File On 4

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Major issues at home and abroad.

2003052020030525

Gerry Northam asks whether it's time for the government to allow a controlled trade in human organs.

2003052720030601

The government has invested heavily in the reform of cancer services and made it clear that broader reforms across the NHS may follow.

But how successful have the changes been?

2003060320030608

With more depleted uranium used during the war in Iraq than in any previous conflict, Jenny Cuffe examines the latest scientific research on the dangers it poses, and asks why the Government is ignoring safety recommendations from its own advisors on the subject.

/ More depleted uranium was used in the recent Iraq war than in any previous conflict.

Jenny Cuffe investigates the latest research on the dangers posed by this volatile material.

2003061020030615
20030615

The European sugar industry has long been kept sweet by a subsidy regime that costs consumers around £5 billion a year.

Now, with EU proposals to reform the subsidy system and health warnings from the World Health Organisation that we should consume less sugar, is the industry facing a bitter future? Fran Abrams reports.

2003112520031130

Iraq and other conflicts have left Britain?s shrinking armed forces more overstretched than at any time in the last fifty years.

Julian O?Halloran reports.

2004021720040222

The Government has promised a review of cases in which children have been removed by the state from their parents on controversial medical testimony in the courts.

But will it address the more fundamental failings of a family courts system in crisis? Allan Urry investigates.

2004032320040328

As investors demand more social responsibility from Britain's biggest companies, Allan Urry investigates one of the nation's leading oil and gas multinationals.

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2004052520040530

In the first of a new series, Jenny Cuffe investigates the role played by private military contractors in Iraq.

As violence and lawlessness increase, business is booming for the security companies - but are there enough controls over the way they operate and the people they employ?

20040601

The government's health reforms promise local control of services through new Primary Care Trusts.

But, with complaints that the Trusts only have real power as long as they do what Whitehall wants, just how democratic is New Labour's NHS? Gerry Northam investigates.

2004060820040613

With Britain's defence budget being further stretched by military involvement in Iraq, Julian O'halloran examines the MOD's spending record.

2004072720040801

The Bichard inquiry into the murder of the two Soham schoolgirls, revealed grave blunders by Humberside police.

But, as Julian O'halloran reports, it also found huge deficiencies in keeping police records nationwide, and the Home Office is now in a race against time to plug the gaps which could allow other child killers to strike.

2004101920041024

The National Health Service is spending more than £6 billion on a computer system linking all hospitals and GP surgeries in England; the biggest public sector computer project in the world.

But as it approaches its launch, Gerry Northam reveals serious unease among some doctors and other health service professionals.

2004110220041107
20041107

Sewers

Every year thousands of homes are flooded with evil-smelling sewage.

Julian O'halloran investigates growing concern over the crumbling state of Britain's sewerage system and the threat it poses public health.

2004110920041114

Why are teenaged boys so vulnerable to abuse by men who pay for sex? Allan Urry investigates one of Britain's biggest paedophile rings to find out how a schoolboy was abducted from his parents and sold to abusers across the country.

2004111620041121

With the European Union considering new legislation which would require tests for thousands of chemicals which are routinely used by manufacturers, Jenny Cuffe assesses the latest scientific research, and asks how much we really know about the long term risks from some of the substances that are contained in almost everything we buy.

2004112320041128

Tony Blair's 'big idea' for secondary education is to create new, independent academies to replace failing schools in deprived areas.

The first 17 have already opened, but will the millions of pounds being invested benefit the pupils most in need?

Gerry Northam reports.

2004120720041212

Around two-thirds of British military deaths in Iraq were caused not by enemy action, but by 'friendly fire', faulty equipment, poor training and other organisational factors.

Now families of victims accuse the Ministry of Defence of covering up its own failings and shifting the blame onto front-line troops.

2005020120050206

Gerry Northam investigates allegations that much of Iraq's oil wealth has been squandered by incompetence and corruption during the current occupation.

2005020820050213

Allan Urry investigates concerns about the huge backlog of repairs, maintenance and construction on Britain's roads.

Is the state of our highways costing lives?

2005021520050220

While billions of pounds have been pledged for victims of the tsunami disaster, other areas of the world desperate for aid are facing a donations famine.

In the tiny kingdom of Lesotho, as in much of Southern Africa, several years of drought, malnutrition and sickness, have been largely ignored by the outside world.

As Julian O'halloran reports, new international trade rules have deepened the crisis by putting thousands out of work.

Julian O'halloran reports from the tiny kingdom of Lesotho, where the people have suffered years of malnutrition, sickness and drought, yet their plight has been largely ignored.

2005022220050227

Alan Urry investigates concerns about the huge backlog of repairs, maintenance and construction on Britain's roads.

Is the state of our highways costing lives?

2005031520050320

With the Provisional IRA accused of being behind one of the UK's biggest ever cash robberies of £26 million from the Northern Bank in Belfast, Allan Urry investigates the scale of serious and organised paramilitary crime north and south of the Irish border.

2005032220050327

With family doctors no longer having to be on call after hours, File on 4 investigates whether patients are being put at risk.

2005032920050403

With family doctors no longer having to be 'on call' after hours, reporter Matthew Hill investigates whether patients are being put at risk.

The programme uncovers evidence of long delays in responding to patients in urgent need of medical care.

2005060720050612

Many food products have been withdrawn because of fears over carcinogenic additives.

The sufferers have been the farmers of the spice fields of INDIA.

Jenny Cuffe investigates.

2005061420050619

With the government signalling that a new generation of NUCLEAR reactors is now a real possibility, how near is Britain to finding a solution to the old problem of what to do with vast quantities of dangerous radioactive waste?

Julian O'halloran reports on the disposal headaches and the radiation leaks which continue to dog the NUCLEAR power industry.

2005062120050626

How good is the Home Office at making immigration and asylum decisions? Amid widely-publicised claims that undeserving applicants have learned to play the system, Gerry Northam investigates complaints that many genuine cases are rejected, causing needless distress and wasting huge amounts of public money on appeals.

2005062820050703

Children and teachers are being put at risk because of failures to pass on information about violent pupils and abusive parents.

Fran Abrams investigates the lapses which have left school staff and children exposed to attack.

2005070520050710

Ten years ago, a warrant was issued for the arrest of Radovan Karadzic, the former leader of the Bosnian Serbs, on charges of genocide.

File on 4 examines the failure of the international community to bring Karadzic to trial and the implications it has for the fragile peace in Bosnia - Herzegovina.

2005071220050717

How safe is it to blow the whistle on alleged wrong-doing in one of the country's most closed public services - the prison system? Jenny Cuffe investigates claims that staff and inmates are being victimised for making complaints.

How safe is it to blow the whistle on alleged wrong-doing in one of the country's most closed public services; the prison system? Jenny Cuffe investigates.

2005071920050724

Hosepipe bans, dwindling river flows, and half full reservoirs - the signs of water shortage are growing across some of Britain's most populated areas.

The last big drought nine years ago spelled out the need to cut water demand and conserve vital supplies if another crisis was to be averted - so what measures were taken and why haven't they worked?

2005072620050731

Gerry Northam examines the new anti-fraud regime in Europe and asks if it is working.

Six years after the European Commission promised zero tolerance of corruption, why do allegations of widespread fraud and financial mismanagement persist?

2005080220050807

With an increasing number of hospitals battling with large scale debts, Liz Carney investigates whether policies designed to increase patient choice could create more financial instability and even lead to hospital closures.

2005080920050814

Alan Whitehouse investigates the performance of Britain's bus companies and uncovers poor reliability, safety failings and a regulatory system that is struggling to cope.

So what are we getting for the millions of pounds of public money funnelled into the bus industry each year?

2005101120051016

Terrorist suspects are supposed to meet speedy justice under streamlined extradition procedures.

However, critics complain that the new law is a recipe for future miscarriages of justice.

Gerry Northam investigates.

2005101820051023

Road hauliers continue to complain about the damaging effects of Britain's fuel prices, but it's only one of the many pressures facing an industry under stress.

There's also a critical shortage of capable lorry drivers at a time when demand is soaring.

Is this why some become so tired that they fall asleep at the wheel, causing fatal accidents?

2005102520051030

Richard Watson investigates the background to the London bombings and asks whether the authorities could have done more to counter the terrorist threat rooted in Britain.

2005110120051106

Tony Blair stepped in personally to speed up compensation for those injured in the London bombings - but other victims of crime are complaining that they have to wait years for compensation, and that money they receive can be woefully inadequate to care for those with the most serious injuries.

File on 4 investigates the system for compensating those who suffer violent attacks.

With Julian O'halloran

2005110820051113

The fight to end poverty highlighted by Live 8 was followed by more pictures of the starving in Niger.

With concerns over more famines, Jenny Cuffe returns to Niger, and asks why the world always wakes up too late.

2005111520051120

After the controversy over the breast cancer drug Herceptin, Gerry Northam examines the way in which Britain approves new drugs for use in the NHS.

Is there needless bureaucracy?

2005112220051127

Brussels has 15,000 lobbyists whose job it is to try to influence European policy.

But does a lack of regulation and transparency allow them and their corporate clients too much influence over the decisions that are made?

Sarah Spiller reports.

2005112920051204

Following the string of high profile cases in which it was shown that mothers had been wrongly convicted of killing their children, the courts were expected to take a more cautious approach to charges of abuse.

But how much has really changed? John Sweeney investigates two new cases in which families claim they've suffered a miscarriage of justice.

2005120620051211

Floods, heatwaves and extreme weather all suggest that climate change could pose real risks for the future.

But as the countries that back the Kyoto global warming treaty meet in Montreal, have Britain's own efforts to curb greenhouse gas emissions run into the sand?

2005121320051218

Jenny Cuffe investigates claims of delays and falling public confidence in the way the police deal with 999 calls.

2006013120060205

Public sector spending on private consultants is now costing billions of pounds, with everyone from Whitehall departments to hospital trusts hiring in external advisors.

But who decides if their advice is a good use of public money, and who assesses their effectiveness?

Allan Urry investigates.

2006020720060212

The public is supposed to be protected from the most dangerous criminals when they are released from prison.

But recent cases of brutal murder reveal serious flaws in the system for managing risk.

Gerry Northam reports.

2006021420060219

In the wake of the Buncefield blast, just how safe are British oil depots and other hazardous sites? Julian O'halloran reveals that there have been a series of lucky escapes.

2006022120060226

Head teachers are now among Britain's most powerful public sector managers.

Education reforms have left them in charge of budgets worth millions - and with little outside control.

As ministers press ahead with measures designed to give schools even more financial freedom, Fran Abrams asks: 'When heads step over the line, who steps in?'.

2006022820060305

Kate Clark reports from southern Afghanistan where a vanguard of British troops arrives ahead of a larger deployment in the spring.

How great are the risks in an area where suicide bomb attacks are on the increase and where the Taleban are said to be resurgent?

2006030720060312

With the number of reported rapes continuing to rise, BBC correspondent Danny Shaw asks why so few still end in a successful prosecution.

With the number of reported rapes continuing to rise, BBC correspondent Danny Shaw asks why so few end in a successful prosecution.

2006031420060319

In the fight against terrorism, how secure are Britain's ports and airports? Gerry Northam examines fears that dangerous people or substances can be too readily shipped in.

2006032120060326

The Child Support Agency is the latest in an ever increasing line of public bodies to enlist the help of bailiffs to help collect monies owed to them in taxes, fines and maintenance payments.

Allan Urry investigates and asks who benefits when the bailiff calls.

2006032820060402

As a new exodus of refugees from troubled Darfur threatens the stability of neighbouring Chad, reporter Liz Carney asks whether three years of international diplomacy has done anything to ease the plight of refugees or to halt the violence of marauding militias.

2006052320060528

Iraqi security forces have been supplied with weapons in complex arms deals involving the US and UK.

But in a country awash with as many as eight million small arms and a thriving black market, Allan Urry examines concerns that guns destined for soldiers and police are being diverted to insurgents, for use against British and American troops.

2006053020060604

As the NHS faces a massive cash crisis, the government insists its multi-billion pound computer project is to press ahead despite widespread opposition from doctors.

Has Whitehall got the prescription wrong? Gerry Northam reports.

2006060620060611

The recent apparent suicide of Alison Davies, and the death of her disabled son Ryan - the mother and son who fell from the Humber Bridge - has highlighted the desperation families face caring for some of Britain's most vulnerable children.

Sarah Spiller investigates the new crisis in respite care.

2006061320060618

With growing concern over foreign criminals being released rather than deported at the end of their prison sentences, Zaiba Malik asks what safeguards exist to prevent convicted European rapists and murderers entering the UK to commit violent new crimes.

2006062020060625

Miriam O'reilly asks who should be accountable for the failure of the new rural payments scheme that has brought many English farmers to the brink of financial ruin.

2006062720060702

Julian O'Halloran investigates the problems with the UK's water supply and asks if the regulatory bodies are doing enough to force the water companies to keep their promises.

2006070420060709

As the US celebrates Independence Day, Jenny Cuffe investigates growing concern among American Muslims about measures being taken to combat home-grown terrorism.

[Rptd Sun 5.00pm]

2006071120060716

As the police inquiry into loans and honours continues, Fran Abrams looks at the activities of some of the government's other business friends.

2006071820060723

With the price of gold surging to new heights, British investors are pumping billions of pounds into new mining ventures around the globe.

Angus Stickler investigates claims that multi-national companies are stripping developing countries of their natural resources, wreaking environmental and social havoc in some of the poorest nations in the world.

2006072520060730

The government wants the interests of crime victims to be a central part of the justice system.

But how well are victims currently treated by prosecutors? With Gerry Northam

2006080120060806

Julian O'halloran investigates cases of teenagers in custody which point to a lack of care, and asks if some of these youngsters should be in prison at all.

2006100320061008

A year after the devastating earthquake in Pakistan, Kate Clark investigates the consequences of allowing extremist Islamic groups and their humanitarian wings to play a major role in the relief and recovery operation.

2006101020061015

As concern grows about heavy fighting in Afghanistan and mounting casualties in Iraq, Allan Urry investigates the system for Defence procurement and asks why British troops can't get some of the equipment they need to help keep them safe.

2006101720061022

The government sets no limit to private corporations in the NHS.

Even GPs surgeries are now being taken over.

But does the record suggest this is wise? Gerry Northam reports.

Gerry Northam examines the ever-increasing deployment of private corporations within the NHS.

2006102420061029

Recent events in America have dented the image of oil giant BP.

Julian O'halloran investigates.

2006103120061105

As former Thai Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra begins a new life in London, Fran Abrams asks why Britain remains the destination of choice for many controversial foreign politicians.

2006110720061112

As the political and military post mortems continue in Israel over the invasion of Lebanon, Paul Adams reports from Jerusalem on the aftermath of the conflict and its implications for the Middle East peace process.

2006111420061119

Richard Watson investigates the extent of radicalisation among Britain's Muslim communities and asks if enough is being done to tackle the problem.

2006112120061126

Gerry Northam investigates the use of bugging and surveillance in the fight against terrorism and major crime and asks whether evidence so obtained should be admissible in court.

2006112820061203

With a new superbug more virulent than MRSA on the rise in Britain's hospitals, Allan Urry asks whether the government is doing enough to protect patients from infections.

2006120520061210

As cracks are revealed at the heart of nuclear reactors, dealing a massive blow to generator British Energy and posing major safety questions, Julian O'halloran asks if Britain has become dangerously dependent on a fleet of ageing and decrepit nuclear power stations.

2007013020070204

As Britain's top military brass say more should be done to support troops serving in Iraq and Afghanistan, the programme investigates the way in which the MoD treats soldiers who have been badly injured and the families of those killed in action.

2007020620070211

Russia has denied any part in the death by radiation poisoning of ex-KGB man Alexander Litvinenko.

And the Kremlin has spoken of a Cold War mentality in the West.

But Julian O'halloran reports from St Petersburg and Moscow on a series of mystery deaths which raise further suspicions and questions over the role of the authorities.

2007021320070218

The government promised to hit major criminals where it hurts.

So why is it closing the agency which seizes their assets? Gerry Northam investigates.

2007022720070304

With attention focused again on the diamond trade, Fran Abrams reports from one of the world's most unstable countries, the Democratic Republic of Congo, on 'conflict copper' and the other less glamorous minerals that fuel violence.

2007030620070311

Stephen Grey tells the inside story of Britain's dirty war against drugs.

Why did a controversial policy of using major dealers as informants do so little to stem the flow of drugs on to our streets?

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2007032020070325

Gerry Northam investigates reports that Britain's most vulnerable adults are not properly protected from abuse by the very people who are paid to care for them.

20070327

Teenage gun crime in Britain is a matter of increasing concern.

Ministers are promising action, but where are young gang members obtaining their firearms? Allan Urry investigates.

2007052920070603

Allan Urry investigates the effects of budget cuts on the Royal Navy as an enquiry about the recent capture of British sailors in the Persian Gulf gets under way.

2007060520070610

Julian O'halloran explores current attempts to cut greenhouse gas emissions and asks whether carbon trading and similar schemes can have any impact on climate change.

2007061220070617

Gerry Northam reports on the Private Finance Initiative.

A keystone of Gordon Brown's policy as Chancellor, the scheme is showing signs of strain.

Have the billions spent on projects including schools and hospitals been used wisely?

2007061920070624

As the death toll in Afghanistan continues to rise, Kate Clark reveals how corruption and mismanagement is threatening Hamid Karzai's government and boosting the Taleban.

2007062620070701

Angus Stickler investigates honour-based violence in the UK, which frequently involves crimes against women in Muslim communities.

There have been at least a dozen so-called honour killings during the last year, but it is claimed that official figures conceal a much more widespread problem.

2007070320070708

International pressure is mounting over Iran's development of its nuclear programme.

Allan Urry asks whether the UK and Europe are doing enough to prevent the Iranians from acquiring sensitive military technology and equipment from western companies.

