Giovanni Paisiello (1740-1816)

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012011020720160606 (R3)

Donald Macleod introduces two Paisiello comic operas - Don Chisciotte and La Frascatana.

012011020720160606 (R3)

Donald Macleod introduces the life and music of the Italian composer whose comic operas were the toast of some of the greatest world leaders of the day.

Giovanni Paisiello was one of the most popular opera composers of his day, feted all over Europe, not least by the greatest world leaders of the day including Napoleon, Catherine the Great and Emperor Joseph II. And yet, other than a handful of operatic arias, he's virtually unknown today. Donald Macleod looks at the life and times of this prolific composer who produced nearly 100 operas and made a significant contribution to the development of opera.

Paisiello was an ambitious young man - although he was already making a name for himself around Italy, he was determined to win the hearts and minds of the Neapolitan court, one of the most flourishing centres of musical excellence in Europe at that time. In the first programme, Donald Macleod introduces excerpts from two of his comic operas - 'Don Chisciotte della Mancia', one of the first to find favour with the King of Naples, and 'La Frascatana', with which Paisiello launched his international career.

0120110207

0120110207
0120110207

Donald Macleod introduces two Paisiello comic operas - Don Chisciotte and La Frascatana.

Donald Macleod introduces the life and music of the Italian composer whose comic operas were the toast of some of the greatest world leaders of the day.

Giovanni Paisiello was one of the most popular opera composers of his day, feted all over Europe, not least by the greatest world leaders of the day including Napoleon, Catherine the Great and Emperor Joseph II. And yet, other than a handful of operatic arias, he's virtually unknown today. Donald Macleod looks at the life and times of this prolific composer who produced nearly 100 operas and made a significant contribution to the development of opera.

Paisiello was an ambitious young man - although he was already making a name for himself around Italy, he was determined to win the hearts and minds of the Neapolitan court, one of the most flourishing centres of musical excellence in Europe at that time. In the first programme, Donald Macleod introduces excerpts from two of his comic operas - 'Don Chisciotte della Mancia', one of the first to find favour with the King of Naples, and 'La Frascatana', with which Paisiello launched his international career.

Giovanni Paisiello was one of the most popular opera composers of his day, feted all over Europe, not least by the greatest world leaders of the day including Napoleon, Catherine the Great and Emperor Joseph II.

And yet, other than a handful of operatic arias, he's virtually unknown today.

Donald Macleod looks at the life and times of this prolific composer who produced nearly 100 operas and made a significant contribution to the development of opera.

Paisiello was an ambitious young man - although he was already making a name for himself around Italy, he was determined to win the hearts and minds of the Neapolitan court, one of the most flourishing centres of musical excellence in Europe at that time.

In the first programme, Donald Macleod introduces excerpts from two of his comic operas - 'Don Chisciotte della Mancia', one of the first to find favour with the King of Naples, and 'La Frascatana', with which Paisiello launched his international career.

0220110208
0220110208

Donald Macleod discovers how Paisiello fared at the court of Catherine the Great.

0220110208

When Catherine the Great invited Paisiello to become musical director of her court in St Petersburg he must have jumped at the chance. It was his first official appointment and with it came both security and prestige. Paisiello quickly became a favourite of the court, thanks to the steady stream of comic operas he produced there. Donald Macleod introduces two of them: 'I filosofi immaginari' - a great favourite of Catherine's, and 'La serva padrona', which recycled the libretto famously set by Pergolesi 50 years earlier.

Donald Macleod discovers how Paisiello fared at the court of Catherine the Great.

When Catherine the Great invited Paisiello to become musical director of her court in St Petersburg he must have jumped at the chance.

It was his first official appointment and with it came both security and prestige.

Paisiello quickly became a favourite of the court, thanks to the steady stream of comic operas he produced there.

Donald Macleod introduces two of them: 'I filosofi immaginari' - a great favourite of Catherine's, and 'La serva padrona', which recycled the libretto famously set by Pergolesi 50 years earlier.

