Gardens Of Faith

Series examining the relationship between different faiths and the natural world by looking at their gardens.

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
01Islam2006110520070721

Peter France visits an Islamic garden in the centre of London to explore how its cultivation and the notion of paradise are inextricably linked, and how Islam views its responsibilty to the natural world.

02Buddhism2006111220070728

Peter France visits a Buddhist temple in Hertfordshire to explore how a community of mendicant monks and nuns view the natural world and how they use their extensive lands.

03Hinduism2006111920070804

Peter France explores how Hindus view nature by visiting the Manor George Harrison gave to the Krishna Hindus in the 1980s.

04Judaism2006112620070811

Peter France explores how Judaism views gardens and nature. For Jews the first garden was the garden of Eden, the home of Adam and Eve, and it was in the garden that God told Adam to work and preserve the land.

Jews believe that a gardener is an excellent metaphor for how all humans should live their lives. Gardens need constant tending and maintaining, and so too does our relationship with people, the natural world and of course ourselves. Two Rabbis explain to Peter the real meaning behind a Jewish garden and the act of gardening.

05 LAST20070818

5/5.

Sikhism

Peter France visits the Khalsa Wood project near Nottingham, a piece of natural woodland designed and planted by the local Sikh community to demonstrate their commitment to nature and to the global problem of climate change.

Sikhism stresses the need for community action and care for all living things.

05 LASTSikhism20061203

Peter France visits woodland near Nottingham. The Khalsa Wood project is a piece of natural woodland that was designed and planted by the local Sikh community to demonstrate their commitment to their community, to nature and to the global problem of climate change.

Sikhism stresses the need for community action and care for all living things. Sikhs believe a garden can be a place for peace and tranquillity, but actually what we should be concentrating on is helping people and the environment, hence Khalsa Wood is a natural forest and not a designed garden.