2007071020070715

With Britain in the middle of a construction boom, Julian O'halloran investigates claims of cartels and price-rigging, and assesses how much such practices could be adding to the final bills faced by UK plc.

2007071720070722

Gerry Northam reports on how the allocation system for council housing works and asks if local people are losing out to economic migrants.

2007072420070729

Ministers believe that investment, rather than aid, is the key to lifting developing countries out of poverty.

But is this theory borne out by facts? Fran Abrams investigates.

2007073120070805

The government is expected to issue the first tenders for the controversial ID card scheme this month.

Sarah Spiller asks whether the project will be a valuable weapon to combat fraud and terrorism or an expensive flop.

2007091820070923

Allan Urry investigates cases of abuse in homes for elderly people in care and asks why it seems so difficult to monitor such cases and to obtain redress when they are discovered.

2007092520070930

As American house prices are hit by a flood of defaults on home loans, Michael Robinson investigates growing concerns about unchecked borrowing and the potential danger for the UK housing market.

2007100220071007

Kate Clark looks at conditions in Basra after the British handover.

2007100920071014

New research suggests that occupational cancer deaths in the UK could be far higher than previously thought.

Tim Whewell asks if the Health and Safety Executive is doing enough to prevent work-related cancers.

2007101620071021

Billions of pounds are allocated for regeneration projects in the UK, but are the proper accounting procedures in place? The European Commission has recently stopped some payments.

Gerry Northam investigates.

2007102320071028

Allan Urry investigates the growing impact of crack cocaine on society as its use spreads across the UK's towns and cities.

He reports on the violent gangs who supply the drug, police efforts to tackle the organisations behind its distribution and the growing numbers of children taken in to care due to the reckless behaviour of parents.

2007103020071104

Julian O'halloran reports on the tensions which have resurfaced in America's Deep South following a case of alleged racial injustice and white supremacist provocation.

The resultant wave of protest has rekindled memories of the Civil Rights marches of the 1960s.

2007110620071111

BBC Business Editor Robert Peston investigates the causes of the recent Northern Rock crisis.

2007112020071125

Gerry Northam investigates reports that research into the development of new cancer treatments is being jeopardised by failure to take basic precautions in laboratories.

2008020520080210

In the wake of the new year chaos on Britain's railways, Julian O'halloran looks at Network Rail's performance on track maintenance and its record on safety checks.

2008021220080217

The major political parties' fundraising methods have all come under close scrutiny recently, but concerns are now being expressed over the finances of the British National Party.

Fran Abrams investigates.

2008021920080224

Town halls are facing thousands of backdated equal pay claims from women workers.

But how are cash-strapped local authorities going to meet bills which could amount to almost three billion pounds? Jenny Cuffe reports.

2008022620080302

Armadeep Basset reports on the activities of UK-based Sikh groups in support of a violent campaign for an independent homeland in the Punjab.

2008030420080309

As the goverrnment devolves more responsibilities to England's nine Regional Development Agencies, Allan Urry investigates their performance.

Critics claim they are unaccountable, out of touch and poor value for their budget.

2008031120080316

Julian O'halloran reports on a new compensation scheme for wounded soldiers which began in 2005 but appears not to have met victims' expectations.

2008032520080330

Angus Stickler investigates the market for platinum.

An essential component of the catalytic convertors which clean up car emissions, this metal is now twice the price of gold.

But as mining companies rush to exploit South Africa's reserves, traditional farmers are claiming that they are being forced off their ancestral lands.

2008060320080608

Fran Abrams investigates the financial war against terrorism in the light of a recent High Court ruling that suspects' assets cannot be frozen.

20080713

Allan Urry investigates the impact of the economic downturn on urban regeneration as the credit crunch and falling property values force some developers to abandon their plans, leaving local authority partners unable to develop key sites.

2008102120081026

As millions of families struggle to pay rocketing gas and electricity bills, Julian O'halloran investigates claims that our bills may be hundreds of pounds too high because of weak regulation, bad planning and the fact that the market is dominated by just six big companies.

2008102820081102

Tim Whewell reports from Georgia, reassessing the origins of the recent conflict with Russia.

He investigates who was responsible for the outbreak of hostilities and whether the fighting could have been avoided, and assesses its impact on leaders in Washington, Moscow and Tbilisi.

2008111120081116

Simon Cox investigates how English football's finances have got into such a mess.

With Premier League clubs alone currently in three billion pounds-worth of debt, the game's governing bodies in England and Europe want action and the UK government has called for a review of financial regulation within the game.

2008111820081123

Amardeep Bassey investigates fears that some of the funds that Britain is spending on projects to prevent violent extremism taking root in Muslim communities may be falling into the hands of the very groups it is trying to defeat.

2008112520081130

Michael Robinson investigates whether the Prime Minister's instruction to banks to keep funds flowing will halt the rise in evictions and unemployment as repossession rates rocket due to the credit crunch.

2009012720090201

Jon Manel finds out if the law is keeping pace with the increasing numbers of British couples who are having children using surrogate mothers, both in Britain and abroad.

2009021720090222

Michael Robinson investigates the legacy of toxic lending by British banks and reveals why the threat it poses to UK jobs, homes and incomes is especially acute.

Michael Robinson investigates the legacy of toxic lending by British banks.

2009022420090301

Grant Ferrett investigates whether the sanctions imposed on Zimbabwe by Britain and Europe are adequate to stop wealth being channelled out of the country by people close to the Mugabe government.

2009031020090315

Simon Cox examines the record of the Royal Military Police in dealing with alleged crimes by British forces both during operations and in peacetime.

The record of the Royal Military Police in dealing with alleged crimes by UK forces.

2009060220090607

Jenny Cuffe asks if the government policy of tightening immigration rules to help preserve jobs for British workers is being undermined by employers who are intent on bringing overseas workers as a way of driving down pay.

Jenny Cuffe asks if the policy of preserving jobs for British workers is being undermined.

2009092920091004

Following criticism of the NHS over the system failures which allowed a man with schizophrenia to kill two people, Miriam O'reilly investigates claims of widespread problems in community mental health services which are allowing dangerous patients to commit violent offences or to harm themselves.

Miriam O'reilly investigates claims of major problems in community mental health services.

2009100620091011

With a Parliamentary report expected to add to criticism of Whitehall's defence purchasing systems, Gerry Northam asks why it seems so hard to buy the right equipment for our forces.

Gerry Northam asks why it seems so hard to buy the right equipment for our forces.

2009101320091018

Fears over deep cuts in council jobs and services have brought predictions of a winter of discontent and strife unlike anything seen for 30 years.

But as councils prepare to wield the axe, Julian O'Halloran asks if some authorities have added to their budget crises by awarding over-the-top pay, perks and severance terms to their own top executives.

Julian O'Halloran examines the levels of pay awarded by some councils to their executives.

2010020220100207

The government has pledged 150 million pounds to combat the threat of improvised explosive devices, which are now the biggest danger to British and other coalition troops in Afghanistan.

But is the UK doing enough to tackle the increasing threat they pose? Allan Urry investigates.

What is being done to tackle the threat of improvised explosive devices in Afghanistan.

2010020920100214

While Britain's top bankers celebrate their bonuses, Michael Robinson investigates the commercial property market and the nasty surprises that it may hold for the banks and for the long-suffering British taxpayers who bailed them out.

Michael Robinson investigates the nasty surprises in the commercial property market.

2010052520100530

For years Britain has been criticised for failing to investigate and punish companies who use bribery and corruption to win contracts overseas.

Just before the General Election, Parliament approved a new Bribery law.

And in recent months the Serious Fraud Office has adopted a new strategy, prosecuting a string of British-based firms and managers who have pleaded guilty to corrupt practices abroad.

It seemed that prosecutors were finally beginning to get results.

But now English judges are objecting to the American-style plea bargains which have encouraged guilty companies to confess to past illegality.

One senior judge has warned prosecutors they have no power to strike such deals, which tend to offer a more lenient sentence in return for an admission of guilt.

And in another case, an executive who cooperated with prosecutors has been sentenced to a year in prison for helping to bribe officials in the Greek health service to buy his company's medical equipment.

In the first of a new series of 'File on 4', Allan Urry investigates bribery by British firms abroad, and serious disarray in the court system which should be bringing them to justice.

Producer: Andy Denwood.

Is Britain's drive to curb bribery and corruption working? Allan Urry investigates.

20100601
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As BP's oil spill threatens fishing towns and tourist beaches along America's Gulf coast, Gerry Northam asks if lessons from previous disasters could have prevented the tragedy.

When the tanker Exxon Valdez hit a reef in Alaska's Prince William Sound in 1989, the resulting oil spill became the worst in American history.

Fisheries were closed and the local economy was undermined.

Many said such a disaster should never again befall American coastal communities.

Tankers were obliged to be constructed with a protective second skin, and the law was changed to give polluters the clear responsibility to pay for oil spills.

But as thousands of barrels a day continue to pour into the Gulf of Mexico, a growing chorus of critics is asking why more preparations were not made for such a tragedy? Gerry Northam reports.

Producer Andy Denwood

Editor David Ross.

Could lessons from past disasters have prevented BP's oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico?

20100727

A special court system is supposed to protect the interests of the vulnerable and the elderly.

It's appointed thousands of 'deputies' - or guardians - to ensure their money is properly managed.

The system was reformed three years ago - but have the changes worked?

There have been allegations the system is slow, bureaucratic and open to abuse.

In some cases lawyers are appointed to oversee people's financial arrangements - and families claim they charge excessive fees.

In other cases, it's a relative who's appointed as a deputy - but are there adequate safeguards to ensure they're not misappropriating the money? Fran Abrams investigates cases where the system has left some vulnerable people worse off.

How well does the Court of Protection safeguard the finances of the old and vulnerable?

20101005
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20110607

Is Iran exploiting the turmoil caused by the Arab Spring, and the uncertainly following the killing of Osama Bin Laden? After Iranian military rockets were found on the battlefields of Afghanistan, Allan Urry assesses new evidence alleging Iran's closer ties with al Qaeda and the Taliban.

And, with more illicit shipments of weapons from Iran being seized in the Middle East, in breach of a UN arms embargo, the programme also reports on the discovery of a weapons smuggling ring set up in the heart of Europe to service Tehran.

It also investigates the involvement of a former British Royal Marine in the ring.

Producer Ian Muir-Cochrane.

Allan Urry investigates claims that Iran has been stepping up its support for terrorism.

20110628

Over the last month Britain's biggest provider of care homes for the elderly, Southern Cross, has been beset by financial woes.

But across the country an even deeper crisis is unfolding as local authorities implement massive budget cuts.

This week File on 4 investigates how cutbacks are leaving elderly people with insufficient care, and councils with a major financial headache.

The programme also hears from small care home providers who say they are being forced out of business because the fees local authorities now pay them are too low.

And with the report from a Government commission due in a few days, the programme asks whether the gap in funding for the care of elderly people can be closed..

Reporter: Fran Abrams

Producer: Gail Champion.

Why the UK's elderly care sector is facing a financial crisis.

20110705

In the wake of the financial disaster, policy makers and regulators around the world pledged to make banking safer and more transparent.

But the reality, many experts claim, is proving very different.

For this edition of File on 4, Michael Robinson investigates some of the apparently straightforward financial products banks now offer and uncovers disturbing complexity.

One product, called Exchange Traded Funds, appears to offer private individuals and pension funds a cheap and simple way to invest - in anything from the top 100 companies on the British stock exchange, to obscure companies in emerging economies or even to baskets of commodities.

Beneath this apparent simplicity, the programme discovers that many EFTs hide a forest of financial engineering designed to increase the profits of the banks which provide them.

But at what risk?

Another product, so-called "Naked Credit Default Swaps" may have an obscure name but they were at the heart of the financial crisis and are still one of the most widespread instruments used by banks.

They are now accused by some of exacerbating Europe's sovereign debt problems.

A leading British financial academic likens them to taking out insurance on someone else's life.

There is then an obvious incentive, he tells the programme, to push the person who's life you have insured under a bus.

On both sides of the Atlantic, regulators hoped to reduce the risks of this massive market.

But, as the programme discovers, there's widespread doubt among financial professionals that they've succeeded.

Producer: Sally Chesworth.

Do the complex financial products banks still offer threaten another meltdown?

20110712

The Border Agency is charged with preventing drugs, weapons and would-be illegal immigrants from getting to the UK.

But three years after being created, the Agency has been accused by MPs of failing to enforce immigration rules.

Faced with cuts to its budget and the loss of around one-fifth of its staff over the next four years, the Agency is looking to new technology to improve its effectiveness.

But with delays to the e-borders project and problems with existing computer systems, Morland Sanders investigates whether the strategy will work.

Facing massive job cuts, will the Border Agency be able to protect the UK's frontiers?

20110719

Why are ambulances queuing up to unload patients needing treatment at hospital Accident and Emergency Departments? Some senior A and E medics say there are too few beds and not enough staff in a front line service struggling to cope.

Cash strapped NHS Trusts are closing casualty units, or replacing them with lower grade Urgent Care Centres but what's been the impact on patients? Allan Urry asks whether A and E is on life support, at a time when the NHS is trying to make £20 billions savings without compromising patient care.

Presenter: Allan Urry

Producer: Samantha Fenwick.

Allan Urry examines claims of a crisis in hospital accident and emergency services.

20110927

The Department of Health wants to slash £1.2 billion off the bill for hospital supplies -- everything from bandages and rubber gloves to operating tables and medical equipment.

The planned savings form part of the £20 billion in NHS efficiency savings the Government has pledged to make by 2014.

There's plenty of scope for savings.

A recent survey found one Hospital Trust bought 177 different types of surgical gloves.

Across the NHS, hospitals buy more than 1,700 different kinds of canula.

Rationalising this medical shopping list could free-up £500 million a year for investment in patient care, the National Audit Office estimates.

But can the increasingly complex NHS procurement system in England deliver the major savings the Government wants to see?

Critics say Foundation Hospital Trusts increasingly make their own buying decisions, with little or no national co-ordination.

Inside hospitals, managers tasked with purchasing millions of pounds worth of equipment often lack the authority or the support of their superiors to drive through savings.

Meanwhile new private sector companies are moving in to take over the purchase and supply of NHS equipment.

Will the Government's plans for a more devolved health service help or hinder the drive to save taxpayers' money.

Jenny Cuffe investigates.

Producer: Andy Denwood.

Does the NHS spend too much on bandages and syringes? Jenny Cuffe investigates.

20111004
20111011
20111018
20120221
20120306
2012062620120701

Why are more schools failing their Ofsted inspections? Fran Abrams investigates.

Ofsted has a new, hard-line chief inspector and a new, tougher inspection regime - and in the past few months that has led to a spike in the number of schools deemed inadequate.

Predictably, there has been a corresponding wave of anger in schools - with a growing number taking to the courts to challenge the inspectors' views?

So are the inspectors really up to the job? And who inspects the inspectors?

Fran Abrams investigates.

Producer: Rob Cave.

2012080720120812

Is enough being done to combat diesel pollution which is blamed for thousands of deaths?

World health chiefs have branded diesel exhaust emissions a major cause of cancer. Despite the efforts of car-makers to filter out the most noxious substances, these fumes still play a big part in causing air pollution.

Britain has the second worst respiratory death rates in Europe and has long been under notice from Brussels to clean up its act. So why are most UK areas in breach of legal limits?

And do ministers have any clear plan to reduce the huge annual total of resulting deaths?

Julian O'Halloran investigates.

Producer : Rob Cave.

2014071520140720

Childhood Cancer: Is red tape stopping the development of new drug treatments?

Every year more than 1,500 UK children are diagnosed with cancer.

For some the outlook is good but for those struck down by one of the rarer cancers, the prognosis can be a bleak one.

Two hundred and fifty children die each year from the disease.

Parents have told File on 4 there is a worrying lack of research into new drugs for childhood cancers, with youngsters sometimes offered treatments which have hardly changed in the last forty years - treatments that can have a limited chance of success and which can cause fatal, serious and life-long side-effects for those lucky enough to survive.

In the battle to get the most up-to-date treatments for children with some of the most aggressive cancers, increasing numbers of families say they are forced to raise hundreds of thousands of pounds to travel abroad to take part in pioneering drugs trials elsewhere.

Meanwhile UK researchers say they face a constant battle for funding. They also warn of a loophole in European regulations which they say stops break-through drugs that have been developed for adult cancer sufferers, being developed to benefit children.

As science takes the treatment and understanding of disease to new levels, Jane Deith asks whether enough is being done to give children a fighting chance.

Reporter: Jane Deith

Producer: Nicola Dowling.

2014101420141019 (R4)

What lies behind plans to outsource NHS cancer care in parts of the Midlands?

In the biggest outsourcing to date, the NHS in England has announced it is tendering a huge £700 million contract for providing NHS cancer care in Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent, along with another £500million for end of life care in the region. Officials say it will streamline services and provide better treatment while critics say it's the most reckless privatisation yet. BBC Health Editor Hugh Pym investigates..

Producer: Paul Grant.

20150120

Benefit sanctions are supposed to be part of a system helping people back to work. But critics say they penalise the vulnerable and are among the reasons for the growing use of food banks. So how fair is the Government's system of withholding state payments for those who don't comply with welfare rules? Allan Urry hears from whistleblowers who allege some JobCentrePlus staff are setting claimants up to fail in order to meet internal performance targets. Why did a recovering amputee lose his benefits because he didn't answer the phone?

Reporter: Allan Urry Producer: Nicola Dowling.

20150303

Secure children's homes look after some of the country's most vulnerable youngsters. Largely run by local authorities, they provide safe accommodation for children placed on custody grounds or for welfare reasons because they present a danger to themselves or others. The demand for places is rising but the number of beds is falling. So where does that leave those they are meant to cater for? With the government currently conducting a review into the system, File on 4 gets rare access to one home in the Midlands to meet children and staff; and talks to those struggling to find places for children across the UK.

