Free Thinking Festival

Episodes

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2011, Aditya Chakrabortty20111118

Economist Aditya Chakrabortty examines the impact of economic change on society, in a talk recorded in front of an audience at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011.

Presented by Philip Dodd.

Over the past 30 years governments of every political hue have promised that great prizes will follow economic change, whilst parts of society have been effectively written off.

So argues Aditya Chakrabortty, economics leader writer at The Guardian.

He believes even the newly fashionable zeal for a manufacturing revival will do little to help and calls for a radical solution.

Economist Aditya Chakrabortty examines the impact of economic change on society.

Economist Aditya Chakrabortty examines the impact of economic change on society, in a talk recorded in front of an audience at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011. Presented by Philip Dodd.

Over the past 30 years governments of every political hue have promised that great prizes will follow economic change, whilst parts of society have been effectively written off. So argues Aditya Chakrabortty, economics leader writer at The Guardian. He believes even the newly fashionable zeal for a manufacturing revival will do little to help and calls for a radical solution.

Economist Aditya Chakrabortty examines the impact of economic change on society, in a talk recorded in front of an audience at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011.

Presented by Philip Dodd.

Over the past 30 years governments of every political hue have promised that great prizes will follow economic change, whilst parts of society have been effectively written off.

So argues Aditya Chakrabortty, economics leader writer at The Guardian.

He believes even the newly fashionable zeal for a manufacturing revival will do little to help and calls for a radical solution.

Economist Aditya Chakrabortty examines the impact of economic change on society.

2011, Can We Stop The Mania For Change?20111116

Philip Dodd chairs a debate from Free Thinking 2011 on the obsession with change.

Panel includes BAFTA award-winning film-maker Molly Dineen and the Rev Dr Giles Fraser, former Canon Chancellor of St Paul's Cathedral.

Continuing BBC Radio 3's three weeks of broadcasts from the 2011 Free Thinking festival of ideas, Philip Dodd and guests discuss the central theme of this year's festival: Change.

Politics, work, fashion, technology, our personal lives - all now seem subject to never-ending change.

Is this the sign of a dynamic and flexible society, or is it causing us instability and insecurity?

Debaters include the BAFTA award-winning director Molly Dineen, whose documentaries have chronicled change in British society, Rev Dr Giles Fraser, former Canon Chancellor of St Paul's Cathedral who recently resigned over the Occupy London protest, the futurologist and predictor of change James Woudhuysen, Professor of Innovation and Forecasting at Leicester's De Montfort University, and Dr Liz Mellon, author and leadership expert, Executive Director with Duke Corporate Education, part of Duke University.

The event is chaired by Night Waves' Philip Dodd and is recorded as part of BBC Radio 3's 2011 Free Thinking festival of ideas, taking place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November.

Producer: Craig Smith.

Philip Dodd chairs a debate on obsession with change, with Molly Dineen and Giles Fraser.

Philip Dodd chairs a debate from Free Thinking 2011 on the obsession with change. Panel includes BAFTA award-winning film-maker Molly Dineen and the Rev Dr Giles Fraser, former Canon Chancellor of St Paul's Cathedral.

Continuing BBC Radio 3's three weeks of broadcasts from the 2011 Free Thinking festival of ideas, Philip Dodd and guests discuss the central theme of this year's festival: Change. Politics, work, fashion, technology, our personal lives - all now seem subject to never-ending change. Is this the sign of a dynamic and flexible society, or is it causing us instability and insecurity?

Debaters include the BAFTA award-winning director Molly Dineen, whose documentaries have chronicled change in British society, Rev Dr Giles Fraser, former Canon Chancellor of St Paul's Cathedral who recently resigned over the Occupy London protest, the futurologist and predictor of change James Woudhuysen, Professor of Innovation and Forecasting at Leicester's De Montfort University, and Dr Liz Mellon, author and leadership expert, Executive Director with Duke Corporate Education, part of Duke University.

The event is chaired by Night Waves' Philip Dodd and is recorded as part of BBC Radio 3's 2011 Free Thinking festival of ideas, taking place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November.

Producer: Craig Smith.

Philip Dodd chairs a debate on obsession with change, with Molly Dineen and Giles Fraser.

Philip Dodd chairs a debate from Free Thinking 2011 on the obsession with change.

Panel includes BAFTA award-winning film-maker Molly Dineen and the Rev Dr Giles Fraser, former Canon Chancellor of St Paul's Cathedral.

Continuing BBC Radio 3's three weeks of broadcasts from the 2011 Free Thinking festival of ideas, Philip Dodd and guests discuss the central theme of this year's festival: Change.

Politics, work, fashion, technology, our personal lives - all now seem subject to never-ending change.

Is this the sign of a dynamic and flexible society, or is it causing us instability and insecurity?

Debaters include the BAFTA award-winning director Molly Dineen, whose documentaries have chronicled change in British society, Rev Dr Giles Fraser, former Canon Chancellor of St Paul's Cathedral who recently resigned over the Occupy London protest, the futurologist and predictor of change James Woudhuysen, Professor of Innovation and Forecasting at Leicester's De Montfort University, and Dr Liz Mellon, author and leadership expert, Executive Director with Duke Corporate Education, part of Duke University.

The event is chaired by Night Waves' Philip Dodd and is recorded as part of BBC Radio 3's 2011 Free Thinking festival of ideas, taking place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November.

Producer: Craig Smith.

Philip Dodd chairs a debate on obsession with change, with Molly Dineen and Giles Fraser.

2011, Charles Jencks20111124

Landscape architect Charles Jencks calls for a new cosmic art, in a talk entitled Reclaiming the Universe, given at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011.

Charles Jencks is the visionary designer, theorist and landscape architect whose work includes gardens at the Maggie's Cancer Caring Centres, founded by his late wife Maggie Jencks. He is creating the world's largest sculpture of a human form, Northumberlandia, near the village of Cramlington in the North East.

Jencks argues that understanding the universe is too important to be left to scientists and theologians, and wants us to connect to pre-historic ideas about the cosmos, present in monuments such as Stonehenge.

This event is recorded in front of a live audience at The Sage Gateshead as part of the 2011 Free Thinking Festival. Presented by Rana Miter.

A talk in which landscape architect Charles Jencks calls for a new cosmic art.

2011, Drama On 3 At Free Thinking: A Summer Night20111106

Live from the Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art in Gateshead, a drama written especially for Free Thinking by Jack Thorne.

Set during the recent riots, A Summer Night tells three personal stories from the night when the capital changed shape. A policeman on duty, a carer trying to get to her patient, a teenager on a night out - their paths cross and collide in ways you won't expect.

The play does contain strong language.

Cast

Mark....Toby Jones

Ant....Daniel Kaluuya

Diane....Victoria Elliott

Composer/ Musician: Patrick Dineen

Producer: Kate Rowland.

Set during the 2011 English riots, a drama written for Free Thinking by Jack Thorne.

2011, Julian Savulescu - The Moral Obligation To Improve20111115

Julian Savulescu makes the case for human enhancement in a lecture and interview recorded at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011.

In a talk entitled The Moral Obligation to Improve, he argues that it is time to enhance humans by altering their moral dispositions.

Professor of Practical Ethics at the University of Oxford and Editor of the Journal of Medical Ethics, Julian Savulescu has some controversial opinions that challenge assumptions.

He believes drugs should be allowed in sport, and that we should harness the incredible genetic revolution currently taking place and use technologies such as genetic manipulation and selection to improve our lives.

He argues that if the human race is to survive we must embrace cognitive and moral enhancement, possibly of whole populations.

Without enhancement, he says, we face potential disaster because of our innate reluctance to accept the sacrifices necessary to combat global problems like climate change.

He also argues that using drugs to change behaviour and moral outlook might be required as psychopaths now have the potential power to destroy millions of lives because of developing technology and ease of access to the tools of armageddon.

The event is chaired by Night Waves' Anne McElvoy and was recorded as part of BBC Radio 3's 2011 Free Thinking festival of ideas, which took place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November.

Julian Savulescu makes the case for human enhancement at the 2011 Free Thinking festival.

Julian Savulescu makes the case for human enhancement in a lecture and interview recorded at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011.

In a talk entitled The Moral Obligation to Improve, he argues that it is time to enhance humans by altering their moral dispositions.

Professor of Practical Ethics at the University of Oxford and Editor of the Journal of Medical Ethics, Julian Savulescu has some controversial opinions that challenge assumptions. He believes drugs should be allowed in sport, and that we should harness the incredible genetic revolution currently taking place and use technologies such as genetic manipulation and selection to improve our lives.

He argues that if the human race is to survive we must embrace cognitive and moral enhancement, possibly of whole populations. Without enhancement, he says, we face potential disaster because of our innate reluctance to accept the sacrifices necessary to combat global problems like climate change. He also argues that using drugs to change behaviour and moral outlook might be required as psychopaths now have the potential power to destroy millions of lives because of developing technology and ease of access to the tools of armageddon.

