Foreign Bodies

The two programmes exploring the sexual experiences of westerners in foreign cultures.

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
Genome: [r4 Bd=19900322]

Unknown: Jeffrey Wyn Thomas.

Director: Jane Dauncey

Sandra: Melanie Walters

David: Dorien Thomas

Terry: Peter Dahlsen

Jill: Di Botcher

Dr Richards: Alan Towner

Peter Charles: Richard Mitchley

Reporter: Christine Russ

Travel agent: Paul Garnault

Programme Catalogue - Details: 22 March 199019900322

Producer: J.

DAUNCEY

Next in series: JAPAN (1/2)

Previous in series: ARABIAN NIGHTS

Description

Play by Jeffrey Wyn THOMAS.

The primitive coast of New Zealand seems a good place to get away from it all.

But the wildness can get into the blood...

Subject Categories

drama programmes (genre)

Broadcast history

22 Mar 1990 15:02-16:00 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Di Botcher (Actor)

Richard Mitchley (Actor)

Dorien Thomas (Actor)

Peter Dahlsen (Actor)

Alan Towner (Actor)

Paul Garnault (Actor)

Christine Russ (Actor)

Melanie Walter (Actor)

Jeffrey Thomas (Author)

Jane Dauncey (Producer)

Recorded on 1988-09-12

01The Modern Madame Butterfly1990032919980203

David Neil Lodge visits Tokyo to see love and sex from the point of view of the expat population.

His findings reveal some major cultural differences.

adventures in the capital's `foreign quarter', and what happened to the meek and humble Ms Butterfly?

02 LASTThe Religious Blind Eye1990040519980210

David Neil Lodge visits Egypt, a magnet for the westerner seeking sexual adventure.

How can such apparent liberalism exist within a Muslim society?

15Foreign Bodies20121109 (BBC7)
20130816 (BBC7)

Boris Akunin sets his Erast Fandorin novels in nineteenth century Russia whilst Andrey Kurkov describes twenty first century Ukraine.

Mark Lawson looks at the influence of Bulgakov and Dostoevsky on Russian crime fiction and compares the inside view with those created by outsiders including Martin Cruz Smith and Tom Rob Smith.

Producer Robyn Read.

0101Belgium - Hercule Poirot And Jules Maigret20121022 (BBC7)
20161003 (BBC7)
20161004 (BBC7)

Investigating Europe through crime fiction, Mark Lawson finds two big clues in Belgium.

Foreign Bodies: A History Of Modern Europe Through Literary Detectives

Crime fiction reflects society's tensions. Helped by famous literary detectives including Maigret, Montalbano, Dalgliesh and Wallander, Mark Lawson shows how crimes reflect Europe's times from the world wars of the 20th century to the Eurozone crisis and nationalist tensions of the 21st. In programme one, Mark Lawson looks at the template set by a Belgian created by an Englishwoman and a French cop created by a Belgian: Agatha Christie's Hercule Poirot and Georges Simenon's Jules Maigret hearing from Val McDermid, Lord Grey Gowrie, Andrea Camilleri and David Suchet.

In crime fiction, everyday details become crucial clues: the way people dress and speak, the cars they drive, the jobs they have, the meals they eat. And the motivations of the criminals often turn on guilty secrets: how wealth was created, who slept with whom, what somebody did in the war. For these reasons, detective novels often tell the story of a place and a time much better than more literary novels and newspapers which can take a lot of contemporary information for granted.

Mark Lawson's series focuses on some of the celebrated investigators of European fiction and their creators: from popular modern protagonists - including Henning Mankell's Kurt Wallander, Jo Nesbø's Harry Hole and Andrea Camilleri's Inspector Montalbano - through Ian Rankin's Inspector Rebus and Lynda La Plante's DCI Jane Tennison back to Friedrich Dürrenmatt's Inspector Barlach and Josef Skvorecký's Lieutenant Boruvka.

Producer: Robyn Read.

