Film Programme, The

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Episodes

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20130815

Francine Stock talks to Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright John Patrick Shanley about his own adaptation of his stage drama Doubt, which stars Meryl Streep as a nun who harbours suspicions about a priest who teaches in the Catholic school where she works.

Francine Stock talks to Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright John Patrick Shanley.

Francine Stock talks to Steven Berkoff about working with Stanley Kubrick on his masterpiece Barry Lyndon.

Francine Stock talks to Steven Berkoff about working with Stanley Kubrick on Barry Lyndon.

Francine Stock talks to Gus Van Sant, the director of Milk, which stars Sean Penn as Harvey Milk, California's first openly gay elected official.

Francine also talks to Peter Morgan, writer of The Deal, The Queen and Frost/Nixon.

Francine Stock talks to Gus Van Sant, the director of Milk, starring Sean Penn.

Francine Stock reviews The Wrestler, Mickey Rourke's comeback film that is being tipped for an Oscar nomination.

Francine Stock reviews The Wrestler, Mickey Rourke's Oscar-tipped comeback film.

Francine Stock talks to Danny Boyle about his Mumbai thriller Slumdog Millionaire.

Francine Stock presents a behind the scenes look at the Mike Leigh comedy, Happy-Go-Lucky.

In an extended edition of a programme that was broadcast first in April, Francine Stock presents a behind the scenes look at Happy-Go-Lucky, Mike Leigh's award-winning comedy.

Francine Stock talks to Judy Craymer, the creator of Mamma Mia.

Francine Stock talks to Judy Craymer, the creator of Mamma Mia, the most commercially successful British film of all time, as it is released on DVD.

The latest movie news and reviews.

Francine Stock talks to Sir Ridley Scott about his new thriller Body of Lies.

Francine Stock talks to Fernando Meirelles, director of City of God and The Constant Gardener, about his new film Blindness.

Francine Stock talks to Oliver Stone about W, his controversial biopic of George W Bush.

Francine Stock talks to Oliver Stone about W, his controversial biopic of Geroge W Bush.

Matthew Sweet talks to Herbert Lom about his life in film, from The Ladykillers to the Pink Panther series.

Francine Stock talks to Ricky Gervais about his first starring role in a Hollywood movie, Ghost Town.

Francine Stock presents a silent movie special with piano accompaniment from Neil Brand, who discusses his score for the restored 1928 sci-fi classic High Treason.

Francine Stock talks to Hanif Kureshi and Stephen Frears about their 1985 collaboration My Beautiful Launderette, which launched Daniel Day Lewis' film career.

Francine Stock talks to Ben Stiller about his controversial comedy Tropic Thunder, which drew protests from disability rights groups at its world premiere

Francine Stock talks to James Watkins, director of Eden Lake, a controversial thriller in which working-class children attack and torture a middle-class couple on a camping holiday

Francine Stock talks to Ralph Fiennes about his role in The Duchess, the screen adaptation of Amanda Foreman's best-selling biography Georgiana, The Duchess of Devonshire.

Matthew Sweet talks to Romola Garai and Francois Ozon, star and director of Angel, a French twist on a British costume drama.

Movie news and reviews.

Matthew Sweet talks to Guillermo Del Toro, director of Pan's Labyrinth and The Devil's Backbone, about his new blockbuster Hellboy 2: The Golden Army.

Matthew Sweet unites the star and director of What a Carve Up with Jonathan Coe, who borrowed the title and the plot of the 1961 farce as inspiration for his best-selling novel.

Pat Jackson and former Bond girl Shirley Eaton describe their emotions when they first read the novel and what they think of the film on its DVD release.

Matthew Sweet talks to Luc Jacquet, director of March Of The Penguins, about his new movie The Fox And The Child.

Francine Stock talks to Alex Gibney, director of Taxi to the Dark Side, winner of this year's Oscar for best documentary.

An investigation into interrogation methods used by the United States military, the film focuses on the events that led to the death of a taxi driver in Afghanistan.

Francine Stock talks to actor Casey Affleck, who stars in Gone Baby Gone, directed by his brother Ben.

The thriller was put on hold for British release because of concerns that the film's story-line had parallels with the Madeleine McCann case.

Francine also talks to Sergei Bodrov, director of a new biopic about Genghis Khan which suggests that one of the most ruthless tyrants in the history of the world was not such a bad guy after all.

Francine Stock talks to producer and director Roger Corman, whose credits include Attack of the Crab Monsters, The Pit and the Pendulum and The Trip.

As well as his classic Edgar Allan Poe adaptations and exploitation movies, Corman is also famous for giving major directors such as Francis Ford Coppola and Martin Scorsese their big break in feature films.

Francine Stock talks to Tony Curtis about his favourite film in a career that has spanned 60 years and over a hundred movies.

Francine Stock talks to Morgan Spurlock about his new documentary Where in the World Is Osama Bin Laden? She also meets director Jiri Menzel, who discusses his new film I Served the King of England.

Ken Loach reveals why Menzel's 1966 classic Closely Observed Train was a major influence on his work.

The film magazine features a review of Iron Man, the new superhero movie with Robert Downey Jr in the lead.