The event is chaired by Night Waves' Anne McElvoy and was recorded as part of BBC Radio 3's 2011 Free Thinking festival of ideas, which took place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November.

Julian Savulescu makes the case for human enhancement at the 2011 Free Thinking festival.

Julian Savulescu makes the case for human enhancement in a lecture and interview recorded at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011.

In a talk entitled The Moral Obligation to Improve, he argues that it is time to enhance humans by altering their moral dispositions.

Professor of Practical Ethics at the University of Oxford and Editor of the Journal of Medical Ethics, Julian Savulescu has some controversial opinions that challenge assumptions.

He believes drugs should be allowed in sport, and that we should harness the incredible genetic revolution currently taking place and use technologies such as genetic manipulation and selection to improve our lives.

He argues that if the human race is to survive we must embrace cognitive and moral enhancement, possibly of whole populations.

Without enhancement, he says, we face potential disaster because of our innate reluctance to accept the sacrifices necessary to combat global problems like climate change.

He also argues that using drugs to change behaviour and moral outlook might be required as psychopaths now have the potential power to destroy millions of lives because of developing technology and ease of access to the tools of armageddon.

The event is chaired by Night Waves' Anne McElvoy and was recorded as part of BBC Radio 3's 2011 Free Thinking festival of ideas, which took place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November.

Julian Savulescu makes the case for human enhancement at the 2011 Free Thinking festival.

2011, Linda Colley20111114

Leading historian Linda Colley gives a talk on how we have dealt with periods of dramatic change in the past and how history can help us to understand change today, recorded at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011.

Continuing Radio 3's three weeks of Free Thinking broadcasts, Linda Colley delivers a lecture entitled: The Present and the Past of Change.

Linda Colley is an expert on the history of Britain, empire and nationalism, was invited by Tony Blair to give the Downing Street Millennium Lecture on Britishness, and is Professor of History at Princeton University.

Rana Mitter chairs the event, recorded at The Sage Gateshead in front of a live audience.

Historian Linda Colley delivers a lecture entitled The Present and the Past of Change.

Leading historian Linda Colley gives a talk on how we have dealt with periods of dramatic change in the past and how history can help us to understand change today, recorded at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011.

Continuing Radio 3's three weeks of Free Thinking broadcasts, Linda Colley delivers a lecture entitled: The Present and the Past of Change.

Linda Colley is an expert on the history of Britain, empire and nationalism, was invited by Tony Blair to give the Downing Street Millennium Lecture on Britishness, and is Professor of History at Princeton University.

Rana Mitter chairs the event, recorded at The Sage Gateshead in front of a live audience.

Historian Linda Colley delivers a lecture entitled The Present and the Past of Change.

2011, Music Matters: Has Music Changed The World?20111105

Presenter Tom Service will be debating classical music's impact on the world with a panel of guests including Pamela Rosenberg, former director of San Francisco Opera and the Berlin Philharmonic, composer Christopher Fox, and musicologist Christopher Page.

Broadcast live from The Sage Gateshead.

Tom Service debates classical music's impact on the world with a panel of guests.

Presenter Tom Service will be debating classical music's impact on the world with a panel of guests including Pamela Rosenberg, former director of San Francisco Opera and the Berlin Philharmonic, composer Christopher Fox, and musicologist Christopher Page. Broadcast live from The Sage Gateshead.

Tom Service debates classical music's impact on the world with a panel of guests.

2011, Rev Dr Giles Fraser20111107

Rev Dr Giles Fraser, the former Canon Chancellor of St Paul's Cathedral, gives a talk at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011 on the Crisis of Commitment in our society, and an indepth interview with presenter Matthew Sweet.

Giles Fraser is the festival's Thinker-in-Residence.

He recently resigned as Canon Chancellor of St Paul's Cathedral over the handling of the Occupy London protest.

At St Paul's Cathedral Giles was responsible for contemporary ethics and engagement with the financiers in the City of London.

A popular contributor to Radio 4's Thought for the Day, he also lectures the British army on moral leadership.

In a talk entitled The Magnificent Seven and the Crisis of Commitment, Giles Fraser claims we have become addicted to the detached, uncommitted lifestyle embodied in those wandering gunslingers from western movies, who never want to be tied down.

Is individualism pushing out all other values and leaving us rootless?

This event is chaired by Night Waves presenter Matthew Sweet.

BBC Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival 2011 takes place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November.

The rev Dr Giles Fraser on the 'crisis of commitment', from 2011's Free Thinking Festival.

He recently resigned as Canon Chancellor of St Paul's Cathedral over the handling of the Occupy London protest. At St Paul's Cathedral Giles was responsible for contemporary ethics and engagement with the financiers in the City of London. A popular contributor to Radio 4's Thought for the Day, he also lectures the British army on moral leadership.

In a talk entitled The Magnificent Seven and the Crisis of Commitment, Giles Fraser claims we have become addicted to the detached, uncommitted lifestyle embodied in those wandering gunslingers from western movies, who never want to be tied down. Is individualism pushing out all other values and leaving us rootless?

Rev Dr Giles Fraser, the former Canon Chancellor of St Paul's Cathedral, gives a talk at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011 on the Crisis of Commitment in our society, and an indepth interview with presenter Matthew Sweet.

Giles Fraser is the festival's Thinker-in-Residence.

He recently resigned as Canon Chancellor of St Paul's Cathedral over the handling of the Occupy London protest.

At St Paul's Cathedral Giles was responsible for contemporary ethics and engagement with the financiers in the City of London.

A popular contributor to Radio 4's Thought for the Day, he also lectures the British army on moral leadership.

In a talk entitled The Magnificent Seven and the Crisis of Commitment, Giles Fraser claims we have become addicted to the detached, uncommitted lifestyle embodied in those wandering gunslingers from western movies, who never want to be tied down.

Is individualism pushing out all other values and leaving us rootless?

This event is chaired by Night Waves presenter Matthew Sweet.

BBC Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival 2011 takes place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November.

The rev Dr Giles Fraser on the 'crisis of commitment', from 2011's Free Thinking Festival.

2011, Sarah-jayne Blakemore20111123

Neuro-scientist Sarah-Jayne Blakemore gives a talk on changes in the teenage brain.

Teenagers often act on impulse, are lazy, emotional and get into trouble with the police and parents. Sarah-Jayne Blakemore is Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at University College London and a leading expert on teenage brains. Using recent research about the radical changes taking place in the adolescent brain, she argues it's time to rethink our attitudes towards youth and the place of teenagers in society.

Recorded in front of a live audience at The Sage Gateshead, at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011. Presented by Juliet Gardiner.

Neuro-scientist Sarah-Jayne Blakemore discusses dramatic changes in the teenage brain.

2011, Sunday Night At Free Thinking20111106

Matthew Sweet broadcasts from the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011, with live guests at The Sage Gateshead and an indepth interview with one of the world's top heart surgeons, Francis Wells.

Francis Wells has carried out over 5,000 operations including open heart surgery live on Channel 4. An expert on the anatomical drawings of Leonardo da Vinci, he's a passionate advocate for closer links between art and medicine, employing artists-in-residence at his operating theatre in Papworth, the UK's largest specialist cardiothoracic Hospital. Night Waves presenter Matthew Sweet hosts an indepth interview with Francis Wells, recorded in front of an audience at BBC Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival 2011.

Francis Wells discusses the future of the heart, his work at the cutting-edge of surgery, and his fascination with Leonardo.

Matthew Sweet is also joined live at The Sage Gateshead by BBC Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers.

Free Thinking takes place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November, and is broadcast for three weeks on BBC Radio 3 from Friday 4 November.

Matthew Sweet presents an interview with leading heart surgeon Francis Wells.

2011, Were The Luddites Right?20111122

Rana Mitter chairs a debate about the Luddite Movement to mark their 200th anniversary.

Two hundred years ago this November, artisans in the North of England started protesting against new machines that were destroying their way of life. Inspired by the mythic King Ludd, the Luddites have been condemned by history as standing on the wrong side of progress - but their legacy persists. So what did they want and what does it mean to be a Luddite in today's digital age?

Debaters include the historian and biographer Kathryn Hughes, Luddite expert Katrina Navickas, technology analyst Bill Thompson and writer Andrew Simms.

Recorded at The Sage Gateshead in front of a live audience at the 2011 Free Thinking Festival.

Rana Mitter chairs a debate about the Luddite movement, to mark its 200th anniversary.

2011, What Is News Now?20111105

As part of the 2011 Free Thinking festival, BBC Radio 3 and BBC Radio 5 live join forces at The Sage Gateshead to debate the editorial choices behind news stories.

Broadcast live simultaneously on both networks, 5 live presenter Chris Warburton and Radio 3's Matthew Sweet are joined by a panel of guests from television news and the press.

As internet bloggers and social media such as Twitter transform the consumption and distribution of news, and as celebrity gossip and audience generated stories push foreign affairs and politics further down the agenda, what is the future of traditional news?

