George Gershwin (1898-1937)

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0120061120

Gershwin started life in the music business as a song-plugger on Tin Pan Alley, becoming a fine pianist into the bargain. Donald Macleod looks at the songs that established his reputation as a composer of popular songs and the work with which he crossed the threshold of the concert hall for the first time.

Fascinating Rhythm

Fred and Adele Astaire

George Gershwin (piano)

Swanee

Al Jolson

Lullaby

Cleveland Orchestra

Riccardo Chailly (conductor)

On my mind the whole night long; Scandal Walk

I'll build a stairway to Paradise

Georges Guetary

MGM Studio Orchestra

Johnny Green (conductor)

Rhapsody in Blue

Roy Bargy and Leonard Pennario (piano)

Paul Whiteman Orchestra

Lady be good

Cliff Edwards (Ukelele Ike)

So am I

Adele Astaire and George Voltaire

Empire Theatre Orchestra

John Heuvel (conductor)

The half of it, dearie blues

Fred Astaire

01A Natural Performer20160530

This week Donald Macleod explores the colourful life and music of George Gershwin. Today Gershwin brings in the crowds on Broadway and in the concert hall.

A life cut short, George Gershwin died in 1937 of a brain tumour at the age of just 38. Yet this isn't a story of what might have been. Gershwin's musical legacy stands as one of admirable achievement. He wrote a string of twelve Broadway musicals, orchestral music and an opera. He penned some of the most recorded tunes in the popular song catalogue of all time. We'll hear many of them across the week, in classic versions made by some of the twentieth century's legendary voices, including Frank Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan, Louis Armstrong, Fred Astaire and Judy Garland. Outside the sphere of popular music, Gershwin's orchestral music won plenty of public support although his critical reception was mixed. Nonetheless among his supporters were significant figures in the classical world such as the New York Philharmonic's Walter Damrosch.

Despite the breadth of his appeal, his professional standing and his wealth, Gershwin remained a man who never felt truly confident in his own musical knowledge, perhaps because his musical education had been limited by circumstance. He was born in 1898 in New York, the second son of Jewish immigrant parents, Morris and Rose Gershowitz. As a child George excelled on roller-skates rather than school-work. Leaving altogether at the age of 14 he was pounding away on a piano in Tin Pan Alley for 10 hours a day. Success came early though when he persuaded Al Jolson to record his song "Swanee". The two million records it sold made George a comfortable pile, and from there on, as they say, "the rest is history".

As a song plugger on Tin Pan Alley Gershwin was introduced to Fred and his sister Adele, going on a few years later to produce a Broadway musical for them, "Lady Be Good" and establishing himself as concert pianist, taking five curtain calls at the premiere of his jazz concerto "Rhapsody in Blue".

That Certain Feeling

George Gershwin, piano

Swanee

Al Jolson

Oh Lady Be Good

Fred Astaire

The Oscar Peterson Trio

Lullaby

Brodsky Quartet

Rhapsody in Blue

George Gershwin, piano roll

Members of the Columbia Jazz Band

Michael Tilson-Thomas, conductor

Fascinating Rhythm (Lady be Good)

John Pizzarelli, Jeff White

Lara Teeter, Dick Trevor

Ann Morrison, Susie Trevor

Cast Ensemble,

Orchestra conducted by Eric Stern

I'd Rather Charleston (Lady Be Good)

Donald Macleod on how Gershwin drew in the crowds on Broadway and in the concert hall.

01Tin Pan Alley To Broadway2011051620130211

George Gershwin's progress from Tin Pan Alley song plugger to Broadway sensation.

When George Gershwin died prematurely of a brain haemorrhage, on July 12th 1937, aged only 38, the news stunned the globe. In barely two decades, he'd become the most famous musician in America, possibly the world - a one-time lowly song plugger from the musical furnace of New York's famous 'Tin Pan Alley' who had become a star of both the Broadway stage and the concert hall.

Virtually no composer before or since bridged the popular, jazz and classical worlds as remarkably and adeptly as Gershwin - and more than eight decades on, Gershwin's music continues to inspire music across the musical spectrum.

This week, Donald Macleod presents an overview of some of the composer's most brilliant works from both the concert stage and the world of musicals - showing off his extraordinary gift for melody, and discussing his often-overlooked originality and daring as a so-called 'serious' composer. He also presents a series of numbers from Gershwin's voluminous songbook, in performances and arrangements by artists as diverse as George Martin, Andre Previn, Ella Fitzgerald, Meat Loaf and the Beach Boys' Brian Wilson - amongst many others - and a number of a 'lost' and rarely-heard works.