Francine Stock talks to Robert Sarkies, director of Out of the Blue, a controversial re-enactment of a recent massacre in New Zealand.

Francine Stock's guests are actor John Hurt and director Kimberley Pierce, whose new film Stop Loss is a fictional drama about an American soldier who goes AWOL after refusing to return to fight in Iraq against his will.

Francine Stock talks to one of the greatest directors working today.

Andrzej Wajda is responsible for such masterpieces as Ashes and Diamonds and Man of Iron.

One of the leading lights of the Solidarity movement, Wajda briefly gave up film-making in the 1990s to become a senator in the new Polish democracy.

Aged 82, Wajda was nominated for an Oscar this year for Katyn, his powerful account of the infamous massacre of Polish soldiers by Soviet troops in World War II.

In a special edition, Francine Stock follows the production of Mike Leigh's new film Happy-Go-Lucky from the perspective of its producer, Simon Channing-Williams.

The film had its world premiere at the Berlin Film Festival, where Sally Hawkins won a Silver Bear for best actress.

Francine talks to Sally in Berlin as well as to Mike Leigh, who describes his 20-year partnership with Channing-Williams.

Francine Stock talks to Harmony Korine, the director and former enfant terrible of American independent cinema, about his new film.

Mr Lonely is set in a commune for lookalikes of movie stars, including Marilyn Monroe, Shirley Temple and Charlie Chaplin.

Francine Stock presents the film magazine.

Francine Stock talks to Daniel Day Lewis about his award-winning role in Paul Thomas Anderson's startling tragedy There Will Be Blood.

Francine Stock talks to Johnny Depp and Tim Burton about their bloodthirsty musical Sweeney Todd.

Helena Bonham Carter and Alan Rickman reveal what it was like to sing on film for the first time.

Paul Haggis, Oscar-winning director of Crash, talks about In the Valley of Elah, his controversial new film about the traumatising effects of the Iraq conflict on American soldiers.

Francine Stock talks to German film-maker Wim Wenders, director of Wings of Desire, The Goalkeeper's Fear of the Penalty Kick and The Buena Vista Social Club.

Also featured is Cannes winner Christian Mungiu, who took the Palme D'Or last year with his harrowing drama 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days.

Francine Stock presents a special edition of the show celebrating Thelma Schoonmaker, one of American cinema's unsung heroines.

The wife of the late English director Michael Powell, Thelma has been Martin Scorsese's editor since she won an Oscar for Raging Bull in 1980.

In an extended interview, she talks about life with two of the greatest film-makers in the history of cinema.

Scorsese also talks about the making and editing of the boxing movie Raging Bull.

Francine Stock talks to Chris Weitz, producer of American Pie, who might be considered an odd choice to direct the eagerly anticipated Phillip Pullman adaptation The Golden Compass.

Francine Stock talks to Andrew Dominik, director of Chopper.

His new highly acclaimed horse opera, The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford, stars Brad Pitt.

Dominik tells Francine why he doesn't like westerns and had no previous interest in the celebrity of Jesse James.

Francine Stock talks to Jason Schwartzman, star and co-writer of Wes Anderson's new comedy The Darjeeling Limited.

Frank Cottrell-Boyce, the writer of 24 Hour Party People and Welcome To Sarajevo, joins Francine in the studio to discuss the work of Japanese director Hirokazu Koreeda.

Francine Stock presents a special on production design and takes a tour of the Harry Potter set.

Francine Stock's guest is George A Romero, director of Night of the Living Dead, Dawn of the Dead and Creepshow.

Francine Stock talks to author Neil Gaiman about the movie adaptation of his best-selling fantasy adventure Stardust.

Gaiman also produced the film, which stars Robert De Niro and Michelle Pfeiffer as well as Sienna Miller and Peter O'Toole.

Francine Stock talks to the makers of Control, a new biopic about former Joy Division frontman Ian Curtis, who committed suicide at the peak of the band's success.

Bobby Farrelly, co-director of There's Something About Mary, talks about about his new film The Heartbreak Kid.

Francine Stock talks to director Julie Taymor about her new film Across the Universe, an ambitious musical that incorporates Beatles songs into the story of a young Liverpudlian's American odyssey in the late 1960s.

Tilda Swinton talks about a new thriller Michael Clayton, in which she stars alongside George Clooney.

Francine Stock talks to Quentin Tarantino about his new film Death Proof, which started out as one half of a double bill under the banner Grindhouse.

After disappointing returns at the American box office, the two films, Death Proof and Robert Rodriguez's Planet Terror, were separated and Tarantino's serial killer movie was expanded to feature length.

Francine asks Tarantino if British audiences will ever see the movies in the forms originally conceived.

Andrew Collins talks to director Mike Leigh and producer Simon Channing-Williams about their first film together, the 1998 drama High Hopes, the start of a collaboration that has included Vera Drake, Secrets And Lies and Life Is Sweet.

Ken Loach gives an interview as two boxed sets of his work are released on DVD.

Andrew Collins talks to Judd Apatow, director of The 40-Year-Old Virgin and new release Knocked Up.

Plus an interview with Marina Hands, star of a new version of Lady Chatterley.