Global Classical Music - A New World Symphony

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
01Sunday Feature2014092120150729 (R3)

In a three-part series, Petroc Trelawny sets out to measure the passion and impact of the new global enthusiasm for Western classical music. Is this just an attempt by nations with new wealth and a burgeoning middle-class to buy their way to the international cultural top table, or will this new enthusiasm last and have an impact on places where classical music has few if any roots?

The statistics are often jaw-dropping. Massive new concert halls across China, educational systems in South America and India and millions of children learning western instruments. The fact that 30 million Chinese students are currently studying the piano speaks of a fundamental new development in a musical tradition that was once firmly anchored in the West

In the first programme, Petroc looks at the wave of new building projects under way, particularly in China. Massive concert halls designed by award-winning international architects are a bold statement of intent and they've certainly raised the profile of China's performance ambitions. The question now is how they're going to be filled and why do they continue to be planned and built with such extraordinary zeal when the audiences who might attend remain tentative about what is, to all intents and purposes, an alien culture. Is it enough to believe that 'if you build it, they will come?'

Petroc centres his exploration on Zaha Hadid's iconic Opera House in Guangzhou and also hears from leading cultural figures in India, South America and the Middle East where the story shares universal challenges but with very particular local dimensions.

Producer: Tom Alban.

In a three-part series, Petroc Trelawny sets out to measure the passion and impact of the new global enthusiasm for western classical music. It's an enthusiasm that has been reflected in this year's BBC Proms with visiting orchestras from Qatar, China, Singapore, South Korea, Turkey and Brazil.

Is this just an attempt by nations with new wealth and a burgeoning middle-class to buy their way to the international cultural top table, or will this new enthusiasm last and have an impact on places where classical music has few if any roots?

01Sunday Feature2014092120150729 (R3)

In a three-part series, Petroc Trelawny sets out to measure the passion and impact of the new global enthusiasm for western classical music. It's an enthusiasm that has been reflected in this year's BBC Proms with visiting orchestras from Qatar, China, Singapore, South Korea, Turkey and Brazil.

Is this just an attempt by nations with new wealth and a burgeoning middle-class to buy their way to the international cultural top table, or will this new enthusiasm last and have an impact on places where classical music has few if any roots?

The statistics are often jaw-dropping. Massive new concert halls across China, educational systems in South America and India and millions of children learning western instruments. The fact that 30 million Chinese students are currently studying the piano speaks of a fundamental new development in a musical tradition that was once firmly anchored in the West

In the first programme, Petroc looks at the wave of new building projects under way, particularly in China. Massive concert halls designed by award-winning international architects are a bold statement of intent and they've certainly raised the profile of China's performance ambitions. The question now is how they're going to be filled and why do they continue to be planned and built with such extraordinary zeal when the audiences who might attend remain tentative about what is, to all intents and purposes, an alien culture. Is it enough to believe that 'if you build it, they will come?'

Petroc centres his exploration on Zaha Hadid's iconic Opera House in Guangzhou and also hears from leading cultural figures in India, South America and the Middle East where the story shares universal challenges but with very particular local dimensions.

Producer: Tom Alban.

In a three-part series, Petroc Trelawny sets out to measure the passion and impact of the new global enthusiasm for Western classical music. Is this just an attempt by nations with new wealth and a burgeoning middle-class to buy their way to the international cultural top table, or will this new enthusiasm last and have an impact on places where classical music has few if any roots?

02Sunday Feature2014092820150730 (R3)

Petroc Trelawny's three-part series looking at the extraordinary surge in performance of Western classical music over the last twenty or thirty years turns his attention to the mechanics of the new orchestras.

Building dramatic and iconic concert halls will count for nothing if they're not filled by both visiting and local artists. That puts a great deal of pressure on relatively young orchestras who need to develop audiences unfamiliar with the classical music repertoire.

Concentrating on the Guangzhou Symphony, the Qatar Philharmonic, the Hong Kong Philharmonic and the Sao Paulo Symphony orchestras, Petroc talks to performers, audience members, organisers and government officials about the long-term ambitions for their respective bands.

Will the current funding levels be sustained? Are the audience numbers really growing and will the Western repertoire come to dominate or are they delivering something entirely new to their respective cities and ultimately to the rest of the world?

Petroc also hears from composers and programmers who have to balance cultural ambition with economic pragmatism.

Producer Tom Alban.

Will the current funding levels sustain? Are the audience numbers really growing and will the Western repertoire come to dominate or are they delivering something entirely new to their respective cities and ultimately to the rest of the world?

He also hears from composers and programmers who have to balance cultural ambition with economic pragmatism.

02Sunday Feature2014092820150730 (R3)

Petroc Trelawny's three-part series looking at the extraordinary surge in performance of Western classical music over the last twenty or thirty years turns his attention to the mechanics of the new orchestras.

Building dramatic and iconic concert halls will count for nothing if they're not filled by both visiting and local artists. That puts a great deal of pressure on relatively young orchestras who need to develop audiences unfamiliar with the classical music repertoire.

Concentrating on the Guangzhou Symphony, the Qatar Philharmonic, the Hong Kong Philharmonic and the Sao Paulo Symphony orchestras, Petroc talks to performers, audience members, organisers and government officials about the long-term ambitions for their respective bands.