Monday's episode presents the story of the young George and Ira's progress from New York's Jewish Lower East Side to the glamour and starry lights of Broadway. As well as selection of Gershwin's earliest published works, Donald Macleod presents extended excerpts from the composer's long-forgotten early blues-inspired opera "Blue Monday".

When George Gershwin died prematurely of a brain haemorrhage, on July 12th 1937, aged only 38, the news stunned the globe.

In barely two decades, he'd become the most famous musician in America, possibly the world - a one-time lowly song plugger from the musical furnace of New York's famous 'Tin Pan Alley' who had become a star of both the Broadway stage and the concert hall.

This week, Donald Macleod presents an overview of some of the composer's most brilliant works from both the concert stage and the world of musicals - showing off his extraordinary gift for melody, and discussing his often-overlooked originality and daring as a so-called 'serious' composer.

He also presents a series of numbers from Gershwin's voluminous songbook, in performances and arrangements by artists as diverse as George Martin, Andre Previn, Ella Fitzgerald, Meat Loaf and the Beach Boys' Brian Wilson - amongst many others - and a number of a 'lost' and rarely-heard works.

Monday's episode presents the story of the young George and Ira's progress from New York's Jewish Lower East Side to the glamour and starry lights of Broadway.

As well as selection of Gershwin's earliest published works, Donald Macleod presents extended excerpts from the composer's long-forgotten early blues-inspired opera "Blue Monday".

0220061121

It was not long before George Gershwin and his brother Ira conquered Broadway, and George went on to win the hearts of the public - if not the critics - in the concert hall. Donald Macleod introduces the show that reinforced the brothers' reputation and the concerto with which Gershwin attempted to prove his worth as a serious composer.

Three Preludes

George Gershwin (piano)

Overture (Oh, Kay!)

Buffalo Philharmonic

Michael Tilson Thomas (conductor)

The man I love

Ella Fitzgerald

Concerto in F

Peter Donohoe (piano)

City of Birmingham SO

Simon Rattle (conductor).

02Backstage Dramas20160531

This week Donald Macleod explores the life and music of George Gershwin. Today Gershwin enjoys good business on Broadway and in London's West End as well as keeping up his appearances as a pianist on the concert platform.

A life cut short, George Gershwin died in 1937 of a brain tumour at the age of just 38. Yet this isn't a story of what might have been. Gershwin's musical legacy stands as one of admirable achievement. He wrote a string of twelve Broadway musicals, orchestral music and an opera. He penned some of the most recorded tunes in the popular song catalogue of all time. We'll hear many of them across the week, in classic versions made by some of the twentieth century's legendary voices, including Frank Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan, Louis Armstrong, Fred Astaire and Judy Garland. Outside the sphere of popular music, Gershwin's orchestral music won plenty of public support although his critical reception was mixed. Nonetheless among his supporters were significant figures in the classical world such as the New York Philharmonic's Walter Damrosch.

Despite the breadth of his appeal, his professional standing and his wealth, Gershwin remained a man who never felt truly confident in his own musical knowledge, perhaps because his musical education had been limited by circumstance. He was born in 1898 in New York, the second son of Jewish immigrant parents, Morris and Rose Gershowitz. As a child George excelled on roller-skates rather than school-work. Leaving altogether at the age of 14 he was pounding away on a piano in Tin Pan Alley for 10 hours a day. Success came early though when he persuaded Al Jolson to record his song "Swanee". The two million records it sold made George a comfortable pile, and from there on, as they say, "the rest is history".

Building on the success garnered with "Lady Be Good" Gershwin and his lyricist partner, brother Ira, had three more shows opening on Broadway and a further three in London. As if that wasn't enough, after a short break in Europe, Gershwin returned with sketches for a new concerto, which naturally enough would feature himself as the pianist for the premiere at Carnegie Hall.

Someone To Watch Over Me (Oh, Kay!)

Dawn Upshaw, Kay

Orchestra of St. Luke's

Eric Stern, conductor

Overture (Tip-Toes)

The New Princess Theater Orchestra

John McGlinn, conductor

Piano Concerto in F

Xiayin Wang, piano

Royal Scottish National Orchestra

Peter OUndjian, conductor

Maybe; Clap Yo Hands; Do, Do, Do (Oh, Kay!)

