines to treat childhood diseases have for decades failed to reach the people who need them. The social enterprise he set up, ColaLife, designed an ingenious package that can slot in between soda bottles, piggybacking on Coca-Cola's supply chain and potentially getting anywhere Coca-Cola does.

Called 'Kit Yamoyo' - roughly translated as 'kit of life' in a number of African languages - it includes oral rehydration salts and zinc to treat diarrhoea, plus a bar of soap. The outer shell also functions as a measure and drinking cup for the medicine. The idea caught the attention of the design world and won Cola Life a top prize in the London Design Awards show earlier this year.

But Simon Berry was already realising that a clever design was not enough, and that the real lesson from Coca-Cola was devising a 'value chain' - and making sure everyone involved in the distribution gets paid.

In this programme (in London and Zambia), he explains to Peter Day how he applied the profit-driven ideas of multinational companies to tackle a disease that kills more African children than HIV, malaria and measles combined.

Last Tango20150416

Less than fifteen years since Argentina last plunged into a serious economic crisis, there are fears that trouble is looming again. Peter Day reports from Buenos Aires on why the country finds it so hard to learn from its past and hears about potential solutions. He also watches the world famous tango dancing.

Producer: Keith Moore.

Lean, Mean And At Your Service2008013120080203

Global manufacturers have learnt how to save billions by following the Toyota method of lean production, perfected by the Japanese car maker over decades.

But service industries seem to be far behind.

Peter Day investigates.

Leaner And Fitter2006110220061105

Peter Day finds out how some NHS pioneers are trying to apply the mysteries of lean operating systems to hospitals and doctors' practices.

Leaner And Fitter2007010420070107

Japanese management techniques have revolutionised the car industry, but what do waste-averse production lines have to do with the delicate business of health care? Peter Day finds out how some NHS pioneers are trying to apply similar operating systems to hospitals and doctors' practices.

Learning Curve *2009073020090802

A 21st-century corporation needs a different kind of organisational structure from the old command and control mechanisms that built the world's biggest companies.

Peter Day finds out how people can create learning organisations without commanding and controlling.

Peter Day finds out how people can create learning organisations.

Let Me Entertain You * *2009121720091220

What can business leaders learn from rock musicians and improvisational comedians? Peter Day finds out.

Let's Start A Bank20090524

Peter Day finds out from the experts how to start a new bank - and also how not to do it.

It might be a good time to do so, unencumbered by the toxic loans and the government bailouts of most of the old ones.

Let's Start A Bank * *2009072320090726

Now might be a very good time to start a brand new bank, unencumbered by the toxic loans and the government bailouts of most of the old ones.

Peter Day finds out from the experts how to start a bank as well as how not to do it.

Life Coaches2004012220040125

claim they can tackle any problem from lack of promotion to a failed diet.

But can looking at your life in the round really bring happiness and success? Critics say Life Coaches are over hyped, under trained and out of their depth.

Peter Day gets his own coach to find out the truth.

Life Cycle2010040820100411

Britain is experiencing a two-wheeled revolution.

Folding bikes, e-bikes, tricycles, recumbents, fixies, cargo bikes, bamboo bikes - the bicycle is being reinvented and demand is so great that many manufacturers are struggling to keep up.

Amid burgeoning sales of bicycles and accessories, are we witnessing a genuine cultural shift towards two wheels or will this turn out to be just another fad? Peter Day meets some of the businesses and innovators hoping pedal power is here to stay.

Producer: Ben Crighton.

Peter Day slips on his cycle clips to find out where the bike industry is taking us.

Amid burgeoning sales of bicycles and accessories, are we witnessing a genuine cultural shift towards two wheels? Peter Day meets some of the businesses and innovators hoping pedal power is here to stay.

Life On The Nile20060528

As the world goes global, is the Middle East ready for it? Peter Day reports from Egypt.

Local Heroes2004020520040208

Local shops for local people is the rallying cry of the TV fantasy village of Royston Vasey but there are places still struggling to hang on to vital local enterprises in the face of remorseless competition.

Peter Day reports on farms, hand knitters and cheese makers who are going it alone and defying the odds against them.

Location, Location *20090517

Mobile phones and other devices are helping all sorts of useful objects 'know' where they are - and tell everybody else about it.

Peter Day hears from the people building companies out of this dramatic new sensing ability.

Peter Day looks into the industry arising out of devices that know their location.

Location, Location * *2009051020090514

Mobile phones and other devices are helping all sorts of useful objects 'know' where they are - and tell everybody else about it.

Peter Day hears from the people building companies out of this dramatic new sensing ability.

Longevity War Game2013120520131208

Peter Day discovers if a war game can help bridge the gap of healthy living in Newcastle.

In Newcastle if you live in a well off area you are likely to have eleven more healthy years then if you reside in a more deprived part of the city just a few miles away. These figures are replicated in areas all over Britain. Peter Day attends a Newcastle University war game put together to try and find a way to bridge this gap by 50% in ten years with no extra money. Can they come up with new solutions or will the exercise just highlight how big a problem the country faces as the population ages?

Look No Wires2005060220050605

One of the great obsessions of modern technology is getting rid of the wires that have linked people together since mass communications began.

Peter Day finds out why wireless is so important, and where it's taking business.

Look: No Wires!2003100220031005

Peter Day examines the promise and the pitfalls of wireless computing.

Made In India2011081820110821

In 1995, Peter Day visited Bangalore, the place that created India's reputation as computer outsourcing centre.

Then India was just starting to take off, fueled by deregulation and a huge pool of high-tech talent.

Since then, entrepreneurs have branched out into other industries, and the country has established itself as a world class business hub, but problems including poverty and poor infrastructure remain.

Peter Day recently revisited India to hear from the entrepreneurs who started the boom...

and the people who are setting up new businesses today.

Peter Day returns to India 16 years after his first visit to cover the high-tech boom.

Managing Eden2007053120070603

Tim Smit, creator of the Eden Project in Cornwall, talks to Peter Day about his idiosyncratic style of management.

Mao And Silicon2013112820131201

Peter Day explores two very contrasting enclaves in China.

It's 6.15am and over loudspeakers across quiet streets of Nanjiecun blares out a song more familiar during the days of Chairman Mao, "The East is Red". As the sun rises, a huge white statue of Chairman Mao, surrounded by four equally huge portraits of Lenin, Marx, Stalin and Engels become visible in the town's main square. This the last Maoist collective in China, a little enclave of the past in the socialist market economy that China has now developed. How does their economy work and what is it like to live there? Meanwhile, at 3W Coffee in Beijing's 'Silicon Valley' district entrepreneurs are queuing up for their early morning burst of caffeine. This is Beijing's first tech business incubator where you're catapulted to the China of the twenty first century, with young people pushing the boundaries of the internet to create a very different China to that of Mao sixty years ago.

May Days2004052020040523

For a few days every spring, business leaders gather in SWITZERLAND to network with students who will be the next generation's top bosses.

Peter Day reports.

Medellin Miracle2015052120150524 (R4)

Peter Day reports from Medellin, Colombia, on the city's dramatic transformation.

Less than 25 years ago Medellin was the most dangerous city on earth; with a reputation for kidnapping and murder, as well as a thriving drugs trade. Now Colombia's second city has become a top global tourist destination. Peter Day reports on a remarkable transformation.

Producer: Keith Moore.

Media Mayhem * *2009090320090906

The twin pincers of global recession and technology upheaval are putting traditional newspapers and broadcasters through the ringer.

Peter Day asks what the shape of the new media might be once the troubles are over.

Medicine Man2005062320050626

Britain is still a world-beater when it comes to PHARMACEUTICALS, and Jean-Pierre Garnier is one of the most powerful men in the global DRUGS INDUSTRY.

Peter Day asks the chief executive of GlaxoSmithKline about a business which influences millions of lives, and which has larger than usual responsibilities.

Meet The Vloggers2015010820150111 (R4)

Peter Day meets the vloggers who start making home videos and end up courted by big brands

Vlogging may be the internet's new path to riches. Peter Day meets the Youtubers who start off making videos in their bedroom and end up being courted by big brands. Will these new relationships disrupt the advertising and broadcasting industries and, for those who make the big time, can their authentic appeal be maintained in the face of fame and money?

Million Dollar Jet2003092520030928

American entrepreneur Vern Raburn wants to revolutionise air travel by building a tiny jet plane for less than a million dollars.

Can he succeed?

Mind Your Language2004061720040620

After delayering the management buzzwords and picking all the low hanging fruit, what's left? Possibly a tool for transforming companies.

Peter Day asks if management speak gets results or merely covers up the truth.

Money Making2015011520150118 (R4)

Peter Day explores the future of money and digital currencies.

Peter Day explores the future of money and asks how "cashless" we may become. With the arrival of internet based digital currencies such as bitcoin and payments via mobile phones, he looks at whether the banks will still have a role to play.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

Mr Bottom Line2008060520080608

Peter Day talks to David Tweedie, the most powerful accountant in the world.

As chairman of the International Accounting Standards Board, he is the man who tries to keep global capitalism honest in the face of bubbles, corporate lies, corruption, and huge changes in what companies do and the way they value their businesses.

Peter hears about his ceaseless quest for clarity in a world of often baffling facts and figures.

Ms Boss2004100720041010

For years, women trying to climb the corporate ladder have been banging their head on the invisible "glass ceiling" that seems to stop them from getting to the top.

Now Norway is about to use legislation to get women on company boards.