0102Germany - Inspector Barlach20121023 (BBC7)
20161004 (BBC7)
20161005 (BBC7)

Mark Lawson uncovers German history in the crime novels of Friedrich Durrenmatt.

Mark Lawson's history of Europe seen through the pages of crime fiction looks at the ideas of guilt, responsibility and justice in the writing of Friedrich Dürrenmatt (1921-1990).

His Inspector Barlach books were published in Switzerland in 1950 and 1951 and he used elements of the crime genre in plays including The Pledge and The Visit.

Theatre directors Josie Rourke and Simon McBurney, Hollywood scriptwriters Jerzy Kromolowski and Mary Olson-Kromolowski; Professor and crime blogger Katharina Hall and German lawyer turned best selling author Ferdinand von Schirach share their passion for Dürrenmatt's clear eyed depictions of the impact of German and Swiss actions in World War II.

Producer: Robyn Read.

0103Czechoslovakia - Lieutenant Boruvka20121024 (BBC7)
20161005 (BBC7)
20161006 (BBC7)

Mark Lawson explores Czech history in the crime fiction of Josef Skvorecky.

When Josef Skvorecky published the Mournful Demeanour of Lieutenant Boruvka in 1966 he had to refer obliquely to the Czech political situation but following the Prague spring he emigrated to Canada and his writing became more explicit.

Mark Lawson discusses his writing with translator and former member of the Plastic People of the Universe, Paul Wilson, who argues that the country was a crimescape and that Skvorecký's interest in the crime genre went beyond his Boruvka series.

Producer: Robyn Read.

0104Netherlands - Commissaris Van Der Valk20121025 (BBC7)
20161006 (BBC7)
20161007 (BBC7)

Mark Lawson visits Amsterdam in search of the detective Van Der Valk.

The Van Der Valk novels written by Nicholas Freeling became a popular Thames TV series starring Barry Foster in 1970s. A British chef who lived first in Holland and then France, Freeling's books depict both post war Europe and the development of closer European ties in the European Union.

Mark Lawson's series exploring European history through crime fiction continues with a trip to Amsterdam in search of Van Der Valk. Lord Grey Gowrie remembers interviewing Nicholas Freeling before his death in 2003, and Dutch author Saskia Noort describes her books about crimes involving women which draw on trends in Dutch society now.

Producer: Robyn Read.

0105Sweden - Inspector Martin Beck20121026 (BBC7)
20161007 (BBC7)
20161008 (BBC7)

Mark Lawson discusses the influence of Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo's Martin Beck novels.

In 1965 husband and wife Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö published the first of their series of 10 police procedurals featuring Inspector Martin Beck and his team. Written during a time when Stockholm saw demonstrations against the Vietnam War, the arming and re-organisation of the police force and stresses on the welfare state, the Beck novels deliberately used the crime genre to depict changes in Swedish society.

Current crime best sellers Jo Nesbø, Henning Mankell, Åsa Larsson, Camilla Lackberg, Jens Lapidus, Val McDermid and Gunnar Staalesen are amongst those discussing the influence of the Martin Beck series with Mark Lawson as part of his series looking at European history through crime fiction.

Producer: Robyn Read.

0106United Kingdom - Cmdr Dalgliesh And Ch Insp Wexford20121029 (BBC7)
20161010 (BBC7)
20161011 (BBC7)

PD James' Adam Dalgliesh and Ruth Rendell's Reginald Wexford first appeared in novels written in 1962 and 1964.

Mark Lawson continues his series about the way crime fiction has depicted modern European history by looking at the shifts in UK society they have encountered from rural racism and road rage to fears about changes in the Church of England and the rise of an environmental movement.

You can hear an extended interview with PD James on the Front Row Crime Writers' Archive.

Producer: Robyn Read.

How PD James's Dalgliesh and Ruth Rendell's Wexford have charted changes in UK society.