Patrick Cassidy, Larry Potter

Kurt Ollmann, Jimmy Winter

Ensemble

How Gershwin enjoyed good business in the theatre as well as playing the piano in concerts

02Rhapsody In Blue, And Oh, Kay!2011051720130212

Donald Macleod explores the story of George Gershwin's iconic Rhapsody In Blue.

Gershwin's meteoric progress in the mid 1920s was cemented by the extraordinary and much-loved "Rhapsody In Blue", commissioned by the so-called "King Of Jazz", dance hall bandleader Paul Whiteman. But is it really jazz?

Donald Macleod presents the piece in its rarely-heard original orchestration for jazz band and solo piano, with a solo part performed by none other than George Gershwin himself - reproduced in a pioneering recording through the medium of piano roll.

He also looks at the love of Gershwin's life, the composer and lyricist Kay Swift - and presents two very different arrangements of the Gershwins' hit song "'s Wonderful" by Sarah Vaughan and Andre Previn and David Finck.

Gershwin's meteoric progress in the mid 1920s was cemented by the extraordinary and much-loved "Rhapsody In Blue", commissioned by the so-called "King Of Jazz", dance hall bandleader Paul Whiteman.

But is it really jazz?

He also looks at the love of Gershwin's life, the composer and lyricist Kay Swift - and presents two very different arrangements of the Gershwins' hit song "'s Wonderful" by Sarah Vaughan and Andre Previn and David Finck.

Rhapsody In Blue (1924) (original version for jazz band + piano)

George Gershwin (piano, from 1925 piano roll recording)

The Columbia Jazz Band / Michael Tilson Thomas

CBS CD42240 - Track 1

Oh Kay! (1926) (Act 1 excerpt)

Overture

The Moon Is On The Sea

When Our Ship Comes Sailing In

Don't Ask

Someone To Watch Over Me

The Woman's Touch

Dear Little Girl

Maybe

Clap Yo' Hands

Dawn Upshaw (Kay), Robert Westenberg (The Duke), Patrick Cassidy (Larry Potter), Adam Arkin (Shorty McGree), Liz Larsen (Phillipa Ruxton), Stacey A Logan (Dolly Ruxton), Kurt Ollman (Jimmy Winter)

Orchestra Of St Luke's / Eric Stern

IMP 3036600052 - Tracks 1 --9

'S Wonderful(from "Funny Face", 1927)

Sarah Vaughan (vocals)

EMARCY 8468952 - Track 14

'S Wonderful(from "Funny Face", 1927) (arr.

Previn and Finck)

André Previn (piano)

David Finck (double bass)

DEUTSCHE GRAMMOPHON 4534932 - Track 14.

0320061122

Donald Macleod introduces Gershwin's evocation of the sights and sounds of Paris and the Broadway show that was saved from obscurity by the Wall Street Crash.

An American in Paris

New York Philharmonic

Leonard Bernstein (conductor)

Strike up the band; I've got a crush on you (Strike up the Band)

Jason Graae and Juliet Lambert

Orchestra

John Mauceri (conductor)

Embraceable you; I got rhythm; But not for me (Girl Crazy)

Lorna Luft, David Carroll and Judy Blazer.

03Primrose, Plus A Rarity From The Silver Screen2011051820130213

Donald Macleod presents Gershwin's rare Gilbert and Sullivan pastiche Primrose.

Despite his fame on both sides of the Atlantic, Gershwin wrote only one show specifically for the London stage - the Gilbert and Sullivan-infused comedy "Primrose".

Donald Macleod presents a little-heard excerpt from the original cast recording, as well as a real rarity: the "Dream Sequence" from the Hollywood film Delicious, a vestige of George and Ira Gershwin's unhappy experiences in California. He also showcases the work's sibling from the concert hall: the composer's "Second Rhapsody" for piano and orchestra, also written for the film.

Despite his fame on both sides of the Atlantic, Gershwin wrote only one show specifically for the London stage - the Gilbert and Sullivan-infused comedy "Primrose".

Donald Macleod presents a little-heard excerpt from the original cast recording, as well as a real rarity: the "Dream Sequence" from the Hollywood film Delicious, a vestige of George and Ira Gershwin's unhappy experiences in California.

He also showcases the work's sibling from the concert hall: the composer's "Second Rhapsody" for piano and orchestra, also written for the film.

