Hardeep's Sunday Lunch

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0120121118

Hardeep Singh Kohli travels around the country cooking Sunday lunch with families and communities, introducing some of his favourite recipes, learning about their food and hearing some amazing stories. In the first programme in this 6 part series Hardeep meets Avril and Ron Head. Over the last 30 years they have dedicated much of their lives to caring for children and in particular those with special medical needs. As well as having 3 children of their own they have adopted two children and fostered 138. At a time when foster carers are increasingly in short supply for the growing number of children who need care, Avril and Ron talk about how the values and beliefs that underpin their approach to fostering. As Hardeep cooks them Sunday lunch he hears the story of how they became foster carers and the highs and lows they have experienced over the years.

Producer: Amanda Hancox

Dawn Bryan.

0120121125

Hardeep Singh Kohli travels around the country cooking Sunday lunch with families and communities, introducing some of his favourite recipes, learning about their food and hearing some amazing stories. In the first programme in this 6 part series Hardeep meets Avril and Ron Head. Over the last 30 years they have dedicated much of their lives to caring for children and in particular those with special medical needs. As well as having 3 children of their own they have adopted two children and fostered 138. At a time when foster carers are increasingly in short supply for the growing number of children who need care, Avril and Ron talk about how the values and beliefs that underpin their approach to fostering. As Hardeep cooks them Sunday lunch he hears the story of how they became foster carers and the highs and lows they have experienced over the years.

Producer: Amanda Hancox

Dawn Bryan.

0220121202

Hardeep Singh Kohli travels to Liverpool to cook lunch for Wayne Burns and Lindsay Ball. For many years food has been an important part of both their lives, so much so that after years of overeating they become obese. Eventually events in their lives convinced them the only way forward was for both to have operations for a duodenal switch. Since then Wayne has literally become half the man he was. But as Hardeep finds out dramatic weight loss hasn't solved all their problems.

Producers: Amanda Hancox

Dawn Bryan.

0320121209

This week's Sunday lunch takes Hardeep Singh Kohli to London where he meets Peter Woolf and Will Riley. Over lunch they tell Hardeep about their unusual friendship which developed after Peter broke into Will's house. Sitting in the house where the burglary took place, Peter describes his life of crime which began as a small child, whilst Will talks of his affluent upbringing and his hardworking life as a business man. But as Hardeep hears, their lives were changed for ever when Will disturbed Peter burglarising his house and was injured during an ensuing fight. After a restorative justice meeting in Prison both men eventually formed a friendship which enabled Peter to go straight.

Producer: Dawn Bryan.

0420121216

For this week's Sunday Lunch Hardeep Singh Kohli visits a beautiful valley in Lancashire to meet the volunteers who run Clarion House. With it's red flag waving and a sign outside saying 'Socialism Our Hope', Clarion House is the last Independent Labour Party socialist tea room in the country. Visited several times by Keir Hardie, the tea room was set up at the end of the 19th century to encourage mill workers into the countryside every Sunday. Over pint mugs of tea, visitors were encouraged to make friends, discuss the issues of the day and spread the message of socialism. And as Hardeep finds out, today Clarion House still attracts lots of cyclists and walkers every Sunday in search of a pint of tea and a chat even though the social message is diminished.

Producers: Dawn Bryan

Amanda Hancox.

0520121223

For his Sunday lunch Hardeep Singh Kohli helps to cook traditional Congolese food with the help of Ben and Kongosi Mussanza. Over lunch Ben and Kongosi tell Hardeep about life in the Congo and how they and their children became caught up in the ethnic fighting. But despite being almost killed they talk of their determination to do peace and reconciliation work to stop the violence and counsel the victims. Eventually Kongosi had to flee the country with some of her children and they have settled in Bradford where Ben was studying peace studies. Hardeep talks to the family about how they have tried to overcome the traumas they suffered in the Congo and the problems of moving to another country.

Producers: Dawn Bryan

Amanda Hancox.

06 LAST20121230

In the heart of the Hertfordshire countryside live snow leopards, pumas, amur leopards, ocelot and jaguar. For Hardeep Singh Kohli's last Sunday lunch this week he visits the Cat Survival Trust and with the help of its Director, Terry Moore he cooks lunch for some of the volunteers who work for the charity for free. Whilst preparing his fish pie he finds out why Terry Moore set up his charity over 30 years ago and hears some of the incredible stories about the cats and their keepers.

