Fisk Jubilee Singers, The

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2004110920050324In 1871 a group of freed slaves took their music of bondage and suffering for the first time to white audiences.|Their school in Nashville, Tennessee was on the brink of financial ruin and this was a last desperate attempt to raise funds to avert closure.|Not only did they achieve this, but their success, particularly in Britain, guaranteed the future of Fisk University to the present day.|Critics however point to the fact that in order to make their slave songs acceptable to a white audience, they had to sing those Negro Spirituals in a European choral style turning their backs on their roots and culture.|Horace Boyer, an African-American musicologist, leading gospel singer and one time director of the Fisk Jubilee Singers, returns to Nashville to re-examine the social and musical impact of the Fisk Jubilee Singers.
20071027Bonnie Greer re-traces the journey of The Fisk Singers, a groundbreaking 19th-century black choir in Britain, and examines why their songs of freedom resonated with British audiences.|The Jubilee Singers not only introduced the world to black music, but also challenged racial stereotypes and championed the liberties of all black Americans.
20080823Bonnie Greer re-traces the journey of The Fisk Singers, a groundbreaking 19th-century black choir in Britain, and examines why their songs of freedom resonated with British audiences.|The Jubilee Singers not only introduced the world to black music, but also challenged racial stereotypes and championed the liberties of all black Americans.