Peter Day asks whether it ought to happen here.

Music Machine2007052420070527

Some record companies and film studios are starting to use computer programmes to predict the next big hits.

Peter Day talks to the music people who are embracing the new technology and to those who are sceptical.

Music Machine

Some record companies and film studios are starting to use computer programmes to predict the next big hits.

My Old China2005021720050220

The extraordinary Chinese boom has not yet reached every part of the country.

Manchuria in the north is struggling to reduce its reliance on huge state-owned companies, which made it the industrial heartland of the old CHINA.

It's still got massive coalmines and mighty shipyards.

But Peter Day also discovers vigorous new software companies doing outsourcing for Japan, and a fee-paying boarding school run on Western lines.

Myanmar - Learning To Do Business2014092520140928

Peter Day meets the local entrepreneurs of the new Myanmar.

Myanmar, formerly known as Burma, used to be one of the wealthiest countries of south-east Asia. Then came decades of military rule. While other Asian countries furiously modernised, Myanmar stagnated. In the past few years, the country has begun to open up and many international sanctions have been lifted.

But what's it like for home grown businesses and new entrepreneurs? Peter Day talks to those who are setting up businesses despite a number of challenges, such as a lack of funding and poor infrastructure. In the capital, Yangon, he meets people who went abroad for education and have now returned to seek business opportunities at home. And he visits rural Myanmar and sees how micro-financing is working in the countryside.

Producer: Charlotte MacDonald.

Myanmar Awakening2014091820140921

Peter Day travels to Myanmar to find out how the country is trying to emerge from its past

Peter Day travels to Myanmar, formally known as Burma, to find out how the country is trying to emerge from its undeveloped past into the modern interconnected world. After the lifting of sanctions a few years ago, foreign businesses flocked to take a look at one of the least developed markets in the world. But is the country really open for business? With poor infrastructure, political uncertainty and out-dated laws, can Myanmar make the leap into the 21st century?

Net Bet2002101020021013

Two years after the dotcom bubble burst, companies are still trying to turn the internet into a profitable business.

Peter Day investigates.

Network News * *2009043020090503

What happens to leading-edge high technology companies when their customers are plunged into recession? Peter Day puts the question to two top business leaders on both sides of the Atlantic: John Chambers, chairman of the networking giant Cisco Systems, and Mike Lynch, the founder of Britain's biggest software company, Autonomy.

New Age2010010720100110

Is the increasing number of older people an opportunity for new kinds of business?

Many of the world's biggest countries are on the threshold of a new era where an increasing number of old people will have to be supported by a shrinking younger workforce. Peter Day finds out whether this is a threat to the way we live now or an opportunity for new kinds of business.

New Age * *2010010720100110

Many of the world's biggest countries are on the threshold of a new era where an increasing number of old people will have to be supported by a shrinking younger workforce.

Peter Day finds out whether this is a threat to the way we live now or an opportunity for new kinds of business.

Is the increasing number of older people an opportunity for new kinds of business?

New Bric On The Block2011040720110410

Brazil, Russia, Indonesia and China are the BRICs - the developing countries experts think are well on their way to the top of the world's economic league table.

But now there's talk that the fourth most populous country, Indonesia, is heading there, too.

From Jakarta, Peter Day finds out more.

Indonesia is heading up the world's economic league table.

Peter Day reports.

New Dimension2011072820110731

Three-D printing may be the next revolution in manufacturing.

It's being used to make things in a completely different way from the mass production we've been familiar with ever since Henry Ford introduced the production line more than 100 years ago.

Ford made a succession of almost identical items and that's what mass production still does today.

3D printing --or additive manufacturing as it's also known -- means that every product can be individual.

It's a completely different way of thinking about manufacturing and costs little more to customise than it does to mass produce.

This could potentially revolutionise manufacturing and businesses from top to bottom.

Peter Day investigates.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

Peter Day finds out how 3D printing will revolutionise the manufacturing industry.

New Dimensions2013051620130519

Manufacturing is leaping into the 21st century at some speed. Peter Day hears from the pioneers who are applying digital thinking to the making of things..by using 3D printing and many other techniques as well.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

New Dragon Rising20070121

After decades of post war neglect and isolation, Vietnam has now become the fastest growing country in Asia, after China.

Peter Day reports from a Communist country which has put out the welcome mat for foreign business and has youth on its side.

New Russia2003091820030921

Crisis, corruption and confusion are what RUSSIA went through after the end of Communism.

Twelve years later, some of the smoke is clearing.

From brand conscious Moscow and the heavily industrial provincial city of Nizhny Novgerod, Peter Day reports on business life in the new RUSSIA.

New Wave Computing2007011120070114

The world's biggest computer companies are being threatened by a host of new start-ups powered by open-source software, strings of inexpensive computer chips and 'mash-up' websites which combine information in innovative ways.

Peter Day talks to some of the rising stars of the new revolution and finds out how the computer industry is changing yet again.

No Strings2007100420071007

Generous investors can sometimes help up-and-coming musicians.

Peter Day hears how art and money can sometimes make beautiful music together.

North Sea Oil2013080120130804

The headlines are full of energy shortages and the potential of UK onshore shale gas discoveries.

But what's happening in and under the North Sea where Britain's energy revolution began almost 40 years ago? Peter Day reports from Aberdeen.

There's record investment of more than 13 billion pounds this year in the North Sea oil and gas industry but production is down as the oil has become harder to extract. Aberdeen itself is booming: there is virtually no unemployment and it has become a global hub of technical expertise, with international firms specialising in the technology and equipment needed to extract the oil. The big oil companies are moving further away to the West of the Shetland Isles in search of large new fields while smaller entrepreneurial firms are exploring for, and producing, oil from the older fields. Meanwhile national oil companies from Korea and China are buying their way in through take-overs.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

Norway's European Vision20160121

Norway's European Vision2016012120160124 (R4)

Jonty Bloom learns how Norway does business with the European Union.

Norway's European Vision20160121

Norway's European Vision20160121

Norway isn't a member of the European Union, but does business with the EU. Is it a model for other countries? Jonty Bloom speaks to people working in a range of businesses - including Norway's vital fishing industry - and asks about the advantages and disadvantages of the arrangement.

Produced by Ruth Alexander.

Norway's European Vision20160121

Norway isn't a member of the European Union, but does business with the EU. Is it a model for other countries? Jonty Bloom speaks to people working in a range of businesses - including Norway's vital fishing industry - and asks about the advantages and disadvantages of the arrangement.

Produced by Ruth Alexander.

Not For Profit2007012520070128

Social entrepreneurs are taking a businesslike approach to enterprises such as leisure centres and loan companies.

Peter Day asks what motivates them and how effective they can be.

Not Just Silicon20100516

Silicon Valley California is the place where for the past fifty years new enterprise has thrived more effectively than anywhere else in the world.

So how is the Valley tackling recession?

Peter Day hears from some brand new companies trying to reshape the future in the same old vigorous way.

Producers: Sandra Kanthal and Neil Koenig.

Peter Day finds out how Silicon Valley, California is coping with the effects of recession

Not Made In Britain2003102320031026

Is this country really the place to make manufactured goods when INDIA and CHINA are poised to take over as global production giants? Peter Day reports on a battle for survival happening all over industrial Britain.

Not So Small Beer20151231

Not So Small Beer2015123120160103 (R4)

Peter Day explores the rise of craft beer and how the big breweries are fighting back.

Not So Small Beer20151231

Not So Small Beer20151231

Peter Day explores the rise of craft beer and how the big breweries are fighting back by buying up the competition

Producer: Rosamund Jones.

Not So Small Beer20151231

Peter Day explores the rise of craft beer and how the big breweries are fighting back by buying up the competition

Producer: Rosamund Jones.

Not Very Productive2006050420060507

Peter Day examines why the UK has such a persistently low productivity rate and if this should be something of a concern.

Interviewees:

Andrew Smithers, Chairman of Smithers and Co

Roger Bootle, Managing Director, Capital Economics

John Dowdy, Partner, McKinsey and Co

Andrew Neely, Deputy Director, AIM (Advanced Institute of Management Research)

Gordon Wakeford, Managing Directory Traffic Control, Siemens, Poole

Jurgen Giesbert Executive Vice President, UK, Ireland, Middle East and Africa Marriott Hotels International

Ian MCCafferty, Chief Economic Advisor, CBI.

Now That The Party's Over * *2009012220090125

As the dust begins to settle on the catastrophic business events of 2008, Peter Day lloks at what has changed and finds out how to cope with the future.

Now Wash Your Hands Please2010072920100801

In this edition of In Business, Peter Day hears some simple ideas about cleanliness which could change the fortunes of poor people around the world, hearing from three projects about the techniques of big business, marketing in particular, they are using to carry their messages.

Val Curtis of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in London says the single most cost-effective intervention to save lives in developing countries is washing hands with soap - one million lives could be saved every year.

She's working with producers to make soap available at prices, and sizes, suitable to the pockets of the poor.

Linda Scott is a Professor of Marketing at Oxford who discovered millions of girls were missing school in Africa every month once they started having periods.

She discovered that they were shunned by family and no longer supported once they were deemed to be women.

Now she plans to change that, and economically empower more women, by introducing them to sanitary protection.

And there's news of an on-the-ground initiative using solid business principles to make sanitary pads made of bamboo available at half the price of imported versions in Rwanda and a solution to eye care in countries where opticians are rare.