Producer: Amanda Hancox.

0201Grangemouth20131208

In the first programme of this four part series Hardeep Singh Kohli meets Iain Hogg and Alison Lofthouse. 40 years ago in the Scottish seaport of Grangemouth two babies were found cold, alone and abandoned just 18 months apart. For 35 years those two people thought they were the only one to be found in this way until they made an astonishing discovery. As Hardeep cooks Sunday lunch for Iain and Alley he hears about the events that finally brought them together and why uncovering the identity of the woman who abandoned them remains an issue.

Producer: Catherine Earlam.

0201Marina Chapman20131215

is a grandmother from Yorkshire with a truly exceptional story to tell - a "jungle book" style tale of survival in the wild against all odds. Born in 1950's Columbia, Marina's story starts when she was dramatically abducted around the age of five and abandoned deep within a region of dense tropical forest. The story of what happened next is quite literally beyond belief but it's a story that Hardeep Singh Kohli travels to Bradford to hear over a Sunday lunch of Columbian style food and flavours.

Producer: Catherine Earlam.

0202Fisherman's Friends20131222

Hardeep Singh Kholi continues his gastronomic story telling journey across the UK. This week he visits the picturesque fishing village of Port Isaac on the north Cornish coast. There he finds nine men known as the Fishermen's Friends, whose regular performances on the harbour side caught the attention of a major record label in 2010, catapulting them to unexpected fame and commercial success. But at the start of 2013 a terrible tragedy changed their worlds forever and the voices of the Fishermen's Friends fell silent. With Christmas approaching Hardeep gathers the men together for an evening of freshly caught and cooked seafood which he offers up in return for the their story and, he hopes, a song.

Producer: Catherine Earlam.

0203Jackie And Graham20131229

As New Year approaches Hardeep Singh Kohli cooks his final lunch of the series for two people whose story is all about new beginnings. Jackie Malton and Graham Godden once hated what the other represented. Jackie was Chief Inspector in the Met's "Flying Squad" investigating armed robberies and became the inspiration for Prime Suspect's lead character DCI Jane Tennison. Graham Godden was the "M25 Bandit", a notorious and prolific armed robber during the 1990s. As Hardeep cooks lunch he hears a remarkable story of transformation and change which has led these two most unlikely of friends to be sitting around the table together.

Producer: Catherine Earlam

Series Producer: Amanda Hancox.

0204Foundlings20140105

0204 LASTFoundlings20140105

In the first programme of this four part series Hardeep Singh Kohli meets Iain Hogg and Alison Lofthouse. 40 years ago in the Scottish seaport of Grangemouth two babies were found cold, alone and abandoned just 18 months apart. For 35 years those two people thought they were the only one to be found in this way until they made an astonishing discovery. As Hardeep cooks Sunday lunch for Iain and Alley he hears about the events that finally brought them together and why uncovering the identity of the woman who abandoned them remains an issue.

Producer: Catherine Earlam.

0301Hardeep meets Joe Powell20141109

n the first of the series, Hardeep Singh Kohli travels to Newport, South Wales, to meet Joe Powell. Joe has been on an extraordinary journey. Growing up during a time when his condition, Asperger's Syndrome, was not medically recognised or specifically provided for in the care system; he became non-verbal for ten years, speaking only in whispers for the most part or not at all. But today Joe has a voice and he uses it in the most remarkable way. As Hardeep cooks up Welsh Rarebit and roast chicken for Joe and his close friend Bernard, Joe talks about life with Asperger's in a rare and insightful way.

Producer: Catherine Earlam.

0302Hardeep Cooks at the Circus20141116

Hardeep Singh Kohli enters the marvellous and mystifying world of the circus in this episode of his Sunday Lunch show. He's joined by a French foot juggler, an Australian flying trapeze artist, an Argentinean weapon thrower and ring mistress Yasmin Smart. Yasmin's circus family pedigree could hardly be more prestigious; her grandfather was Billy Smart Sr, founder of the legendary Billy Smart's Circus which became a household name in the 1970's and 80's when it was televised attracting audiences in record-breaking numbers. Now aged sixty, Yasmin is the last Smart still performing in the ring. As Hardeep attempts his own juggling act, with an overzealous barbeque to man and intriguing lunch guests to interview, he hears about lives spent in this extraordinary world.

Producer: Catherine Earlam.