The debate takes place at The Sage Gateshead in front of a live audience as part of BBC Radio 3's Free Thinking festival of ideas 4 - 6 November.

Radio 3 and Radio 5 live join forces to debate the editorial choices behind news stories.

Broadcast live simultaneously on both networks, 5 live presenter Chris Warburton and Radio 3's Matthew Sweet are joined by a panel of guests from television news and the press. As internet bloggers and social media such as Twitter transform the consumption and distribution of news, and as celebrity gossip and audience generated stories push foreign affairs and politics further down the agenda, what is the future of traditional news?

As part of the 2011 Free Thinking festival, BBC Radio 3 and BBC Radio 5 live join forces at The Sage Gateshead to debate the editorial choices behind news stories.

Broadcast live simultaneously on both networks, 5 live presenter Chris Warburton and Radio 3's Matthew Sweet are joined by a panel of guests from television news and the press.

As internet bloggers and social media such as Twitter transform the consumption and distribution of news, and as celebrity gossip and audience generated stories push foreign affairs and politics further down the agenda, what is the future of traditional news?

The debate takes place at The Sage Gateshead in front of a live audience as part of BBC Radio 3's Free Thinking festival of ideas 4 - 6 November.

Radio 3 and Radio 5 live join forces to debate the editorial choices behind news stories.

2011, What Is The Future Of Civilisation As The Oil Runs Out?20111117

Anne McElvoy chairs a debate about the impact of a future energy crisis on our way of life, recorded in front of an audience at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011

How will our world change as traditional energy supplies shrink and climate change forces us to use less fossil fuels? Should we return to a locally-focused pre-modern lifestyle where travel is a luxury for the few, will conflict over declining resources destabilise the globe, or will science save the day?

Debaters include Paul Younger, Director of the Newcastle Institute for Research on Sustainability, the philosopher Melissa Lane from Princeton University, scientist Colin McInnes and gobal energy specialist Neil Hirst.

Anne McElvoy chairs a talk about the impact of a future energy crisis on our way of life.

2011, Words And Music: Transformations20111106

Jonathan Keeble and Kim Gerard join soprano Lisa Milne and members of Northern Sinfonia perform a special edition of Words and Music exploring themes of change. Recorded live at the Free Thinking festival at The Sage Gateshead, the programme's transformations include those caused by ageing, cosmetic surgery, medical experiment, divine intervention and technology. With poetry and prose by Shakespeare, Mary Shelley, Franz Kafka, Roald Dahl and Alan Bennett, and music by Schubert, Saint-Saens, Strauss and Schoenberg. Presented by Ian McMillan.

Texts and music inspired by change, performed at the 2011 Free Thinking festival.

Jonathan Keeble and Kim Gerard join soprano Lisa Milne and members of Northern Sinfonia perform a special edition of Words & Music exploring themes of change. Recorded live at the Free Thinking festival at The Sage Gateshead, the programme's transformations include those caused by ageing, cosmetic surgery, medical experiment, divine intervention and technology. With poetry and prose by Shakespeare, Mary Shelley, Franz Kafka, Roald Dahl and Alan Bennett, and music by Schubert, Saint-Saens, Strauss and Schoenberg. Presented by Ian McMillan.

Texts and music inspired by change, performed at the 2011 Free Thinking festival.

012011, The Free Thinking Essay, New Generation Thinker: Lucy Powell20111107

Lucy Powell, lecturer at University College London and one of BBC Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers, gives a talk on the surprising history of novelty, recorded at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011.

Today we think of originality as exciting, perhaps the most admired feature of new art.

But in the past novelty was regarded as deeply suspect.

Even Shakespeare disliked dreaming up new plots, preferring to borrow from others.

So why the reversal? Lucy Powell charts the rise and rise of novelty.

This essay is recorded in front of an audience at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011, which takes place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November.

The New Generation Thinkers are winners of the inaugural talent scheme run the BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanities with the potential to turn their ideas into fascinating broadcasts.

Lucy Powell gives a talk on the surprising history of novelty.

Lucy Powell, lecturer at University College London and one of BBC Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers, gives a talk on the surprising history of novelty, recorded at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011.

Today we think of originality as exciting, perhaps the most admired feature of new art. But in the past novelty was regarded as deeply suspect. Even Shakespeare disliked dreaming up new plots, preferring to borrow from others. So why the reversal? Lucy Powell charts the rise and rise of novelty.

This essay is recorded in front of an audience at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011, which takes place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November. The New Generation Thinkers are winners of the inaugural talent scheme run the BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanities with the potential to turn their ideas into fascinating broadcasts.

Lucy Powell gives a talk on the surprising history of novelty.

Lucy Powell, lecturer at University College London and one of BBC Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers, gives a talk on the surprising history of novelty, recorded at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011.

Today we think of originality as exciting, perhaps the most admired feature of new art.

But in the past novelty was regarded as deeply suspect.

Even Shakespeare disliked dreaming up new plots, preferring to borrow from others.

So why the reversal? Lucy Powell charts the rise and rise of novelty.

This essay is recorded in front of an audience at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011, which takes place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November.

The New Generation Thinkers are winners of the inaugural talent scheme run the BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanities with the potential to turn their ideas into fascinating broadcasts.

Lucy Powell gives a talk on the surprising history of novelty.

022011, The Foreign Secretary William Hague20111108

The Foreign Secretary William Hague is interviewed by Anne McElvoy at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011.

The central theme for this year's festival is Change, and William Hague discusses the dramatic changes taking throughout the globe and Britain's role in this transforming world order.

At the age of 50 the Rt Hon William Hague MP must be our youngest elder statesman.

The MP for Richmond (Yorkshire) has been Welsh Secretary, Leader of the Conservative Party for five years, and since May 2010 the British Foreign Secretary and First Secretary of State.

Night Waves presenter Anne McElvoy hosts an indepth interview recorded at The Sage Gateshead in front of an audience at the 2011 Free Thinking festival of ideas.

The BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival takes place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November and is broadcast on Radio 3 from Friday 4 November for three weeks.

Anne McElvoy talks to Foreign Secretary William Hague at the 2011 Free Thinking festival.

The Foreign Secretary William Hague is interviewed by Anne McElvoy at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011.

The central theme for this year's festival is Change, and William Hague discusses the dramatic changes taking throughout the globe and Britain's role in this transforming world order.

At the age of 50 the Rt Hon William Hague MP must be our youngest elder statesman.

The MP for Richmond (Yorkshire) has been Welsh Secretary, Leader of the Conservative Party for five years, and since May 2010 the British Foreign Secretary and First Secretary of State.

Night Waves presenter Anne McElvoy hosts an indepth interview recorded at The Sage Gateshead in front of an audience at the 2011 Free Thinking festival of ideas.

The BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival takes place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November and is broadcast on Radio 3 from Friday 4 November for three weeks.

Anne McElvoy talks to Foreign Secretary William Hague at the 2011 Free Thinking festival.

The Foreign Secretary William Hague is interviewed by Anne McElvoy at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011. The central theme for this year's festival is Change, and William Hague discusses the dramatic changes taking throughout the globe and Britain's role in this transforming world order.

At the age of 50 the Rt Hon William Hague MP must be our youngest elder statesman. The MP for Richmond (Yorkshire) has been Welsh Secretary, Leader of the Conservative Party for five years, and since May 2010 the British Foreign Secretary and First Secretary of State. Night Waves presenter Anne McElvoy hosts an indepth interview recorded at The Sage Gateshead in front of an audience at the 2011 Free Thinking festival of ideas.

022011, The Free Thinking Essay, New Generation Thinker: Rachel Hewitt20111108

Rachel Hewitt, one of BBC Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers, gives a talk on the mapping of the Scottish border, recorded at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011.

The dividing line between Scotland and England has been a source of tension over the centuries, but it wasn't until the 1750's that the border was mapped from scratch, with the most sophisticated instruments and methods the Englightenment had to offer.

Rachel Hewitt, lecturer at Queen Mary University London author of an acclaimed history of the Ordnance Survey, tells the story of that mapping, the motives that fuelled it, and the role of maps as icons of national identity.

This essay is recorded in front of an audience at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011, which takes place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November.

The New Generation Thinkers are winners of the inaugural talent scheme run the BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanities with the potential to turn their ideas into fascinating broadcasts.

Rachel Hewitt gives a talk on the mapping of the Scottish border.

Rachel Hewitt, one of BBC Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers, gives a talk on the mapping of the Scottish border, recorded at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011.

The dividing line between Scotland and England has been a source of tension over the centuries, but it wasn't until the 1750's that the border was mapped from scratch, with the most sophisticated instruments and methods the Englightenment had to offer. Rachel Hewitt, lecturer at Queen Mary University London author of an acclaimed history of the Ordnance Survey, tells the story of that mapping, the motives that fuelled it, and the role of maps as icons of national identity.

This essay is recorded in front of an audience at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011, which takes place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November. The New Generation Thinkers are winners of the inaugural talent scheme run the BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanities with the potential to turn their ideas into fascinating broadcasts.