Peter Day hears some basic ideas about health.

And there's news of an on the ground initiative using a solid business principles to make sanitary pads made of bamboo available at half the price of imported versions in Rwanda and a solution to eye care in countries where opticians are rare.

Producer: Richard Berenger.

Nuts About Brazil2006010520060108

Economists predict that Brazil may be one of the countries vaulting to supremacy as huge changes reshape the global economy over the next 30 years.

But in fact they have been saying something like this for the past century.

Peter Day asks whether Brazil's future is finally about to arrive.

Odd Jobs2003100920031012

As students gain more qualifications, companies are complaining about the widening gap between what educators teach and what employers want.

Peter Day investigates.

On The Rack2008061220080615

Many of the clothes bearing some of the best-known labels in the high street are made by exploited workers in developing countries, according to campaigners.

Some retailers stand accused of selling goods made with child labour, or by workers not paid a living wage.

Peter Day investigates.

On Their Metal2012112220121125

Peter Day travels to the Midlands to ask how businesses are coping in an era of no growth.

Peter Day travels to the Midlands to find out how beleaguered manufacturers are coping with the most difficult economy in decades. The region used to be the metal bashing heartland of the country but now manufacturers, service providers and entrepreneurs starting their own companies are all struggling to find a way to keep profitable in an era of low growth. What lessons have been learned over the past five years and how can the past help plan the way forward for the future?

Operation Robot2010120220101205

The revolution in the operating theatre is only just beginning, but robotic surgery could change the way we think about healthcare...

and the way surgeons work.

Peter Day looks at what surgeons are able to achieve with robots now and at the proto-types for healthcare in the future.

He asks how significant these advances could be for health in Britain and for British business and hears from the robot pioneers: surgeons, engineers and business people.

Producer : Caroline Bayley.

Peter Day looks at robotic surgery and asks how it is changing healthcare.

Opportunity Knocks2006051120060514

What is life like for those for whom Britain is a land of opportunity? Peter Day hears from people determined not to stay at the bottom of the heap.

Britain's Polish workforce has increased greatly in the two years since Poland joined the European Union.

It's estimated that nearly 350 000 Poles have come to the UK since 2004.

Peter Day speaks to members of this new army of workers, and asks them what they find attractive about Britain, and what they want to achieve whilst they're here.

Guests:

Magda Harvey, Managing Director, Polish Specialities

Fiona Lucas, Area Director, Barclays Bank PLC

Professor John Salt, Migration Research Unit, University College London

Vijay Patel, Founder and Chairman of Waymade Pharmaceuticals

Justyna Jackholt, President of the Polish City Club

Katarzyna Nalepa, Executive Director, Venture Investment and Property International

Organising Salvation2009122420091227

The management guru Peter Drucker called the Salvation Army the most 'effective organisation in America'.

Peter Day asks if that is true in Britain and finds out how the Army is bringing innovation to salvation.

Over A Barrel2011033120110403

Turmoil across the Middle East sent oil prices jumping and has raised big questions about the security of the energy supplies that have powered the world economy for the past 100 years.

Peter Day investigates the future of oil.and what the current upheavals might mean for other energy supplies.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

What does the turmoil in the Middle East mean for the future of energy supplies?

Over The Moon2007050320070506

Journeys into space are catching the attention of a new generation of private entrepreneurs.

They have big ambitions but they insist that commercial space travel can be economically viable.

Peter Day investigates.

Packaging In A Pickle2014052220140525

Modern living generates ever increasing amounts of packaging to wrap up the things we purchase and that generates widespread criticism of the packaging industry. But packaging companies are trying to innovate to respond to both environmental and marketing needs. Peter Day investigates what is wrapped around the products we all buy.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

Pain In The Neck2006021620060219

Sickness absence in the workplace: Who's sick the worker or the organisation?

Sometimes people are too ill to work, sometimes perhaps they just don't feel like it.

According to the labour experts being absent from work in Britain has been stubbornly high for the last three decades.

For employers, the CBI estimates being absent is costing 12 billion pounds a year in lost days at work.

On average a public sector worker is off 9.1 days every year, in the private sector the average is 6.4 days.

So is Britain a nest of malingerers or is there something wrong with the way we work, or the way work works?

Passport To Europe2006091420060917

Two more countries are lining up to join the European Union next year.

Travelling across Bulgaria and Romania, Peter Day asks if they are ready for the EU.

Past Masters2003052220030525

Management gurus often invoke the leadership skills of historic figures.

But can Alexander the Great or Sun Tzu be relevant in today's business climate?

Patents Make Perfect2005012020050123

Companies need new ideas to survive, and the granting of patents to protect these ideas has increased in recent years.

Peter Day investigates.

Picture Perfect2003010220030105

Thomas Kinkade is the world's richest artist.

He tells Peter Day how he has built up a billion-dollar business out of America's nostalgia for a past it never had.

Plug-in Car2006092120060924

Tesla Motors has designed an electric car with sports car performance.

Peter Day meets the Silicon Valley enthusiast behind the American company challenging conventional motoring ideas.

Potash Of Gold2013042520130428

Nearly one mile underground beneath the North Sea are vast supplies of potash and polyhalite waiting to be dug up and turned into valuable fertiliser. There's just one snag: the planned new mine would be in the North York Moors National Park, where such developments are normally prohibited. Locals are taking sides for and against, as Peter Day reports.

Producer: Mike Wendling.

Power Drive2009041620090419

As the world's biggest car companies appeal for government bailouts, fearless newcomers are seeking to revolutionise the global automobile industry with electric cars.

Peter Day takes a test drive in a plug-in Chinese newcomer and hears from an Israel start-up company that wants to charge by the mile.

Power Failure2002100320021006

Peter Day looks at the state of British electricity companies.

Power Play2010080520100808

Huge hopes and vast sums of money are being pinned on the so-called Intelligent Grid: a new network of electricity systems feeding information about supply and demand across the grid all the time.

Linked to new compulsory smart meters, it will extend into every home.

Peter Day asks what's happening to our power supplies and why.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

Huge sums are being put into the Intelligent Grid.

Peter Day investigates.

Press Under Pressure2010050620100509

Many of the world's best-known business newspapers and magazines are being painfully squeezed by the recession and the rise of rival media.

In London and New York, Peter Day finds out why it matters..and how they are going about fighting for survival.

Producer : Julie Ball.

Press under pressure.

How business publications will survive in the internet era.

Price Conscious2014051520140518

Peter Day looks at current retail pricing strategies, from market stalls to luxury brands.

Manufacturers were banned by law from fixing retail prices 50 years ago, ushering in a revolution in British retailing. So what do prices mean now? How are they set and how much are we prepared to pay for things? Peter Day finds out.

Private Grief2007021520070218

The new breed of private equity funds control huge resources, earn big money and are very secretive.

Now there are worries that they may destabilise the world economy, and bring previously sound companies to their knees.

Peter Day reports.

Prize Giving2005051920050522

Offering prizes for scientific and technological innovation can be traced back to the 18th century.

Today, large cash prizes are once again being offered to solve some of our most ambitious challenges - from affordable space travel to a cure for ageing.

Peter Day reports.

Prize Performers2011090120110904

At a time of grave crisis, some of the world's top Nobel Prize winning economists have been meeting for a conference on an idyllic Bavarian island.

Peter Day was there to find out if they had any ideas about how to get out of the mess we're in and what their predictions are for the future.

Producer : Neil Keonig.

Peter Day joins a gathering of Nobel Prize economists to discuss the economic crisis.

Productivity Puzzle2013040420130407

Something strange is happening to the economy. In Britain, recession is not hitting the total number of people in employment, which means that the nation's vital productivity rate is falling. In the USA, productivity has gone on rising, detaching itself from the rise in jobs for the first time since World War Two. Behind the figures, Peter Day has been trying to find out what's going on and why it matters to a country's standard of living.

Professor Profit2005101320051016

Universities are being challenged to 'sweat their assets' - by turning academic good ideas into real life companies and patents.

Peter Day asks if the strategy is really working to the benefit of both the British economy and the universities balance sheets.

Interviewees:

John Hassard, Imperial College particle physicist and co-founder, chairman of Hydroventuri

Susan Searle, chief executive, Imperial College Innovations

Tom Hockaday, executive director, ISIS Innovation

Bob Boucher, vice chancellor, University of Sheffield

Richard Lambert, member of the Monetary Policy Committee, Bank of England and author of the Lambert Review.

Stephen Allott, managing director, Trinamo Ltd.

David Cleevely, entrepreneur

Warren East, CEO, Arm Holdings

Billy Boyle, co-founder Owlstone Nanotech.

Universities are now being challenged to 'sweat their assets' by turning academic good ideas into real life companies.

Peter Day investigates.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 03 April 199019900403

Producer: R.

POUNSETT

Next in series: 10 April 1990

Previous in series: 27 March 1990

Broadcast history

03 Apr 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-03-27.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 03 October 199019901003

Producer: C.

WILDE

Next in series: PUBLISHING

Previous in series: 26 September 1990

Broadcast history

03 Oct 1990 20:45-21:15 (RADIO 4)

07 Oct 1990 19:00-19:30 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-10-02.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 03 October 199019901007

First broadcast on 1990-10-03

Producer: C.