Reporter: Fran Abrams

Producer: Emma Forde.

20150324

With Britain on heightened alert following Islamist shootings in Paris and Copenhagen, how well prepared are we to deal with a similar attack?

Allan Urry discovers how extremists in neighbouring European countries were able to get access to guns and hears concerns about the ready availability of illegal weapons from Eastern Europe and North Africa.

So what risk does that pose for the UK? Britain prides itself on tough gun control, but is that enough to prevent determined would-be terrorists getting access to firearms?

Reporter: Allan Urry Producer: Gail Champion.

20150519

Mental health services are facing a period of unprecedented change. The Department of Health has committed itself to reducing the disparity between spending on physical and mental illness, and a new payment system means services will be funded differently in the future. In the meantime there are concerns that vulnerable patients are dying because of pressures to release them from hospital too quickly, and a failure to provide adequate support in the community.

Can a new focus on what has traditionally been dubbed a 'Cinderella service' reverse the impact of years of cuts?

Reporter: Adrian Goldberg

Producer: Gail Champion.

20150602

Next month the National Audit Office is due to report on the outcomes for young people leaving care. There are claims that, under financial pressure, local authorities are pushing too many teenagers into independent living before they're ready. File on 4 investigates new figures that suggest many young care leavers are failing to cope - with large numbers ending up in custody, homeless, sexually exploited or pregnant. Social services chiefs say the welfare of care-leavers must be a key priority for the new government. But who holds them to account when they fail those they are meant to have looked after? And, with more cuts on the way, can the system cope? Fran Abrams reveals how hands-off caring can have tragic consequences.

20150623

Sixty thousand people have crossed the Mediterranean and made it to Europe so far this year.

Frontex, the EU border agency, warns that between 500,000 and 1 million people - Eritreans, Syrians, Afghans, Somalis - could be waiting to leave the shores of Libya for Italy.

Its latest report says resources are being devoted to migrants' care but not towards screening and collecting basic information such as their nationality - which means many are quickly moving on to countries like the UK. According to the report, 'this puts the EU internal security at risk'.

There are also fears terrorists belonging to the so-called Islamic State could secrete themselves among the migrants.

So how easy is it for people to avoid security checks as they journey across the EU?

European countries are supposed to stop illegal migrants and enter their fingerprints and details on a central database. EU rules state that the country where people are first fingerprinted must look after them and consider their asylum applications.

This means many migrants set on coming to this country try to stay under the radar in Italy and France, hoping to reach the UK without being processed.

Jane Deith follows the routes used by some of those headed for Britain.

She also investigates the smugglers who help them - from individuals using their own cars, to organized crime gangs offering money back guarantees on a new life in the UK.

Is Europe losing the battle for control?

Reporter: Jane Deith Producer: Paul Grant.

20150630

The UK's £12 billion pound foreign aid budget is one of the few areas of Government spending protected from cuts. The commitment to spend 0.7% of Britain's gross national income on aid means at least 60 billion pounds will be spent on overseas development in the next five years. Many of these projects are delivered by large companies that receive tens of millions of pounds from DFID (the Department for International Development). They can charge over a thousand pounds a day for a consultant and their directors earn six figure salaries but how effective are they are and the programmes they are paid to deliver? Simon Cox investigates the UK's aid industry and asks how taxpayers can know that they're getting value for money.

Reporter: Simon Cox Producer: Gail Champion.

20150707

Works behind schedule; costs going up; an inquiry into poor performance announced by the industry regulator. It's a depressingly familiar story on our railways. From brand new station escalators at a standstill in Birmingham, to only 10 per cent of trains on time at one of London's busiest stations, even the Chancellor's planned Northern Powerhouse is threatened as line upgrades between Manchester and York are delayed.

Allan Urry investigates Network Rail's woes as pressure mounts to deliver £24 billion of infrastructure improvements.

Reporter: Allan Urry Producer: Rob Cave.

20150714

Complaints against the police are running at a record high. The vast majority, nine out of ten, are rejected from the start. But when complainants appeal to the Independent Police Complaints Commission, one in 2 cases is overturned. Others - disgruntled with the way they've been treated by the police - sue the force. File on 4 hears from people who've been battling for years to pursue a complaint and who claim the process is unfairly weighted in favour of the police.

In the Queen's Speech the Government confirmed its plans to overhaul the complaints system in order to restore public confidence. As part of the reform, Police and Crime Commissioners could be able to decide if they want to handle allegations against their local forces. The Commissioners themselves are divided on whether they want this additional role and critics say they would not have the resources to do it effectively.

So just what recourse do you have when you feel you've been dealt with unfairly by the police? And will the Home Office proposals make any difference? Claire Savage investigates.

Presenter: Claire Savage Producer: David Lewis.

2015091520150920 (R4)

Under fire over controversial decisions, is the Crown Prosecution Service up to the job?

Controversial charging decisions in the cases of Lord Janner, Operation Elveden and a doctor accused of female genital mutilation have brought a hostile reaction in the media to the Director of Public Prosecutions and increasing concern about the health of her organisation - the Crown Prosecution Service.

Over the past five years the CPS has seen budget cuts of over 25% resulting in job losses and internal reforms. Despite this, the organisation maintains that it continues to improve performance - measured by conviction rates in both magistrates' and Crown Courts.

However, there are increasing concerns about staff morale, the quality of decision-making and the standard of advocacy in court. BBC Home Affairs Correspondent, Danny Shaw has been hearing frank testimony from both inside and outside the CPS which presents a revealing picture of the justice system in England and Wales.

Presenter: Danny Shaw Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane.

2015102020151025 (R4)

A lasting legacy? Have the sexual abuse revelations blighted Rotherham in the longer-term?

Like other steel communities, Rotherham faces the loss of hundreds of jobs following the recent announcement of redundancies at the local plant. It's the latest blow to a town now synonymous with widespread child grooming. Last year the Jay Report estimated that 1400 young people had been sexually abused there. It said most of the victims were white and most of the perpetrators were Asian men. So what's been the impact on community relations and how far has the scandal affected the local economy? For File on 4, Manveen Rana returns to the town to talk to families, business owners and the authorities to find out whether Rotherham can recover.

Producer: Sally Chesworth.

Like other steel communities, Rotherham faces the loss of hundreds of jobs. It is the latest blow to a town now synonymous with widespread sexual abuse. So can Rotherham recover?

20160112

In the first of a new series, Allan Urry investigates claims by former officers from one of Britain's biggest police forces that they've been the victims of crimes committed by their own colleagues. He hears claims of dirty tricks by a secretive police unit within Greater Manchester Police which some officers say have led to criminal charges against them. Others say they've been unfairly targeted through the internal disciplinary process, with evidence distorted and statements changed.

Are they bad cops with an axe to grind or victims of corrupt practices and institutional cover up?

Producers: Sally Chesworth and Neil Morrow.

20160202

Vaccination has long been one of the greatest weapons in the battle against a range of potentially fatal diseases. Millions of lives have been saved worldwide, and Britain has played a major role in helping to combat new pandemics. But, rarely, things do go wrong and people develop serious side-effects. In the UK, the Government's Vaccine Damage Payment Scheme is supposed to help those left severely disabled as a result. Among those currently arguing their case are the families of children who developed an incurable and devastating sleep disorder after being immunised against swine flu. But, to date, most have received nothing and Ministers have now gone to the Court of Appeal to try and establish a less generous interpretation of the pay-out rules. Lawyers for the families say the whole scheme is outdated and unfit for purpose. Are they right? Jenny Chryss investigates.

Reporter: Jenny Chryss Producer: Ruth Evans.

20160216

Are international conflicts creating tensions between Sunni and Shia Muslims in the UK?

Shabnam Mahmood reports from both Sunni and Shia communities and reveals how divisive messages from the Middle East are fuelling intolerance here.

Organisations which monitor hate crimes say sectarian violence, while low level, is increasing.

One Shia man tells the programme: "It is now becoming quite dangerous. It is an attack on me as a Shia that really scares me."

Mahmood reports from one of an increasing number of unity events being staged across the country to foster good relations. A Sunni imam tells her: "These are dangerous times and the religious leadership need to be seen to be doing things to bring communities together."

So can such work prevent tensions escalating in the face of the sectarian propaganda that's increasingly available online and on satellite television channels?

Producer: Sally Chesworth.

20160223

It's estimated there are around 620,000 people in England with dementia. Prime minister David Cameron says fighting the disease is a personal priority and doctors in England have been encouraged to proactively identify people with early stage dementia.

The PM says that an early diagnosis allows families to prepare for the care of a relative, but others argue there's no treatment for such a diagnosis and no robust evidence to justify a process that might lead to harm. Deborah Cohen hears from doctors who are concerned the drive to raise diagnosis rates is leading to people being misdiagnosed.

The Government has also pledged millions of pounds to help make England "the best place in the world to undertake research into dementia and other neuro-degenerative diseases". Scientists leading the research say they are making progress to find tests which could identify people at risk from the disease and develop a cure. But other researchers say money is being wasted because current directions in drug development are following the same path as those of the past which have ended in failure.

Producer: Paul Grant.

2016030820160313 (R4)

With applications rising, is the UK's asylum process reaching crisis point?

2016031520160320 (R4)

Two months ago a File on 4 investigation into match-fixing in tennis made headlines around the world.

The programme revealed how tennis authorities had received repeated alerts in the past decade about 16 players, all of whom have been in the top 50.

It also questioned the effectiveness of the sport's watchdog, the Tennis Integrity Unit.

Now, in a follow up programme, Simon Cox reveals new allegations of corruption and further evidence of the involvement of gambling syndicates in trying to influence the outcome of matches.

Officials from the governing bodies of tennis have already been interviewed by MPs about the findings of the original programme. They have also appointed a prominent London barrister to head an independent review into anti-corruption policies and practices.

Reporter: Simon Cox Producer: Paul Grant.

Simon Cox reveals more allegations about match-fixing in tennis.

*2008012920080203

As investigations continue into the cause of the blaze at the Royal Marsden, Allan Urry asks whether fire safety standards in Britain's hospitals are good enough.

*2008031820080323

Danny Shaw looks at government proposals to deal with prison overcrowding and asks whether bigger jails will solve the problem.

He reports from Europe's largest prison at Fleury Merogis, near Paris.

*2008052020080525
*2008061720080622

Gerry Northam investigates claims that tens of thousands of elderly dementia sufferers are being given powerful psychiatric drugs which are not only unnecessary but also have potentially lethal side effects.

*20080624
*20080629

Kate Clark investigates efforts to stem the opium trade in Afghanistan, which is said to bankroll the Taliban.

*2008070120080706

Lesley Curwen investigates growing concerns that many blood transfusions are unnecessary and could do more harm than good to patients.

*20080708
*2008091620080921

While Britain's hospitals struggle to contain the spread of MRSA, Jenny Cuffe reports on a new and potentially fatal strain of the bacteria which attacks children and young people in the community.

Experts warn that the death toll will continue to rise unless the government takes decisive action.

*2009012020090125

Julian O'halloran examines Britain's insolvency laws and asks whether weaknesses in regulation and enforcement are being exploited by some company directors to unfairly dispose of debts.

Julian O'halloran examines Britain's insolvency laws.

*2009020320090208

Allan Urry investigates how criminal syndicates have been able to target GPs, hospitals and chemists with cheap counterfeit drugs.

With the NHS under pressure to cut its 11 billion-pound annual spending on medicines, has the hunt for cheaper alternatives opened the door to these dangerous fakes?

*2009030320090308

Julian O'halloran investigates claims that overreaction by schools to minor incidents or unproven allegations is ruining the careers of hundreds of innocent teachers.

As efforts to protect children from abuse or cruelty are intensified, Julian asks if some safety measures have gone too far?

Julian O'halloran asks if school safety measures to protect children have gone too far?

*2009052620090531

Allan Urry investigates more claims of bad behaviour on the part of bankers, and follows the David and Goliath struggle of a group of small business owners who are battling to force one of the high street giants to take responsibility for the decisions that they claim left them in ruins.

Allan Urry investigates more claims of bad behaviour on the part of bankers.

*2009062320090628

The government's flagship policy for public investment, the Private Finance Initiative, has always relied on big loans from banks.

But now, as lenders demand far more for their money, Michael Robinson investigates disturbing increases in the cost of building our schools, hospitals and roads.

In today's economic climate, does PFI represent value for money for hard-pressed taxpayers?

*2009063020090705

With payouts in clinical negligence cases expected to reach a record 700 million pounds in 2010, Miriam O'reilly investigates no-win, no-fee lawyers.

Some of them are allowed to charge up to 800 pounds per hour in bringing claims against the NHS, enabling many law firms to earn substantially more in fees than their clients receive in damages.

Miriam O'reilly investigates the no-win, no-fee lawyers who bring claims against the NHS.

*2009070720090712

Following a series of blunders by the justice authorities, who left a dangerous criminal free to torture and murder two French students in London, Allan Urry asks whether government ministers can still justify their claim that Britain's system of public protection from violent offenders and sex abusers is among the best in the world.

Is Britain's system of public protection from violent offenders still among the best?

*2009071420090719

With an inquiry underway into the mid-air explosion in 2006 aboard a Nimrod aircraft, which killed 14 service personnel, Angus Stickler examines the safety record of the RAF in recent conflicts.

Angus Stickler examines the safety record of the RAF in recent conflicts.

*2009072820090802

As evidence continues to emerge about the CIA's secret detention and interrogation programme, calls grow on this side of the Atlantic for an inquiry into claims that Britain colluded in the torture of suspects.

Stephen Grey investigates the relationship between the US and the UK security services in the hidden War on Terror.

*2009092220090927

As the government's strategy for combating extremism is revised to focus on white racist groups as well as Islamic radicals, Allan Urry assesses the threat of attacks by right-wing extremists and fears that they could lead to a rise in racial tensions.

*2009110320091108

The head of the Financial Services Authority, Lord Turner, has questioned the social usefulness of what banks do.

But as he and other regulators wrestle with ways of controlling so-called 'casino operations', Michael Robinson lifts the lid on the latest tricks of the trade which some banks are now using to increase profits.

Michael Robinson examines the latest tricks which some banks are using to increase profits

*2009111720091122

With record gold prices stimulating demand, Jenny Cuffe reports from the Democratic Republic of Congo on the scale of illegal mining and asks if the industry does enough to ensure that gold supplies aren't being used to fund conflict.

Jenny Cuffe reports from DR Congo on the scale of illegal gold mining.

*2009112420091129

With around 8,000 people waiting for an organ transplant in the UK, hospitals are having to use organs from the elderly, smokers, cancer sufferers and drug abusers.

Gerry Northam examines the dilemmas posed for doctors and assesses the risks to transplant patients.

*2009120120091206

US troops have handed control for security in Iraq back to the Iraqi government, which was supposed to be the first sign that normality was returning to the streets.

So why are thousands of Iraqi refugees still refusing to return home? Kate Clark invesigates.

Kate Clark investigates why thousands of Iraqi refugees are still refusing to return home.

*2010021620100221

After two big scandals in a year over dire standards in hospitals which put patients at serious risk, Julian O'halloran asks how many people are still being killed by avoidable medical blunders, and how far the NHS has progressed since it began to address the problem ten years ago.

Julian O'halloran asks how many people are being killed by avoidable hospital blunders.

*2010030920100314

Five years ago the government promised to provide a safety net for when pension funds went bust, but this new scheme is already more than a billion pounds in deficit.

Fran Abrams investigates allegations that some companies are simply dumping their obligations and leaving the Pensions Protection Fund - and in some cases the taxpayer - to pick up the bill.

Investigating allegations that some companies are failing their pension fund obligations.

*2010032320100328

The government is promising extra help for people out of work during the recession.

But, as Britain braces itself for a rise in unemployment, Allan Urry reports from the communities already hardest hit and asks what redundant steelmakers, public sector workers and others joining the dole queue can really expect at the Jobcentre.

Allan Urry reports from the communities already hardest hit by the rise in unemployment.

* *2008012220080127

Five years after Lord Laming's inquiry into the death of Victoria Climbie, children are still dying at the hands of their parents or carers.

The Laming Report called for a major reform of the way child abuse cases are handled, but how much has changed?

* *2008052720080601

Allan Urry reports from Liverpool.

The city is celebrating its status as European Capital of Culture and its regeneration programme is one of Europe's biggest.

The area should be booming, yet Liverpool City Council is faced with mounting debts and is the subject of scathing reports by government auditors.

* *2008071520080720

Gerry Northam investigates the Colonial Development Corporation, established in 1948 to promote industry and agriculture in the poorest parts of the British Empire.

Rumours of impending privatisation of the agency are circulating, and its critics claim that it is increasingly concerned with making profits rather than relieving poverty.

* *2008092320080928

Allan Urry examines the case for linking animal cruelty with child abuse, amid concerns expressed by organisations such as the RSPCA and the NSPCC that offenders may be more likely to commit both crimes.

* *2009021020090215

Lucy Ash investigates the behind-the-scenes role played by Egypt and its President Hosni Mubarak in the latest crisis in Gaza.

Mubarak may have placed himself at the centre of attempts to end the conflict, but how will he weather the mounting criticism levelled at him both at home and abroad?

The role played by Egypt and its President Hosni Mubarak in the Gaza crisis.

* *2009031720090322

As local authorities struggle to balance the books because of the economic downturn, Allan Urry reports on a crisis in town hall finances.

At a time when councils say that they are being forced to lay off thousands of staff, Allan asks why they have been investing a billion pounds of taxpayers' cash in banks which have crashed, with no sign of recovering the money.

* *2009033120090405

Shari Vahl investigates the extent to which inadequate safeguards to property rights in Britain might be contributing to the theft of millions of pounds, as criminals 'steal' houses from under the noses of homeowners by exploiting the way Land Registry information is made available.