Rachel Hewitt gives a talk on the mapping of the Scottish border.

Rachel Hewitt, one of BBC Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers, gives a talk on the mapping of the Scottish border, recorded at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011.

The dividing line between Scotland and England has been a source of tension over the centuries, but it wasn't until the 1750's that the border was mapped from scratch, with the most sophisticated instruments and methods the Englightenment had to offer.

Rachel Hewitt, lecturer at Queen Mary University London author of an acclaimed history of the Ordnance Survey, tells the story of that mapping, the motives that fuelled it, and the role of maps as icons of national identity.

This essay is recorded in front of an audience at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011, which takes place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November.

The New Generation Thinkers are winners of the inaugural talent scheme run the BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanities with the potential to turn their ideas into fascinating broadcasts.

Rachel Hewitt gives a talk on the mapping of the Scottish border.

032011, Kevin Fong20111109

Kevin Fong, who presents BBC2's Horizon and is a leading expert on space medicine, gives a talk at the 2011 Free Thinking Festival: Why we should not retreat from the final frontier.

In the wake of the retirement of the space shuttle, Kevin Fong - who works for NASA - argues that now is no time to pull back from space exploration, calling for a Second Space Age.

Co-director of the Centre for Aviation Space and Extreme Environment Medicine, he believes that Britain should be at the forefront of space science.

Night Waves presenter Rana Mitter hosts Kevin Fong's talk, recorded in front of an audience at BBC Radio 3' Free Thinking Festival 2011, which takes place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November, and which is broadcast on Radio 3 for three weeks from 4 November.

From the 2011 Free Thinking festival, scientist Kevin Fong calls for a 'second space age'.

Kevin Fong, who presents BBC2's Horizon and is a leading expert on space medicine, gives a talk at the 2011 Free Thinking Festival: Why we should not retreat from the final frontier.

In the wake of the retirement of the space shuttle, Kevin Fong - who works for NASA - argues that now is no time to pull back from space exploration, calling for a Second Space Age.

Co-director of the Centre for Aviation Space and Extreme Environment Medicine, he believes that Britain should be at the forefront of space science.

Night Waves presenter Rana Mitter hosts Kevin Fong's talk, recorded in front of an audience at BBC Radio 3' Free Thinking Festival 2011, which takes place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November, and which is broadcast on Radio 3 for three weeks from 4 November.

From the 2011 Free Thinking festival, scientist Kevin Fong calls for a 'second space age'.

In the wake of the retirement of the space shuttle, Kevin Fong - who works for NASA - argues that now is no time to pull back from space exploration, calling for a Second Space Age. Co-director of the Centre for Aviation Space and Extreme Environment Medicine, he believes that Britain should be at the forefront of space science.

032011, The Free Thinking Essay, Corin Throsby20111109

Corin Throsby, one of BBC Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers, gives a talk on the extraordinary fan mail received by the poet Lord Byron, recorded at the 2011 Free Thinking Festival

We think of fan mail as a recent phenomenon, but in the early 19th Century the poet Byron receieved hundreds of letters from love-sick admirers.

Cambridge academic Corin Throsby takes us on a journey into Byron's intimate fan mail and shows what those letters reveal about the creation of a celebrity culture that has continued into the globalised present.

This essay is recorded in front of an audience at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011, which takes place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November.

The New Generation Thinkers are winners of the inaugural talent scheme run the BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanities with the potential to turn their ideas into fascinating broadcasts.

Corin Throsby gives a talk on the fan mail Byron received.

Corin Throsby, one of BBC Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers, gives a talk on the extraordinary fan mail received by the poet Lord Byron, recorded at the 2011 Free Thinking Festival

We think of fan mail as a recent phenomenon, but in the early 19th Century the poet Byron receieved hundreds of letters from love-sick admirers. Cambridge academic Corin Throsby takes us on a journey into Byron's intimate fan mail and shows what those letters reveal about the creation of a celebrity culture that has continued into the globalised present.

This essay is recorded in front of an audience at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011, which takes place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November. The New Generation Thinkers are winners of the inaugural talent scheme run the BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanities with the potential to turn their ideas into fascinating broadcasts.

Corin Throsby gives a talk on the fan mail Byron received.

Corin Throsby, one of BBC Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers, gives a talk on the extraordinary fan mail received by the poet Lord Byron, recorded at the 2011 Free Thinking Festival

We think of fan mail as a recent phenomenon, but in the early 19th Century the poet Byron receieved hundreds of letters from love-sick admirers.

Cambridge academic Corin Throsby takes us on a journey into Byron's intimate fan mail and shows what those letters reveal about the creation of a celebrity culture that has continued into the globalised present.

This essay is recorded in front of an audience at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011, which takes place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November.

The New Generation Thinkers are winners of the inaugural talent scheme run the BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanities with the potential to turn their ideas into fascinating broadcasts.

Corin Throsby gives a talk on the fan mail Byron received.

042011, Germaine Greer20111110

Germaine Greer delivers a talk questioning the pursuit of freedom at BBC Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival 2011.

One of the most influential intellectual voices of our times, Germaine Greer has caused controversy ever since her book The Female Eunuch became an international best-seller in 1970.

Inspired by the Janis Joplin lyric "Freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose", she argues that the pursuit of freedom has caused havoc throughout the world, and calls for a new version of liberation.

Night Waves presenter Philip Dodd hosts Germaine Greer's talk, which was recorded in front of an audience at BBC Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival 2011.

Free Thinking takes place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November and is broadcast on Radio 3 for three weeks following Friday 4 November.

Germaine Greer questions the idea of freedom at the 2011 Free Thinking Festival.

Germaine Greer delivers a talk questioning the pursuit of freedom at BBC Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival 2011.

One of the most influential intellectual voices of our times, Germaine Greer has caused controversy ever since her book The Female Eunuch became an international best-seller in 1970.

Inspired by the Janis Joplin lyric "Freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose", she argues that the pursuit of freedom has caused havoc throughout the world, and calls for a new version of liberation.

Night Waves presenter Philip Dodd hosts Germaine Greer's talk, which was recorded in front of an audience at BBC Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival 2011.

Free Thinking takes place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November and is broadcast on Radio 3 for three weeks following Friday 4 November.

Germaine Greer questions the idea of freedom at the 2011 Free Thinking Festival.

One of the most influential intellectual voices of our times, Germaine Greer has caused controversy ever since her book The Female Eunuch became an international best-seller in 1970. Inspired by the Janis Joplin lyric "Freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose", she argues that the pursuit of freedom has caused havoc throughout the world, and calls for a new version of liberation.

042011, The Free Thinking Essay, New Generation Thinker: Laurence Scott20111110

Laurence Scott, one of BBC Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers, gives a talk on the fascinating figure of the gothic heroine, recorded at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival.

Swooning maidens crowd early horror stories, but these hunted heroines are also stalked through the pages of 20th Century novels such as Virginia Woolf's Mrs Dalloway, and hidden behind Blitz fiction's blackout curtains.

Laurence Scott explores the evolution of the gothic heroine.

This essay is recorded in front of an audience at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011, which takes place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November.

The New Generation Thinkers are winners of the inaugural talent scheme run by BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanties with the potential to turn their ideas into fascinating broadcasts.

Laurence Scott of King's College London on the fascinating figure of the gothic heroine.

Laurence Scott, one of BBC Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers, gives a talk on the fascinating figure of the gothic heroine, recorded at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival.

Swooning maidens crowd early horror stories, but these hunted heroines are also stalked through the pages of 20th Century novels such as Virginia Woolf's Mrs Dalloway, and hidden behind Blitz fiction's blackout curtains. Laurence Scott explores the evolution of the gothic heroine.

This essay is recorded in front of an audience at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011, which takes place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November. The New Generation Thinkers are winners of the inaugural talent scheme run by BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanties with the potential to turn their ideas into fascinating broadcasts.

Laurence Scott of King's College London on the fascinating figure of the gothic heroine.

Laurence Scott, one of BBC Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers, gives a talk on the fascinating figure of the gothic heroine, recorded at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival.

Swooning maidens crowd early horror stories, but these hunted heroines are also stalked through the pages of 20th Century novels such as Virginia Woolf's Mrs Dalloway, and hidden behind Blitz fiction's blackout curtains.

Laurence Scott explores the evolution of the gothic heroine.

This essay is recorded in front of an audience at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011, which takes place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November.

The New Generation Thinkers are winners of the inaugural talent scheme run by BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanties with the potential to turn their ideas into fascinating broadcasts.

Laurence Scott of King's College London on the fascinating figure of the gothic heroine.

052011, The Verb At Free Thinking20111111

Poet Ian McMillan hosts BBC Radio 3's The Verb, his unique cabaret of the word, recorded at The Sage Gateshead as part of BBC Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival 2011.

There's music from the double platinum selling band Maxïmo Park, one of the few bands of recent times to wear their intellectualism on their sleeves.