WILDE

Next in series: PUBLISHING

Previous in series: 26 September 1990

Broadcast history

03 Oct 1990 20:45-21:15 (RADIO 4)

07 Oct 1990 19:00-19:30 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-10-02.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 03 September 199519950903

Producer: PAUL DAWYER

Next in series: MICKEYS NETWORK

Previous in series: 11 June 1995

Broadcast history

03 Sep 1995 18:30-19:00 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1995-08-31.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 05 September 199019900905

Producer: S.

CHILCOTT

Next in series: 12 September 1990

Previous in series: 29 August 1990

Broadcast history

05 Sep 1990 20:45-21:15 (RADIO 4)

09 Sep 1990 19:00-19:30 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 05 September 199019900909

First broadcast on 1990-09-05

Producer: S.

CHILCOTT

Next in series: 12 September 1990

Previous in series: 29 August 1990

Broadcast history

05 Sep 1990 20:45-21:15 (RADIO 4)

09 Sep 1990 19:00-19:30 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 06 March 199019900306

Producer: R.

POUNSETT

Next in series: 13 March 1990

Previous in series: 12 September 1989

Broadcast history

06 Mar 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

07 Mar 1990 19:20-19:45 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 06 March 199019900307

First broadcast on 1990-03-06

Producer: R.

POUNSETT

Next in series: 13 March 1990

Previous in series: 12 September 1989

Broadcast history

06 Mar 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

07 Mar 1990 19:20-19:45 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 08 May 199019900509

First broadcast on 1990-05-08

Producer: R.

POUNSETT

Next in series: 29 August 1990

Previous in series: 01 May 1990

Broadcast history

08 May 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

09 May 1990 19:20-19:45 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 10 April 199019900410

Producer: R.

POUNSETT

Next in series: FRANCE

Previous in series: 03 April 1990

Broadcast history

10 Apr 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 12 September 199019900912

Producer: S.

CHILCOTT

Next in series: 4

Previous in series: 05 September 1990

Broadcast history

12 Sep 1990 20:45-21:15 (RADIO 4)

16 Sep 1990 19:00-19:30 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-09-11.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 12 September 199019900916

First broadcast on 1990-09-12

Producer: S.

CHILCOTT

Next in series: 4

Previous in series: 05 September 1990

Broadcast history

12 Sep 1990 20:45-21:15 (RADIO 4)

16 Sep 1990 19:00-19:30 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-09-11.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 13 March 199019900313

Producer: R.

POUNSETT

Next in series: 21 March 1990

Previous in series: 06 March 1990

Broadcast history

13 Mar 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

14 Mar 1990 19:20-19:45 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 13 March 199019900314

First broadcast on 1990-03-13

Producer: R.

POUNSETT

Next in series: 21 March 1990

Previous in series: 06 March 1990

Broadcast history

13 Mar 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

14 Mar 1990 19:20-19:45 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 17 October 199019901017

Producer: S.

CHILCOTT

Next in series: 06 March 1991

Previous in series: PUBLISHING

Broadcast history

17 Oct 1990 20:45-21:15 (RADIO 4)

21 Oct 1990 19:00-19:30 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 17 October 199019901021

First broadcast on 1990-10-17

Producer: S.

CHILCOTT

Next in series: 06 March 1991

Previous in series: PUBLISHING

Broadcast history

17 Oct 1990 20:45-21:15 (RADIO 4)

21 Oct 1990 19:00-19:30 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 17 September 199519950917

Producer: K.

MERKEL

Next in series: 24 September 1995

Previous in series: MICKEYS NETWORK

Broadcast history

17 Sep 1995 18:30-19:00 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1995-09-13.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 1990050119900501

01 May 1990

Producer: R.

POUNSETT

Next in series: 08 May 1990

Previous in series: 24 April 1990

Broadcast history

01 May 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 1990050819900508

08 May 1990

Producer: R.

POUNSETT

Next in series: 29 August 1990

Previous in series: 01 May 1990

Broadcast history

08 May 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

09 May 1990 19:20-19:45 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 21 March 199019900321

Producer: R.

POUNSETT

Next in series: 27 March 1990

Previous in series: 13 March 1990

Broadcast history

21 Mar 1990 19:20-19:45 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-03-20.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 24 April 199019900424

Producer: R.

POUNSETT

Next in series: 01 May 1990

Previous in series: FRANCE

Broadcast history

24 Apr 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

25 Apr 1990 19:20-19:45 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 24 April 199019900425

First broadcast on 1990-04-24

Producer: R.

POUNSETT

Next in series: 01 May 1990

Previous in series: FRANCE

Broadcast history

24 Apr 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

25 Apr 1990 19:20-19:45 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 24 September 199519950924

Producer: S.

CHILCOTT

Next in series: 01 October 1995

Previous in series: 17 September 1995

Broadcast history

24 Sep 1995 18:30-19:00 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1995-09-18.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 26 September 199019900926

Producer: C.

WILDE

Next in series: 03 October 1990

Previous in series: 4

Broadcast history

26 Sep 1990 20:45-21:15 (RADIO 4)

30 Sep 1990 19:00-19:30 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 26 September 199019900930

First broadcast on 1990-09-26

Producer: C.

WILDE

Next in series: 03 October 1990

Previous in series: 4

Broadcast history

26 Sep 1990 20:45-21:15 (RADIO 4)

30 Sep 1990 19:00-19:30 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 27 March 199019900327

Producer: R.

POUNSETT

Next in series: 03 April 1990

Previous in series: 21 March 1990

Broadcast history

27 Mar 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

28 Mar 1990 19:20-19:45 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 27 March 199019900328

First broadcast on 1990-03-27

Producer: R.

POUNSETT

Next in series: 03 April 1990

Previous in series: 21 March 1990

Broadcast history

27 Mar 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

28 Mar 1990 19:20-19:45 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 29 August 199019900829

Producer: S.

CHILCOTT

Next in series: 05 September 1990

Previous in series: 08 May 1990

Broadcast history

29 Aug 1990 20:45-21:15 (RADIO 4)

02 Sep 1990 19:00-19:30 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 29 August 199019900902

First broadcast on 1990-08-29

Producer: S.

CHILCOTT

Next in series: 05 September 1990

Previous in series: 08 May 1990

Broadcast history

29 Aug 1990 20:45-21:15 (RADIO 4)

02 Sep 1990 19:00-19:30 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 419900919

Producer: S.

CHILCOTT

Next in series: 26 September 1990

Previous in series: 12 September 1990

Broadcast history

19 Sep 1990 20:45-21:15 (RADIO 4)

23 Sep 1990 19:00-19:30 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 419900923

First broadcast on 1990-09-19

Producer: S.

CHILCOTT

Next in series: 26 September 1990

Previous in series: 12 September 1990

Broadcast history

19 Sep 1990 20:45-21:15 (RADIO 4)

23 Sep 1990 19:00-19:30 (RADIO 4).

Programme Catalogue - Details: France19900417

Producer: R.

POUNSETT

Next in series: 24 April 1990

Previous in series: 10 April 1990

Description

SBH:Long feature on setting up of Euro-Disney and shorter one on European business fashion.

Presenter: Carol Leonard.

Broadcast history

17 Apr 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

18 Apr 1990 19:20-19:45 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Rod Pounsett (Producer)

Tony Young (Speaker)

Carol Leonard (Speaker)

Nicholas de Schonen (Speaker)

John Cora (Speaker)

Christian Cardon (Speaker)

Mary Deschamps (Speaker)

John Forsgreen (Speaker)

Joel Mcclure (Speaker)

Stuart Toy (Speaker)

Notes: CAIRS 418072.

Programme Catalogue - Details: France19900418

First broadcast on 1990-04-17

Producer: R.

POUNSETT

Next in series: 24 April 1990

Previous in series: 10 April 1990

Description

SBH:Long feature on setting up of Euro-Disney and shorter one on European business fashion.

Presenter: Carol Leonard.

Broadcast history

17 Apr 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

18 Apr 1990 19:20-19:45 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Rod Pounsett (Producer)

Tony Young (Speaker)

Carol Leonard (Speaker)

Nicholas de Schonen (Speaker)

John Cora (Speaker)

Christian Cardon (Speaker)

Mary Deschamps (Speaker)

John Forsgreen (Speaker)

Joel Mcclure (Speaker)

Stuart Toy (Speaker)

Notes: CAIRS 418072.

Programme Catalogue - Details: Mickeys Network19950910

Producer: S.

CHILCOTT

Next in series: 17 September 1995

Previous in series: 03 September 1995

Broadcast history

10 Sep 1995 18:30-19:00 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1995-09-07.

Programme Catalogue - Details: Publishing19901014

First broadcast on 1990-10-10

Producer: C.

WILDE

Next in series: 17 October 1990

Previous in series: 03 October 1990

Broadcast history

14 Oct 1990 19:00-19:30 (RADIO 4).

Project Alcatraz2009123120100103

What makes a businessman turn gangsters into employees? Peter Day talks to Alberto Vollmer of the Santa Teresa Rum Company in Venezuela. He tells Peter how the theft of a security guard's gun led him to set up a project which has cut crime in his area by 40 per cent and has now become an integral part of this 200-year-old family business.

Project Alcatraz * *2009123120100103

What makes a businessman turn gangsters into employees? Peter Day talks to Alberto Vollmer of the Santa Teresa Rum Company in Venezuela.

He tells Peter how the theft of a security guard's gun led him to set up a project which has cut crime in his area by 40 per cent and has now become an integral part of this 200-year-old family business.

What makes a businessman turn gangsters into employees? Peter Day finds out.