* *2009060920090614

Julian O'halloran investigates claims that industrial-scale pig farms in America played a key role in exposing us to the swine flu virus.

Local people near the first known case in Mexico questioned the role of an American-owned industrial scale pig farm not far away.

Any link was strenuously denied, however, and the US pork industry soon helped persuade medical authorities to drop the term 'swine flu'.

But for years American virologists have been studying the links between new and potentially risky flu viruses and farm animals.

Whatever the role of pig farms in Mexico, experts say that parts of the current flu virus can be traced back to outbreaks of swine flu, then affecting only pigs, in several American states in 1998.

As Julian reports from the USA, the move to highly intensive pig farming methods by some companies has long been denounced by green groups and the animal welfare lobby, who allege massive damage to the environment, intolerable smells, and health risks to farm workers and their families.

Now they are asking if factory farming conditions could have increased the dangers of a global flu pandemic.

Julian O'halloran investigates claims about the causes of the swine flu virus.

* *2009061620090621

Gerry Northam investigates allegations of incompetence and neglect in England's biggest quango, the Learning and Skills Council.

As the recession leads to rocketing unemployment, apprentices and local college students have been hit by a dramatic cash crisis in this government agency, which oversees their training.

Gerry Northam investigates allegations of incompetence in the Learning and Skills Council.

* *2009072120090726

Fraud is estimated to cost the UK economy upwards of 14 billion pounds a year, a figure which is expected to rise dramatically during the recession.

Gerry Northam investigates whether some of the biggest and most audacious corporate fraudsters are now practically immune from prosecution.

* *2009111020091115

Some of Britain's police forces are warning of a funding crisis, with staff cuts, stations closing and parts of the motorway network left unpatrolled.

Allan Urry investigates the effects on the frontline and asks if the police could still do more to deliver better value from the money they get.

Allan Urry investigates the effects of the police force's current funding problems.

* *2010022320100228

CAFCASS, the family courts' advisory service, is again facing claims that it is failing the vulnerable children it is supposed to protect.

Seven years after reporting that the organisation was in crisis, Jenny Cuffe returns to ask why the service is still facing a backlog of urgent cases and unprecedented delays.

Jenny Cuffe asks why CAFCASS, the family courts' advisory service, is facing a backlog.

* *2010030220100307

As ministers decide whether a 12-billion-pound NHS computer project in England offers value for money, Gerry Northam asks if some major IT projects could be scrapped by a new government looking for big spending cuts.

Gerry Northam asks if some major IT projects could be scrapped by a new government.

* *2010031620100321

Around a third of all youngsters who have been abused are victims of other children and young people.

Jackie Long investigates what is done to help young abusers stop offending and asks why so many are slipping through the net.

Jackie Long finds out what is being done to help young abusers stop offending.

* * *2009120820091213

The government's forensic science service is crucial to taclking crime, but is shedding hundreds of jobs and closing half its laboratory facilities in a drive to make the organisation more commercial.

Fran Abrams investigates whether or not the aggressive cost-cutting in beginning to hit the way the service operates and consequently undermine justice.

01/06/201020100606

The UK has some of the highest rates of stillbirths and early neonatal deaths in Europe.

There have been calls for improved care in hospital labour wards and an increase in research efforts to discover why so many apparently perfectly normal babies die.

However there is growing concern that in some hospitals, these deaths are not being properly investigated.

Parents report difficulties in finding out full details of what went wrong.

Shortages of specialist pathologists have meant that crucial post-mortem examinations are never carried out.

And the inquest system is patchy when it comes to discovering the cause of a new born baby's death.

For 'File on 4', Ann Alexander investigates.

Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane.

Ann Alexander asks why the UK has some of the highest rates of stillbirths in Europe.

03/02/200920090208

Allan Urry investigates how criminal syndicates have been able to target GPs, hospitals and chemists with cheap counterfeit drugs.

With the NHS under pressure to cut its 11 billion-pound annual spending on medicines, has the hunt for cheaper alternatives opened the door to these dangerous fakes?

Allan Urry investigates the sale of counterfeit drugs to GPs, hospitals and chemists.

05/07/201120110710

Do the complex financial products banks still offer threaten another meltdown?

05/10/201020101010

The planned withdrawal of British and other foreign troops from Afghanistan relies on the Afghan army and police to take over security duties.

Since 2002, the USA has spent $27bn - over half of its total reconstruction fund - training and equipping Afghan forces.

The aim is to build up an army of 171,600 people and a police force of 134,000 by October 2011.

The Afghan President Hamid Karzai wants national forces to be in complete control of the country by 2014.

But these targets, and the loyalty of some personnel, are called into question by recent killings carried out by members of the Afghan security forces:

*20 July 2010: two US weapons trainers were shot dead by an Afghan soldier

*13 July 2010: three British soldiers were attacked by an Afghan soldier who shot one dead in his bed and fired a rocket-propelled grenade which killed two others

*3 November 2009: three British soldiers and two members of the Royal Military Police were shot dead by an Afghan policeman.

An investigation published in June 2010 by the US Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction found that officials had often overstated the readiness of Afghan forces, rating some units as first class when they were incapable of fighting the Taliban on their own.

It also reported high levels of desertion, corruption and drug abuse.

Gerry Northam asks if the transition to Afghan control is really on track.

Producer: David Lewis Editor: David Ross.

Can Afghan forces guarantee the country's security when British and other troops pull out?

06/07/201020100711

File on 4: Lifting the lid on illegal London - welcome to a world of forged documents and faked identities.

It's believed there are likely to be more than 200,000 illegal migrant workers in the UK's capital city.

But how are they able to survive.

How do they get work? In this special investigation, Jon Manel obtains rare access into the lives of some of London's illegal workers - lives often based on lies and deception.

He discovers that some are now so much part of the system, they even pay tax and national insurance.

He hears of miserable and difficult times spent living in the shadows.

But other illegal workers say they are making a bigger contribution than many who were born here.

"I'm doing a job that most English persons wouldn't do.

I think I've never seen an English person cleaning a toilet".

And he goes to a well known part of London that owes its survival to the workers who shouldn't be here.

Producer: Paul Grant.

Jon Manel lifts the lid on illegal working in London.

07/06/201120110612

Allan Urry investigates claims that Iran has been stepping up its support for terrorism.

08/06/201020100613

As MPs and senior officials retire on 'gold-plated' pensions, the media report that public sector pension schemes are heading for crisis because of multi-billion pound funding deficits.

Local Councils alone are said to face a black hole of £53bn, which critics claim can only be filled by drastic cuts in entitlements and increased contributions from staff.

Both Conservatives and Liberal Democrats are committed to reform of the system.

Unions are planning a campaign to preserve their members' rights and have already secured a significant court victory blocking cuts to redundancy payments.

Gerry Northam looks behind the headlines and asks if there really is a looming pensions crisis.

Producer: Samantha Fenwick.

Is there really a crisis over public sector pensions? Gerry Northam investigates.

12/07/201120110717

Facing massive job cuts, will the Border Agency be able to protect the UK's frontiers?

13/07/201020100718

Britain claims to have one of the most effective arms export control regimes in the world, but Allan Urry investigates how weapons dealers are using the UK to get huge secret consignments to the Middle East and other conflict zones, in defiance of UN Security Council sanctions.

Producer: Gail Champion

Editor: David Ross.

Allan Urry investigates UK connections to the illegal weapons trade in conflict zones.

15/06/201020100620

New research plays down claims of an epidemic of mental illness among soldiers who've served in Afghanistan.

But do the official figures tell the full story? Julian O'halloran investigates and speaks to veterans who warn of a huge hidden problem and a culture that still pressurises soldiers to get on with the job rather than seek help.

And he reports from The Netherlands on efforts there to discover the extent of the psychological damage their military personnel may be suffering.

Producer Sally Chesworth.

Is there a hidden epidemic of mental illness among soldiers who've served in Afghanistan?

19/07/201120110724

Allan Urry examines claims of a crisis in hospital accident and emergency services.

22/06/201020100627

Described as the modern-day face of slavery, scores of foreign workers are being brought into the UK to work in domestic servitude.

They work long hours - often under physical duress and for low or non-existent pay.

File on 4 investigates whether the authorities are doing enough to protect these workers - and to prosecute the people who've exploited them.

Reporter: Jenny Cuffe

Producer: Nicola Dowling.

Investigating the plight of foreign workers in the UK working in domestic servitude.

27/07/201020100801

A special court system is supposed to protect the interests of the vulnerable and the elderly.

It's appointed thousands of 'deputies' - or guardians - to ensure their money is properly managed.

The system was reformed three years ago - but have the changes worked?

There have been allegations the system is slow, bureaucratic and open to abuse.

In some cases lawyers are appointed to oversee people's financial arrangements - and families claim they charge excessive fees.

In other cases, it's a relative who's appointed as a deputy - but are there adequate safeguards to ensure they're not misappropriating the money? Fran Abrams investigates cases where the system has left some vulnerable people worse off.

Producer: Samantha Fenwick.

How well does the Court of Protection safeguard the finances of the old and vulnerable?

28/06/201120110703

Why the UK's elderly care sector is facing a financial crisis.

29/06/201020100704

Is Britain's economic recovery going to be stifled by banks not offering sufficient finance to small and medium size companies?

Firms are concerned that although the banks say they are open for business the reality of the terms, conditions and fees make it unrealistic for them to apply for finance.

In frustration, some businesses have turned to foreign banks to make finance available to them.

And at a time when hi-tech businesses are seen as a source of future growth for the British economy, companies complain that banks are assessing loan applications using traditional business criteria which offer little support to this sector.

As the part state owned banks fail to meet lending targets set by the previous administration, the new Business Secretary Vince Cable says he is determined to address this.

But in the current climate how much more financial help can British business really expect?

For 'File on 4', Morland Sanders investigates.

Producer Ian Muir-Cochrane.

Is economic recovery at risk as banks are failing to lend? Morland Sanders investigates.

911 Lawsuits2003100720031012
A Bridge Too Far?2012032020120325

To the west of Edinburgh, construction of the new £1.5bn Forth road bridge will use cement shipped across the North Sea under a contract with a German supplier. Scotland's only cement company, based 40 miles from the bridge, was unsuccessful in the bidding. It is claimed that the deal could have maintained 130 jobs in the Dunbar area.

£790m worth of steel for the bridge will also come from abroad. A plant near Motherwell lost out as part of a consortium bidding for the work. It says the contract could have secured hundreds of local jobs.

Officials insist that they have to follow EU rules which state that any company across the single market can bid for public contracts. But analysts complain that UK authorities interpret these rules more narrowly than their European counterparts, to the detriment of British firms. French public spending goes outside France at only half the rate that British contracts go abroad.

With the economy struggling, the Government has pledged support for British business but accepts that public projects are too often awarded in a way that disadvantages domestic companies. So can it take action to support UK jobs without being accused of protectionism?

Reporter: Gerry Northam

Producer: Gail Champion.

Why do so many British public sector contracts go to foreign companies?

A Deadly Dilemma2014070120140706

In many parts of the world, charities are trying to deliver much-needed aid to desperate people living in areas controlled by militant groups. What do they do when counter-terrorism laws ban them from contact with those de facto authorities?

Risk of prosecution has now created a climate of fear in many aid agencies - and the UN wants counter-terrorism policies redrawn to ensure lives can be saved without charity workers risking jail.

Tim Whewell reports from Gaza - and talks to aid workers operating in Syria, Somalia and other places - on the practical and moral dilemmas involved.

Producer: Paul Grant.

A Healthy Market?2013111220131117

The biggest ever slice of the NHS is up for grabs in Cambridgeshire. Ten bidders, including NHS hospital trusts and private companies Serco, Virgin Care and Circle, are competing for a five year contract to run older peoples' services. It will be worth a minimum of £700,000. The successful bidder will provide everything from podiatry and occupational therapy to dementia treatment and end of life care. The stakes are high. But how much will patients be told about how the bid was won? With commissioners advertising dozens of other big money tenders, File on 4 looks at the secrecy surrounding NHS contracts when they're awarded and when they're challenged. Does commercial confidentiality make public accountability impossible? And how far does the competitive market improve healthcare for patients?

Reporter Jane Deith

Producer Ian Muir-Cochrane.

What do we know about the deals struck with private companies to run parts of the NHS?

The biggest ever slice of the NHS is up for grabs in Cambridgeshire. Ten bidders, including NHS hospital trusts and private companies Serco, Virgin Care and Circle, are competing for a five year contract to run older peoples' services. It will be worth a minimum of £700,000. The successful bidder will provide everything from dentistry, to emergency hospital treatment and end of life care. The stakes are high. But how much will patients be told about how the bid was won? With commissioners advertising dozens of other big money tenders, File on 4 looks at the secrecy surrounding NHS contracts when they're awarded and when they're challenged. Does commercial confidentiality make public accountability impossible? And how far does the competitive market improve healthcare for patients?

A Living Death2011062120110626

A review into the care of patients in vegetative or low awareness states has been launched by the Royal College of Physicians.

There are thought to be as many as 5000 such people in the UK.

The working party will look at concerns that assessment and diagnosis of patients is not consistent across the country and will ask whether the cost of long term care is affordable to the NHS.

Ann Alexander examines calls for a reform of the process to end the life of such patients where their families believe their loved one would no longer wish to be alive.

The programme reveals how some hospitals appear unaware of the law and hears how the process can be lengthy and costly, putting families under further strain.

Producer: Paul Grant.

Should it be made simpler to end the life of patients in a vegetative state?

A Pensions Patchwork2015031020150315 (R4)

In Canada, everything is big - including powerful pension funds such as the Ontario Teachers fund which owns half of Birmingham airport and other large projects around the world. It's all a far cry from the British pension scene, where a hundred local government pension funds each run their own affairs separately and pay costly fees to City firms for investment advice.

Many of them still have financial deficits. Taxpayers have been forced to pick up bills to pay off those shortfalls and already hard-pressed local services have been stretched further.

Lesley Curwen investigates how these individual funds are run and asks whether we should have larger funds with cheaper costs - like Canada does. And she asks whether more councils should be using pension money to invest in housing and infrastructure as a way to boost their local economies?

Producer: Anna Meisel Reporter: Lesley Curwen.

A Place Of Safety?2013073020130804

Psychiatric hospitals have a duty to keep their patients safe, which means taking extra care with patients suffering acute depression who may be at risk of self-harm.

So campaigners argue that when a patient commits suicide, it is vital that a thorough investigation should discover any failings by doctors and nurses and any weaknesses in hospital systems of communication or levels of staffing.

But, unlike deaths in prison or police custody, fatalities in psychiatric units are not reviewed from the start by a fully independent investigator. Initial reports are usually prepared by staff of the NHS and kept confidential to the health officials and family concerned. Only at the subsequent inquest does an independent inquiry take over.

Critics call this 'a recipe for cover-up by the NHS'.

File on 4 reports on a series of suicides in one psychiatric unit which have led the local coroner to accuse the NHS of 'a catalogue of failures stemming from an institutional complacency'.

Reporter - Gerry Northam

Producer - Gail Champion.

A Taxing Dilemma2010102620101031

While the government axes public spending to try to cut the deficit, Michael Robinson investigates loopholes which let big businesses slash their UK tax bills.

This month George Osborne said he plans to make Britain the most attractive corporate tax regime in the G20.

But some companies have already moved abroad for tax reasons.

And for others able to operate on a global scale, there are many ways for them to reduce their tax liability.

So how does the Government square the tax circle?

Producer: Gail Champion.

Michael Robinson reveals loopholes which let big businesses slash their UK tax bills.

A Terminal Failure2008042920080504

Julian O'halloran investigates the events surrounding the fiasco of the opening of Terminal 5 at Heathrow.

He examines the record of BAA, the company running several of Britain's busiest airports.

Abandoned To Their Fate2015060220150607 (R4)

Next month the National Audit Office is due to report on the outcomes for young people leaving care. There are claims that, under financial pressure, local authorities are pushing too many teenagers into independent living before they're ready. File on 4 investigates new figures that suggest many young care leavers are failing to cope - with large numbers ending up in custody, homeless, sexually exploited or pregnant. Social services chiefs say the welfare of care-leavers must be a key priority for the new government. But who holds them to account when they fail those they are meant to have looked after? And, with more cuts on the way, can the system cope? Fran Abrams reveals how hands-off caring can have tragic consequences.

Abuse In Sport2012071020120715

It was the Paul Hickson scandal in the mid 90s which first brought the issue of sexual abuse in sport to the public eye. The Olympic swimming coach was jailed for 17 years for raping and sexually abusing young girls he trained. The case led to the setting up of the Child Protection in Sport Unit and the introduction of safeguarding measures in most sports.

But, more than a decade on, the problem hasn't gone away and this edition of File on 4 reveals new figures which show how many allegations of sexual and physical abuse were made across most major sports last year.

The programme also examines concerns about the way information about coaches who have disciplined or banned, is shared with parents and other sports bodies, primarily because of data protection laws. It reveals how some coaches accused of sexual misconduct are able to move between sporting organisations and carry on coaching

Reporter Chris Buckler also hears calls from families and child welfare charities for a change in the law to make it illegal for coaches to have a sex with athletes aged 16 or 17 which would bring them in line with teachers and others who have close contact with young people

Presenter: Chris Buckler

Producer: Paul Grant.

Abused But Not Heard2014091620140921

Victims of sexual abuse at Knowl View school in Rochdale tell their side of the story.