Lead singer Paul Smith talks about the songwriting process.

We feature the first performance of a new poem on the theme of Change, written together by Jackie Kay, Sean O'Brien and W.N.

Herbert, and commissioned by the Newcastle Centre for the Literary Arts.

Celebrated children's writer David Almond grew up in the Gateshead area and discusses regionalism in art and what it's like to be labelled a 'northern writer'.

He describes how he found his confidence as a writer from the North East by looking to the great writers of the southern states of America, like Flannery O'Connor.

And there's performance from spoken word artist Kate Fox.

Producer : Dymphna Flynn.

Maxïmo Park, Jackie Kay, and David Almond join Ian McMillan for The Verb at Free Thinking.

Poet Ian McMillan hosts BBC Radio 3's The Verb, his unique cabaret of the word, recorded at The Sage Gateshead as part of BBC Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival 2011.

There's music from the double platinum selling band Maxïmo Park, one of the few bands of recent times to wear their intellectualism on their sleeves.

Lead singer Paul Smith talks about the songwriting process.

We feature the first performance of a new poem on the theme of Change, written together by Jackie Kay, Sean O'Brien and W.N.

Herbert, and commissioned by the Newcastle Centre for the Literary Arts.

Celebrated children's writer David Almond grew up in the Gateshead area and discusses regionalism in art and what it's like to be labelled a 'northern writer'.

He describes how he found his confidence as a writer from the North East by looking to the great writers of the southern states of America, like Flannery O'Connor.

And there's performance from spoken word artist Kate Fox.

Producer : Dymphna Flynn.

Maxïmo Park, Jackie Kay, and David Almond join Ian McMillan for The Verb at Free Thinking.

Poet Ian McMillan hosts BBC Radio 3's The Verb, his unique cabaret of the word, recorded at The Sage Gateshead as part of BBC Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival 2011.

There's music from the double platinum selling band Maxïmo Park, one of the few bands of recent times to wear their intellectualism on their sleeves. Lead singer Paul Smith talks about the songwriting process.

We feature the first performance of a new poem on the theme of Change, written together by Jackie Kay, Sean O'Brien and W.N. Herbert, and commissioned by the Newcastle Centre for the Literary Arts.

Celebrated children's writer David Almond grew up in the Gateshead area and discusses regionalism in art and what it's like to be labelled a 'northern writer'. He describes how he found his confidence as a writer from the North East by looking to the great writers of the southern states of America, like Flannery O'Connor.

And there's performance from spoken word artist Kate Fox.

Producer : Dymphna Flynn.

Maxïmo Park, Jackie Kay, and David Almond join Ian McMillan for The Verb at Free Thinking.

05 LAST2011, The Free Thinking Essay, New Generation Thinker: David Petts20111111

David Petts, one of BBC Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers, gives a talk calling for the physical preservation of the industrial heritage of the North East, recorded at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival

The North-East of England was once one of the industrial heartlands of Britain, yet today the physical traces of entire industries have been swept away.

Archaeologist and Durham University Lecturer David Petts argues that this is no way to treat the past, and that the physical remains of our recent history should be preserved now before they are lost forever.

This essay is recorded in front of an audience at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011, which takes place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November.

The New Generation Thinkers are winners of the inaugural talent scheme run by BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanities with the potential to turn their ideas into fascinating broadcasts.

David Petts calls for the preservation of the industrial heritage of the North East.

David Petts, one of BBC Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers, gives a talk calling for the physical preservation of the industrial heritage of the North East, recorded at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival

The North-East of England was once one of the industrial heartlands of Britain, yet today the physical traces of entire industries have been swept away. Archaeologist and Durham University Lecturer David Petts argues that this is no way to treat the past, and that the physical remains of our recent history should be preserved now before they are lost forever.

This essay is recorded in front of an audience at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011, which takes place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November. The New Generation Thinkers are winners of the inaugural talent scheme run by BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanities with the potential to turn their ideas into fascinating broadcasts.

David Petts calls for the preservation of the industrial heritage of the North East.

David Petts, one of BBC Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers, gives a talk calling for the physical preservation of the industrial heritage of the North East, recorded at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival

The North-East of England was once one of the industrial heartlands of Britain, yet today the physical traces of entire industries have been swept away.

Archaeologist and Durham University Lecturer David Petts argues that this is no way to treat the past, and that the physical remains of our recent history should be preserved now before they are lost forever.

This essay is recorded in front of an audience at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011, which takes place at The Sage Gateshead 4 - 6 November.

The New Generation Thinkers are winners of the inaugural talent scheme run by BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanities with the potential to turn their ideas into fascinating broadcasts.

David Petts calls for the preservation of the industrial heritage of the North East.

06Free Thinking Festival20121112

Martin Goodman, one of Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers, gives a talk on the perils of writing biographies, recorded at the Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival.

"Following in the footsteps" is an obsession for biographers as they travel the world to bring their subjects to life, sometimes with dangerous consequences.

Hull University Professor of Creative Writing Martin Goodman, biographer of the sorcerer Carlos Castaneda, draws on visits to high peaks, the sea-bed, coal mines and monasteries to reveal the challenges of the biographer's art.

The Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival takes place at The Sage Gateshead Friday 2 - Sunday 4 November and is broadcast for three weeks on Radio 3 from Friday 2 November.

The New Generation Thinkers are winners of a talent scheme run by BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanities with the potential to turn their ideas into broadcasts.

Amos Oz, one of Israel's most influential thinkers, gives a talk on the Middle East and the prospect of future co-existence between Israel and Palestine at the Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival.

A best-selling novelist, essayist and journalist, Amos Oz is frequently cited as a possible candidate to win the Nobel Prize for Literature.

Oz's work has been published in 41 languages, including Arabic, and he is known as a prominent advocate of a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

His books include the semi-autobiographical novel A Tale of Love and Darkness, a portrait of war-torn Jerusalem in the 1950s, and the recent collection of stories Scenes from a Village Life.

The event is chaired by Night Waves presenter Philip Dodd and recorded as part of Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival 2012.

The Free Thinking festival of ideas takes place at The Sage Gateshead Friday 2 - Sunday 4 November and is broadcast for three weeks on Radio 3 from Friday 2 November.

07Free Thinking2012111320130723

Rana Mitter chairs a debate about World History at the Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival, with historian Antony Beevor, broadcaster Andrew Marr and India expert Maria Misra.

Does World History really still mean Western History, or do we need a radical new understanding of the past?

Antony Beevor is our leading military historian and author of the best-selling history books The Second World War and Stalingrad. Andrew Marr's landmark series A New History of the World aired on BBC1 last year, and he has published the book A History of the World. And Maria Misra is Fellow in Modern History at the University of Oxford and author of Vishnu's Corwded Temple, India since the Great Rebellion.

The event is hosted by Chinese History expert and Radio 3's Night Waves presenter Rana Mitter, and was recorded as part of Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival 2012.

First broadcast in November 2012.

07Free Thinking Festival20121113

Nandini Das, one of Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers, gives a talk on the 16th Century craze for crime pamphlets, recorded at the Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival.

Crime fiction and travel writing are regulars on the book charts today. But long before the charts were invented it was the crime pamphlet that seized the nation's imagination.

Nandini Das explores the late sixteenth-century craze that revealed a new secret world to readers and became the first best-selling phenomenon of the popular press.

The Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival takes place at The Sage Gateshead Friday 2 - Sunday 4 November and is broadcast for three weeks on Radio 3 from Friday 2 November.

The New Generation Thinkers are winners of a talent scheme run by BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanities with the potential to turn their ideas into broadcasts.

Rana Mitter chairs a debate about World History at the Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival, with historian Antony Beevor, broadcaster Andrew Marr and India expert Maria Misra.

Does World History really still mean Western History, or do we need a radical new understanding of the past?

Antony Beevor is our leading military historian and author of the best-selling history books The Second World War and Stalingrad. Andrew Marr's landmark series A New History of the World is airing on BBC1, and he has published the book A History of the World. And Maria Misra is Fellow in Modern History at the University of Oxford and author of Vishnu's Corwded Temple, India since the Great Rebellion.

The event is hosted by Chinese History expert and Radio 3's Night Waves presenter Rana Mitter, and recorded as part of Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival 2012.

The Free Thinking festival of ideas takes place at The Sage Gateshead Friday 2 - Sunday 4 November and is broadcast for three weeks on Radio 3 from Friday 2 November.

08Free Thinking Festival20121114

Joshua Nall, one of Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers, gives a talk on the Victorian obsession with the planet Mars at the Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival.

With the recent success of NASA's Curiosity lander, Mars is firmly back on the agenda. But where did our fascination with the red planet start?

Cambridge University historian Joshua Nall returns to Mars, as it was seen a century ago, when science and literature buzzed with claims about inhabitants on the neighbouring planet.

The Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival takes place at The Sage Gateshead Friday 2 - Sunday 4 November and is broadcast for three weeks on Radio 3 from Friday 2 November.