Prophet Motive * *2009021220090215

Peter Day hears about the influence of religion on business.

Quick On The Draw2011041420110417

In an age of high technology communications, two long-established companies in a single German city are still battling each other for supremacy in a global marketplace...

in pencils.

In Nuremberg Peter Day asks Faber-Castell and Staedtler how they both stay sharp...

and finds out what light (and shade) they can throw on the success of German industry and the viability of Europe as a single economy.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

Peter Day visits two rival German pencil companies in Nuremberg.

Radio Me2005050820050523

Radio is facing enormous changes from the Internet.

Just like downloading songs, podcasting makes radio available as the listener wants it.

Peter Day investigates.

Radio Times2003070320030706

Digital technology is changing the way radio works.

But will it change a business long regarded as TV's poor relation? Peter Day investigates.

Rail Revolution2007101820071021

Peter Day reports on the current railway revival and how it is changing the map of Europe.

Ready To Wear2010012120100124

Many of our clothes are made by low-paid workers in low-cost countries.

But when In Business got involved, a factory was closed and working conditions improved.

From Bangladesh, Peter Day found out what happens when westerners intervene.

What happens when westerners intervene on behalf of low-paid clothing factory workers.

Many of our clothes are made by low-paid workers in low-cost countries. But when In Business got involved, a factory was closed and working conditions improved. From Bangladesh, Peter Day found out what happens when westerners intervene.

Recruiting By Algorithm20160508

Can a computer programme choose the right applicant for a job? Online assessments, scanning programmes, computer algorithms and the number crunching of social network data are all now part of the tool kit of the recruitment industry. As Peter Day discovers, to get through to an actual interview, you often have to impress a computer algorithm first. Traditionally a subjective process, Peter looks at this huge change in the way people are selected for jobs and asks whether technology can achieve the recruiters' aim of eliminating bias from hiring.

Producer Caroline Bayley.

Regenerating Margate2013081520130818

Towns and cities all over the world are looking to culture to help them rejuvenate. Two years ago Margate in Kent joined the trend when it opened the £17 million Turner Contemporary gallery. Can art improve the fortunes of a struggling community? Peter Day finds out.

Towns and cities all over the world are looking to culture to help them rejuvenate themselves. Two years ago Margate in Kent joined the trend when it opened the £17million Turner Contemporary gallery. Can art (plus shopping) change the fortunes of a struggling community? In Radio Four's Year of Culture, Peter Day finds out.

Research Party2007062120070624

Billions of federal dollars are spent on financing research projects by American corporations.

Finland boasts a similar scheme to boost innovation.

Peter Day asks whether these are examples Britain ought to follow.

Reshaping The World2006011220060115

Peter Day runs up against a BRIC wall in this edition.

Brazil, Russia, India and China - the BRICs - are on the rise.

The world may be a very different place well before 2050, when some economists say the BRICs will have pushed the UK, France and Germany out of the G-7.

In the second of two programmes exploring the future of the world economy, Peter asks what these changes will mean for those of us living in the developed world.

Interviewees:

Jim O'Niell

Chief Global Economist, Goldman Sachs

C K Prahalad

Author, The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid

Eugen von Keller

Partner, Roland Berger Strategy Consultants - China

Clyde Prestowitz

Author, Three Billion New Capitalists

Sir Martin Sorrell

CEO, WPP

Naresh Goyal

CEO and Founder, Jet Airways

Remeeb

Farmer and Road Worker, Mumbai, India

Dr Alexandre Qi

Director, CHINBRA

The 21st Century is going to see huge changes in the way the world's economy works.

But with countries such as India and China on the rise - to say nothing of Russia and Brazil - what will happen to the current top nations?

Peter Day investigates.

Reshaping the World

Risky Business2002101720021020

`Risky Business'.

Insurance used to one of Britain's most successful industries, but is now going through troubled times.

Is the roof about to fall in? Peter Day investigates.

Running Towards Empty2004050620040509

The world is still powered by oil, and even though discoveries peaked decades ago, nobody knows how much is left buried in the earth.

Peter Day asks some basic questions about the supply and demand of the energy that makes the world work.

Rwanda Rising20100418

Rwanda has huge ambitions to grow itself out of poverty and become a middle income country by the year 2010 by becoming an information technology and business hub for central and eastern Africa.

Rwanda hopes to set an example that it is possible to do proper business in Africa.

Peter Day reports.

Producer: Richard Berenger.

After a tragic recent history, Rwanda is trying to recreate itself, as Peter Day reports.

Sail Of The Century2003022720030302

The Queen Mary 2 will be the largest liner ever built.

Peter Day goes behind the scenes with the people who have spent years planning the great ship.

Scared New World2005091520050918

War and conflict usually spell money - money being made and money being lost.

Who do you turn to when you want to steer an honest path through the conflict zone to do business? A veritable army of advisors has grown up to show you how.

In Business investigates the new industry of Risk Control.

Selling Shakespeare2016042120160424 (R4)

Author Andrew Dickson explores William Shakespeare's influence on the business world.

Selling Shakespeare20160421

As part of the festivities for the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare's death, In Business asks how the Bard has had an impact on the corporate world. As well as being a profitable part of the British economy, particularly for the tourist sector in Stratford-upon-Avon, Shakespeare's plays have been exported to almost every country there is. In Neuss, Germany, a replica of the Globe has stood since 1991. In Bollywood, Shakespeare's stories have been retold since the dawn of Indian cinema, and become major money-spinners courtesy of movies such as Omkara (Othello) and Haider (Hamlet). In corporate America, his plays have been seized upon by executive training teams. And in China, Shakespeare's works are being marketed to a new generation of domestic consumers, eager for a taste of historical culture.

Author and critic Andrew Dickson goes on a globe-trotting journey to find out how the Bard is still very much in business - and discovers one of the most successful and flexible cultural brands there is. Produced by Nina Robinson.

Selling Shakespeare20160421

Silicon Roundabout2011090820110911

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers.

Hundreds of small companies have set up shop in a shabby area of East London defined mostly by an enormous traffic interchange.

'Silicon Roundabout' bears little physical resemblance to its California namesake, but it is becoming one of Europe's biggest technology clusters.

Some observers say the area could have a global impact, and the government has latched on to the idea, creating competitive grants for startups and rebranding the larger area 'TechCity UK'.

There are success stories - such as LastFM, a music sharing site sold to American media giant CBS for £140 million - and many more entrepreneurs just starting out.

Could Britain's tech centre spawn a world-beating company along the lines of a Facebook or Twitter? In this programme Peter Day weighs up the evidence, talking to some of London's most promising social networking companies, and the venture capitalists and business groups supporting them, as well as the sceptics who doubt the area could really rival the unprecedented ecosystem that is Silicon Valley.

Peter Day visits the high-tech companies springing up in an unusual area of East London.

Small Change2005010620050109

David Bussau thinks he has hit on an important way to tackle world POVERTY.

He tells his story to Peter Day - from orphanage to global social entrepreneur.

Small Wonder2009120320091206

Microloans have brought credit to millions of poor people shunned by the conventional banking system, but now commercial financial institutions are jumping on the microlending bandwagon.

Peter Day wonders whether a microloan bubble is about to burst.

Small World20100502

Outsourcing used to be something that big companies did when they transferred the work of whole departments to offshore specialists across the world to save money.

But now small start-ups are learning how to build global organisations from day one of their existence.

Peter Day finds out why.

Producer : Caroline Bayley.

Why are some start-ups going global from day one? Peter Day finds out.

Smoke Gets In Your Eyes2004102820041031

Europe's companies face big fines from the EU over excess emissions from the start of next year, but few British businesses seem prepared.

It will only work if emissions are traded, but how does that work? Peter Day discovers a new industry and a new type of salesman - the carbon trader.

Smoke Gets in your EyesEUROPE's companies face big fines from the EU over excess emissions from the start of next year, but few British businesses seem prepared.

Sociability2010082620100829

When the new breed of social entrepreneurs meet the new networks of interactive social media, the impact is felt round the globe.

Peter Day reports on some clever ideas that are tackling some of the big problems in the developing world.

Producer: Julie Ball.

Peter Day finds out what happens when social entrepreneurs meet interactive social media.

Sovereign Wealth Funds2014120420141207 (R4)

Government owned Sovereign wealth funds are treasure troves of money earned by oil resources and mighty export earnings, vast nest-eggs for the future when overseas earnings dry up. Obscure though they may be, SWFs have extraordinary flows of cash to invest and potentially enormous international clout. This programme investigates SWFs: who they are and what they're doing.

Squeaky Clean2009082720090830

WD40 is one of those rare products that users deeply identify with.

In San Diego, Peter Day investigates the company's secret formula and finds out how to run an international business by using the promise of the original brand to navigate into the future.

Start-up City2012112920121202

Peter Day reports from Berlin - a city developing into a successful high-tech hub.

Every city wants to become a high technology business hub, but ambitious entrepreneurs

from all over Europe are rushing to set up shop in Berlin. So-called Silicon Allee is fast

becoming a start-up rival to Silicon Roundabout in London. Peter Day finds out why.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

Steel in the UK2016051920160522 (R4)

Peter Day examines the history of Britain's steel industry.

Steel in the UK20160519

Amid concern about the future of the Port Talbot steel works - and fear for the jobs of workers there - Peter Day looks at the history of the industry in Britain. When was the heyday of British steel, and what went wrong? Peter visits Port Talbot and also delves into the archives to hear stories from a time when manufacturing dominated the British economy.

