Henri Dutilleux (1916-2013)

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
Comments
01Timbre, Space And Movement20160118
01Timbre, Space And Movement20160118
01Timbre, Space And Movement20160118
01Timbre, Space And Movement20160118
01Timbre, Space And Movement20160118

Donald Macleod on Dutilleux's early years and his struggles in occupied Paris during WWII.

01Timbre, Space And Movement20160118

Dutilleux 100

Donald Macleod explores the life and work of one of the 20th century's most sensuous and beguiling musical voices.

Henri Dutilleux (1916-2013) was one of French music's greatest composers: the heir to Fauré, Debussy and Ravel. His music blends ravishing instrumental colours and harmonies with a highly individual approach to new sounds and forms. Always beautiful, never barbarous, Dutilleux's music never clung dogmatically to avant-garde trends or fashions, making his one of the most accessible and appealing modern voices in classical music. In the week of what would have been Dutilleux's 100th birthday, Donald Macleod discusses his life and legacy with two of the UK's leading experts on his music, who the composer wryly dubbed "les deux Carolines...": Caroline Potter and Caroline Rae.

The week begins with Dutilleux's early years growing up in Douai in the far north of France, his struggles in Occupied Paris during the Second World War, and two of his most beloved orchestral works: "Timbres, Space and Movement" and his First Symphony.

Dutilleux

Gong (1) (Correspondances)

Barbara Hannigan, soprano

Orchestre Philharmonique De Radio France

Esa-Pekka Salonen, conductor

I. Quarter note = c.72 (Timbres, Espace, Mouvement)

BBC Philharmonic

Yan Pascal Tortelier, conductor

Feerie Au Clair De Lune; Fantasio

Patrick Mason, baritone

Robert Spellman, piano

Sonatine for flute and piano

Emmanuel Pahud, flute

Eric Le Sage, piano

I. Passacaille Andante; II. Scherzo Molto Vivace (Symphony no.1)

Orchestre De Paris

Paavo Järvi, conductor

Gong (2); De Vincent À Theo (Correspondances)

02From The Wolf To Metaboles20160119

Donald Macleod gives a rare airing to the suite from Dutilleux's ballet The Wolf.

Dutilleux 100

Donald Macleod explores Dutilleux's brilliant, rare ballet "The Wolf", and his first mature work, written for his beloved wife, the pianist Geneviève Joy.

Henri Dutilleux (1916-2013) was one of French music's greatest composers: the heir to Fauré, Debussy and Ravel. His music blends ravishing instrumental colours and harmonies with a highly individual approach to new sounds and forms. Always beautiful, never barbarous, Dutilleux's music never clung dogmatically to avant-garde trends or fashions, making his one of the most accessible and appealing modern voices in classical music. In the week of what would have been Dutilleux's 100th birthday, Donald Macleod discusses his life and legacy with two of the UK's leading experts on his music, who the composer wryly dubbed "les deux Carolines...": Caroline Potter and Caroline Rae.

Today's programme gives a rare airing to the suite from Dutilleux's ballet "The Wolf" - a dazzling synthesis of Poulenc and Stravinsky that the composer later reluctantly withdrew. We also hear his declared Opus 1: his piano sonata - written for his beloved wife of more than six decades, Geneviève Joy - and his kaleidoscopic orchestral work "Metaboles".

Dutilleux

Sarabande et Cortège for bassoon and piano

Per Hannisdal, bassoon

Vebjørn Anvik, piano

Le Loup

Orchestre Societé Concerts Du Conservatoire

Georges Prêtre, conductor

I. Allegro (Piano Sonata)

Geneviève Joy, piano

Métaboles

Seattle Symphony

Ludovic Morlot, conductor.

03A Whole Distant World20160120

Donald Macleod discusses Dutilleux's arrangements of traditional French sea shanties.

Dutilleux 100

Donald Macleod explores a pair of rare works for voices, plus a unique cello concerto for the virtuoso Mstislav Rostropovich.

Henri Dutilleux (1916-2013) was one of French music's greatest composers: the heir to Fauré, Debussy and Ravel. His music blends ravishing instrumental colours and harmonies with a highly individual approach to new sounds and forms. Always beautiful, never barbarous, Dutilleux's music never clung dogmatically to avant-garde trends or fashions, making his one of the most accessible and appealing modern voices in classical music. In the week of what would have been Dutilleux's 100th birthday, Donald Macleod discusses his life and legacy with two of the UK's leading experts on his music, who the composer wryly dubbed "les deux Carolines...": Caroline Potter and Caroline Rae.

