Glasgow Rcs - Poulenc

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01Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert20150505

Michael Collins and friends begin a week's celebration of the chamber works of Poulenc at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland in Glasgow. The, at times mournful, sonata for clarinet is a late work written for Benny Goodman and dedicated to his friend, the composer Honegger. The sextet for piano and woodwind is quite clearly in the neoclassical vein in the mode of Stravinsky and Poulenc makes full use of the instruments' characters to produce his trademark acerbic yet witty finish. Glinka's Trio is by contrast a work of full-blown and theatrical romanticism. He is joined for Poulenc's Sextet by Members of Stevenson Winds, all students at the RCS making their Lunchtime Concert debut.

Poulenc: Sonata for clarinet and piano

Glinka: Trio Pathetique in D minor

Poulenc: Sextet for Piano and Wind

Michael Collins, clarinet

Peter Whelan, bassoon

Scott Mitchell, piano

Members of Stevenson Winds:

Alasdair Garrett, flute

Alice McArthur, oboe

Christopher McShane, bassoon

Andrew MacLean, horn.

01Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert20151117

Michael Collins and friends begin a week's celebration of the chamber works of Poulenc at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland in Glasgow. The, at times mournful, sonata for clarinet is a late work written for Benny Goodman and dedicated to his friend, the composer Honegger. The sextet for piano and woodwind is quite clearly in the neoclassical vein in the mode of Stravinsky and Poulenc makes full use of the instruments' characters to produce his trademark acerbic yet witty finish. Glinka's Trio is by contrast a work of full-blown and theatrical romanticism. He is joined for Poulenc's Sextet by Members of Stevenson Winds, all students at the RCS making their Lunchtime Concert debut.

Poulenc: Sonata for clarinet and piano

Glinka: Trio Pathetique in D minor

Poulenc: Sextet for Piano and Wind

Michael Collins, clarinet

Peter Whelan, bassoon

Scott Mitchell, piano

Members of Stevenson Winds:

Alasdair Garrett, flute

Alice McArthur, oboe

Christopher McShane, bassoon

Andrew MacLean, horn.

02Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert20150506

Former Cardiff Singer of the World winner, Nicole Cabell and pianist Simon Lepper celebrate Poulenc's profound love for the contemporary poets of his day in Paris in this recital from the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland in Glasgow.

Banalités' is a group of five songs from various sources of which, 'Hotel' and 'Voyage a Paris' come from a group of short poems also entitled 'Banalités' by the poet Apollinaire which appealed to him because of their silliness. The group of poems are disparate and have no obvious thematic thread however his settings, beautifully illuminate the sometimes obscure texts.

The poetry of Louise de Vilmorin gave Poulenc the opportunity to write specifically for the female voice in 'Fiancailles pour rire'. The cycle begins with the expression which has come to represent the duality of Poulenc's musical personality -) the monk and the street urchin - the sublime alongside the ridiculous. The final song of the cycle, "Fleurs," is one of those grave songs of love and loss that no one else but Poulenc could have composed.

Poulenc's works are contrasted with two well-known song cycles by his older contemporary, Maurice Ravel; the magically evocative song cycle Shéhérazade originally written for soprano (or tenor) and orchestra and his Cinq populaires grecques which were written around the same time for voice and harp to illustrate a lecture his friend Pierre Aubry was giving on Greek folk song. They are all popular songs which range in mood from the carefree 'Tout gai', to the atmospheric and meditative 'La-bas, vers l'eglise'.

Poulenc: Banalités

Ravel: Shéhérazade

Poulenc: Fiançailles pour rire

Ravel: 5 Popular Greek Songs

Nicole Cabell, soprano

Simon Lepper, piano.

02Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert20151118

Former Cardiff Singer of the World winner, Nicole Cabell and pianist Simon Lepper celebrate Poulenc's profound love for the contemporary poets of his day in Paris in this recital from the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland in Glasgow.

Banalités' is a group of five songs from various sources of which, 'Hotel' and 'Voyage a Paris' come from a group of short poems also entitled 'Banalités' by the poet Apollinaire which appealed to him because of their silliness. The group of poems are disparate and have no obvious thematic thread however his settings, beautifully illuminate the sometimes obscure texts.

The poetry of Louise de Vilmorin gave Poulenc the opportunity to write specifically for the female voice in 'Fiancailles pour rire'. The cycle begins with the expression which has come to represent the duality of Poulenc's musical personality -) the monk and the street urchin - the sublime alongside the ridiculous. The final song of the cycle, "Fleurs," is one of those grave songs of love and loss that no one else but Poulenc could have composed.

Poulenc's works are contrasted with two well-known song cycles by his older contemporary, Maurice Ravel; the magically evocative song cycle Shéhérazade originally written for soprano (or tenor) and orchestra and his Cinq populaires grecques which were written around the same time for voice and harp to illustrate a lecture his friend Pierre Aubry was giving on Greek folk song. They are all popular songs which range in mood from the carefree 'Tout gai', to the atmospheric and meditative 'La-bas, vers l'eglise'.

Poulenc: Banalités

Ravel: Shéhérazade

Poulenc: Fiançailles pour rire

Ravel: 5 Popular Greek Songs

Nicole Cabell, soprano

Simon Lepper, piano.

03Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert20150507

Bass-baritone Jonathan Lemalu and pianist Joseph Middleton team up to perform songs by Poulenc contrasted with works by Fauré, Ibert and Duparc from the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland in Glasgow. Poulenc wrote his Chansons villageoises in 1942 during World War 2 and described them as 'a defiant celebration of the French way of life impervious to the German occupation'.

Fauré: L'horizon chimérique

Duparc: Le manoir de Rosemonde

Duparc: Phidylé

Duparc: La vague et la cloche

Ibert: Don Quichotte

Poulenc: Chansons villageoises

Jonathan Lemalu, baritone

Joseph Middleton, piano.

03Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert20151119

Bass-baritone Jonathan Lemalu and pianist Joseph Middleton team up to perform songs by Poulenc contrasted with works by Fauré, Ibert and Duparc from the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland in Glasgow. Poulenc wrote his Chansons villageoises in 1942 during World War 2 and described them as 'a defiant celebration of the French way of life impervious to the German occupation'.

Fauré: L'horizon chimérique

Duparc: Le manoir de Rosemonde

Duparc: Phidylé

Duparc: La vague et la cloche

Ibert: Don Quichotte

Poulenc: Chansons villageoises

Jonathan Lemalu, baritone

Joseph Middleton, piano.

04Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert20150508

Pianist Pascal Rogé performs the music of Poulenc and Ravel, for which he has a strong affinity, from the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland

Poulenc: 3 Mouvements perpétuels

Poulenc: 3 Improvisations

Poulenc: 3 Novelettes

Ravel: Sonatine

Poulenc: Soirées de Nazelles

Pascal Rogé, piano.

04Radio 3 Lunchtime Concert20151120

Pianist Pascal Rogé performs the music of Poulenc and Ravel, for which he has a strong affinity, from the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland

Poulenc: 3 Mouvements perpétuels

Poulenc: 3 Improvisations

Poulenc: 3 Novelettes

Ravel: Sonatine

Poulenc: Soirées de Nazelles

Pascal Rogé, piano.