Presenter: Peter Day

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

Steel in the UK20160519

Steel in the UK2016051920160522 (R4)

Peter Day examines the history of Britain's steel industry.

Steel in the UK20160519

Amid concern about the future of the Port Talbot steel works - and fear for the jobs of workers there - Peter Day looks at the history of the industry in Britain. When was the heyday of British steel, and what went wrong? Peter visits Port Talbot and also delves into the archives to hear stories from a time when manufacturing dominated the British economy.

Presenter: Peter Day

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

Steel in the UK20160519

Steinway20150910

Steinway2015091020150913 (R4)

Peter Day visits Steinway and Sons in New York to hear what makes its pianos special.

Steinway2015091020150913 (R4)

Peter Day visits Steinway and Sons in New York to hear what makes its pianos special.

Steinway20150910

Steinway20150910

For more than 150 years, Steinway and Sons have been building handmade pianos to please the ear of the most discerning musicians. Their sound fills concert halls around the world. Why? Is it simply because they're the best; the best marketed or is there another reason?

Peter Day visits one of Steinway's two factories, in Astoria New York, to find out what gives this instrument its prized status in the concert world and ask if this once family owned firm can keep its place on the world stage.

Producer:

Sandra Kanthal.

Steinway20150910

For more than 150 years, Steinway and Sons have been building handmade pianos to please the ear of the most discerning musicians. Their sound fills concert halls around the world. Why? Is it simply because they're the best; the best marketed or is there another reason?

Peter Day visits one of Steinway's two factories, in Astoria New York, to find out what gives this instrument its prized status in the concert world and ask if this once family owned firm can keep its place on the world stage.

Producer:

Sandra Kanthal.

Stitch In Time2014010920140112

Peter Day asks how serious UK manufacturing is for the British fashion industry.

As fashion retailers demand an ever faster response to consumer desires and costs rise abroad, there are signs of a fledgling revival in British textile manufacturing. Peter Day finds out how real it is, and whether it can last.

Strictly Private2005021020050213

Huge and secretive investment groups are bagging great swathes of industry in Britain and abroad.

Once public companies are now being swallowed up in the portfolios of these private equity firms.

Peter Day asks what drives these ""new kings of capitalism""...and whether they are good for us.

Strike Up The Broadband2012121320121216

Peter Day examines the government's aim to increase internet speeds across the UK.

The government's aim is clear: by 2015, it wants Britain to have the best superfast broadband network in Europe. The internet is so essential to businesses, the argument goes, that the network over which internet traffic travels is becoming a vital part of the UK's infrastructure - as important as energy and roads.

Right now, though, the country is a long way off from the target. Nowhere is this more apparent than in rural and remote areas of the country. In Norfolk, some small businesses are struggling just to get connected, much less plug into the high-speed network the government has pledged to help expand.

A decade ago, internet access was a luxury for many small firms, but today it's essential. Orders are placed and received online, a website is a key marketing tool for all sorts of companies, and businesses must now file VAT returns via a website.

This week on In Business, Peter Day evaluates the government's plans for broadband and finds out how close the UK is coming to a high-speed future online.

Producer: Mike Wendling.

Strong Medicine2012120620121209

Peter Day visits two Swiss pharmaceutical companies to look at future drug development.

Big problems loom over the pharmaceutical industry which influences so many people's lives. Giant corporations are beset by scandal and their pipelines of new treatments are running dry. Peter Day looks at the future of the industry through the eyes of two Swiss pharma companies, one very big and one of them tiny. Both are linked by their quest for a treatment for Alzheimers.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

Student Start-ups2009091020090913

Britain's universities are alive with a new wave of business activity, and in many of them the largest student societies are the ones which bring would-be entrepreneurs together with potential backers and mentors.

Peter Day samples some of the start-up ideas on show at Cambridge University and hears how academic attitudes to business have changed over the past few decades.

Sugaring The Pill2009121020091213

Brazil has been pioneering the use of ethanol for its vehicles for over three decades.

Ethanol emits 90 per cent less emissions than gasoline.

As world leaders debate climate change in Copenhagen, can Brazil convince the rest of the globe that sugar really is good for you?

Survival Strategy2011112420111127

As economic gales blow even harder, are there lessons to be learnt from previous recessions? Peter Day talks to some veteran small business survivors and small business advisors to find out how they manage to get through tough times.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal

Editor: Stephen Chilcott.

Peter Day finds out what lessons business owners can be learned from previous recessions.

Survivors2008051520080518

For more than a decade Britain's shrunken manufacturing industry has been battered by the strength of the pound.

Now manufacturers may be staring recession in the face.

Peter Day hears how manufacturing companies plan to continue to survive against the odds.

Survivors' Stories2013091920130922

Peter Day talks to business survivors from the 25 years he has presented this programme.

In Peter Day's 25 years of presenting this programme, he has seen a succession of booms and busts, and heard from people who seem to know how to survive in business. He's been back to revisit a few of them, to find out what lessons they have learnt.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

Take A Bow2014082820140831

Thanks to great craftsmen such as the Amati family and Antonio Stradivari, the city of Cremona in northern Italy has been a global centre of violins for five centuries. Peter Day finds out how tradition, marketing and years of training enable Cremonese instrument makers to survive in a fast changing musical world.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

Cremona in northern Italy is a centre of violin making, but can the old industry survive?

Take A Copy2011051920110522

Intellectual property sounds an innocuous enough idea, but patents and copyright have recently been stirring up a lot of strife.

Peter Day finds out why copyright in particular is such a contentious issue in the Internet age.

Producer: Sanda Kanthal.

Peter Day finds out why copyright is such a contentious issue in the internet age.

Take Me To The Leader2005092920051002

The programme looks at two different captains of industry.

First the company man, Jeff Immelt, the Chief Executive and Chairman of one of the world's biggest companies, General Electric.

Next the serial entrepreneur, Wayne Huizinga, former head of companies such as Blockbuster Video, AutoNation and owner of the American football team the Miami Dolphins.

Peter Day compares the two men's different ways of working and gets their insights into what it's like being a leader.

Tall Storeys2005052620050529

Much of the world is experiencing a boom in construction.

But will we get better buildings out of it? What role are the ARCHITECTs playing? Peter Day investigates.

Tangled Web2006061520060618

The Internet is evolving into a powerful new communications medium.

It is leaching power away from the old information providers in press and broadcasting and handing it to a new democracy of bloggers and communicators, now numbered in millions.

Peter Day asks how established businesses will cope with this vital change in the media landscape.

Taste Makers2003021320030216

Peter Day meets the boffins who manipulate the flavour of the foods we love - and hate.

Tax transparency - Norway's model20160407

The Panama papers reveal tax evasion is a huge international problem.

But how can governments clean things up? One way might be by opening things up.

In the UK, it is a criminal offence to reveal someone else's tax affairs, but in some countries you can easily discover how much anyone earns and how much they pay in tax, from the prime minister and the richest business leader to the poorest pensioner.

It can have a profound effect on business practice and wider society, as business correspondent Jonty Bloom discovers, travelling to Norway.

Producer: Ruth Alexander

With special thanks to Bill Lomas, Leek Town Crier.

Tax Transparency - Norway's Model2016040720160410 (R4)

Jonty Bloom goes to Norway to find out what happens when salaries and tax are made public.

Tax transparency - Norway's model20160407

Taxi2006101920061022

A new breed of tiny jets is spawning a new air taxi industry.

Peter Day hears from the pioneers of a new business that just might change the way we think about flying.

Peter Day talks to Muhammad Yunus, winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, about the remarkable achievements of the Grameen bank in Bangladesh and the growing phenomenon of micro credit. .

Testing, Testing2005092220050925

Why do employers need to subject their workers to psychometric tests and what do they learn from them? Peter Day investigates.

Thames Gateway2012080220120805

Britain is getting a new port on the Thames. Peter Day looks at the impact this will have.

NEW GATEWAY

Britain is getting a new port on the Thames, the first for many years. When London Gateway opens next year, it will be able to handle several million containers a year.

Peter Day asks what impact this vast undertaking is likely to have on the way the country works and on the port's competitors.

Producer: Caroline Bayley

Editor Stephen Chilcott.

Thanks For The Memory2014090420140907

Peter Day asks if the potential to remember everything forever is a good for business.

The internet and and the rapid rise of social networking creates the possibility of total recall forever for many of life's most significant (and insignificant) moments - maybe all of them.

Peter Day hears from people building businesses based on this new extension of the human mind..and asks whether it is really a good idea.

Producer: Mike Wendling.

The Apprentices2011091520110918

With Peter Day.

Series about the world of work from vast corporations to modest volunteers.

With big increases looming in the cost of going to university, the number of people choosing apprenticeships is rising fast.

Peter Day finds what modern apprenticeship means.

to apprentices and the companies who employ them.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

Peter Day looks at modern apprenticeships.

The Business Of Kindness2012122720121230

Peter Day finds out how random acts of kindness can help businesses in surprising ways.

Random acts of kindness can help businesses grow in surprising ways. Peter Day talks with one woman who explains how the generosity of others has made all the difference to her company. Henrietta Lovell, the Rare Tea Lady, started her firm just before becoming seriously ill. Through the kindness of strangers she has managed to return to health and run a prosperous company. She is now a great advocate for spreading the idea that kind gestures are an important force in the way we conduct our personal and professional lives.