0320110209

Donald Macleod introduces the opera destined to be Paisiello's biggest hit.

0320110209

Paisiello didn't compose a great deal of instrumental music during his lifetime, but whilst in St Petersburg, he wrote a selection of keyboard music dedicated to two of his most prestigious pupils. Donald Macleod introduces the gracious Harpsichord Concerto in C major and the opera which was destined to become Paisiello's biggest hit, 'Il barbiere di Siviglia'.

03Giovanni Paisiello (1740-1816)20110209

Donald Macleod introduces the opera destined to be Paisiello's biggest hit.

Paisiello didn't compose a great deal of instrumental music during his lifetime, but whilst in St Petersburg, he wrote a selection of keyboard music dedicated to two of his most prestigious pupils.

Donald Macleod introduces the gracious Harpsichord Concerto in C major and the opera which was destined to become Paisiello's biggest hit, 'Il barbiere di Siviglia'.

0420110210
0420110210

Donald Macleod introduces two new operas written after Paisiello's return to Naples.

0420110210

In 1784, after eight years in Russia, Paisiello was at long last offered an appointment back in Naples, as court composer of dramatic music. On his way back home, Paisiello stopped off in Vienna, where he composed the opera 'Il re Teodoro a Venezia' for another great supporter of his, Emperor Joseph II. Donald introduces the overture from this popular work, an excerpt from 'I giuochi d'Agrigento', written for the inauguration of La Fenice Opera House in Venice, part of an opera to celebrate a major dynastic wedding - 'La Daunia felice', and, by way of stark contrast, the pared-down beauty of Paisiello's sacred work 'Christus', written for Holy Week in 1794.

Donald Macleod introduces two new operas written after Paisiello's return to Naples.

In 1784, after eight years in Russia, Paisiello was at long last offered an appointment back in Naples, as court composer of dramatic music.

On his way back home, Paisiello stopped off in Vienna, where he composed the opera 'Il re Teodoro a Venezia' for another great supporter of his, Emperor Joseph II.

Donald introduces the overture from this popular work, an excerpt from 'I giuochi d'Agrigento', written for the inauguration of La Fenice Opera House in Venice, part of an opera to celebrate a major dynastic wedding - 'La Daunia felice', and, by way of stark contrast, the pared-down beauty of Paisiello's sacred work 'Christus', written for Holy Week in 1794.

0520110211
0520110211

Donald Macleod explores Paisiello's final years, when Naples was under French rule.

0520110211

Paisiello's final years took place against a backdrop of political turmoil. Around the turn of the century, his home town of Naples was twice invaded by the French. Paisiello opted to remain behind and work for the new republican state. When the King of Naples was restored to the throne the second time, he turned his back on Paisiello, leaving him in a state of poverty and disgrace for the remaining months of his life. Donald introduces music from Paisiello's final years, including the overture to 'Proserpina', dedicated to his friend and supporter, Napoleon Bonaparte, an excerpt from his penultimate stage work 'Il passaggio de Monte San Bernardo' composed to honour Napoleon's brother Joseph, and part of the Mass for the Dead dedicated to members of the Neapolitan royal family.

05 LAST20110211

Donald Macleod explores Paisiello's final years, when Naples was under French rule.

Paisiello's final years took place against a backdrop of political turmoil.

Around the turn of the century, his home town of Naples was twice invaded by the French.

Paisiello opted to remain behind and work for the new republican state.

When the King of Naples was restored to the throne the second time, he turned his back on Paisiello, leaving him in a state of poverty and disgrace for the remaining months of his life.

Donald introduces music from Paisiello's final years, including the overture to 'Proserpina', dedicated to his friend and supporter, Napoleon Bonaparte, an excerpt from his penultimate stage work 'Il passaggio de Monte San Bernardo' composed to honour Napoleon's brother Joseph, and part of the Mass for the Dead dedicated to members of the Neapolitan royal family.