0303Crime, Gangs And Food20141123

Hardeep Singh Kohli meets the woman who broke-up a notorious South London gang through the power of faith, food and motherly love. In 2006 Pastor Mimi Asher discovered that her 13 year-old-son Michael had joined Brixton's "Organised Crime" gang. Violence was spiralling out-of-control on her estate, a crime-ridden no-go area nicknamed "Baghdad" and she feared a bleak outcome for her son. The journey that followed is an extraordinary story and it's a one Hardeep unravels as he arrives in Brixton to cook Punjabi goat curry for Pastor Mimi, her son Michael Adusei and former gang leader Karl Lokko.

Producer: Catherine Earlam.

0304 LASTThe Kemp Family20141130
0304 LASTThe Kemp Family20141130

The final programme in the series takes Hardeep Singh Kohli to Bath where he meets the Kemps - a family more connected than most. Barnaby Kemp is recovering from a kidney transplant. The donor was his sister. But its not the first time he has received a kidney from a family member and it may not be the last. As Hardeep gets busy cooking the family lunch he hears about a long journey from shock diagnosis to transplant surgery from father to son and sister to brother.

Producer: Catherine Earlam.

0304 LASTThe Kemp Family20141130

The final programme in the series takes Hardeep Singh Kohli to Bath where he meets the Kemps - a family more connected than most. Barnaby Kemp is recovering from a kidney transplant. The donor was his sister. But its not the first time he has received a kidney from a family member and it may not be the last. As Hardeep gets busy cooking the family lunch he hears about a long journey from shock diagnosis to transplant surgery from father to son and sister to brother.

Producer: Catherine Earlam.

04Bradford20151122

While the news is dominated by stories of conflict between Muslims and Jews, Hardeep travels to Bradford to tell the story of a heart-warming and inspiring friendship across the religious divide. The city's Muslim community has not only raised money to save Bradford's last remaining synagogue from closure, but as the ties have grown and trust and friendship blossomed, a Muslim is now on the synagogue's ruling council and another Muslim has been invited to preach there. Hardeep meets Rudi Leavor who has been the synagogue chairman for the past 40 years and finds out how, in spite of global politics, the relationship between Jews and Muslims in this part of Bradford is getting stronger. Rudi introduces Hardeep to two of his biggest Muslim supporters; Jani Rashid who recently became a member of the synagogue's ruling council and Zulfi Karim, a local businessman who raised money for repairs and is now not only Rudi's personal friend, but who has also preached in the synagogue. Now the urgent repairs have been completed, the work to secure a future for the synagogue in the city is just the beginning. Zulfi Karim found it a tough decision to begin working with his Jewish neighbours and thought deeply before offering his assistance - he wondered if he would be betraying his religion but realised that he had a duty to his community, regardless of race or creed. Jani took his position on the Synagogue Council at the start of this year. He says he looks at people of different faiths around the world, struggling to live side by side and says, "Bradford can buck that trend by its acts of friendship".

Producer: Phil Pegum.

04Dartmoor Hill Ponies20151129

In this last episode in the series Hardeep travels to Dartmoor for a taste of the iconic ponies that roam the moor. He meets the woman who's made it her life's mission to protect these semi wild ponies whose genes have been shaped by the harsh landscape in which they survive. Dartmoor hill ponies are wonderfully adapted to their environment, surviving by crushing the gorse with their feet so it can be eaten. It was said you could tell where you were on Dartmoor by the colour of the coats of the ponies around you, which was easy just over a hundred years ago when there were thirty thousand ponies on the moor. This rugged pony flourished for centuries because they could also be used for agricultural work. As farming has become mechanised the numbers of ponies have dwindled and today a little over one thousand remain. The presence of ponies on the moor helps maintain biodiversity and accessibility for visitors like Hardeep to enjoy. Now some conservationists have come up with a radical and controversial plan to save Dartmoor's hill ponies. Hardeep is cooking lunch for Charlotte Faulkner who lives on a farm in an ancient Dartmoor longhouse. Charlotte is worried that without intervention the Dartmoor hill ponies will disappear altogether. She has begun developing a range of pony meat called 'Taffety'. It is organic, low in fat and high in omega 3. Charlotte says it's delicious and by putting pony on the menu, she is hoping to give more value to the lives of animals otherwise destined for the slaughterhouse and she hopes it will help make the maintenance of herds viable again for farmers. But her plans have split her family.