The New Generation Thinkers are winners of a talent scheme run by BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanities with the potential to turn their ideas into broadcasts.

Vicky Featherstone gives a talk on the idea of a modern national theatre, recorded at the Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival.

Vicky is the founding Artistic Director and Chief Executive of the National Theatre of Scotland, whose award-winning productions include Black Watch, based on the testimonies of British soldiers in Iraq, and Enquirer, a timely examination of the media.

She is about to become the new Artistic Director of the Royal Court Theatre in London.

As Scotland heads towards a referendum on independence, Vicky Featherstone discusses the role of a modern day national theatre in shaping and capturing national identity and history.

The event is hosted by Night Waves presenter Anne McElvoy, and recorded as part of Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival 2012.

The Free Thinking festival of ideas takes place at The Sage Gateshead Friday 2 - Sunday 4 November and is broadcast for three weeks on Radio 3 from Friday 2 November.

09Free Thinking Festival20121115

Sue-Ann Harding gives a talk entitled Expat or Immigrant at the Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival.

What is the difference between being an expat and an immigrant? Can a citizen still be a migrant?

Originally from Australia, Sue-Ann Harding was a migrant in the UK at the University of Manchester researching Russia's Beslan hostage disaster, and is now an expat in Qatar at Hamad Bin Khalifa University.

She draws on television portrayals of migrants and personal experience to explore and challenge the ideas we have about migration.

The Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival takes place at The Sage Gateshead Friday 2 - Sunday 4 November and is broadcast for three weeks on Radio 3 from Friday 2 November.

The New Generation Thinkers are winners of a talent scheme run by BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanities with the potential to turn their ideas into broadcasts.

Philip Dodd chairs a debate on Immigration and the Challenge to Belonging at the Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival.

What does it mean to belong today?

Immigration is a highly sensitive and polarising issue that throws up big questions about belonging and identity. Multiculturalism, integration and social division are increasingly part of the political debate. But what impact does immigration have on everyone's sense of national identity?

Debaters include the director of the influential Demos think-tank David Goodhart, Alp Mehmet, who is Vice Chairman of Migration Watch and one of Britain's first ambassadors from an ethnic minority, and the political activist and head of British Future Sunder Katwala.

The event is hosted by Night Waves presenter Philip Dodd, and recorded as part of Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival 2012.

The Free Thinking festival of ideas takes place at The Sage Gateshead Friday 2 - Sunday 4 November and is broadcast for three weeks on Radio 3 from Friday 2 November.

10Free Thinking2012111620130724

Evolutionary biologist Mark Pagel gives a talk on Evolution and Humanity - What Next? at the Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival.

Why have humans evolved to speak so many incomprehensible languages? Why do we work against our own survival by going to war with one another?

Professor Mark Pagel, Head of the Evolution Laboratory at the University of Reading and author of Wired for Culture, argues that despite today's incredible cultural diversity, humanity has been steadily evolving from small tribes to huge nation states.

Are we moving towards a unified world of one language and one state?

The event is chaired by Night Waves presenter Rana Mitter and was recorded as part of Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival 2012.

First broadcast in November 2012.

20112011, Music Matters: Has Music Changed The World?20111105

Presenter Tom Service will be debating classical music's impact on the world with a panel of guests including Pamela Rosenberg, former director of San Francisco Opera and the Berlin Philharmonic, composer Christopher Fox, and musicologist Christopher Page.

Broadcast live from The Sage Gateshead.

Tom Service debates classical music's impact on the world with a panel of guests.

20112011, Susie Orbach20111121

Psychotherapist Susie Orbach challenges the obsession with personal change, in a talk recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011.

Presented by Philip Dodd.

Susie Orbach is Britain's most high-profile pyschotherapist, whose book Fat is a Feminist Issue revolutionised the way we understand our bodies.

She co-founded The Women's Therapy Centre, has been a consultant for The World Bank and NHS, and is an advocate for body diversity and emotional literacy.

Continuing three weeks of broadcasts from the 2011 Free Thinking festival of ideas, which takes place 4 - 6 November at The Sage Gateshead.

Susie Orbach challenges the obsession with personal change at Free Thinking 2011.

Psychotherapist Susie Orbach challenges the obsession with personal change, in a talk recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011.

Presented by Philip Dodd.

Susie Orbach is Britain's most high-profile pyschotherapist, whose book Fat is a Feminist Issue revolutionised the way we understand our bodies.

She co-founded The Women's Therapy Centre, has been a consultant for The World Bank and NHS, and is an advocate for body diversity and emotional literacy.

Continuing three weeks of broadcasts from the 2011 Free Thinking festival of ideas, which takes place 4 - 6 November at The Sage Gateshead.

Susie Orbach challenges the obsession with personal change at Free Thinking 2011.

Psychotherapist Susie Orbach challenges the obsession with personal change, in a talk recorded in front of a live audience at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011. Presented by Philip Dodd.

Susie Orbach is Britain's most high-profile pyschotherapist, whose book Fat is a Feminist Issue revolutionised the way we understand our bodies. She co-founded The Women's Therapy Centre, has been a consultant for The World Bank and NHS, and is an advocate for body diversity and emotional literacy.

2011Charles Jencks20111124

Landscape architect Charles Jencks calls for a new cosmic art, in a talk entitled Reclaiming the Universe, given at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011.

Charles Jencks is the visionary designer, theorist and landscape architect whose work includes gardens at the Maggie's Cancer Caring Centres, founded by his late wife Maggie Jencks.

He is creating the world's largest sculpture of a human form, Northumberlandia, near the village of Cramlington in the North East.

Jencks argues that understanding the universe is too important to be left to scientists and theologians, and wants us to connect to pre-historic ideas about the cosmos, present in monuments such as Stonehenge.

This event is recorded in front of a live audience at The Sage Gateshead as part of the 2011 Free Thinking Festival.

Presented by Rana Miter.

A talk in which landscape architect Charles Jencks calls for a new cosmic art.

2011Sarah-jayne Blakemore20111123

Neuro-scientist Sarah-Jayne Blakemore gives a talk on changes in the teenage brain.

Teenagers often act on impulse, are lazy, emotional and get into trouble with the police and parents.

Sarah-Jayne Blakemore is Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at University College London and a leading expert on teenage brains.

Using recent research about the radical changes taking place in the adolescent brain, she argues it's time to rethink our attitudes towards youth and the place of teenagers in society.

Recorded in front of a live audience at The Sage Gateshead, at the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2011.

Presented by Juliet Gardiner.

2011Were The Luddites Right?20111122

Rana Mitter chairs a debate about the Luddite Movement to mark their 200th anniversary.

Two hundred years ago this November, artisans in the North of England started protesting against new machines that were destroying their way of life.

Inspired by the mythic King Ludd, the Luddites have been condemned by history as standing on the wrong side of progress - but their legacy persists.

So what did they want and what does it mean to be a Luddite in today's digital age?

Debaters include the historian and biographer Kathryn Hughes, Luddite expert Katrina Navickas, technology analyst Bill Thompson and writer Andrew Simms.

Recorded at The Sage Gateshead in front of a live audience at the 2011 Free Thinking Festival.

Rana Mitter chairs a debate about the Luddite movement, to mark its 200th anniversary.

201220121102

Mary Robinson delivers the opening lecture of the BBC Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2012, arguing that women leaders are better placed than men to sort out the crises of the 21st Century.

Mary Robinson has had a pioneering political career. She was the first female President of Ireland, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, and Chair of the Council of Women World Leaders. Now she is a member of The Elders, along with Nelson Mandela and Jimmy Carter, the group of global leaders who campaign together for peace and human rights, and is President of the Mary Robinson Foundation - Climate Justice, a centre dedicated to helping marginalised victims of climate change.

Mary Robinson's talk about women leaders was recorded earlier tonight in front of an audience at The Sage Gateshead and presented by Matthew Sweet. It marks the start of three weeks of Free Thinking broadcasts on BBC Radio 3.

This year's festival theme is "Them and Us": exploring whether the world is becoming a more divided place, discussing social inequality, difference and how we define ourselves in relation to others.

Speakers include Michael Igatieff, Lee Hall, Philippa Gregory, Antony Beevor, Amos Oz, Tom Holland, Mona Siddiqui, Jeremy Bowen, Julie Bindel, Tony Harrison, Polly Toynbee, Colm Toibin and Andrew Marr.

Plus new drama by Simon Armitage about Olympic torchbearers to be broadcast live from the Baltic.

Now in its seventh year, the Free Thinking Festival of ideas takes place at The Sage Gateshead 2-4 November and is produced and broadcast by BBC Radio 3. It's a platform for today's innovative thinkers, who debate the ideas shaping our world.

Go to www.bbc.co.uk/freethinking for more details.

201220121104

Matthew Sweet broadcasts live from the Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2012 at The Sage Gateshead, with live guests including Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers.