The week continues with a true Dutilleux rarity - his arrangements of traditional French sea shanties for young voices, completed during his time at Radio France. We also hear from his uniquely imaginative Symphony no.2 "Le Double", for two orchestras, and end with the work the composer himself felt was his most exquisitely lyrical - his Cello Concerto "A Whole Distant World", written for the great Russian cello virtuoso Mstistlav Rostropovich.

(arr. Dutilleux)

Les Filles De La Rochelle (Quatre Chansons à Virer)

Maitrise De Radio France

Dutilleux

I. Animato Ma Misterioso (Symphony no.2 "Le Double")

Orchestre Du Capitole De Toulouse

Michel Plasson, conductor

San Francisco Night

Dawn Upshaw, soprano

Jerome Ducros, piano

Toute Un Monde Lointain

Mstislav Rostropovich, cello

Orchestre Philharmonique De Radio France

Esa-Pekka Salonen, conductor

Pique La Baleine (Trois Chansons Du Gaillaird d'Avant)

04The Tree Of Dreams20160121
04The Tree Of Dreams20160121
04The Tree Of Dreams20160121
04The Tree Of Dreams20160121
04The Tree Of Dreams20160121

Donald Macleod on Dutilleux's only string quartet, plus violin concerto The Tree of Dreams

04The Tree Of Dreams20160121

Dutilleux 100

Donald Macleod explores one of the 20th century's greatest string quartets, and a much-loved violin concerto.

Henri Dutilleux (1916-2013) was one of French music's greatest composers: the heir to Fauré, Debussy and Ravel. His music blends ravishing instrumental colours and harmonies with a highly individual approach to new sounds and forms. Always beautiful, never barbarous, Dutilleux's music never clung dogmatically to avant-garde trends or fashions, making his one of the most accessible and appealing modern voices in classical music. In the week of what would have been Dutilleux's 100th birthday, Donald Macleod discusses his life and legacy with two of the UK's leading experts on his music, who the composer wryly dubbed "les deux Carolines...": Caroline Potter and Caroline Rae.

We continue our exploration of Dutilleux's life and music with two of his most celebrated works - his only string quartet, "Thus The Night", considered to be among the greatest string quartets of the second half of the twentieth century, and his much-loved violin concerto, "The Tree Of Dreams".

There Was Nothing But Torn Trunks; I Dreamt That I Carried You In My Arms (2 Sonnets De Jean Cassou)

Paul-Armin Edelmann, baritone

Rheinland-Pfalz State Philharmonic Orchestra

Karl-Heinz Steffens, conductor

Ainsi La Nuit

Belcea Quartet

Violin Concerto "L'Arbre Des Songes"

Pierre Amoyal, violin

Orchestre National De France

Charles Dutoit, conductor.

05The Mystery Of The Moment, The Shadows Of Time20160122
05The Mystery Of The Moment, The Shadows Of Time20160122
05The Mystery Of The Moment, The Shadows Of Time20160122
05The Mystery Of The Moment, The Shadows Of Time20160122

05The Mystery Of The Moment, The Shadows Of Time20160122

Donald Macleod introduces Dutilleux's meditations on the passing of time.

05The Mystery Of The Moment, The Shadows Of Time20160122

Dutilleux 100

Donald Macleod introduces poignant meditations on the passing of time, from Dutilleux's ninth and tenth decades.

Henri Dutilleux (1916-2013) was one of French music's greatest composers: the heir to Fauré, Debussy and Ravel. His music blends ravishing instrumental colours and harmonies with a highly individual approach to new sounds and forms. Always beautiful, never barbarous, Dutilleux's music never clung dogmatically to avant-garde trends or fashions, making his one of the most accessible and appealing modern voices in classical music. In the week of what would have been Dutilleux's 100th birthday, Donald Macleod discusses his life and legacy with two of the UK's leading experts on his music, who the composer wryly dubbed "les deux Carolines...": Caroline Potter and Caroline Rae.

To end the week, two profoundly moving meditations on the nature of passing time are prefaced by one of Dutilleux's most sheerly exuberant works: his collection of fleeting orchestral snapshots, "The Mystery Of The Moment". We end with the composer's swansong - his song cycle "Time And The Clock", written for the American soprano Renée Fleming.

Mystere de l'instant

BBC Philharmonic

Edward Cervenka, conductor

The Shadows Of Time

Orchestre Philharmonique De Radio France

Esa-Pekka Salonen, conductor

Le Temps l'horloge

Renée Fleming, soprano

Orchestre National De France

Seiji Ozawa, conductor.