0107Sicily - Inspector Rogas20121030 (BBC7)
20161011 (BBC7)
20161012 (BBC7)

Leonardo Sciascia created crime stories to depict the power of the Mafia in Sicily.

Leonard Sciascia used crime stories to highlight Mafia crimes. The Sicilian was the author of novels including The Day of the Owl, A Simple Story and Equal Danger - which features Inspector Rogas. Paul Bailey, Gianrico Carofiglio, Andrea Camilleri and Petra Reski discuss with Mark Lawson the influence of Leonardo Sciascia and the continuing prescence of the Mafia in Italian life.

Producer: Robyn Read.

0108Spain - Pi Pepe Carvalho20121031 (BBC7)
20161012 (BBC7)
20161013 (BBC7)

Manuel Vazquez Montalban's Pepe Carvalho novels dramatise tensions in post-Franco Spain.

In his Pepe Carvalho novels, Manuel Vázquez Montalbán created a Barcelona based Private Eye with a gastronomic passion, whose investigations are set against political developments in post Franco Spanish society.

Mark Lawson continues his series looking at European history through crime fiction - discussing the books of Montalbán with Antonio Hill and Jason Webster - whose own crime novels depict contemporary Spain.

Producer: Robyn Read.

0109Britain - Dci Jane Tennison20121101 (BBC7)
20161013 (BBC7)
20161014 (BBC7)

Lynda La Plante's DCI Jane Tennison changed police procedurals, argues Mark Lawson.

Helen Mirren's portrayal of DCI Jane Tennison created a new image of women police officers in Britain. Lynda La Plante describes the creation of her character and what serving officers taught her about the macho culture of British policing before the millennium.

The Granada TV series which first aired in 1991 was sold around the world. Dutch best seller Saskia Noort and Scottish authors Ian Rankin and Val McDermid discuss its impact with Mark Lawson.

Producer: Robyn Read.

0110Italy - Inspector Montalbano20121102 (BBC7)
20161014 (BBC7)
20161015 (BBC7)

Andrea Camilleri's crime stories depict corruption, politics and power in Italy.

Andrea Camilleri discusses the influence of both the Spanish writer Montalbán and Belgian author Georges Simenon on the creation of his Sicilian detective Inspector Montalbano. In a conversation recorded at his home in Rome with Mark Lawson, he describes the way he uses his crime stories to comment upon the effects of both the Mafia and Berlusconi's leadership on Italian society today.

Producer: Robyn Read.

0111Germany - Pi Kemal Kayankaya20121105 (BBC7)
20161017 (BBC7)
20161018 (BBC7)

German writer Jakob Arjouni's Turkish sleuth, Kemal Kayankaya, reflects a reunited Germany

German author Jakob Arjouni returns periodically to write fiction featuring his Turkish PI Kemal Kayankaya. Mark Lawson visits him in Berlin to discuss the way his crime novels have reflected upon events including re-unification and the war in Yugoslavia, and drawn on more recent debates about what view of Islam it's appropriate to show in cartoons and films.

Producer: Robyn Read.

0112Scotland - Di John Rebus20121106 (BBC7)
20161018 (BBC7)
20161019 (BBC7)

Mark Lawson meets Ian Rankin, whose crime stories reflect social changes in Scotland.

Mark Lawson visits Edinburgh to meet Ian Rankin and discuss the way his novels featuring DI John Rebus reflect the building of the Scottish parliament, the G8 summit and debates over Scottish independence.

Producer: Robyn Read.

0113Sweden - Kurt Wallander And Lisbeth Salander20121107 (BBC7)
20161019 (BBC7)
20161020 (BBC7)

Mark Lawson investigates how Swedish society reflects in the novels of Larsson and Mankell

If the Martin Beck novels of Sjöwall and Wahlöö set the template for the social commentary found in Scandinavian crime fiction - Henning Mankell's Kurt Wallander novels and Steig Larsson's Millennium Trilogy have both used the form to focus on racist attitudes in modern Sweden.