Will the current funding levels be sustained? Are the audience numbers really growing and will the Western repertoire come to dominate or are they delivering something entirely new to their respective cities and ultimately to the rest of the world?

Petroc also hears from composers and programmers who have to balance cultural ambition with economic pragmatism.

Producer Tom Alban.

Will the current funding levels sustain? Are the audience numbers really growing and will the Western repertoire come to dominate or are they delivering something entirely new to their respective cities and ultimately to the rest of the world?

He also hears from composers and programmers who have to balance cultural ambition with economic pragmatism.

03Sunday Feature2014100520150731 (R3)

From the much heralded success of El Sistema in South America to the overwhelming numbers of Chinese instrumentalists and the new projects in India and the Middle East, everyone agrees that the sustained growth of Classical music around the world depends on Education. In the final programme of the series looking at the new classical music world order Petroc Trelawny explores the different approaches to music and finds that one size does not fit all.

He talks to Chinese teachers and performers about the technical brilliance being achieved but the desire to develop a sense of ensemble and performance; he visits new schools in India, where the systems and notations of classical music are being harnessed to work alongside the powerful Indian musical traditions and the industrial production requirements of Bollywood, and he assesses the lasting impact of Venezuela's El Sistema and its impact elsewhere in South America.

Thus far the very highest levels of musical ambition still require students to head back to the heartland of the Western Classical tradition. Academies and Conservatoires in Britain, America, Germany and Russia are luring ambitious musicians from across the globe. A significant change in recent years is the number who then return home to share the skills they've developed and to encourage a new self-confidence and maturity.

But, as Petroc discovers, there's another more pressing concern for those passionate about classical music and that's the less straightforward education of audiences.

Producer: Tom Alban.

03Sunday Feature2014100520150731 (R3)

From the much heralded success of El Sistema in South America to the overwhelming numbers of Chinese instrumentalists and the new projects in India and the Middle East, everyone agrees that the sustained growth of Classical music around the world depends on Education. In the final programme of the series looking at the new classical music world order Petroc Trelawny explores the different approaches to music and finds that one size does not fit all.

He talks to Chinese teachers and performers about the technical brilliance being achieved but the desire to develop a sense of ensemble and performance; he visits new schools in India, where the systems and notations of classical music are being harnessed to work alongside the powerful Indian musical traditions and the industrial production requirements of Bollywood, and he assesses the lasting impact of Venezuela's El Sistema and its impact elsewhere in South America.

Thus far the very highest levels of musical ambition still require students to head back to the heartland of the Western Classical tradition. Academies and Conservatoires in Britain, America, Germany and Russia are luring ambitious musicians from across the globe. A significant change in recent years is the number who then return home to share the skills they've developed and to encourage a new self-confidence and maturity.

But, as Petroc discovers, there's another more pressing concern for those passionate about classical music and that's the less straightforward education of audiences.

Producer: Tom Alban.

03 LASTSunday Feature20141005

From the much heralded success of El Sistema in South America to the overwhelming numbers of Chinese instrumentalists and the new projects in India and the Middle East, everyone agrees that the sustained growth of Classical music around the world depends on Education. In the final programme of the series looking at the new Classical music world order Petroc Trelawny explores the different approaches to music and finds that one size does not fit all.

He talks to Chinese teachers and performers about the technical brilliance being achieved but the desire to develop a sense of ensemble and performance; he visits new schools in India, where the systems and notations of classical music are being harnessed to work alongside the powerful Indian musical traditions and the industrial production requirements of Bollywood, and he assesses the lasting impact of Venezuela's El Sistema and its impact elsewhere in South America.

Thus far the very highest levels of musical ambition still require students to head back to the heartland of the Western Classical tradition. Academies and Conservatoires in Britain, America, Germany and Russia are luring ambitious musicians from across the globe. A significant change in recent years is the number who then return home to share the skills they've developed and to encourage a new self-confidence and maturity.

But, as Petroc discovers, there's another more pressing concern for those passionate about Classical music and that's the less straightforward education of audiences.

Producer: Tom Alban.

03 LASTSunday Feature20141005

From the much heralded success of El Sistema in South America to the overwhelming numbers of Chinese instrumentalists and the new projects in India and the Middle East, everyone agrees that the sustained growth of Classical music around the world depends on Education. In the final programme of the series looking at the new Classical music world order Petroc Trelawny explores the different approaches to music and finds that one size does not fit all.

He talks to Chinese teachers and performers about the technical brilliance being achieved but the desire to develop a sense of ensemble and performance; he visits new schools in India, where the systems and notations of classical music are being harnessed to work alongside the powerful Indian musical traditions and the industrial production requirements of Bollywood, and he assesses the lasting impact of Venezuela's El Sistema and its impact elsewhere in South America.

Thus far the very highest levels of musical ambition still require students to head back to the heartland of the Western Classical tradition. Academies and Conservatoires in Britain, America, Germany and Russia are luring ambitious musicians from across the globe. A significant change in recent years is the number who then return home to share the skills they've developed and to encourage a new self-confidence and maturity.

But, as Petroc discovers, there's another more pressing concern for those passionate about Classical music and that's the less straightforward education of audiences.

Producer: Tom Alban.