03War And Warriors20160601

This week Donald Macleod explores the life and music of George Gershwin. Today Gershwin moves in an entirely new direction, creating his own brand of musical satire.

A life cut short, George Gershwin died in 1937 of a brain tumour at the age of just 38. Yet this isn't a story of what might have been. Gershwin's musical legacy stands as one of admirable achievement. He wrote a string of twelve Broadway musicals, orchestral music and an opera. He penned some of the most recorded tunes in the popular song catalogue of all time. We'll hear many of them across the week, in classic versions made by some of the twentieth century's legendary voices, including Frank Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan, Louis Armstrong, Fred Astaire and Judy Garland. Outside the sphere of popular music, Gershwin's orchestral music won plenty of public support although his critical reception was mixed. Nonetheless among his supporters were significant figures in the classical world such as the New York Philharmonic's Walter Damrosch.

Despite the breadth of his appeal, his professional standing and his wealth, Gershwin remained a man who never felt truly confident in his own musical knowledge, perhaps because his musical education had been limited by circumstance. He was born in 1898 in New York, the second son of Jewish immigrant parents, Morris and Rose Gershowitz. As a child George excelled on roller-skates rather than school-work. Leaving altogether at the age of 14 he was pounding away on a piano in Tin Pan Alley for 10 hours a day. Success came early though when he persuaded Al Jolson to record his song "Swanee". The two million records it sold made George a comfortable pile, and from there on, as they say, "the rest is history".

Following a meeting in Atlantic City with the producer Edgar Selwyn, Gershwin and his lyricist writing brother Ira, are invited to work on a satire on war written by George S. Kaufman, the man behind the Marx Brothers production of The Cocoanuts. What came out of the collaboration was "Strike Up The Band" a musical unlike anything the Gershwins had ever written before.

Oh This Is Such A Lovely War (Strike up the Band, Act 2)

Chorus and orchestra conducted by John Mauceri

I've Got A Crush on You (Strike Up The Band, rev. 1930)

Ella Fitzgerald

Ellis Larkins, piano

Wintergreen For President...Of Thee I Sing (Of Thee I Sing, Act 1)

Paige O'Hara, Diana Devereaux

Maureen McGovern, Mary Turner

Louise Eideken, Miss Benson

Larry Kert, John P. Wintergreen

Merwin Goldsmith, Louis Lippmann

George Dvorsky, Sam Jenkins

New York Choral Artists

Orchestra of St. Luke's

Michael Tilson-Thomas, conductor

An American In Paris

New York Philharmonic

Leonard Bernstein, conductor

The Man I Love

Sarah Vaughan

Hal Mooney and his Orchestra.

How Gershwin moved in an entirely new direction, creating his own brand of musical satire.

0420061123

The first all-Gershwin concert was staged in 1932 at the Lewisohn Baseball Stadium, playing to a huge crowd.

Donald Macleod introduces the overture premiered at the event, written during a holiday in Cuba; Gershwin's Second Rhapsody, premiered by Gershwin himself; and George and Ira's biggest hit to date, a burlesque on post-War politics.

Of Thee I Sing (excerpt)

Throttlebottom....Jack Gilford

Wintergreen....Larry Kert

Diana....Paige O'Hara

Mary....Maureen McGovern

French Ambassador....Frank Dabdoub

New York Choral Artists

Orchestra of St Luke's

Michael Tilson Thomas (conductor)

Second Rhapsody

Los Angeles Philharmonic

George Gershwin's Songbook (excerpts)

Peter Donohoe (piano)

Cuban Overture

London Symphony Orchestra

Andre Previn (conductor).

04Anyone For Tennis?20160602

How Gershwin discovered writing music for Hollywood films could be a frustrating business.

Donald Macleod explores the life and music of George Gershwin. Today Gershwin discovers writing music for Hollywood films can be a frustrating business.

A life cut short, George Gershwin died in 1937 of a brain tumour at the age of just 38. Yet this isn't a story of what might have been. Gershwin's musical legacy stands as one of admirable achievement. He wrote a string of twelve Broadway musicals, orchestral music and an opera. He penned some of the most recorded tunes in the popular song catalogue of all time. We'll hear many of them across the week, in classic versions made by some of the twentieth century's legendary voices, including Frank Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan, Louis Armstrong, Fred Astaire and Judy Garland. Outside the sphere of popular music, Gershwin's orchestral music won plenty of public support although his critical reception was mixed. Nonetheless among his supporters were significant figures in the classical world such as the New York Philharmonic's Walter Damrosch.