Henning Mankell, Kenneth Branagh, Liza Marklund, Camilla Läckberg and Eva Gabrielsson - Stieg Larsson's partner, share their views about whether the Swedish state can still be held up as an ideal as Mark Lawson continues his series about the way modern European history is reflected through the pages of crime fiction.

Producer Robyn Read.

0114Norway - Harry Hole20121108 (BBC7)
20161020 (BBC7)
20161021 (BBC7)

How does Jo Nesbo's Norwegian detective reflect changes in Scandinavian society?

Jo Nesbø's novels, featuring detective Harry Hole top best seller lists across the world - the latest example of the boom in Scandinavian crime fiction.

Mark Lawson talks to Nesbø, Liza Marklund and Gunnar Staalesen about the impact of Norwegian oil on the economy, the divisions caused by the Second World War and the effect of random acts of violence in Sweden and Norway with the assassination of politicians and the killing spree on Utøya island.

Producer Robyn Read.

0115Russia And Ukraine - Erast Fandorin20121109 (BBC7)
20161021 (BBC7)
20161022 (BBC7)

Russian and Ukrainian crime writers Akunin and Kurkov. Is Dostoevsky still an influence?

Boris Akunin sets his Erast Fandorin novels in nineteenth century Russia whilst Andrey Kurkov describes twenty first century Ukraine.

Mark Lawson looks at the influence of Bulgakov and Dostoevsky on Russian crime fiction and compares the inside view with those created by outsiders including Martin Cruz Smith and Tom Rob Smith.

Producer Robyn Read.

0301Cuba20141117

To complement Radio 4's major dramatisations of The Havana Quartet by Cuba's leading crime writer, Leonardo Padura, Mark Lawson examines how mystery novels have reflected five different political systems in a new series of Foreign Bodies.

In today's programme Mark Lawson explores fictional investigations of Cuba after the Castro revolution with Leonardo Padura, author of The Havana Quartet, and Caroline Garcia-Aquilera, a Cuban-American writing from exile in Miami.

0302Usa20141118

To complement Radio 4's major dramatisations of The Havana Quartet by Cuba's leading crime writer, Leonardo Padura, Mark Lawson, in a new series of Foreign Bodies, examines how mystery novels have reflected five different political systems.

Today Laura Lippman and Walter Mosley - creators of private eyes Tess Monaghan and Easy Rawlins - discuss with Mark Lawson how they introduced the experience of women and black Americans into crime fiction dominated by men and a McCarthyite fear of outsiders.

0303Poland20141119

To complement Radio 4's major dramatisations of The Havana Quartet by Cuba's leading crime writer, Leonardo Padura, Mark Lawson, in a new series of Foreign Bodies, examines how mystery novels have reflected five different political systems.

Zygmunt Miloszewski and Joanna Jodelka reflect on how Polish crime fiction has reflected the country's occupation by both Nazis and Communists, the transition to democracy through the Solidarity movement and lingering accusations of racism and anti-Semitism.

0304Australia20141120

To complement Radio 4's major dramatisations of The Havana Quartet by Cuba's leading crime writer, Leonardo Padura, Mark Lawson, in Foreign Bodies, examines how mystery novels have reflected five different political systems.

Australia's leading crime novelist, the South African-born Peter Temple -- whose books include The Broken Shore and Truth -- talks to Mark Lawson about depicting a society shaped by both British colonialism and American power and why Australian crime fiction should contain as few words as possible.

0305 LASTNigeria20141121

To complement Radio 4's major dramatisations of The Havana Quartet by Cuba's leading crime writer, Leonardo Padura, Mark Lawson, in Foreign Bodies, examines how mystery novels have reflected five different political systems.

The writers Helon Habila, whose books include the award-winning Oil on Water, and CM Okonkwo talk to Mark Lawson about how a flourishing new tradition of Nigerian crime fiction explores British legacy, tribal tradition and the new "corporate colonialism" as global companies exploit the country's mineral reserves.