Knowl View special school for boys has become infamous as the haunt of Cyril Smith. Prosecutors now say 'Mr Rochdale' should have been charged with abuse of boys while he was alive. But he was not the only one. In the first of a new series, former pupils in the 1970s, 80s and 90s tell File on 4 how a web of abusers, including local paedophiles and other pupils preyed on boys as young as eight while people supposed to protect them looked the other way. Previous police investigations came to nothing. A new probe is underway, focusing on who could be guilty of a criminal cover up. But what became of the innocent? Jane Deith hears from some of those who experienced life in Knowl View. Telling their stories for the first time, they describe childhoods twisted by sexual abuse. Now questions are being asked about whether the failure to end the abuse at Knowl View led to a culture in which the subsequent grooming of young girls in Rochdale was allowed to happen. Alan Collins, a specialist child abuse lawyer representing some of the men who're suing Rochdale Council over abuse at Know View, believes things would have been different had Cyril Smith been prosecuted and convicted: "That would have sent a clear message through Rochdale and much further afield that there was clearly a problem and that problem would not have been so easy to brush away. I think that had a very long tail and that that tail continued right up until recent times."

Reporter: Jane Deith

Producer: Sally Chesworth.

Afghanistan Elections2004062920040704

As the US and Britain hand over power to a new administration in Iraq, Jenny Cuffe reports from Afghanistan on the attempts at nation-building there.

Elections are due in September, but with President Karzai's Government still deeply unpopular, and with the Taliban resurgent in the south, is Afghanistan really on the road back to democracy?

After The Floods - A Tale Of Two Cities20160209

The Dutch city of Nijmegen has much in common with the English city of York. Similar in size, both are much visited by tourists because of their histories and architecture. But both also have rivers running through them and are susceptible to flooding. So how do their defences compare? And, as York and other communities continue to mop up the damage caused by the latest catastrophic flooding, did basic mistakes and a failure of planning make a bad situation very much worse?

Reporter: Allan Urry Producer: Rob Cave.

Air Crashes2011040520110410

The investigation following an air disaster is supposed to make air travel safer.

But do the reports always get to the truth about why planes crash? Emma Jane Kirby examines claims that international air accident investigations are often slow, incompetent and influenced by political sensitivities.

So how does this affect the victims' families as they fight manufacturers and airlines for compensation? And could the blame game be preventing lessons being learned that could prevent future accidents?

Producer Jenny Chryss.

When a plane crashes, does the investigation always get to the real reasons?

Airport Woes2011022220110227
Alcohol Fraud2012100920121014

A criminal gang was recently jailed for one of the biggest ever alcohol smuggling rackets in the UK. It's become big business for organised crime according to HMRC, with tax losses in unpaid duty as high as £1.2 billion per year. MP's are demanding tougher action. But these are highly complex frauds, which take years to investigate. Allan Urry examines the scale of the challenge facing the authorities, and reveals the extent to which criminals have penetrated the legitimate market in beer, wine and spirits

Presenter: Allan Urry

Producer: Paul Grant.

Alcohol smuggling is costing more than a billion pounds in lost taxes. Allan Urry reports.

An Inside Job20151110
An Inside Job?2011110120111106

The Justice Secretary Ken Clarke wants more jobs for convicts.

He told his party conference: "If we want prison to work, then our prisoners have got to be working".

He encourages private companies to open workshops inside prisons, where inmates would be 'properly paid' for hard work, would pay their due of taxes and help fund victims' support.

Mr Clarke points to a metal factory in a Merseyside prison where prisoners work a 40 hour week and learn skills which could make them more employable on release.

He argues that this will also make then less likely to return to crime.

But is this plan practicable?

Prison Governors say that two-thirds of their inmates were unemployed before they started their sentences and that they are generally reluctant to engage in meaningful work.

They say many of them can hardly read and write.

Governors also fear that moving jobs inside prison would mean taking opportunities away from law-abiding job-seekers outside.

And they complain that it would prove costly in terms of staff time.

One prison reform group which set up a pioneering graphic design studio inside prison says the project was popular and effective among prisoners but was forced to close following hostility and obstruction from officers.

Gerry Northam asks if the government is overstating the possible advantages of its policy, and investigates whether it can be made to succeed at a time when the Ministry of Justice faces funding cuts.

Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane.

Should more prisoners be made to work? And are government plans to make them realistic?

The Justice Secretary Ken Clarke wants more jobs for convicts. He told his party conference: "If we want prison to work, then our prisoners have got to be working". He encourages private companies to open workshops inside prisons, where inmates would be 'properly paid' for hard work, would pay their due of taxes and help fund victims' support.

Mr Clarke points to a metal factory in a Merseyside prison where prisoners work a 40 hour week and learn skills which could make them more employable on release. He argues that this will also make then less likely to return to crime.

Prison Governors say that two-thirds of their inmates were unemployed before they started their sentences and that they are generally reluctant to engage in meaningful work. They say many of them can hardly read and write.

Governors also fear that moving jobs inside prison would mean taking opportunities away from law-abiding job-seekers outside. And they complain that it would prove costly in terms of staff time.

Asset Returns2012070320120708

Are stolen Arab billions still locked in British banks? Jenny Cuffe reports.

The Arab world's newest governments are desperate to retrieve billions banked in Britain by despots including Libya's Muammar Gaddafi and Hosni Mubarak of Egypt.

The money, they say, was stolen from their people and is needed to rebuild shattered economies.

In 'File on 4' Jenny Cuffe reports on the Arab nations' mounting impatience at the lengthy and costly process of investigation demanded to prove that assets were illicitly obtained by the now deposed leaders, their families and associates.

Already Egypt has gone to court to demand more information from the British Treasury about where their lost billions are stashed.

And campaigners in Tunisia - the first of the Arab Spring nations - complain Britain is dragging its feet. They contrast slow progress in London with a more helpful response from the country once renowned as the most impenetrable of banking fortresses: Switzerland.

Producer: Andy Denwood

Presenter: Jenny Cuffe

Asylum Seekers2003070120030706

With the Government promising to reduce the number of asylum seekers in Britain, Julian O'halloran examines progress so far.

Will the Prime Minister be able to deliver on his personal pledge to cut applications by fifty per cent by September? / "Can the government keep its promise to reduce the number of asylum seekers in Britain? Julian Halloran investigates.

".

Asylum Seekers2015021020150215 (R4)

Around 28 thousand people are claiming asylum in the UK. They're accommodated in some of the nation's most deprived areas while their cases are considered. Now, with numbers on the rise, some communities say they're struggling to cope. Allan Urry reports from the Northwest of England where, in some areas, there's concern about growing pressures on health services and schools. In Liverpool the City's Mayor, Joe Anderson, talks of an asylum "apartheid" and says other towns and cities need to take a fairer share. In Rochdale in Greater Manchester, there are more asylum seekers than the whole of the south east of England. The local MP Simon Danczuk says he's worried the pressures could undermine the good community relations that have always existed in the town.

Recent stories of asylum seekers living in fancy hotels have led to outraged newspaper headlines but are they a symptom of bigger failings in the UK's system for housing those who come here seeking refuge?

Reporter: Allan Urry

Producer: Matt Precey.

Around 25 thousand people a year claim asylum in the UK. They're accommodated in some of the nation's most deprived areas while their cases are considered. Now, with numbers on the rise, some communities say they're struggling to cope. Allan Urry reports from Greater Manchester - which has more asylum seekers than the whole of the south east of England - on the pressures that the latest arrivals pose for local health services and schools. And he investigates conditions for those claiming refuge. Stories of asylum seekers living in fancy hotels have led to outraged newspaper headlines but are they a symptom of bigger failings in a system marked by sub-standard housing and long backlogs in dealing with cases?

Bad Solicitors2004062220040627

For years, trying to complain about bad solicitors has been fraught with difficulty.

As the Law Society's ability to control its members is yet again under scrutiny, Fran Abrams investigates growing concern over the extent of malpractice in the profession.

Bent Cops20110208
Bent Cops20110208

Are police doing enough to tackle corruption in their ranks? Following a number of high profile trials in which officers have been jailed, Allan Urry investigates the crimes they committed and asks if more could have been done to stop them. A constable given a life sentence earlier this month for a series of sex attacks on vulnerable women he met while on duty, had previously been put on trial for rape, during his time in the army. Why didn't the police service know this when they agreed to employ him?

How was a police sergeant able to live a double life as a respected bobby and as the leader of a ruthless underworld crime gang, dealing drugs, laundering money, and intimidating witnesses?

Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane.

Bent Cops2011021320110215
Biosecurity2012020720120212

Dutch and American scientists have succeeded in mutating a deadly bird-flu virus to make it easily transmissible to humans. If it got out, it could start a fatal epidemic. They keep it securely locked away in their laboratories, but want to publish the biological recipe for making it. In an unprecedented move, the U.S. government is pressing them to keep the details of their experiments secret for fear that bio-terrorists could use the organism to kill hundreds of millions of people.

At the same time, a rapidly developing branch of science known as 'synthetic biology' offers dramatic possibilities for developing new vaccines and targeting many lethal diseases. But does it also increase the risk that newly-created organisms could be used for harmful purposes as the necessary research techniques spread out from authorised laboratories to a network of DIY enthusiasts?

Could genetic mutation of pathogens become as commonplace as home-brewing? And how well protected is the UK against biological threats?

Reporter : Gerry Northam

Producer : Nicola Dowling

Editor : David Ross.

As scientists alter viruses to make potentially deadly mutations, is the public at risk?

Bitter Medicine2011011820110123

Legal aid has been withdrawn from a long-running case against a pharmaceutical giant.

Children born with severe disabilities, including spina bifida, were suing the manufacturer of an anti-epilepsy drug which their mothers took during pregnancy and which they blame for causing birth defects - a claim the company denies.

After years of legal proceedings which the claimants' solicitors say have so far cost £3.25m, the Legal Services Commision refused a much smaller sum to take the case to trial, just weeks before hearings were due to start.

As a result, more than a hundred claimants are left with no chance of their day in court.

Their case was not deemed strong enough to pass the standard test which requires them to prove that the drug doubled (at least) the risk of harm.

This test is called into question by experts in cases against pharmaceutical companies in Britain and the USA.

A lower level of proof is needed in American courts.

The government has announced that future patients in England and Wales alleging clinical negligence or personal injury can expect to have their applications for legal aid refused under its programme of spending cuts.

No such change of policy is planned in Scotland.

A case is proceeding there with support from legal aid by a patient who took another drug, for relieving arthritis, which is blamed for increasing the risk of heart attacks and strokes - again this is denied by the company concerned.

Patients in England and Wales who took the same drug and suffered heart attacks have been turned down for legal aid funding and have shelved their cases.

Will government cuts effectively put wealthy pharmaceutical companies beyond challenge in the civil courts?

Reporter: Gerry Northam

Producer: Gail Champion.

Is the government making it almost impossible to sue a drug company?

Blacklisted Airlines2004020320040208

An airliner which crashed into the Red Sea at the start of this year, killing all on board, had already been blacklisted by Swiss safety authorities.

Julian O'halloran investigates.

Blackouts2003102120031026

Increasing strains on an old system have already caused one blackout in London.

Are we headed for a winter of power cuts? Julian O'halloran investigates.

Border Security: All At Sea?2014093020141005 (R4)

How well are Britain's borders patrolled and defended at a time when the authorities are battling to stem the flow of illegal immigrants coming across the Channel and tightening national security because of fears of a terrorist attack by extremists returning from fighting in Syria and Iraq?

Allan Urry assesses the vulnerability of our ports, struggling with cuts to Border Force personnel and problems with a computer system that was supposed to have identified all those coming into and going out of the UK. The programme reveals how security checks on cargo are being compromised and hears concern about the gaps in surveillance of our coastline.

Producer: Emma Forde

Reporter: Allan Urry.

Britain In Flood2013022620130303

Has the Government done enough to protect communities from flooding? Were cuts in river maintenance work responsible for farmers land in Somerset being underwater for months? Why are planners allowing developers to continue to build on floodplains? A committee of MPs accuses the Coalition of being woefully slow to bring in measures to combat the problem. Allan Urry investigates.

Producer Nicola Dowling.

Britain's Plutonium Mountain2013021920130224

The Government is currently deciding what to do with the UK's civilian plutonium stockpile - the largest in the world. Some are concerned that it could become the target of terrorists intent on making a dirty bomb.

The stockpile has come from nuclear waste that was reprocessed to extract plutonium which was to have been used to power a new generation of fast breeder reactors. But that project failed to be finished and now just over 100 tonnes of it is being stored at Sellafield in Cumbria. The stockpile grew even more when the UK received imports from Japan and Germany which it had hoped to convert into fuel - again this project has failed to deliver.

The Government is considering a number of options.

Convert the plutonium into mixed oxide (Mox) fuel and then burn the fuel in conventional, nuclear reactors. This would involve the construction of a second Mox fuel plant at Sellafield despite the fact the first plant failed to produce any significant amount of Mox and was closed in 2011.

Burn the plutonium in a new breed of Prism fast reactors. But critics say the technology is not proven and therefore risky.

Treat it as a deadly waste product and bury the plutonium currently stored at Sellafield deep underground for thousands of years. Again critics say burying waste is risky and even then the plutonium would have to be treated before it could go into the facility. Supporters of plutonium as fuel still claim that would be throwing away a potentially valuable asset. On top of that we are not likely to have a repository for decades and very few local authorities have volunteered to consider having it in their back yard.

Rob Broomby investigates the difficult questions facing the Government whose decision will potentially bring in a bill for the taxpayer of billions of pounds.

And how much of gamble will it be choosing what to do with this most deadly of substances?

Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane.

The Government is currently deciding what to do with the UK's civilian plutonium stockpile - the largest in world. Some are concerned that it could become the target of terrorists intent on making a dirty bomb.

Bungled Autopsies2002100120021006

Fran Abrams investigates a crisis in the forensic pathology service, asking if innocent people are being convicted because of bungled autopsies.

Business And Football2003110420031109

As increasing numbers of football clubs hit the financial buffers and slide into administration, Jenny Cuffe examines the realities of 'the beautiful game' for sides which play outside the lucrative Premiership.

Have those who run soccer done enough to referee the tensions between business and sport?

Cafcass2003070820030713

"Jenny Cuffe investigates claims of a crisis in the children's court service, CAFCASS, and asks if poor management and financial constraints are putting the lives of children at risk.

Care Homes: When An Inspector Calls2010112320101128

A new law regulating care homes in England came into force last month.

All homes must be registered and ensure they meet certain standards of quality and safety.

The regulator - the Care Quality Commission - is promising to monitor homes and take action against those who fail to meet standards.

But unions say the numbers of inspectors has been cut.

They are warning of fewer inspections and say staff are so overstretched they could miss vital warning signs of abuse or neglect.

Worried relatives say they feel their concerns are not being heard.

Frans Abrams asks whether the elderly in care homes are being adequately protected.

Is enough being done to protect the elderly in care homes? Fran Abrams investigates.

Fran Abrams asks whether the elderly in care homes are being adequately protected.

Producer: Paul Grant.

Carers In Conflict2012012420120129

Jenny Cuffe talks to foster parents who find themselves battling with local authorities over the children in their care. They describe a Kafkaesque nightmare where doors are shut, telephone calls and emails unanswered, even court orders are ignored. Meanwhile, vulnerable children are treated as pawns as social workers move them from one place to another.

In one case investigated by File on 4, foster parents who offered to care for four siblings were denied the financial and practical support they needed from the council. Their official complaints were upheld yet key recommendations continued to be ignored and, as a consequence, the children have now been split up. After giving up their jobs to care for the children, the couple are now in debt and have to sell their home. The local MP describes the council's treatment of the family as outrageous. He says the case is extreme but not unusual and he's called for an enquiry.

In another case, a teenager with complex mental and physical needs was unlawfully removed from the foster home where he'd grown up. His sister told File on 4: "When he was in his foster mum's care he was always clean, always happy and he looked well but when I saw him he was dishevelled. It was as if someone took him away from himself. I felt his personality had gone." When his foster mother went to court to get him back, she was vilified by the council who used public funds to defend their actions to the bitter end but lost in court.

A recent report identified a shortage of foster carers in the UK but are some councils driving away the people who should be their best resource?

Producer: Sally Chesworth.

File on 4 investigates claims of bullying and abuse of power by social services.

Cash From The Crisis2011102520111030

World leaders preparing for the G20 conference are facing a threat to the global economy from the on-going Eurozone sovereign debt crisis.

But as they try to avert further economic catastrophe some investors see opportunities to profit from the mayhem.

Michael Robinson reveals how on-going economic volatility and uncertainty can also present golden investment opportunities - and how, through complex trades, bets and investments, some find cash in the current crisis.

Producer: Gail Champion

Reporter: Michael Robinson

Editor: David Ross.

How investors are profiting from the Eurozone crisis.

Can money be made from disaster?

Charities - Giving And Taking2010110920101114

Under the Prime Minister's project for The Big Society, the coalition government wants charities to have much greater involvement in the running of public services.

At the same time, substantial cuts are expected in official regulators which check that charities are competent and honest.

Recent financial scandals have shown the vulnerability of even the most prestigious organisations to systematic fraud.

The Charity Commission admits that a quarter of charities fail to file their accounts on time, covering a combined annual income of £6 billion.

The Commission also says that in future allegations of fraud may no longer be automatically investigated.

Meanwhile, other national charities are facing rebellions from lifelong local supporters over planned reorganisations designed to win huge public contracts.

Gerry Northam asks if we can be confident that charities are fit and honest enough to take responsibility from the public sector.

Producer: Sally Chesworth.

Can charities be trusted to run public services well and honestly? Gerry Northam reports.

Chemical Weapons2014010720140112

As a complex operation continues to destroy the remainder of Syria's chemical weapons stockpile, how much will we ever know about the supply routes through which the Assad regime acquired the basic ingredients for its arsenal? Vast quantities of chemicals are traded around the world every day, so what chance do we have of controlling their use by rogue states and terrorists? In the first of a new series, Allan Urry reports from the headquarters of the OPCW - the organisation set up to stop the spread of chemical warfare and which is overseeing the removal and destruction of the Syrian weapons. He also investigates the efforts of terrorist groups including Al Qaeda and al Shabab to develop nerve agents of their own; and examines the global attempts to limit the availability of "dual use" chemicals which are essential in the manufacture of every day products from fertilisers to toothpaste but which can also be turned into powerful explosives for use in IEDs and other bombs.