The Business Of Kindness - Revisited2014122520141228 (R4)

Random acts of kindness can help businesses grow in surprising ways. Peter Day talks with one woman who explains how the generosity of others has made all the difference to her company. Henrietta Lovell, the Rare Tea Lady, started her firm just before becoming seriously ill. Through the kindness of strangers she has managed to return to health and run a prosperous company. She is now a great advocate for spreading the idea that kind gestures are an important force in the way we conduct our personal and professional lives.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

The Business Of Trust2016010720160110 (R4)

How important is trust, and can it be won back if it is lost? Matthew Gwyther investigates

The revelation that Volkswagen cheated emissions tests is the latest in a line of scandals that have dented the public's faith in business since 2008's financial crisis.

It was seen as a betrayal of trust. But just what is trust and how important is it in business? And, once it has been lost, can it ever be won back?

The editor of Management Today, Matthew Gwyther, interviews Rupert Stadler, the chairman of Audi - which is part of the VW group.

He also speaks to the chairman of the John Lewis Partnership, Charlie Mayfield, and former chief of Severn Trent Water and Jaguar, Sir John Egan.

The former EMEA head of public relations firm Edelman, Robert Phillips, explores PR's influence on trust and Nobel Prize winning economist and author Professor Robert Shiller gives his thoughts.

Amid all the negativity about business, Rachel Botsman - who is an expert on the collaborative economy - offers some hope.

Producer: Keith Moore.

The Californian Drought20150806

California has some of the world's most productive agricultural land. It puts fruit and vegetables on America's tables and exports huge amount of produce too; nearly all of the almonds we consume come from here. But the state is also endured a severe drought, now into its fourth year. Farm land is being fallowed, farm workers are losing their jobs and thousands of wells are drying up. Some farmers believe that this year is the tipping point. If rain does not fall in the winter, they'll be out of business next year. But other farmers have had some of their best years during these testing times. Peter Day explores what happens when water becomes the most valuable commodity there is.

Producer: Rosamund Jones.

The Curse Of The Bonus2011120820111211

It started off as a nice pat on the back for exceptional work.

But then the bonus became some people's primal motivation..first in the financial markets in the City of London, then in big business, and then in the way public services are run too.

Peter Day traces the rise and rise of the bonus culture, and asks how much damage it causes.

Producer Caroline Bayley

Editor Stephen Chilcott.

The Fizz Biz2012080920120812

Peter Day discovers the new fizz in English wine.

THE FIZZ BIZ

There's a new boom in English sparkling wine. It is taking on Champagne and (sometimes) beating it. But what's behind the bubbles? Peter Day finds out from some of the top English growers... and a select group of world wine experts on a pioneering trip into unknown territory. You can also watch a special video with Peter Day, by following the link on the In Business webpage, via the Radio 4 website.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal

Editor: Stephen Chilcott.

The Freelance Economy2015040220150405 (R4)

Peter Day explores the growing freelance and micro-business economy.

In Business returns with a new series.

This week Peter Day explores the growing freelance and micro-business economy. He asks why so many people are setting up on their own and whether it will be a decision they'll come to regret?

Also, what impact will the rise in the number of sole traders and micro-business owners have on the strength of the UK economy?

Producer: Rosamund Jones.

The Internet Of Things2013091220130915

Peter Day looks at a future when cows and cars will be connected to the internet.

Six billion people worldwide already have mobile phones. Now the experts are talking about the coming Internet of Things: 50 billion interconnected objects, from cows to coffee machines. Peter Day asks what it means and how it may happen.

Producer: Laura Gray.

The Long March2008021420080217

China has built an economic machine designed to help millions of country people out of poverty.

Peter Day meets villagers who are still waiting to see the benefits and looks at the impact of one of of the great official modernisation projects, the Three Gorges Dam.

The Music Industry2014010220140105

How can musicians make money in an industry that has changed so much in the past decade?

It has been long established that the music industry has changed irrevocably over the past decade, with the internet disrupting the status quo as it has many other sectors. But the story has moved on from an industry dying from dwindling record sales.

The traditional way of releasing your record has changed thanks to new publishing companies, companies that gather music statistics and the streaming services such as Spotify and Deezer. Now these companies are disrupting the industry once again. Peter Day speaks with the key businesses involved such as Spotify and Musicmetric and the traditional, established players such as Sony Music.

Yet streaming services have also caused controversy because their payments to musicians are seemingly minuscule. Radiohead's lead singer Thom Yorke has battled against Spotify, calling it the 'last fart of a dying corpse' ; how can musicians make money now? Peter hears from a band just starting out, Yossarian, to Moby who has sold millions of records and singer songwriter Billy Bragg. We compare how much musicians receive from different sources of revenue.

But others see the streaming services as saviours and the future of the music industry. Is the problem of small returns from songs streamed actually a clash between a new way of listening to music and the traditional way the industry has been run? Sony Music explain how they are writing their record deals with musicians and that they are thinking about changing this for the new digital age.

Producer: Charlotte Pritchard.

The New Leaders19970622

In the final programme of the series, Peter Day investigates what big business can learn from a new breed of entrepreneurs.

The New Manufacturing2014040320140406

Peter Day reports from Sheffield on how manufacturing is evolving in globalising world.

UK Manufacturing has been under heavy pressure for decades but now there are signs of resurgence. Peter Day reports from Britain's former steel capital, Sheffield, on what it takes to survive and prosper in an intensely globalising world.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

The Remarkable Mr China * *2009020520090208

Peter Day talks to Irish businessman Liam Casey from his base in the industrial powerhouse of Shenzen, close to Hong Kong.

He gives his insights into how China works and how its influence is rippling through companies and consumers all over the world.

Peter Day talks to Irish businessman Liam Casey from his base in Shenzen, near Hong Kong.

The Sharing Economy2014050820140511

Home swaps, driving your neighbour's car, private car parking in your drive, even renting your neighbour's clothes. They are all part of a new style of collaborative enterprise in which nearly everyone can join and (maybe) make money: the 'shared economy'.

It's breaking cover, growing fast and could be important. Perhaps the best known example is Airbnb but many more companies have sprung up allowing people to share their things and even their time. And now companies are trying to make money out of what makes all this sharing possible: trust.

But existing regulations and laws are set up for traditional businesses such as hotels and car hire companies, and that is causing problems. Peter Day investigates the opportunities and snags of the sharing economy and asks if it could become a big democratic movement.

Producer: Charlotte Pritchard.

Sharing your neighbour's car, tools and clothes. Peter Day reports on the sharing economy.

The Sick Note2013041120130414

Peter Day examines new plans to get people who are off sick back to work more quickly.

Until recently, doctors filled in a sick note for people off work. But now things are changing. The sick note has turned into a fit note, and from next year a government-backed scheme will try to help ill people get back to work as quickly as possible, even if it is only part time. Peter Day finds out what's behind the changes, and why they matter.

Producer Caroline Bayley.

The Uncertainty Principle2003050820030511

The war has made uncertainty a permanent feature of today's world.

Peter Day investigates the effects the rapidly changing future will bring.

Peter Day investigates the effects the changing future will bring.

The Veneto2014041020140413

Crisi is the Italian word for "crisis" and the country has been living through political and economic upheaval for several years. It has meant hard times for Italy's family businesses serving a global marketplace. From the Veneto region north of Venice, Peter Day finds out how these distinctive Italian companies are hanging on.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

Peter Day visits family-run businesses in the Italian Veneto.

There's Oil In Them Thar Sands2006012620060129

Peter Day reports on the great Canadian oil rush.

For hundreds of years, people have known about the huge reserves of oil trapped in a black tar sands in the north of Alberta - a wilderness of oil stretching for miles.

It was always too expensive to get at, but now the rising global price of crude oil means that companies are scrambling to get their hands on it, creating what many describe as an oil rush.

Interviewees:

Greg Stringham, VP Markets and Fiscal Policy, Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers

Clive Mather, President and CEO, Shell Canada

Kyle Reedman, DJ, Kyx 98

Sandra Bessey, instructor, Keyano College

Annette Cake, Fort McMurray Oilsands Discovery Centre

Chris Bloomer, Chief Financial Officer, Petrobank

Dan Woynillowicz, environment policy analyst, The Pembina Institute

Melody Lepine, Director, Mikisew Cree First Nation Industry Relations

Bill, Nancy and Rowland Woodward

Music by East Coast Connection.

Thinking Machines2015050720150510 (R4)

Peter Day explores the concept and implications of 'thinking machines'.

One of the most famous computer systems in the world is called Watson, developed by IBM. It's best known in for beating two human contestants to win the American game show, Jeopardy. Watson may now be leading a revolution in 'machine learning'.

Peter Day reports from New York City, fast becoming a high tech rival of Silicon Valley, to find out how smart our machines are becoming and whether we should be worried about the impact Artificial Intelligence will have our lives.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

Image credit: Science Photo Library

Programme includes clips from:

Jeopardy!, Sony Pictures

Her, director Spike Jonze, producers: Spike Jonze, Megan Ellison and Vincent Landay, distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures

Mayor Bloomberg via http://wearemadeinny.com/

Through The Mill2012042620120429

In the 19th century the Lancashire cotton industry was at the heart of the world's industrial revolution and the main engine of the British economy. In the 20th century it started a long decline. Today a few remaining textile manufacturers are finding ways of surviving huge global competition. Peter Day finds out how they are doing it.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

Peter Day finds out how the Lancashire textile industry struggles to survive.

