Getting The Picture

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01The Camera Has Attitudes20140113

01The Camera Has Attitudes2014011320140501

(Image: David Bailey self-portrait. Credit: David Bailey.)

David Bailey's portrait photographs are world famous, instantly recognisable and have charted decades of fashion, celebrity and notoriety.

"You can't be judgmental and be a photographer," Bailey says in the first of two programmes in which he tells presenter, Tim Marlow, how he has gone about producing the images which have defined our times.

Bailey reveals in the first programme how he got started and how the portraiture that shot him to fame makes fashion photography more potent. "I thought the best way to sell the frock is through the girl. If the girl doesn't work, the picture doesn't work," he says.

As he lights Tim's own photographic portrait and selects the cameras for the shoot, Bailey discusses how he has gone about portraiture over the last fifty years or more.

In the central London studio which houses his archive of images, Bailey also reveals to Tim how he made his name with photographs of such stars as Marianne Faithfull, most notably for "Vogue".

And Tim talks to Marianne Faithfull herself about the two striking images of her which Bailey shot - in youth and in later years - and the sharply contrasting views she has of them now.

As this first programme draws to a close, the first shots of Tim's photographic session with Bailey are taken.

Producer Simon Coates.

Mick Jagger, Kate Moss, the Kray Twins, Margaret Thatcher, Michael Caine - and, of course, Diana, Princess of Wales. David Bailey's portrait photographs are world famous, instantly recognisable and have charted decades of fashion, celebrity and notoriety.

On the eve of a major exhibition of his work at London's National Portrait Gallery, Bailey reveals in the first programme how he got started and how the portraiture that shot him to fame makes fashion photography more potent. "I thought the best way to sell the frock is through the girl. If the girl doesn't work, the picture doesn't work," he says.

As he lights Tim's own photographic portrait and selects the backgrounds for the shoot lead to a discussion of the importance of advertising in photography which Bailey has been involved with for over fifty years.

In the central London studio which houses his archive of images, Bailey also reveals to Tim how he made his name with photographs of such stars as Marianne Faithfull and most notably for "Vogue" for which he still works 45 years after his first commission.

"I could do all those fashion pictures in "Vogue" over the phone," he tells Tim. "What lens to put on, what light to use - but it wouldn't be interesting. It would just be like going to work."

And Tim talks to Marianne Faithfull herself about the two striking images of her which Bailey shot - in youth and in later years - and how she regards them now.

02 LASTHe Seduces Everybody!20140120

02 LASTHe Seduces Everybody!2014012020140508

(Image: David Bailey self-portrait. Credit: David Bailey.)

In the second of two programmes about his work, David Bailey discusses with Tim Marlow the less well-known - but just as definitive - aspects of his portraiture. These include the documentary photographs he has taken on trips around the world which date back to his National Service in Singapore in the 1950s.

Bailey explains how the writer Rudyard Kipling and the explorer Sir Richard Burton fired his youthful imagination. He also talks about his reaction to the New York of the early 1960s and meeting Andy Warhol there. To a doubtful Tim, who wonders if there will be a change of heart, Bailey initially claims his recent punishing trip to India's Nagaland will also be his last foreign foray. This programme reveals if Bailey will in fact do more work abroad and, if so, where.

Bailey also discusses the joint ventures he has undertaken, including those with his wife Catherine, and with the artist Damien Hirst. Hirst, in turn, reveals how he and Bailey came to work together and what their collaborations have achieved.

As the opening of his current show at London's National Portrait Gallery draws near, Bailey looks back on some of the shots that give him special pleasure.

And Catherine tells Tim that Bailey "seduces everyone from behind the camera". She adds, "He does it to me, he does it to everybody!"

Producer Simon Coates.

02 LASTHe Seduces Everybody!20140120

(Image: David Bailey self-portrait. Credit: David Bailey.)

In the second of two programmes about his work, David Bailey discusses frankly with Tim Marlow what draws him to his subjects and how he assesses the results of his shoots.

Tim also considers with Bailey the less celebrated aspects of his work, including the documentary photographs he's taken on trips around the world since his National Service in Singapore in the 1950s.

Bailey explains why the explorer, Richard Burton, fired his youthful imagination and why New York, when he first visited it, disappointed him. To a doubtful Tim, who wonders if there will be a change of heart, Bailey initially claims his recent punishing trip to India's Nagaland will also be his last foreign foray. This programme reveals if Bailey will in fact do more work abroad and, if so, where.

Following on from programme 1, Bailey discusses the images he has taken of Tim in his studio. They also talk about the collaborations Bailey has undertaken. Damien Hirst tells Tim how he and Bailey worked together and why he sees Bailey as an artist.

"If I do six photographs a year that's doing well," Bailey tells Tim. "There is no evolution in my work."

As the opening of his forthcoming new show at London's National Portrait Gallery draws nearer, Bailey looks back on some of the shots that give him special pleasure.

And Catherine tells Tim that Bailey "seduces everyone from behind the camera". She adds, "He does it to me, he does it to everybody!".

"Before he's photographed other people, I don't see them," says Catherine Bailey, wife of the world-renowned photographer.

"I see the person and won't necessarily think they're beautiful or interesting. Then I see the photograph and I think, 'Oh, I missed that!' Then I look at the person in a different way."