Producer: Paul Grant.

Child Support Agency2004101220041017

Jenny Cuffe investigates the Child Support Agency, 10 years old and still failing many of Britain's most vulnerable households.

Children Expelled From School2003071520030720

Fran Abrams reports on the fate of children expelled from school.

The Government insists that they must receive alternative full-time education, but many do not.

Coal Comfort?2013072320130728

The amount of coal burned in Britain's power stations rocketed in 2012 with ministers relying on the fuel to help keep the lights on in the next few years.

But coal mining in Britain is now in deep trouble.

Two of the UK's major mining firms have collapsed and a third is in trouble following a huge underground fire in February.

The fire was at Daw Mill in Warwickshire, one of the few remaining deep mines in the UK.

Coming on the back of competition from cheap coal from abroad, the costly fire plunged mine operators UK Coal into financial crisis and has put the pensions of workers at serious risk.

As the government negotiates to try to help pick up the pieces Julian O'Halloran discovers UK Coal's problems come on top of heavy penalties imposed in recent years by safety regulators over fatal accidents underground.

Meanwhile the collapse of two key operators in Scotland has left a trail of unrestored opencast sites which local people say are blighting their areas. They blame national and local government for failing to force the mining companies to clear up their mess.

So what does the future hold for the industry, the miners and local communities. And at what cost to the taxpayer?

Producer: Nicola Dowling.

Continuing Healthcare: The Secret Fund2014111820141123 (R4)

Care Crisis: Can the NHS afford long-term community nursing care for the old and the sick?

Is demand for long term nursing about to tip NHS finances over the edge?

Under the system of "Continuing Healthcare" people with complex medical needs can claim the costs of nursing and medical help to keep them out of hospital. But the system has become mired in controversy with many people claiming they've been denied funding to which they are entitled.

Now there's a deluge of backdated claims against Clinical Commissioning Groups.

File on 4 finds the backlog is creating long delays in new assessments of patients.

And it hears claims the assessments themselves are a postcode lottery, with the chances of being deemed eligible varying wildly between GP commissioning groups.

The programme also hears evidence of NHS commissioners and councils fighting each other not to take responsibility for patients.

Patients and their families are going to the health ombudsman in their hundreds.

18 clinical commissioning groups are already going to end the year in the red, with some threatened with being put in special measures over their finances. Now they owe millions of pounds in backdated claims, plus interest.

Is this creating an incentive to squeeze spending on continuing care? GP commissioners are about to be asked to put £1.9 billion into the pot for new joined-up health and social care services. Do they have the money, or the will, to buy into joined-up care?

Reporter: Jane Deith Producer: Nicola Dowling.

Coroners Under Scrutiny2011111520111120

Are families getting justice in the coroner's court?

Ann Alexander investigates concerns about the conduct of inquests in England and Wales and asks why there is so much variation in behaviour of coroners and the rigour of their investigations.

Under the current system, it is up to the coroner what evidence he or she relies on, but this can leave families unhappy at the verdict and with little hope of appeal.

The Coroners and Justice Act 2009 included long awaited reforms to the coronial system.

At its centre was the role of Chief Coroner, but the coalition Government said the post was unaffordable and want it scrapped.

So are Ministers missing a chance to ensure judicial oversight, enforce national standards and increase accountability?

Presenter: Ann Alexander

Producer: Paul Grant.

Are families getting justice in the coroner's court? Ann Alexander investigates.

Costing The Games2011110820111113

With plans for future use of London's Olympic stadium in disarray, Allan Urry asks whether taxpayers' billions will leave a lasting legacy from 2012.

London's successful bid to stage the 2012 Olympics placed great emphasis on the benefits it could create for Britain and its capital city.

Not only should the Games bequeath impressive new sporting facilities to the people of London, but the event and its aftermath was expected to kick-start economic development in the East End -- still one of the least prosperous parts of the country.

Has the forward planning paid off? Controversy and confusion still shrouds the future ownership and operation of London's Olympic stadium.

Despite bids from rival football clubs, the stadium remains in public ownership.

The Olympic village meanwhile has been sold to developers at a loss to taxpayers, and some critics claim a major opportunity to embed a new science and technology research centre on the Olympic park has been squandered.

With mounting pressure on Games organisers and Government to recoup the taxpayers' investment in the Olympics, many Londoners fear that the early promises of economic regeneration for the East End will fail to materialise.

Reporter: Allan Urry

Producer: Andy Denwood.

Will Britain's Olympic billions buy a lasting legacy for taxpayers?

Council Asset Sales2013061820130623

Local authorities across the UK are facing tough decisions as they try to balance their books in the face of unprecedented funding cuts - with many opting to sell land and buildings to reduce spending and bring in much needed capital.

But, one person's white elephant is another's much loved local facility, so the choice of what goes on the market often causes great public resentment.

Jenny Chryss visits four local authorities where announcements about asset sales have caused serious questions to be asked. She finds allegations of decisions taken behind closed doors, sums that don't stack up and property that could end up being mothballed for years to come.

So are councils getting value for money for their tax payers? Or are they out of their depth when they negotiate with the private sector, especially in one of the harshest property markets for years?

And with a major shift in the way councils are audited, is there a danger that mistakes could go unnoticed and unchallenged?

Producer: Rob Cave.

Counterfeit Drugs2004100520041010

There's been an explosion in counterfeit and substandard pharmaceutical drugs which kill thousands in developing countries.

But are the drug companies doing enough to combat it - and why is there so little international regulation of the global market in vital medicines?

With Allan Urry.

Court Martials2005030120050306

Fran Abrams investigates what happens when members of the armed forces are accused of crimes.

Many are sceptical of Britain's court martial system which dates back over 300 years.

Many are sceptical of Britain's courts martial system, which dates back over 300 years.

Credit Rating Agencies2012022820120304

Their judgments send markets into freefall. It is alleged that their mistakes led to the Enron collapse and the 2008 financial crisis. They are the credit rating agencies. Who exactly are they and what exactly do they do?

Is this exploration of the complex world of the "Big Three" rating agencies, BBC Chief Economics Correspondent Hugh Pym takes listeners behind the scenes of the world economy. Through revealing interviews with insiders and former analysts at Standard and Poor's (S&P), Moody's and Fitch, along with leading investors and bankers, Hugh tells the story of the world's ongoing financial woes from a new perspective and ask if anything has really changed. S&P managing director John Chambers explains why governments listen to what his company says.

In Italy the agencies - rarely heard about until recently - have suddenly been subject to police raids and front page headlines. Italy, like many European nations, is unhappy about its recent downgrade and campaigner Elio Lannutti is on a mission to break the power of the rating agencies. But is there any truth in the idea that they're acting politically in their judgements on the Eurozone?

Real concern about the "Big Three" began following the collapse, in 2001-2003, of several major multinationals, including Parmalat, dubbed Europe's Enron. Ordinary people who lost money know only too well what it means when the rating agencies get it wrong. When mortgage-backed securities began going bad in 2007, alarm bells rang again. Why had financial products riddled with bad debt been given Triple A ratings?

So is there any way of breaking the "Big Three's" grip on power - or are they an inevitable fact of life in a global financial landscape?

Producer: Lucy Proctor.

Do credit rating agencies threaten our financial stability? Hugh Pym investigates.

Cut-price Care2014020420140209

Ministers have promised a new focus on home care for the elderly and disabled amid concern that 15-minute calls and a low-paid, underskilled workforce are leaving vulnerable people at risk.

From this Spring, inspectors will ask how councils' commissioning practices are affecting the daily lives of those they care for. But with authorities under pressure simultaneously to cut costs, will quality continue to suffer?

Fears have been mounting about whether the basic needs of vulnerable people are being met. The government's human rights watchdog has been pressing the issue, along with tax officials who say many companies are breaching minimum wage legislation.

This week File on 4 reports on the results of its own survey of local authorities in England. Have councils increased spending to keep pace with inflation in the past few years, or have they actually driven down costs? And are they providing even the most basic level of resources that social service chiefs say are needed to keep those in their care safe and well?

Reporter: Fran Abrams

Producer: Emma Forde.

Cyber Spies2011092020110925

The criminal exploitation of the internet poses one of the biggest threats to UK national security.

As organised crime gangs and terrorists use it to communicate and plan their activities, the police and security agencies are turning to hacking to conduct surveillance and gather intelligence.

In the first of a new series, File on 4 looks at the covert techniques being used to get beyond the firewall of a suspect's PC.

But are the tactics legal? One leading expert says the rules governing interception are inconsistent and on occasions, misinterpreted by the police.

Reporter Stephen Grey also examines the way British companies are helping to proliferate this hi-tech snooping to countries with questionable human rights and which use it to monitor political opponents and dissidents.

And, with the Ministry of Defence developing its defences against sophisticated international attacks how vulnerable is the UK to "cyber warfare".

Why did a Chinese state telecommunications company briefly 'hijack' most of the world's internet traffic one day last year?

Producer: David Lewis

Reporter: Stephen Grey.

Cyber Spies: computer hacking and the state.

: computer hacking and the state.

Danger At Work2011030820110313

Following the recent first conviction and hefty fine under new Corporate Manslaughter legislation, the UK's health and safety regime has been hailed a success.

Falling death and accident rates appear to confirm an improving trend.

But the families of some of those seriously injured and killed in workplace accidents say too many employers are still gettings off too lightly even when they've been found responsible for serious breaches of health and safety legislation.

As the government proposes lighter regulation of workplaces and the Health and Safety Executive faces deep cuts, Morland Sanders asks whether protection for employees will be put at risk.

After the first UK corporate manslaughter conviction, File on 4 examines safety at work.

Dangerous Hospitals?2013031920130324

In the wake of the Mid-Staffordshire hospital scandal, investigations are going on at 14 other hospitals in England identified as having above average death rates among their patients. But why has it taken so long for enquiries to begin? Should the Department of Health and the hospitals regulator, the Care Quality Commission, have sounded the alarm much earlier?

It took a lengthy public inquiry to get to the bottom of failings in Mid-Staffordshire. Complaints of dangerous clinical practice and shoddy nursing standards were overlooked while whistle-blowers were treated as mere troublemakers and threatened with reprisals if they went public with their concerns.

Evidence is now emerging of a similar pattern in other places.

Gerry Northam examines the list of hospitals now under investigation and hears from doctors, nurses, patients and bereaved relatives. Have NHS managers done enough to address concern about high death rates?

How could it happen that the hospital reported to have the highest rate of excess mortality in the country - 20% above the expected level for its population of patients - was given a full seal of approval only three months earlier by the official regulator?

Producer: Rob Cave

Reporter: Gerry Northam.

Deadly Drugs2013102920131103

What's behind the rise in deaths among those who have taken the drug ecstasy?

What's behind the recent death of a clubgoer in Manchester who's believed to have taken a bad dose of the drug ecstasy? He's one of 12 in the area in the last year who've died after using illegal stimulants with toxic new additives, prompting the Government's Chief Medical Officer to issue a formal alert. Police are concerned organised crime is hiring backstreet chemists to cook up their own toxic amphetamines. Allan Urry investigates.

Producer: Carl Johnston.

Deadly Hospitals?2014022520140302

Each year the number of deaths in every hospital in England is recorded and compared with national averages for the range of patients and conditions treated. The results are published by a company called Dr Foster in The Hospital Guide.

The Guide has a solid reputation. Its findings are studied and used by leaders of the NHS. Dr Foster's statistical expert says that high mortality statistics should act as a 'smoke alarm' raising investigation of standards at a hospital. The Care Quality Commission praises Dr Foster's "powerful analysis of hospital trusts" and the Health Secretary says: "We expect all hospitals to examine this data carefully and take action wherever services need to improve".

But some leading statisticians question the reliability of mortality statistics as an indication of clinical quality. And they believe that many pockets of poor practice go undetected in hospitals with good mortality scores.

Critics also see the publication of such data as an invitation to the press to distort the available evidence by calculating numbers of 'needless deaths' within the NHS. Such calculations have in fact been produced and then given widespread publicity. The NHS Medical Director calls them "clinically meaningless and academically reckless". But they continue to make the front pages.

Gerry Northam reports from hospitals which have "worryingly high" mortality statistics according to Dr Foster and asks how much this really shows about their quality of care.

Producer : Ian Muir-Cochrane

Editor : David Ross.

But some leading statisticians question the reliability of mortality statistics as an indication of clinical quality. They argue that publication in a Guide gives NHS managers the incentive to game the system by adjusting the collection of mortality data to lower their scores in the Guide. And they believe that many pockets of poor practice go undetected in hospitals with good mortality scores.

Default By Design?2014012120140126

Last month a report by a government advisor, Lawrence Tomlinson, accused The Royal Bank of Scotland of forcing some viable businesses into insolvency. The Bank has denied Tomlinson's claims and has asked a leading law firm to carry out an independent investigation. With their findings due to be published shortly, File on 4 assesses the evidence.

Jane Deith speaks to families who claim their companies were unfairly forced to the wall and their lives ruined as a result of the actions of the Bank's Global Restructuring Group.

Billed as the equivalent of an intensive care unit designed to help nurse distressed businesses back to health, did the Global Restructuring Group kill some of them off instead? And was RBS able to profit as a result?

With a rising tide of complaints against the taxpayer-owned bank, the Financial Conduct Authority is beginning its own investigation.

So, was RBS being predatory or prudent?

Reporter: Jane Deith

Producer: Nicola Dowling.

Last month a report by a government advisor, Lawrence Tomlinson, accused The Royal Bank of Scotland of forcing some viable businesses into insolvency. The Bank has denied Tomlinson's claims and has asked a leading firm of accountants to carry out an independent investigation. With their findings due to be published shortly, File on 4 assesses the evidence.

Diabetes20120226

New NHS research has revealed the shocking toll of preventable deaths caused by just one medical condition. Diabetes - in which the body fails to control blood sugar levels safely - is causing 24,000 needless deaths a year in England alone.

It's not just the old and middle-aged who are at risk. Young women with diabetes are 6 to 9 times more likely to die than their age group overall. And many more young people who don't die will develop life threatening diseases later due to failure to manage their blood sugar.

Badly controlled diabetes can lead to kidney disease, heart conditions, or blindness. It's also the cause of 5,000 amputations a year, mainly of legs or feet. With around 3 million diagnosed sufferers known to the health service, diabetes is said to be costing the NHS £9 billion a year, about a tenth of the total health budget.

Julian O'Halloran reveals why, despite Government pledges, it's so difficult to get to grips with the disease. And, with the incidence of diabetes rocketing, he asks whether the NHS can cope.

Producer - Gail Champion.

Despite pledges to tackle diabetes, why do 24,000 people die needlessly each year?

Dirty Money Uk20151006

What does the theft of a billion dollars from Europe's poorest country have to do with a run-down housing estate in Edinburgh? Moldova was robbed of 12% of its GDP by the bafflingly complex financial scam uncovered earlier this year. It involved a web of companies in the ex-Soviet country, with the money thought to have ended up in Russia via Latvian banks.

But the trail also goes via a number of UK-registered companies, including one based in the district of north Edinburgh made famous by "Trainspotting", the novel about heroin addicts. It's not the only example of Eastern European fraudsters using the UK to launder their dirty money in this way. So why is it allowed to happen? Why is it so easy to set up an opaque shell company in the UK? And what is the role of so-called company formation agents? Tim Whewell investigates

Reporter: Tim Whewell Producer: Simon Maybin.

Dirty Secrets2014111120141116 (R4)

The UK generates nearly 300 million tonnes of waste every year. That's rich pickings for criminals who illegally dump what we don't want, damaging the environment and threatening our health. The black market in rubbish is said to be worth a billion pounds. With such huge sums at stake there's concern that organised crime is increasing its grip on the sector. Allan Urry examines the efforts of Britain's Environment Agencies to try to hold the line. But it's tough going at a time when cuts have led to a reduction in staffing.

Reporter: Allan Urry

Producer: Carl Johnston.

The UK generates nearly 300 million tonnes of waste every year. That's rich pickings for criminals who illegally dump what we don't want, damaging the environment and threatening our health. The black market in rubbish is said to be worth a billion pounds. With such huge sums at stake there's concern that organised crime is increasing its grip on the sector. Allan Urry examines the efforts of Britain's Environment Agencies to try to hold the line. But it's tough going at a time when cuts have lead to a reduction in staffing.

Disposing Of Clinical Waste2003111820031123

Allan Urry investigates the system for disposing of the dangerous clinical waste produced by Britain's hospitals.

Could illegal and unsafe practices pose a danger to public health?

Doctors In Charge2011030120110306

Success of the Government's proposed NHS reforms rests on England's family doctors.

GPs will be responsible for commissioning treatment for their patients.

But how much do we know about the effectiveness and value for money offered by doctors in General Practice? Gerry Northam reports.

Family doctors are key to Government health reforms, but how efficient are they?

Drug Danger Distraction?2010012620100131

Investigating concerns about the way a bestselling antipsychotic drug was marketed.

A British drug company is being sued by more than 15,000 people in the United States who claim its bestselling antipsychotic drug caused severe weight gain, diabetes and other serious medical conditions. Ann Alexander investigates concerns about the way it was marketed and asks how much the public should be told about the drugs they take.

A British drug company is being sued by more than 15,000 people in the United States who claim its bestselling antipsychotic drug caused severe weight gain, diabetes and other serious medical conditions.

Ann Alexander investigates concerns about the way it was marketed and asks how much the public should be told about the drugs they take.

Ebola2014102120141026 (R4)

Simon Cox investigates why it took so long for the world to wake up to the threat of ebola

is now regarded as an international threat to peace and security, according to the World Health Organisation. Yet, when the WHO was first warned of an unprecedented outbreak, the organisation said it was "still relatively small."