Through The Net2005100620051009

As jobs for life decrease, people in search of contacts and contracts are turning to new business networks for help and support.

Peter Day meets the networkers.

Ticking Over20100425

Can the Isle of Man create a revival in British watch making? Precision time pieces are proving recession proof but with so few watchmakers left in this country Peter Day finds out if we can really wind the clock back for a British tradition.

Producer: Clare Walker.

Can the Isle of Man create a revival in watch making? Peter Day finds out.

Ticking Over2010052020100523

Can the Isle of Man create a revival in British watch making? Precision time pieces are proving recession proof but with so few watchmakers left in this country Peter Day finds out if we can really wind the clock back for a British tradition.

Producer: Clare Walker.

Can the Isle of Man rejuvenate the business of watchmaking?

Tiny Profits2004022620040229

NANOTECHNOLOGY has been described as both the next big thing in science and the invention of grey goo that will destroy us all at the same time.

Peter Day investigates the potential of the science of small things for inventors and investors.

Town And Country2006092820061001

Far from the cities, rural communities are trying to cope with the advances of the 21st Century - while keeping their ancient characteristics.

Peter Day tours two different towns to hear about some strategies that work and some that don't.

Ttip: The World's Biggest Trade Deal20150122

The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, or Ttip, is currently being negotiated between the US and the EU. It is the world's biggest trade deal and highly controversial. Peter Day asks how it may effect what we eat, how we work and the strength of our democracy. Will it provide a beneficial boost for business or allow big corporations to side-step important regulation?

Producer: Rosamund Jones.

Turnarounds2016051220160515 (R4)

Matthew Gwyther discovers how to turn around a failing company.

Turnarounds20160512

Imagine you run a company and it's failing. What do you do?

Matthew Gwyther speaks to leaders who've turned around businesses in difficulties and finds out how they did it, what inspired them and what lessons they can pass on.

Produced by Nina Robinson.

Turnarounds20160512

Turnarounds2016051220160515 (R4)

Matthew Gwyther discovers how to turn around a failing company.

Turnarounds20160512

Imagine you run a company and it's failing. What do you do?

Matthew Gwyther speaks to leaders who've turned around businesses in difficulties and finds out how they did it, what inspired them and what lessons they can pass on.

Produced by Nina Robinson.

Turnarounds20160512

Unlimited Company2009112620091129

In a world where banks and conventional companies have taken a big battering in the recession, perhaps there are better ways of running an business.

Peter Day listens to some people who are trying to do things completely differently.

Peter Day hears from people who are taking a different approach to running companies.

Unravelling The Garment Industry2004012920040201

With the end of the Muliti Fibre Agreement looming, Peter Day looks at the wide ranging effects of the MFA in South East ASIA, and finds out how some manufacturing businesses are preparing themselves for the future.

Upending The Pyramid: Remembering Ck Prahalad
Vorsprung Durch Technik Or Universitat?2013052320130526

Peter Day examines innovation in Germany and asks why it lacks world class universities.

Influential experts are worried that the German economic powerhouse is running out of steam. Where is German innovation, they ask? Why do so few German universities rank among the world leaders? Peter Day reports from Munich.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

Germany Crawling

Walk To Widsom2007022220070225

Twice a year, management professor Anil Gupta leads a troop of followers on foot across villages in India in search of local knowledge and inventions that are in danger of being lost, a walk called Shodhyatra.

Peter Day joined him to report on a vision of India far removed from the high technology boom on which the country is placing such high hopes for the future.

Watch This Space2011042120110424

America's space effort faces big upheavals as President Obama reigns in government spending and NASA is told to work in partnership with private enterprise.

From the Kennedy Space Centre in Florida and the Mojave Desert, Peter Day asks what happens next on the USA's journey into space.

Watch Your Language2011051220110515

There is no reason why the words used in corporate communications should be pompous and jargon-ridden

but that is how it often turns out to be.

Peter Day goes into a huddle with a group of enthusiasts determined

to improve the way business language works.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

Peter Day joins a group of enthusiasts determined to improve the language of business.

Water Works2007020820070211

The geopolitics of oil has loomed over global affairs for the past 80 years, but now the attention of policy makers and investors is turning to an even more basic resource.

In an ever thirstier world, Peter Day asks if water will be the next oil?

What Makes a Company Last?20150924

What Makes a Company Last?2015092420150927 (R4)

Peter Day asks what makes a company last and whether longevity still matters.

What Makes a Company Last?2015092420150927 (R4)

Peter Day asks what makes a company last and whether longevity still matters.

What Makes a Company Last?20150924

What Makes a Company Last?20150924

Peter Day asks whether companies really should still be built to last in today's hi-tech internet world. What are the characteristics of those that stand the test of time? Many do learn to change or even re-invent themselves while others, such as Woolworths, have disappeared altogether. In interviews with business leaders and entrepreneurs he discusses whether longevity still matters.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

What Makes a Company Last?20150924

Peter Day asks whether companies really should still be built to last in today's hi-tech internet world. What are the characteristics of those that stand the test of time? Many do learn to change or even re-invent themselves while others, such as Woolworths, have disappeared altogether. In interviews with business leaders and entrepreneurs he discusses whether longevity still matters.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

What's In A Name?2004092320040926

Over the past 20 years, job titles have changed beyond recognition.

Executive President for Presenting Peter Day investigates.

What's In Store?2008052220080525

As increasing numbers of us are buying goods and services online, Peter Day asks what the future holds for the traditional shopping centre.

Where Are We Now:2003091120030914

Autumn is the time when experts assess economic and business outlook.

In a world currently gripped by uncertainty, Peter Day asks what the future holds.

Which Way Now For Scottish Businesses?2014091120140914

Peter Day asks Scottish entrepreneurs to assess the business landscape post-referendum.

Peter Day talks to businesses in Scotland and asks how they see the future post-referendum. Could there be a return to the status quo or has so much changed already as a result of the political debate, regardless of which way the vote goes?

Peter Day assesses the future through the eyes of video games companies in Dundee, young entrepreneurs in Edinburgh and established Scottish business leaders.

Producer: Caroline Bayley.

Whistling In The Dark2008100920081012

Peter Day finds out what happens when co-workers blow the whistle on what appear to be dirty dealings by companies and organisations, and whether they ought to be rewarded for their activities.

Who Sets Our Standards?2010040120100404

World trade in goods and services - from the butter on your bread to the existence of the mobile phone - is held together by an invisible web of standards set by all kinds of official and semi official organisations.

Peter Day has been asking the standards-setters what they do, and why it matters.

Producer: Sandra Kanthal.

Peter Day asks the standards-setters what they do and why it matters.

Why Chile Works2006020920060212

The free market arrived in Chile under military rule during the 1970s.

It hasn't gone away - and it appears to work.

So much so that successive democratically elected governments have kept to the map laid out then.

As a result, sparkling innovative government-backed projects and trade deals are driving the country and exports forward, but Chile also has deep social division.

Peter Day examines the 'Chilean Miracle' and the economic strategy that's seen by many as a model for other countries in Latin America.

He hears from successful businesses and strategists, as well as social entrepreneurs who are fighting to bridge the divide of inequality and joblessness that, they say, makes Chile a lopsided miracle.

Contributors:

Harald Bayer - Minister for Public Works

Lucas Sierra - Economist, Estudios Publicos

Hugo Zanetta - General Manager, Casas Del Bosque Winery,

Gail Thornton - PR Casas Del Bosque

Eduardo Bitran - Fundacion Chile,

Aleck Kleinsteuber

Joe Vasconcellos

Gloria Rosales - social assistant, Rodelillo Foundation

Macarena Currin - Director, Rodelillo Foundation (voice over by Harriet Green)

Joaquin and Jenny Reyes de Noso

Women's Work * *2009081320090816

Some business leaders think that the credit crunch crisis marks a great opportunity for women.

Peter Day asks whether female skills can help to guide the world out of the ruins.

Work Of Fiction - The Fiction Business2004010820040111

This week In Business is gingerly stepping into the world of fiction.

Dickens could do it, and so could Trollope; American novelists still write books with business at their heart.

But it's hard to find business novels here in Britain, while television and the theatre find business "difficult", too.

Is this lack of fictional response to business more than just a curiosity, or is it a serious deficit which damages art as well as commercial life.

Authors tend to shun the working world.

Peter Day asks them what they think of business, and what business thinks about how it is portrayed in fiction.

Workload2013121220131215

Peter Day talks to people with disabilities and asks how equal their opportunities are.

Once there were quotas for employing disabled people. Now there is equality legislation and protection from discrimination in the workplace. Employers are ultra-sensitive about this but what does it actually mean for people with disabilities and the people they work with? Peter Day finds out.

0201Chips Off The Old Block2010090920100912

Once upon a time, British computing led the world.

In a mobile world, some people think it might be happening again.

From Bletchley Park to Bristol, Peter Day reports on the past, present and future of computers UK.

Peter Day reports on the past, present and future of UK computing.

0504After The Crunch2010091620100919

comes what? Double dip or W-shaped recovery? Or something much more uncertain? Peter Day reports from the front line of industry.

Editor: Stephen Chilcott.

Peter Day reports from the front line of industry.

Peter Day is on quest to the North East to find out how businesses are doing in a part of the country where many publically funded jobs have been created in the past decade - jobs that are now under threat as the country waits to hear how and where the big planned government spending cuts will bite.

What comes after the crunch? Peter Day reports from the front line of industry.