Despite the breadth of his appeal, his professional standing and his wealth, Gershwin remained a man who never felt truly confident in his own musical knowledge, perhaps because his musical education had been limited by circumstance. He was born in 1898 in New York, the second son of Jewish immigrant parents, Morris and Rose Gershowitz. As a child George excelled on roller-skates rather than school-work. Leaving altogether at the age of 14 he was pounding away on a piano in Tin Pan Alley for 10 hours a day. Success came early though when he persuaded Al Jolson to record his song "Swanee". The two million records it sold made George a comfortable pile, and from there on, as they say, "the rest is history".

Signed up by RKO pictures, Gershwin moved to the West Coast in 1936. In typical workaholic fashion he immediately set to work, producing simultaneously music for the Astaire vehicle "Shall We Dance?" and another picture with Astaire "A Damsel in Distress". Gershwin was happy to embrace the lifestyle, enjoying a hectic social calendar full of dinners and parties at the homes of producers, stars and songwriters. Arnold Schoenberg was a neighbour, and soon came round on a regular basis to play tennis with him. Even so, Gershwin began to get restless, and there was talk of making a return to Broadway, a string quartet, a symphony or even a ballet.

Promenade (Shall We Dance?) - arr. Sol Berkewitz, adaptation by Paul Rosenbloom and John Fullam

John Fulham, clarinet

Buffalo Philharmonic Orchsetra

JoAnn Falletta, conductor

Suite from A Damsel in Distress

The New Princess Theater Orchestra

John McGlinn, conductor

Shall We Dance? (Shall We Dance?) - arr. and orch. Herbert Spense, Fud Livingstone, Robert Russell Bennett

Fred Astaire

The RKO Radio Studio Orchestra

Nathaniel Shilkret, conductor

Second Rhapsody

Howard Shelley, piano

Philharmonia Orchestra

Yan Pascal Tortelier, conductor

Arr. and Orch. Sy Oliver, Axel Stordahl

I Got Rhythm (Girl Crazy)

Judy Garland

Mickey Rooney

Six Hits and a Miss

The Music Maids

Hall Hopper

Trudy Erwin

Bobbie Canvin

Tommy Dorsey and his Orchestra

Cuban Overture

New Zealand Symphony Orchestra

James Judd, conductor

'S Wonderful (Funny Face)

Audrey Hepburn

Orchestra conducted by Adolph Deutsch.

04Of Thee I Sing2011051920130214

Donald Macleod introduces excerpts from George and Ira Gershwin's Of Thee I Sing.

Donald Macleod introduces excerpts from George and Ira Gershwin's Pulitzer Prize-winning satire "Of Thee I Sing" - a runaway hit on Broadway after the political and social fallout of the Wall Street Crash - and discusses the brilliant - and touching -relationship between the two gifted brothers.

In advance of tomorrow's extended excerpt from Act 2 of the composer's masterpiece, "Porgy and Bess", Donald Macleod also tells the story of the opera's genesis, and introduces the rarely-heard orchestral suite "Catfish Row", drawn from its darkest and most profound musical material.

Donald Macleod introduces excerpts from George and Ira Gershwin's Pulitzer Prize-winning satire "Of Thee I Sing" - a runaway hit on Broadway after the political and social fallout of the Wall Street Crash - and discusses the brilliant - and touching -relationship between the two gifted brothers.

In advance of tomorrow's extended excerpt from Act 2 of the composer's masterpiece, "Porgy and Bess", Donald Macleod also tells the story of the opera's genesis, and introduces the rarely-heard orchestral suite "Catfish Row", drawn from its darkest and most profound musical material.

05 LAST20061124

Donald Macleod introduces what was to be Gershwin's final concert work, his first and only opera, and some of the most memorable songs from the final years of his life.

Variations on I Got Rhythm

Fazil Say (piano)

New York Philharmonic

Kurt Masur (conductor)

Porgy and Bess (Act 2, excerpt)

Porgy....Willard White

Bess....Cynthia Haymon

Clara....Harolyn Blackwell

Sportin' Life....Damon Evans

Jake....Bruce Hubbard

Serena....Cynthia Clarey

Maria....Mariette Simpson

Mingo....Barrington Coleman

Lily....Maureen Briathwaite

Annie....Paula Ingram

Frazier....William Johnson

Scipio....Linda Thompson

Mr Archdale....Ted Maynard

Glyndebourne Chorus

London Philharmonic

Simon Rattle (conductor)

Walking the dog

Let?s call the whole thing off

Gregory Hines

Patti Austin

Hollywood Bowl Orchestra

John Mauceri (conductor)

A foggy day

Nice work if you can get it

Love is here to stay

Ella Fitzgerald

05 LASTPorgy And Bess2011052020130215

Donald Macleod explores the poignant story of George Gershwin's unhappy last months.