Now the UK has asked for volunteers to travel to West Africa to try to bring Ebola under control. Thousands of American troops are also flying out to the region. But could all this have been avoided? Simon Cox asks why it took so long for the world to wake up to the threat posed by Ebola? He also investigates the treatments that are now, belatedly, being developed - treatments that have existed for decades. Vaccines and other drugs are being rushed into production at an unprecedented pace, by-passing the usual safety controls. However, all predictions are that many more people will die before the disease is brought under control. Even then, will it become endemic?

Reporter: Simon Cox

Producer: John Murphy.

Egypt's Missing Millions2011031520110320

File On 4.

Banks and fraud squads across the world are beginning the task of tracing a vast fortune stolen from the Egyptian people by members of the Mubarak regime.

Some estimates have suggested the missing money could run into many billions of pounds.

Ministers, businessmen and members of the president's family have deposited vast sums in Swiss bank accounts and bought luxury properties in London.

Where did all this wealth come from? How was the Egyptian government able to continue abusing its power for three decades? And could the regime's business partners in multinational corporations really have been blind to what was happening?

Fran Abrams travels to Egypt to investigate and to assess the chances of the money being recovered.

Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane.

Fran Abrams investigates the corruption that lay behind the Mubarak regime.

Elderly Care: Neglected Questions2013060420130609

Operation Jasmine was the UK's biggest ever care home abuse investigation.

But in January this year proceedings against two key figures in the case collapsed, leaving dozens of families asking if they will ever get justice.

While relatives demand a public inquiry into what happened in the six Welsh care homes at the centre of the case, 12.5 metric tonnes of unpublished evidence lie in a Pontypool warehouse.

Experts say prosecutors too often face insurmountable difficulties in bringing people accused of neglecting the vulnerable to justice. Several high-profile figures are now calling for a change in the law: one barrister and academic tells File on 4 current legislation gives greater protection against cruelty to animals than against people.

With other major scandals such as those at Winterbourne View and Mid-Staffordshire still fresh in the public mind, Fran Abrams asks if the justice system is fit for purpose when it comes to dealing with abuse and neglect.

Producer: Nicola Dowling.

Election Fraud2014031120140316

With local authority elections due in May, Allan Urry investigates claims of organised vote rigging.

Earlier this year, the Electoral Commission identified 16 areas in England with wards that are at particular risk of electoral fraud.

File on 4 visits some of those towns and cities and hears first hand evidence of intimidation and the widespread abuse of postal votes - including allegations that some people are being pressured into handing over their vote to party activists.

A candidate who successfully took a court case against his opponent after narrowly losing an election, says some campaigners have lost sight of what is right and wrong.

And a judge who sits in election fraud cases attacks the system as "shambolic" and "wide open to abuse".

So is our voting system too vulnerable to fraud? Are the authorities doing all they can to root out corruptions? And is it time to end postal voting on demand?

Producers: Emma Forde and Sally Chesworth.

File on 4 visits some of those towns and cities and hears first hand evidence of intimidation and the widespread abuse of postal votes.

One MP tells the programme that many of his constituents have complained of being pressured into handing over their vote to party activists.

And a high court judge attacks the system as "shambolic" and "wide open to abuse".

Electricity Prices: A Shock To The System?2013100120131006

What will the government's plan to produce more low-carbon energy do to our fuel bills?

The Government wants more wind power and nuclear energy to supply our electricity, but how well is it delivering that plan? In Scotland where conditions for renewable sources are good, there's been a rush to cash in on generous subsidies for wind farms. But the infrastructure can't cope so companies are also being paid handsomely to dump the energy they produce. And, deals which include subsidies are being concluded behind closed doors between Government officials and the nuclear industry for a new generation of power stations. What's this going to add to our fuel bills? Allan Urry investigates.

Producer: Rob Cave.

Energy Prices20111009

Household gas and electricity bills are set to soar, leaving millions at risk of 'fuel poverty' and vulnerable to cold as winter approaches.

The government's hopes for recovery in UK manufacturing industry are also threatened in key sectors by rocketing energy prices.

Some small and medium-sized businesses have already been pushed into liquidation and there are fears that others will follow.

Politically, attention is now focusing on the behaviour of the so-called Big Six energy companies which supply 99% of the gas and electricity used in British homes.

The regulator OFGEM accuses them of 'complex and unfair pricing policies'.

It wants to increase competition by making it simpler for customers to decide to switch suppliers.

It finds that prices go up like a rocket but fall like a feather.

And it wants greater disclosure of corporate accounting systems, to check for excessive profits.

Gerry Northam examines claims from some industry insiders that the Big Six are behaving as the banks did before the credit crunch - threatening economic recovery while believing they are too big to fail.

Producer: Samantha Fenwick.

Are households and businesses being overcharged for gas and electricity?

European Funding2012071720120722

Why are areas of Britain losing millions of pounds of regeneration money from Europe?

The EU has allocated millions of pounds in grants to help our towns and cities regenerate. So why are some complaining they can't get their hands on the cash? European rules mean Britain has to put up an equal amount of money. But, as Allan Urry reveals, cuts at Westminster and in town halls around the country mean that some projects have either stalled or been abandoned because no "matched funding" is available. Critics of the Government say up to a billion pounds of regeneration money will end up in the Treasury's coffers or being returned to Brussels. Yet, it supposed to be supporting economic development in the English regions which the Government has argued will drive growth. That's what's happened in Germany and other EU countries. Have they made better use of funds from Brussels to help narrow the gap between their rich and poor regions? Now, as Europe struggles with austerity, does the European Commission need to re-think its system for allocating cash, and should the Coalition Government in Britain do more to deliver growth?

Producer: Samantha Fenwick.

European Funding: Missing A Match2012071720120722
Europe's Missing Millions2010113020101205

As European member states make spending cuts should more be done to prevent mismanagement of subsidies at EU level? Angus Stickler tracks how money has gone astray across the 27 member states and asks why funding continues in regions with proven records of mismanagement and fraud.

Producer: Gail Champion

Editor: David Ross.

Angus Stickler investigates fraud involving European regional funding schemes.

Over the last seven years, the European Union has paid out billions of Euros in grants designed to revitalise Europe's poorest regions.

But an investigation for File on 4 has revealed the extent to which these payments are open to widespread fraud, abuse and mismanagement.

Angus Stickler tracks how money has gone astray across the 27 member states and asks why funding continues in regions with proven records of corruption and fraud.

Throughout the EU there is evidence that money has been wasted or even stolen.

In Southern Italy, money has gone to Mafia-controlled construction companies and bogus energy projects.

Across the EU expensive projects lie unused and unfit for purpose, despite receiving funding of millions of Euros.

The EU has created its own anti-fraud agency, OLAF, to stop these abuses, but are critics right when they claim it's underfunded and ineffective?

File on 4/Bureau of Investigative Journalism co-production.

Exiles In Fear2011080220110807

The UK is the largest bilateral donor to Rwanda, giving around £83m a year.

President Paul Kagame is praised by the British government for bringing stability and economic growth to a country torn apart by the genocide in 1994.

But recently it was revealed that two opponents of the Rwandan regime living in London had been warned by police they were in danger of being assassinated by their own government.

Other Rwandans living in the UK have been threatened too.

The Rwandan High Commission say the allegations are baseless.

Robert Mugabe's Zimbabwe also receives substantial amounts of British aid but via charities and other non-governmental organisations.

However an exile involved in the ex-patriot community and who had attended Movement for Democratic Change meetings has been revealed as a former torturer.

Far from rejecting his past, its alleged he has until recently been on the pay-roll of the notorious Central Intelligence Organisation - leaving the Zimbabwe community scared and in disarray.

Jenny Cuffe asks whether in the light of such claims the British government should question its aid policy.

Why are some Rwandans in the UK living in fear of their government? Jenny Cuffe reports.

Fair Game2016053120160605 (R4)

Should English football clubs take a closer look at who they turn to for investment?

English football clubs enjoy a high profile around the world, leading to many companies vying to do business with them. But have some football clubs entered into financial deals with companies with questionable backgrounds?

File on 4 explores whether clubs are vulnerable to companies and individuals who use the reputation of English football to lend credibility to their activities. But what due diligence do clubs undertake when securing such deals? Allan Urry looks at the relationship between soccer and sponsorship. He hears from some of the victims who've lost money, because they believed those who do business with the biggest names in football, could be trusted.

Reporter - Allan Urry

Producer - Emma Forde.

Faith, Hope And... Tax Avoidance2013070920130714

While the G8 summit of world leaders has agreed a global deal to ensure big business pays its dues, concerns about tax avoidance go wider.

A group of MPs has just examined the case of the Cup Trust, a charity which tried to claim £46 million in tax relief but spent just £55,000 on good works. The Chair of the Public Accounts Committee, Margaret Hodge, concluded the Trust's purpose "was to avoid tax".

And she said this wasn't an isolated case. The Committee heard that HMRC investigates around 300 charities a year over concerns about tax fraud.

In this week's File on 4 Fran Abrams examines the blurred lines around charities and tax.

What happens when genuine charities find 'donations' are designed so the donors can claim Gift Aid payments from the tax man? And how easy is it to register a charity whose main aim is actually tax avoidance?

Is the 160 year-old Charity Commission up to the job of policing 21st Century charities?

Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane.

And she said this wasn't an isolated case. The Committee heard that HMRC investigates 300 similar schemes a year.

Family Annihilation20120311

In the last two months, four fathers have killed their partners, children and themselves. File on 4 investigates what drives these men to take such drastic action.

The programme talks to relatives, expert forensic psychiatrists and academics to try to find out why they became so-called 'family annihilators'.

It looks at new research into such cases which points to a link to unemployment rates and the levels of gun ownership. It will also ask whether authorities like the health service and police could do more to watch for signs that men are a risk to their families and asks whether new gun licence measures are working.

Presenter: Jane Deith

Producer: Paul Grant.

What drives fathers to kill their families and themselves? Jane Deith investigates.

Flooding: Best Laid Plans?2014021120140216

Flights grounded. Trains cancelled. Roads flooded. It's becoming a familiar story every winter as Britain's transport systems are battered by the weather. While rainfall this winter has been unusually high, has some of the disruption that we've seen been caused by a lack of strategic planning and routine maintenance? Should a flooded river have been able to knock out power supplies at Gatwick, catching airport authorities by surprise? Were the drainage systems adequate on some of the railway embankments that collapsed, leaving passengers stranded? Allan Urry investigates why our infrastructure is struggling to cope with the storms and asks whether bad planning has made a bad situation worse?

Producer: Rob Cave.

Flights grounded. Trains cancelled. Roads flooded. It's becoming a familiar story every winter as Britain's transport systems are battered by the weather. Allan Urry investigates why our infrastructure is struggling to cope with the storms. While rainfall has been unusually high, was some of the disruption caused by a lack of strategic planning and routine maintenance? Should a flooded river have been able to knock out power supplies at Gatwick, catching airport authorities by surprise? Were the drainage systems adequate on some of the railway embankments that collapsed, leaving passengers stranded? And we revisit the Somerset Levels a year after locals were promised their rivers would be dredged to help prevent further flooding. How much did the failure to deliver on those pledges make a bad situation worse?

Food Fraud2014012820140202

A year after the horsemeat scandal there are calls for a new police force to fight food fraud amid concerns that organised crime is increasingly targeting the sector because there are huge profits to be made at the expense of the consumer.

Prof Chris Elliott, who was commissioned by the government to investigate the UK's most serious food scandal in recent years, says criminals are committing more food fraud because there's little risk of detection or serious penalties if they're caught.

Gerry Northam investigates the extent of food fraud across the UK and reports from Brussels on whether the EU has learned enough lessons from last year's scandal.

Producer: Carl Johnston.

Foundation Hospitals: An Acute Crisis?2010101920101024

The drive to make acute hospitals more prudent and independent through foundation trust status was meant to usher in a new era of prudent spending for the whole of the NHS.

But now the process is faltering, as a series of foundation trusts hit grave financial, managerial or care quality problems.

And though the NHS was meant to be ring-fenced from the deep cuts now hitting the rest of the public sector, a number foundation hospital trusts are facing bed closures and serious job losses.

In some cases emergency measures have been adopted to turn failing trusts around by bringing in highly paid crisis managers.

But these have alienated staff and unions and seemingly pushed some hospitals further into the red.

So where does this leave the Government's plans for all hospitals to be run by foundation trusts? Julian O'Halloran reports.

Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane.

Why should we want more foundation hospitals when so many are in financial trouble?

Fraud: The Thin Blue Line2014100720141012 (R4)

The nature of crime is changing, with much of it now happening online, sparking growing concern that official figures fail to account for potentially millions of fraud offences. Experts say frauds involving plastic debit and credit cards are among the crimes left out of the data. So just how reliable - and useful - are the statistics?

At the same time, police economic crime units, which investigate fraud, have become increasingly stretched, partly as a result of government budget cuts. BBC Home Affairs correspondent, Danny Shaw, asks whether law enforcement has kept pace with the changing face of fraud and if there are enough resources to tackle financial crime and bring fraudsters to justice.

Reporter: Danny Shaw

Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane.

Funding For The Arts19900321

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: 28 March 1990

Previous in series: PRO-LIFE CAMPAIGNERS

Description

Robin LUSTIG investigates 'funding for the arts'

Subject Categories

documentaries (programme format)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

budgets (state finance)

arts (administration)

Broadcast history

21 Mar 1990 16:05-16:45 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Robin Lustig

Gerry Northam (Producer)

Karen Monger (Producer)

Peter Hall (Speaker)

Brian Cox (Speaker)

Roy Strong (Speaker)

Richard Luce (Speaker)

Terry Hands (Speaker)

Philip Hedley (Speaker)

Max Stafford-Clark (Speaker)

Colin Tweedy (Speaker)

Ian Rushton (Speaker)

John Stalker (theatre director (spkr)) (Speaker)

Clive Priestly (Speaker)

Ian Brown (arts council (spkr)) (Speaker)

John Doyle (drama director (spkr)) (Speaker)

Recorded on 1990-03-20.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19880126]

(Details tomorrow at 4. 05pm)

Genome: [r4 Bd=19880127]

Is revolution stirring in the Occupied Territories?

Hugh Prysor-Jones reports on the extent of the challenge to Israel's authority.

Producer VICKY WHITFIELD Editor BRIAN WALKER BBC Manchester

Genome: [r4 Bd=19880127]

Unknown: Hugh Prysor-Jones

Producer: Vicky Whitfield

Editor: Brian Walker

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900109]

Reporter: Helen Boaden

Producer: Sarah Eldridge

Editor: Gerry Northam

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900116]

Unknown: Liz McCallum

Producer: Liz Carney

Editor: Gerry Northam

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900123]

Reporter: Stuart Simon.

Producer: Nicola Meyrick

Editor: Gerry Northam

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900130]

Reporter: Helen Boaden

Editor: Gerry Northam

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900206]

Unknown: Linda Alexander

Producer: Liz Carney

Editor: Gerry Northam

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900213]

Reporter: Eric Robson

Producer: Nicola Meyrick

Editor: Gerry Northam

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900220]

Reporter: Robin Lustig

Producer: Karen Monger

Editor: Gerry Northam

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900227]

Reporter: Stuart Simon.

Producer: Sarah Eldridge

Editor: Gerry Northam

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900306]

Unknown: Helen Boaden

Producer: Uz Carney

Editor: Gerry Northam

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900313]

Reporter: Haig Gordon

Producer: Nicola Meyrick

Editor: Gerrv Northam

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900320]

Reporter: Robin Lustig.

Producer: Karen Monger

Editor: Gerry Northam

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900327]

Reporter: Robin Lustig

Producer: Lynne Jones

Editor: Gerry Northam

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900403]

Reporter: Haig Gordon.

Producer: Nicola Meyrick

Editor: Gerry Northam

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900515]

with Winifred Robinson Producer Sarah Eldridge Editor Gerry Northam BBC North

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900515]

Unknown: Winifred Robinson

Producer: Sarah Eldridge

Editor: Gerry Northam

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900515]

Unknown: Winifred Robinson

Producer: Sarah Eldridge

Editor: Gerry Northam

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900516]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19900522]

Reporter Robin Lustig Producer Liz Carney Editor Gerry Northam BBC North

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900522]

Reporter: Robin Lustig

Producer: Liz Carney

Editor: Gerry Northam

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900522]

Reporter: Robin Lustig

Producer: Liz Carney

Editor: Gerry Northam

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900523]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19900529]

Reporter Eric Robson Producer Nicola Meyrick Editor Gerry Northam BBC North

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900529]

Reporter: Eric Robson

Producer: Nicola Meyrick

Editor: Gerry Northam

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900529]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19900530]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19900605]

Reporter: Haig Gordon

Producer: Lynne Jones

Editor: Gerry Northam

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900612]

Unknown: Winifred Robinson

Producer: Liz Carney

Editor: Gerry Northam

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900619]

Reporter: Robin Lustig

Producer: Nicola Meyrick

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900626]

Reporter: David Nisbet

Editor: Gerry Northam

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900703]

Reporter: David Lomax.

Editor: Gerry Northam

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900710]

Unknown: Jonathan Moyle

Unknown: David Lomax.

Producer: Liz Carney

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900717]

Reporter: Helen Boaden.

Editor: Gerry Northam

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900724]

Reporter: David Nisbet

Producer: Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19900731]

Reporter: Eric Robson

Producer: Rod Crocker

Genome: [r4 Bd=19901002]

Reporter: Helen Boaden.

Producer: Nicola Meyrick

Genome: [r4 Bd=19901009]

Unknown: Stuart Simon

Unknown: Saddam Hussein.

Producer: Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19901016]

Unknown: David Nisbet

Producer: Rod Crocker

Genome: [r4 Bd=19901023]

Reporter: Helen Boaden

Producer: Liz Carney

Genome: [r4 Bd=19901030]

Reporter: Stuart Simon

Producer: Nicola Meyrick

Genome: [r4 Bd=19901106]

Reporter: David Nesbit.

