Sir David Frost is famous the world over for his interviews with presidents and prime ministers but his journalistic side is just one part of his repertoire.

Michael Sheen, the British actor who portrayed Frost on the big screen, celebrates his role at the centre of popular culture in 1960s Britain and America.

David has been a household name for five decades but it was in the early 60s that he first rose to fame as host of the ground-breaking satire show That Was The Week That Was, and later, The Frost Report.

In a new interview, Sir David remembers the turning points in his long and illustrious career; while friends and former colleagues including Sir Michael Parkinson, Ronnie Corbett and Robin Gibb give their verdict on the great survivor of television.

His eye for talent helped to launch the careers of many household names including The Two Ronnies; while his entrepreneurial skills saw him co-found both London Weekend Television and TV-AM as well as his own production company.

He's produced eight films, written more than a dozen books and was orchestrating global charity music concerts long before Live Aid was ever dreamed up.

He planned and organised the 1979 UNICEF Gift Of A Song Concert in New York which was beamed all around the world with acts like The Bee Gees, Rod Stewart and Abba supporting the cause.

Sir David is the only person ever to interview the past seven US Presidents and his interview with Nixon became one of the most widely watched news interviews in the history of television.

In 2008, a play and major Hollywood movie were made in its honour - Frost/Nixon - starring Michael Sheen.

Contributors to this documentary include Sir David Frost, Sir Michael Parkinson, Robin Gibb, Ronnie Corbett, Kenneth Cope and Sheila Steafel.

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2010060920120829Sir David Frost is famous the world over for his interviews with presidents and prime ministers but his journalistic side is just one part of his repertoire. Michael Sheen, the British actor who portrayed Frost on the big screen, celebrates his role at the centre of popular culture in 1960s Britain and America.
David has been a household name for five decades but it was in the early 60s that he first rose to fame as host of the ground-breaking satire show That Was The Week That Was, and later, The Frost Report. In a new interview, Sir David remembers the turning points in his long and illustrious career; while friends and former colleagues including Sir Michael Parkinson, Ronnie Corbett and Robin Gibb give their verdict on the great survivor of television.
His eye for talent helped to launch the careers of many household names including The Two Ronnies; while his entrepreneurial skills saw him co-found both London Weekend Television and TV-AM as well as his own production company. He's produced eight films, written more than a dozen books and was orchestrating global charity music concerts long before Live Aid was ever dreamed up. He planned and organised the 1979 UNICEF Gift Of A Song Concert in New York which was beamed all around the world with acts like The Bee Gees, Rod Stewart and Abba supporting the cause.
Sir David is the only person ever to interview the past seven US Presidents and his interview with Nixon became one of the most widely watched news interviews in the history of television. In 2008, a play and major Hollywood movie were made in its honour - Frost/Nixon - starring Michael Sheen.
Contributors include Sir David Frost, Sir Michael Parkinson, Ronnie Corbett, Kenneth Cope, Sheila Steafel, Robin Gibb, Dame Cleo Laine, singer-songwriter Julie Felix, Reggie Perrin creator David Nobbs, and former ITN Executive Sir David Nicholas.
This programme first broadcast in 2010. It's repeated ahead of a new series for Radio 2 - David Frost: Hollywood Greats - which begins next Tuesday with the actress Shirley MacLaine.
Actor Michael Sheen looks back at the legendary career of Sir David Frost
2010060920131128Actor Michael Sheen looks back at the legendary career of Sir David Frost
Sir David Frost is famous the world over for his interviews with presidents and prime ministers but his journalistic side was just one part of his repertoire. Michael Sheen, the British actor who portrayed Frost on the big screen, celebrates his role at the centre of popular culture in 1960s Britain and America.
David has been a household name for five decades but it was in the early 60s that he first rose to fame as host of the ground-breaking satire show That Was The Week That Was, and later, The Frost Report. Sir David talks about the turning points in his long and illustrious career; while friends and former colleagues including Sir Michael Parkinson, Ronnie Corbett and Robin Gibb give their verdict on the great survivor of television.
His eye for talent helped to launch the careers of many household names including The Two Ronnies; while his entrepreneurial skills saw him co-found both London Weekend Television and TV-AM as well as his own production company. He's produced eight films, written more than a dozen books and was orchestrating global charity music concerts long before Live Aid was ever dreamed up. He planned and organised the 1979 UNICEF Gift Of A Song Concert in New York which was beamed all around the world with acts like The Bee Gees, Rod Stewart and Abba supporting the cause.
Sir David is the only person ever to interview the past seven US Presidents and his interview with Nixon became one of the most widely watched news interviews in the history of television. In 2008, a play and major Hollywood movie were made in its honour - Frost/Nixon - starring Michael Sheen.
This programme was first broadcast in 2010, before the death of Sir David Frost

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