Introducing some of the highlights of the weekend, including another chance to hear from keynote speaker Mary Robinson, the former President of Ireland and UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, who argues that women leaders are best placed to sort out the crises of the 21st Century.

Free Thinking takes place at The Sage Gateshead 2 - 4 November and is broadcast for three weeks on BBC Radio 3 from Friday 2 November.

2012Free Thinking2012122020130725

Rana Mitter talks to the best-selling novelist Philippa Gregory about writing historical fiction and her fascination with the Tudors, recorded at the Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival.

Philippa Gregory's fiction turns the spotlight on the lives of women at significant moments in history. Her Tudor series of novels includes The Other Boleyn Girl, which became a Hollywood film, and her most recent collection is set during the War of the Roses, England's epic power struggle between the Houses of Lancaster and York. BBC1 have now turned these novels into a major drama series The White Queen.

In an event recorded at Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival at The Sage Gateshead in November 2012 in front of a live audience, Philippa Gregory reveals why she went from academia to fiction, how her approach to Tudor characters such as Thomas Cromwell differs from other historial novelists such as Hilary Mantel, whose Wolf Hall won the Man Booker prize, and why she can't help interfering with drama scripts of her novels.

First broadcast in December 2012.

2012Free Thinking Festival20121119

Anne McElvoy chairs a debate titled Hell is Other People at the Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival.

As our global population increases, the world is becoming an ever more connected place, with social media such as Facebook and Twitter encouraging us to engage with other people 24/ 7.

Does this mean we are becoming more sociable, or is hyperconnectivity and overcrowding actually making us more lonely?

To debate this crucial issue Anne McElvoy is joined by the broadcaster and former foreign correspondent Kate Adie, the clinical psychologist and best-selling author Oliver James, the Times columnist David Aaronovitch and the popular philosopher Julian Baggini.

The event is recorded as part of Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival of ideas, which takes place at The Sage Gateshead Friday 2 - Sunday 4 November and is broadcast for three weeks on Radio 3 from Friday 2 November.

2012Free Thinking Festival20121120

Julie Bindel gives a talk arguing that sexuality is a choice at the Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival.

Whether sexuality is genetic or not goes to the heart of the ongoing debate about same-sex marriage. Are gay rights activists right to insist sexuality has biological origins, or is it a lifestyle choice as claimed by some traditionalists?

In a talk titled Not Born This Way, the feminist, lesbian, columnist and writer Julie Bindel challenges liberal thinking by arguing that sexuality is indeed a choice, and that the current scientific quest to identify a gay gene is both pointless and dangerous.

The event is chaired by Night Waves presenter Samira Ahmed and recorded as part of Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival 2012.

The Free Thinking festival of ideas takes place at The Sage Gateshead Friday 2 - Sunday 4 November and is broadcast for three weeks on Radio 3 from Friday 2 November.

2012Free Thinking Festival2012112120130218

Another chance to hear Matthew Sweet debating how the discovery of alien life might change the way we think about humanity.

Scientists have now detected distant planets that may contain life. If we are not alone in the Universe, will this fundamentally affect how we understand ourselves and should we prepare for the consequences? Ought we to begin work on a set of truly "universal" rights or prepare to take arms against the greatest threat to our existence?

Debating how the discovery of alien life will impact our moral and philosophical universe are the best-selling science-fiction writer Stephen Baxter, whose books include the latest Doctor Who novel, the science broadcaster and journalist Sue Nelson, the futurist and neuroscientist Anders Sandberg, and one of our leading space scientists, John Zarnecki, Professor of Space Science at the Open University.

The event is chaired by Night Waves presenter Matthew Sweet and was recorded as part of Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival 2012.

Matthew Sweet debates how the discovery of alien life might change the way we think about humanity.

Scientists have now detected distant planets that may contain life. If we are not alone in the Universe, will this fundamentally affect how humanity understands itself, and should we be prepared for the consequences? Ought we begin work on a set of "universal" rights or prepare to take arms against the greatest threat to our existence?

Debating how the discovery of alien life will impact upon humanity are the best-selling science-fiction writer Stephen Baxter, whose books include the latest Doctor Who novel, the science broadcaster and journalist Sue Nelson, the futurist and neoroscientist Anders Sandberg, and one of our leading space scientists, John Zarnecki, Professor of Space Science at the Open University.

The event is chaired by Night Waves presenter Matthew Sweet and recorded as part of Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival 2012.

2012Free Thinking Festival20121122

Jeremy Bowen and Tarek Osman discuss Revolution, Democracy and the Arab Spring at the Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival.

What kind of societies will the Arab Spring give birth to? Democratic, Capitalist, Islamic, or Unstable?

The revolutions sweeping the Arab World have led to the introduction of democratic rule in some countries. But is a new kind of non-western democracy emerging, and what are the implications for our world?

Jeremy Bowen is the BBC's Middle East Editor and author of The Arab Uprisings, and Tarek Osman is an Egyptian political economist and author of Egypt on the Brink.

The event is chaired by Night Waves presenter Samira Ahmed and recorded as part of Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival 2012.

The Free Thinking festival of ideas takes place at The Sage Gateshead Friday 2 - Sunday 4 November and is broadcast for three weeks on Radio 3 from Friday 2 November.

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Economist Ian Goldin gives a talk on Globalisation and the Future at Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival.

Ian Goldin has been Vice President of the World Bank and advisor to Nelson Mandela. He is now Professor of Globalisation at the University of Oxford and Director of the Oxford Martin School, a new college dedicated to researching the big concerns of the 21st Century, from ageing and poverty to political conflict and technological change.

At Free Thinking, Ian Goldin explores whether globalisation is a force for good, or whether it will be the source of an ever more unequal and unstable world.

Presented by Anne McElvoy.

Producer: Neil Trevithick.

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Colm Toibin is one of Ireland's finest writers, whose books explore issues such as Catholicism, immigration and homosexuality.

His 2009 novel Brooklyn won the Costa novel of the Year, and his latest The Testament of Mary is a controversial re-imagining of the life of the Virgin Mary.

In an extended interview recorded at the Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival at The Sage Gateshead, Philip Dodd talks to Colm Toibin about his own life, his ideas, and thoughts on literature.

Producer: Philippa Ritchie.

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Columnist and youth worker Lindsay Johns argues that we should stop listening to the young, in a talk recorded Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival.

In many ways Britain's youth is in crisis, trapped by rising debt and unemployment. And yet youth culture has never been more influential or all-pervasive.

Lindsay Johns argues that we need to stop pandering to young people, and that all too often we tell them only what they want to hear. John's a writer and broadcaster, runs a youth mentoring scheme in South London.

Controversially, he believes we are "genuflecting at the altar of youth".

This event was recorded earlier in November at The Sage Gateshead, at Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival. The presenter is Rana Mitter.

Producer: Laura Thomas.

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Rana Mitter talks to the best-selling novelist Philippa Gregory about writing historical fiction and her fascination with the Tudors, recorded at the Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival.

Philippa Gregory's fiction turns the spotlight on the lives of women at significant moments in history. Her Tudor series of novels includes The Other Boleyn Girl, which became a Hollywood film, and her most recent collection is set during the War of the Roses, England's epic power struggle between the Houses of Lancaster and York. BBC1 have turned these novels into a major drama series to air in 2013.

In an event recorded at Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival at The Sage Gateshead earlier in November in front of a live audience, Philippa Gregory reveals why she went from academia to fiction, how her approach to Tudor characters such as Thomas Cromwell differs from other historial novelists such as Hilary Mantel, whose Wolf Hall won the Man Booker prize, and why she can't help interfering with drama scripts of her novels.

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Charlotte Blease, one of Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers, gives a talk that questions the relationship between doctors and patients, recorded at Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival.

We trust the 36,000 GPs in this country to work out what is wrong with us. But how much of what they do is guesswork?

In her talk titled "The Medicine Game", philosopher of medicine Charlotte Blease of Queen's University Belfast argues that the relationship between doctors and patients is built on a phoney image of medicine, and instead diagnosis involves playing the "medicine game".

The Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival takes place at The Sage Gateshead Friday 2 - Sunday 4 November and is broadcast for three weeks on Radio 3 from Friday 2 November.

The New Generation Thinkers are winners of a talent scheme run by BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanities with the potential to turn their ideas into broadcasts.

On the eve of the US election, Michael Ignatieff gives a talk on Enemies in Politics at the Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2012.

After a high-profile career in the UK as a broadcaster, law academic and Booker shortlisted author, Michael Ignatieff returned to Canada to become a politician, leading the Canadian Opposition in the 2011 election and losing dramatically to Prime Minister Stephen Harper.

Ignatieff's Free Thinking talk is titled "Them and Us: Enemies and Adversaries in Politics". Addressing this year's central festival theme "Them and Us", he blames excessive partisanship for the public's dislike of politics. Why is political competition so vicious when party differences are so small?

Michael Ignatieff reveals what he believes needs to be done to restore faith in politics.

The event is chaired by Night Waves presenter Matthew Sweet.