Producer: Phil Pegum.

04Hands20151108

Hardeep cooks lunch with Corinne Hutton who's in line to be the first person in the UK to have a double hand transplant. Her bag is packed and the call to travel to hospital for the operation could come at any moment. Not only does Corinne not have any hands, she doesn't have any feet either. They were amputated two years ago after what she thought was a bad cough turned into pneumonia and eventually septicaemia. Though doctors saved her life, they couldn't save her hands and feet. She's focused on regaining her health and as much independence as possible, living alone with her young son.

Since her illness, Corinne has been busy with her own physiotherapy and treatment and also raising money and helping other people who have experienced life changing trauma through her charity, Finding your Feet. She is hoping new hands will enable her to do even more - but things will get worse before they get better, as her lunch companion, Mark Cahill helps explain. Mark had a hand transplant two years ago. He's really pleased with the results but it is a slow process and takes time to gain sensations and dexterity. He can't yet hold a knife and fork but is able to feel pain and hot and cold. Corinne decided to agree to have a hand transplant after meeting Mark who allayed some of her fears. She's going to become very dependent after her transplant as she will not be able to use her forearms at all for months. She believes she has coped with a lot worse and is focused on the end result. Ultimately she says, "I want to hold my son's hand again."

Producer: Phil Pegum.

04Journeymen Boxers20151115

Hardeep cooks up a meal that packs a protein fuelled punch when he enters the world of the boxing journeymen - the men who are paid to show young hopefuls the ropes and not to win. Hardeep meets Johnny Greaves, one of the best in the business - 100 fights, 96 defeats, 4 wins. As Johnny says "turn up, fight, lose, get paid. Happy days." Johnny Greaves is refreshingly honest about the realities of being a mid-ranking professional boxer. Johnny makes losing look like an art form and is very proud of his craft. He first started boxing as a 9 year old against his older brother Frank in the family's back garden in London's East End. When he turned pro, brother Frank became his trainer and manager and Johnny spent the next six years getting beaten up for the pleasure of a baying, paying public. Hardeep discovers what keeps people like Johnny fighting and gets an insight in to the tight-knit world of boxing that's a very long way from the glamour of big money title fights.

Journeymen are the life-blood of boxing and many have skills that belie the stats in their losses columns. They accept fights against ambitious, highly trained fighters and must always put on a show to make sure fans have a good night, whilst making sure they don't hurt them too much - or get hurt themselves. It takes enormous physical skill and courage, but the journeyman also has to be mentally tough; there's a stigma to being a journeyman and no one relishes being labelled a loser even if they're getting well paid for it. Now though, the tables have turned. Frank Greaves, at the veteran age of 37 and despite his wife's concerns, has decided that it's time he stepped into the ring and his brother Johnny has become his trainer. Can Frank make it as a journeyman boxer?

Producer: Phil Pegum.

04Journeymen Boxers20160103

Hardeep cooks up a meal that packs a protein fuelled punch when he enters the world of the boxing journeymen - the men who are paid to show young hopefuls the ropes and not to win. Hardeep meets Johnny Greaves, one of the best in the business - 100 fights, 96 defeats, 4 wins. As Johnny says "turn up, fight, lose, get paid. Happy days." Johnny Greaves is refreshingly honest about the realities of being a mid-ranking professional boxer. Johnny makes losing look like an art form and is very proud of his craft. He first started boxing as a 9 year old against his older brother Frank in the family's back garden in London's East End. When he turned pro, brother Frank became his trainer and manager and Johnny spent the next six years getting beaten up for the pleasure of a baying, paying public. Hardeep discovers what keeps people like Johnny fighting and gets an insight in to the tight-knit world of boxing that's a very long way from the glamour of big money title fights.

Journeymen are the life-blood of boxing and many have skills that belie the stats in their losses columns. They accept fights against ambitious, highly trained fighters and must always put on a show to make sure fans have a good night, whilst making sure they don't hurt them too much - or get hurt themselves. It takes enormous physical skill and courage, but the journeyman also has to be mentally tough; there's a stigma to being a journeyman and no one relishes being labelled a loser even if they're getting well paid for it. Now though, the tables have turned. Frank Greaves, at the veteran age of 37 and despite his wife's concerns, has decided that it's time he stepped into the ring and his brother Johnny has become his trainer. Can Frank make it as a journeyman boxer?

Producer: Phil Pegum.