When George Gershwin died at the age of 38, he was at the height of his compositional powers, and teeming with ideas. In the final programme of the week, Donald Macleod explores the poignant story of his unhappy final months, spent in Hollywood away from his home in New York - and the effect that his tragic premature death had on his beloved brother Ira.

We also hear arguably the two finest works of Gershwin's final years - the dazzling "Variations on 'I Got Rhythm'" for piano and orchestra - performed in an archive recording by the composer's great friend Oscar Levant - and two complete scenes from Gershwin's operatic masterpiece, "Porgy and Bess".

When George Gershwin died at the age of 38, he was at the height of his compositional powers, and teeming with ideas.

In the final programme of the week, Donald Macleod explores the poignant story of his unhappy final months, spent in Hollywood away from his home in New York - and the effect that his tragic premature death had on his beloved brother Ira.

We also hear arguably the two finest works of Gershwin's final years - the dazzling "Variations on 'I Got Rhythm'" for piano and orchestra - performed in an archive recording by the composer's great friend Oscar Levant - and two complete scenes from Gershwin's operatic masterpiece, "Porgy and Bess".

05 LASTThe Dream Team20160603

Donald Macleod on how George Gershwin worked with his regular lyricist and brother Ira.

Donald Macleod explores the life and music of George Gershwin. Today, as part of BBC Music Day's theme of collaboration, a look at how George worked with his regular lyricist and brother Ira.

A life cut short, George Gershwin died in 1937 of a brain tumour at the age of just 38. Yet this isn't a story of what might have been. Gershwin's musical legacy stands as one of admirable achievement. He wrote a string of twelve Broadway musicals, orchestral music and an opera. He penned some of the most recorded tunes in the popular song catalogue of all time. We'll hear many of them across the week, in classic versions made by some of the twentieth century's legendary voices, including Frank Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan, Louis Armstrong, Fred Astaire and Judy Garland. Outside the sphere of popular music, Gershwin's orchestral music won plenty of public support although his critical reception was mixed. Nonetheless among his supporters were significant figures in the classical world such as the New York Philharmonic's Walter Damrosch.

Despite the breadth of his appeal, his professional standing and his wealth, Gershwin remained a man who never felt truly confident in his own musical knowledge, perhaps because his musical education had been limited by circumstance. He was born in 1898 in New York, the second son of Jewish immigrant parents, Morris and Rose Gershowitz. As a child George excelled on roller-skates rather than school-work. Leaving altogether at the age of 14 he was pounding away on a piano in Tin Pan Alley for 10 hours a day. Success came early though when he persuaded Al Jolson to record his song "Swanee". The two million records it sold made George a comfortable pile, and from there on, as they say, "the rest is history".

Together George and Ira Gershwin wrote a string of twelve Broadway musicals, beginning with Lady Be Good in 1924 and culminating in 1933 with Let 'Em Eat Cake. They wrote for Hollywood films and had a string of hits that have all gone on to stand on their own. They worked together right up to the end of George Gershwin's life.

A Foggy Day

Frank Sinatra

Let's Call The Whole Thing Off

Harry Connick, vocal and piano

Benjamin Jonah Wolfe, bass

Jeff "Tain" Watts, drums

I Was Doing Alright

Louis Armstrong

The Lorelei... Isn't It A Pity (Pardon My English)

William Katt, Golo

John Collum, commissioner Bauer

Arnetia Walker, Gita

Michelle Nicastro, Ilse Bauer

Chorus and Orchestra conducted by Eric Stern

Porgy and Bess (Excerpt from Act 2)

Damon Evans, tenor, Sportin Life

Gregg Baker, baritone, Crown

Cynthia Hamon, soprano, Bess

The Glyndebourne Chorus

The London Philharmonic

Simon Rattle, conductor

Aren't You Kind of Glad We Did

Ella Fitzgerald

Nelson Riddle, conductor and arranger.