BBC Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival takes place at The Sage Gateshead 2 - 4 November and is broadcast for three weeks on Radio 3 from Friday 2 November.

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Adriana Sinclair, one of Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers, gives a talk on the control ex-colonies increasingly exert over their former colonial powers, recorded at Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival 2012.

Lecturer in International Relations at the University of East Anglia, Adriana Sinclair argues that as Asia rises and Europe fades, new patterns and forms of exploitation and domination will emerge that could turn the tables on the old world.

The Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival takes place at The Sage Gateshead Friday 2 - Sunday 4 November and is broadcast for three weeks on Radio 3 from Friday 2 November.

The New Generation Thinkers are winners of a talent scheme run by BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanities with the potential to turn their ideas into broadcasts.

Anne McElvoy chairs a debate on Social Mobility at the Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival: Is Social Mobility Overrated?

Social Mobility has become the new Holy Grail for politicians, with all three main parties united in their desire to break down social barriers and inequality. It's an emotive topic in Britain, raising issues of class, wealth and education.

But for some people to rise up, do others have to slide down? And does greater openness to talent necessarily make a more equal society?

Tackling the Free Thinking Festival's central theme "Them and Us" is a panel including Guardian columnist Polly Toynbee, Oxford historian Lawrence Goldman and management consultant Jamie Whyte.

The event is chaired by Night Waves presenter Anne McElvoy and recorded as part of BBC Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival 2012.

The festival of ideas takes place at The Sage Gateshead Friday 2 - Sunday 4 November and is broadcast for three weeks on Radio 3 from Friday 2 November.

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Oxford University historian Jonathan Healey, one of Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers, gives a talk questioning the value of lessons from history.

Healey claims that lessons drawn from the past and applied to our own world are meaningless, despite what we are told by best-selling historians and television documentaries. It is precisely because the past is so foreign that we are able to understand what is so unique about today.

The Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival takes place at The Sage Gateshead Friday 2 - Sunday 4 November and is broadcast for three weeks on Radio 3 from Friday 2 November.

The New Generation Thinkers are winners of a talent scheme run by BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanities with the potential to turn their ideas into broadcasts.

Tom Holland and Mona Siddiqui discuss the essential difference between Islam and Christianity at the Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival.

Just how different are the two biggest world religions?

Two leading scholars explore what differentiates Islam from Christianity, and the impact that has on the world today, from their different historical origins to their different versions of God.

With the historian Tom Holland, author of a book on Arabic history In the Shadow of the Sword and presenter of the recent Channel 4 documentary Islam: The Untold Story. And the leading theologian Mona Siddiqui, Professor of Islamic Studies at the University of Edinburgh.

The event is chaired by Night Waves presenter Samira Ahmed and recorded as part of Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival 2012.

The Free Thinking festival of ideas takes place at The Sage Gateshead Friday 2 - Sunday 4 November and is broadcast for three weeks on Radio 3 from Friday 2 November.

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Emma Griffin, one of Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers, gives a talk on what makes a good mother today, recorded at the Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival 2012.

Historian Emma Griffin of the University of East Anglia turns to the poor of Victorian Britain to ask what made a good mother then in families struggling to keep body and soul together.

She finds that our own values and ideas about motherhood may not be as instinctive as we like to believe.

The Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival takes place at The Sage Gateshead Friday 2 - Sunday 4 November and is broadcast for three weeks on Radio 3 from Friday 2 November.

The New Generation Thinkers are winners of a talent scheme run by BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanities with the potential to turn their ideas into broadcasts.

An audience with Lee Hall, writer of Billy Elliot and The Pitmen Painters, recorded at The Sage Gateshead as part of the Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival.

The Newcastle born screenwriter and playwright Lee Hall is best known for the hugely successful film and musical Billy Elliot, for which he won a Tony Award and was nominated for an Oscar.

Hall's play The Pitmen Painters, about a group of miners from Ashington in the North East, has been performed throughout the world. He recently updated Alan Plater's 1960s musical drama Close the Coalhouse Door and is now working on a biopic of Elton John.

From a working-class background, much a Hall's work explores the complexities of what class means in the UK. At Free Thinking 2012 Lee Hall discusses class and art, his own life, writing and ideas.

The event is chaired by Night Waves presenter Philip Dodd and recorded as part of Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival 2012.

The Free Thinking festival of ideas takes place at The Sage Gateshead Friday 2 - Sunday 4 November and is broadcast for three weeks on Radio 3 from Friday 2 November.

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Timothy Secret, one of Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers, gives a talk exploring how we react when looked at by animals, recorded at the Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival.

Our world changes when we're on display. When caught in another person's gaze, some of us strut like a peacock whilst others squirm like a fly.

But how do we react when an animal, rather than a human, looks at us? Is there a difference, and what does this say about our relationship with animals?

In a talk titled "Cat's Eyes", University of Essex philosopher Timothy Secret examines the philosophical consequences of the animal gaze.

The Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival takes place at The Sage Gateshead Friday 2 - Sunday 4 November and is broadcast for three weeks on Radio 3 from Friday 2 November.

The New Generation Thinkers are winners of a talent scheme run by BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanities with the potential to turn their ideas into broadcasts.

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Matthew Smith, one of Radio 3's New Generation Thinkers, gives a talk on peanuts and the rise of food allergies at the Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival, entitled Peanut Panic.

Food allergies now affect 15 million people in North America and the UK. And drastic measures are being taken to protect the public, including banning peanuts from places where they were once commonplace: airplanes, sports arenas and schools.

Medical historian Matthew Smith, of Strathclyde University, explores the current obsession with allergies revealing why, in the space of a decade, the peanut has become food enemy number one.

The Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival takes place at The Sage Gateshead Friday 2 - Sunday 4 November and is broadcast for three weeks on Radio 3 from Friday 2 November.

The New Generation Thinkers are winners of a talent scheme run by BBC Radio 3 and the Arts and Humanities Research Council to find the brightest academic minds in the arts and humanities with the potential to turn their ideas into broadcasts.

Evolutionary biologist Mark Pagel gives a talk on Evolution and Humanity - What Next? at the Radio 3 Free Thinking Festival.

Why have humans evolved to speak so many incomprehensible languages? Why do we work against our own survival by going to war with one another?

Professor Mark Pagel, Head of the Evolution Laboratory at the University of Reading and author of Wired for Culture, argues that despite today's incredible cultural diversity, humanity has been steadily evolving from small tribes to huge nation states.

Are we moving towards a unified world of one language and one state?

The event is chaired by Night Waves presenter Rana Mitter and recorded as part of Radio 3's Free Thinking Festival 2012.

The Free Thinking festival of ideas takes place at The Sage Gateshead Friday 2 - Sunday 4 November and is broadcast for three weeks on Radio 3 from Friday 2 November.

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BBC Radio 3's annual Free Thinking festival of ideas hits the road this summer as it takes up residency at leading summer events across the country.

Rana Mitter begins by chairing a debate from the York Festival of Ideas on the legacy of the War of the Roses

In the year that Richard III's remains were identified beneath a Leicester Car Park, Free Thinking is in York, the seat of his power, to debate how the Wars of the Roses shaped the country from the 15th century right up to the present day - from the tough choices and trauma ordinary people faced, to the role the conflict played in pushing England towards modernity.

The panel includes historian Mark Ormrod from University of York and She-Wolves author Helen Castor

The event is chaired by Night Waves presenter Rana Mitter and was recorded earlier this month at the York Festival of Ideas as part of BBC Radio 3's Free Thinking in the Summer

Free Thinking is visiting four festivals throughout the summer including HowTheLightGetsIn at Hay, the Institute Français Philosophy Night in London, York Festival of Ideas and the Chalke Valley History Festival in Wiltshire. These events will be broadcast throughout June and July and lead the way towards Free Thinking's annual weekend of debate at the Sage, Gateshead in October 2013.

BBC Radio 3's annual Free Thinking festival of ideas hits the road this summer as it takes up residency at leading summer events across the country.

Rana Mitter begins by chairing a debate from the York Festival of Ideas on the legacy of the War of the Roses

In the year that Richard III's remains were identified beneath a Leicester Car Park, Free Thinking is in York, the seat of his power, to debate how the Wars of the Roses shaped the country from the 15th century right up to the present day - from the tough choices and trauma ordinary people faced, to the role the conflict played in pushing England towards modernity.

The panel includes historian Mark Ormrod from University of York and She-Wolves author Helen Castor

The event is chaired by Night Waves presenter Rana Mitter and was recorded earlier this month at the York Festival of Ideas as part of BBC Radio 3's Free Thinking in the Summer

Free Thinking is visiting four festivals throughout the summer including HowTheLightGetsIn at Hay, the Institute Français Philosophy Night in London, York Festival of Ideas and the Chalke Valley History Festival in Wiltshire. These events will be broadcast throughout June and July and lead the way towards Free Thinking's annual weekend of debate at the Sage, Gateshead in October 2013.