Producer: Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19901113]

Reporter: Helen Boaden.

Producer: Rod Crocker

Genome: [r4 Bd=19901121]

Unknown: David Nisbet

Producer: Liz Carney

Genome: [r4 Bd=19901127]

Reporter: Robin Lustig.

Producer: Nicola Meyrick

Genome: [r4 Bd=19901204]

Unknown: Stuart Simon

Producer: Rod Crocker

Genome: [r4 Bd=19901211]

Reporter: Helen Boaden.

Producer: Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19901218]

Unknown: Eric Robson

Producer: Liz Carney

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910129]

A new series of the programme that covers major issues, changing attitudes and important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Stuart Simon. Producer Lynne Jones

Contributors

Reporter: Stuart Simon.

Producer: Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910129]

Reporter: Stuart Simon.

Producer: Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910130]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910212]

Reporter Roisin McAuley. Producer Clare Hastings

Contributors

Reporter: Roisin McAuley.

Producer: Clare Hastings

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910212]

Reporter: Roisin McAuley.

Producer: Clare Hastings

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910213]

Reporter Roisin McAuley.

Contributors

Reporter: Roisin McAuley.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910213]

Reporter: Roisin McAuley.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910219]

Major issues, changing attitudes and important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Helen Boaden. Producer Liz Camey

Contributors

Reporter: Helen Boaden.

Producer: Liz Camey

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910219]

Reporter: Helen Boaden.

Producer: Liz Camey

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910220]

Reporter Helen Boaden.

Contributors

Reporter: Helen Boaden.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910220]

Reporter: Helen Boaden.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910226]

Only six years after the last great famine, over seven-and-a-half million

Sudanese are at risk of starvation. Is the Sudanese government as much to blame as poor harvests? Reporter Stuart Simon. Producer David Ross

Contributors

Reporter: Stuart Simon.

Producer: David Ross

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910226]

Reporter: Stuart Simon.

Producer: David Ross

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910227]

Reporter Stuart Simon.

Contributors

Reporter: Stuart Simon.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910227]

Reporter: Stuart Simon.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910305]

When Nelson Mandela was freed a year ago, he called upon the black youth to reject the slogan 'Liberation Now -

Education Later'. How have they responded?

Mandla Themba reports from Soweto on the prospects for peaceful change among a generation reared on militancy and violence. Producer John Drury

Contributors

Unknown: Nelson Mandela

Unknown: Mandla Themba

Producer: John Drury

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910305]

Unknown: Nelson Mandela

Unknown: Mandla Themba

Producer: John Drury

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910306]

Mandia Thema reports from Soweto on the prospects for peaceful change among a generation reared on militancy and violence.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910312]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Roisin McAuley. Producer Lynne Jones

Contributors

Reporter: Roisin McAuley.

Producer: Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910312]

Reporter: Roisin McAuley.

Producer: Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910313]

Reporter Roisin McAuley

Contributors

Reporter: Roisin McAuley

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910313]

Reporter: Roisin McAuley

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910319]

A focus on major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter

Helen Boaden.

Producer Clare Hastings

Contributors

Unknown: Helen Boaden.

Producer: Clare Hastings

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910319]

Unknown: Helen Boaden.

Producer: Clare Hastings

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910320]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910326]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Dorothy Allen. Producer Liz Carney

Contributors

Reporter: Dorothy Allen.

Producer: Liz Carney

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910326]

Reporter: Dorothy Allen.

Producer: Liz Carney

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910327]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910402]

Reporter Roisin McAuley. Producer David Ross

Contributors

Reporter: Roisin McAuley.

Producer: David Ross

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910402]

Reporter: Roisin McAuley.

Producer: David Ross

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910403]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910409]

Reporter Robin Lustig. Producer Lynne Jones

Contributors

Reporter: Robin Lustig.

Producer: Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910409]

Reporter: Robin Lustig.

Producer: Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910410]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910416]

Reporter Gerry Northam. Producer Clare Hastings

Contributors

Reporter: Gerry Northam.

Producer: Clare Hastings

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910416]

Reporter: Gerry Northam.

Producer: Clare Hastings

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910417]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910423]

Major issues and events at home and abroad.

Producer David Ross

Contributors

Producer: David Ross

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910423]

Producer: David Ross

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910424]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910521]

The return of the documentary series. The 'men in the middle' who really matter in modern soccer are not referees but agents.

Stuart Simon reports on how they bend the rules in fixing lucrative transfers and contracts.

Producer Andrew Smith

Contributors

Unknown: Stuart Simon

Producer: Andrew Smith

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910521]

Unknown: Stuart Simon

Producer: Andrew Smith

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910522]

In the first of a new series, Stuart Simon reports on how soccer agents bend the rules.

Contributors

Unknown: Stuart Simon

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910522]

Unknown: Stuart Simon

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910528]

Why is South America facing a cholera epidemic for the first time this century? Roisin McAuley reports from Peru. Producer David Ross

Contributors

Unknown: Roisin McAuley

Producer: David Ross

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910528]

Unknown: Roisin McAuley

Producer: David Ross

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910529]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910604]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Paul Barker. Producer Lynne Jones

Contributors

Reporter: Paul Barker.

Producer: Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910604]

Reporter: Paul Barker.

Producer: Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910605]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910611]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Stuart Simon. Producer Louise Hibbins

Contributors

Reporter: Stuart Simon.

Producer: Louise Hibbins

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910611]

Reporter: Stuart Simon.

Producer: Louise Hibbins

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910612]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910612]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910618]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Roisin McAuley. Producer David Ross

Contributors

Reporter: Roisin McAuley.

Producer: David Ross

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910618]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910619]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Roisin McAuley.

Contributors

Reporter: Roisin McAuley.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910619]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910625]

Can the peace process in Lebanon point the way through deadlock in the Middle East? Gerald Butt reports from Beirut. Producer Liz Carney

Contributors

Unknown: Gerald Butt

Producer: Liz Carney

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910625]

Unknown: Gerald Butt

Producer: Liz Carney

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910626]

Can the peace process in Lebanon point the way through deadlock in the Middle East? Gerald Butt reports from Beirut.

Contributors

Unknown: Gerald Butt

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910626]

Unknown: Gerald Butt

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910702]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad. Reporter Susan O'Keeffe. Producer Lynne Jones

Contributors

Reporter: Susan O'Keeffe.

Producer: Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910702]

Reporter: Susan O'Keeffe.

Producer: Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910703]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad. Reporter Susan O'Keeffe.

Contributors

Reporter: Susan O'Keeffe.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910703]

Reporter: Susan O'Keeffe.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910709]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Roisin McAuley. Producer Louise Hibbins

Contributors

Reporter: Roisin McAuley.

Producer: Louise Hibbins

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910709]

Reporter: Roisin McAuley.

Producer: Louise Hibbins

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910710]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910710]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910716]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad. Reporter Tony Baker. Producer David Ross

Contributors

Reporter: Tony Baker.

Producer: David Ross

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910716]

Reporter: Tony Baker.

Producer: David Ross

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910717]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910730]

Recent revelations suggest that Iraq has long been cheating on the nuclear non-proliferation treaty. Has the treaty any value? And if it collapses, will there be nuclear anarchy? Reporter Stuart Simon. Producers Liz Carney and Olwyn Hocking

Contributors

Reporter: Stuart Simon.

Producers: Liz Carney

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910730]

Reporter: Stuart Simon.

Producers: Liz Carney

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910731]

Recent revelations suggest that Iraq has long been cheating on the nuclear non-proliferation treaty. Has the treaty any value? And if it collapses, will there be nuclear anarchy? Reporter Stuart Simon.

Contributors

Reporter: Stuart Simon.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910731]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19910806]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter David Levy. Producer Louise Hibbins

Contributors

Reporter: David Levy.

Producer: Louise Hibbins

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910806]

Reporter: David Levy.

Producer: Louise Hibbins

Genome: [r4 Bd=19910807]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19911015]

Trial and Error

This special documentary is the first in a new series of the programme.

Gerry Northam investigates evidence of radiation damage to hundreds of patients at Britain's biggest cancer centre, the Christie Hospital in Manchester.

Producer Andrew Smith

Contributors

Unknown: Gerry Northam

Unknown: Christie Hospital

Producer: Andrew Smith

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911015]

Unknown: Gerry Northam

Unknown: Christie Hospital

Producer: Andrew Smith

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911016]

Trial and Error

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911022]

President Bush has warned Israel to stop expandingjewish settlements in the Occupied Territories.

Stuart Simon traces the complex and controversial means by which the Israeli Government may have quietly sabotaged a land-for-peace deal. Producer David Ross

Contributors

Unknown: Stuart Simon

Producer: David Ross

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911022]

Unknown: Stuart Simon

Producer: David Ross

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911023]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19911029]

As the USA and Holland accept a patient's right to die, Roger Harrabin asks whether it is time for

Britain to change the laws on euthanasia.

Producer Liz Carney

Contributors

Unknown: Roger Harrabin

Producer: Liz Carney

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911029]

Unknown: Roger Harrabin

Producer: Liz Carney

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911030]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19911105]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Robin Lustig. Producer Louise Hibbins

Contributors

Reporter: Robin Lustig.

Producer: Louise Hibbins

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911105]

Reporter: Robin Lustig.

Producer: Louise Hibbins

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911106]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19911112]

Two-and-a-half years after the Red Army left

Afghanistan, the chances of a political settlement there have never looked better. Will the fighting now stop and enable five million refugees to return home? Hugo Fay reports from Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Producer Lynne Jones

Contributors

Unknown: Hugo Fay

Producer: Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911112]

Unknown: Hugo Fay

Producer: Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911113]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19911120]

(Broadcastyesterday 7.20pm)

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911126]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Mark Halliley. Producer Liz Carney

Contributors

Reporter: Mark Halliley.

Producer: Liz Carney

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911126]

Reporter: Mark Halliley.

Producer: Liz Carney

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911127]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19911203]

Ashes of Empire The first of three programmes in which Gordon Clough reports from the Soviet Union. Can a new, cohesive confederation arise from the ashes of the old empire? Red Flag, Green Banners From the northern and southern outposts of the old Union, how strong are the forces of separation and the Islamic challenges to Soviet and Russian domination?

Producers Lucy Ash and Lynne Jones

Contributors

Unknown: Gordon Clough

Producers: Lucy Ash

Producers: Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911203]

Unknown: Gordon Clough

Producers: Lucy Ash

Producers: Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911204]

Ashes of Empire

A three-part series in which Gordon Clough reports from the Soviet Union.

1: Red Flag, Green Banners

Contributors

Unknown: Gordon Clough

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911204]

Unknown: Gordon Clough

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911210]

Ashes of Empire

A three-part series in which Gordon Clough reports from the Soviet Union. 2: Goinglt Alone

Will the separation now demanded by the Ukraine and other republics plunge the old Union into greater poverty and chaos?

Producers Lucy Ash and Lynne Jones

Contributors

Unknown: Gordon Clough

Unknown: Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911210]

Unknown: Gordon Clough

Unknown: Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911211]

Ashes of Empire A three-part series. 2: Coing lt Alone

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911217]

Ashes of Empire

The last of a three-part series in which

Gordon Clough reports from the Soviet Union. Can a new, cohesive confederation arise from the ashes of the old empire?

The 16th Republic

As the 15 former Soviet

Republics set about establishing their own armed forces, what role is left for the rump of the Soviet Army? Can there be effective control of the huge Soviet nuclear arsenal? And could the proliferation of firepower lead to a Soviet Yugoslavia? Producers Lucy Ash and Lynne Jones

Contributors

Unknown: Gordon Clough

Producers: Lucy Ash

Producers: Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19911217]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19911218]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920114]

NEW The return of the series exploring major issues, changing attitudes and important events at home and abroad. Reporter Stuart Simon. Producer Louise Hibbins

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920114]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920115]

(Broadcastyesterdayat

7.20pm FM)

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920121]

Why are a growing number of diagnosed psychopaths who have committed serious offences being refused treatment in Britain' s top security hospitals? And does this refusal put society at risk? Reporter Mark Ha))i)ey. Producer Dav!dRoss

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920122]

fBroadcasf yesterday 7.20pm)

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920128]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad. Reporter Owen Bennett Jones. Producer Liz Carney

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920128]

Reporter: Owen Bennett Jones.

Producer: Liz Carney

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920129]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920204]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad. Reporter Robin Lustig. Producer Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920204]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920205]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920211]

Reporter Adam Raphael. Producer Louise Hibbins

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920211]

Reporter: Adam Raphael.

Producer: Louise Hibbins

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920212]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920219]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920225]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad. Reporter Mark Halliley. Producer David Ross

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920225]

Reporter: Mark Halliley.

Producer: David Ross

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920226]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920303]

An inquest may be the only time a bereaved family learns the full facts of a controversial death. But are coroners' courts equipped to cope with such investigations? Reporter Caroline Beck. Producer Liz Carney

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920303]

Reporter: Caroline Beck.

Producer: Liz Carney

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920304]

An inquest may be the only time a bereaved family learns the full facts of a controversial death.

But are coroners'courts equipped to cope with such investigations?

Reporter Caroline Beck.

(Broadcastyesterday 7.20pm FM)

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920304]

Reporter: Caroline Beck.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920310]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad. Reporter Stuart Simon. Producer Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920310]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920311]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920317]

Adam Raphael reports on major issues, changing attitudes, and important events at home and abroad. Producer Vicky Whitfield

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920317]

Unknown: Adam Raphael

Producer: Vicky Whitfield

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920318]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920922]

Reporter Mark Halliley. Producer Liz Carney

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920922]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19920923]

(Broadcast yesterday at 7.20pmJ

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920929]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Wend y Jones. Producer Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920929]

Producer: Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19920930]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19921006]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Stuart Simon. Producer David Ross

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921006]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19921007]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19921013]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Gerry Northam. Producer Mark Weston-Turner

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921013]

Reporter: Gerry Northam.

Producer: Mark Weston-Turner

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921014]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19921020]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Mark Halliley. Producer Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921020]

Reporter: Mark Halliley.

Producer: Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921021]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Mark Halliley.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921021]

Reporter: Mark Halliley.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921027]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Wendy Jones. Producer Liz Carney

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921027]

Reporter: Wendy Jones.

Producer: Liz Carney

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921028]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19921103]

Reporter Caroline Beck. Producer David Ross

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921103]

Reporter: Caroline Beck.

Producer: David Ross

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921104]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19921110]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Mark Halliley. Producer Mark Weston-Turner

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921110]

Reporter: Mark Halliley.

Producer: Mark Weston-Turner

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921111]

Reporter Mark Halliley.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921111]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19921117]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19921117]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19921118]

Reporter Wendy Jones.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921118]

Reporter: Wendy Jones.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921124]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Kati Whitaker. Producer David Ross

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921124]

Reporter: Kati Whitaker.

Producer: David Ross

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921125]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19921201]

Reporter Mark Halliley. Producer Mark Weston-Turner

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921201]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19921202]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19921215]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Stuart Simon. Producer Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921215]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19921216]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19921222]

A militant mutation of Muslim fundamentalism is coursing through the Arab world. In the second of two special programmes,

Stuart Simon reports on the radical challenge of Islam to Arab governments. Producer Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921222]

Unknown: Stuart Simon

Producer: Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19921223]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930126]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Mark Halliley. Producer David Ross

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930126]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930127]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930127]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930202]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Wendy Jones. Producer Mark Weston-Turner

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930202]

Reporter: Wendy Jones.

Producer: Mark Weston-Turner

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930203]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Wendy Jones.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930203]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930209]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Stuart Simon. Producer Liz Carney

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930209]

Reporter: Stuart Simon.

Producer: Liz Carney

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930210]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930216]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930216]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930217]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930217]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930223]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Wendy Jones. Producer Mark Weston Turner

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930223]

Reporter: Wendy Jones.

Producer: Mark Weston Turner

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930224]

with Wendy Jones.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930224]

Unknown: Wendy Jones.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930302]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Jolyon Jenkins. Producer David Ross

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930302]

Reporter: Jolyon Jenkins.

Producer: David Ross

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930303]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Jolyon Jenkins.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930303]

Reporter: Jolyon Jenkins.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930309]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Roisin McAuley. Producer Chris Harmer

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930309]

Reporter: Roisin McAuley.

Producer: Chris Harmer

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930310]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Roisin McAuley.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930310]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930316]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Stuart Simon. Producer Mark Weston-Turner

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930316]

Reporter: Stuart Simon.

Producer: Mark Weston-Turner

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930317]

Reporter Stuart Simon.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930317]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930330]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Mark Halliley. Producer Chris Harmer

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930330]

Reporter: Mark Halliley.

Producer: Chris Harmer

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930331]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930406]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad. The last programme of the present series.

Reporter Roisin McAuley. Producer Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930406]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930407]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930407]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930511]

The documentary series returns.

The Fear of Living Dangerously

The face of teenage crime is undergoing some alarming changes. In some areas the level of violence has reached a point where shootings and street-level extortion are routine. In the first of a new series, Brian Crawford investigates the young generation of violent lawbreakers, the disturbing development of a "gun culture", and the emergence of the female gangster. His report uncovers a hard core of disaffected youth who are armed, dangerous and at war with each other. Producer Paul Sapin

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930511]

Unknown: Brian Crawford

Producer: Paul Sapin

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930512]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930518]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter

Caroline Beck.

Producer Liz Carney

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930518]

Unknown: Caroline Beck.

Producer: Liz Carney

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930519]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930525]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930525]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930526]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930601]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930602]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930608]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad. Reporter Alex Kirby. Producer Helen Boaden

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930608]

Reporter: Alex Kirby.

Producer: Helen Boaden

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930609]

Major issues, changing attitudes, and important events at home and abroad.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930615]

Major issues, changing attitudes and important events at home and abroad. Reporter Jolyon Jenkins. Producer Amanda Ashton

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930615]

Reporter: Jolyon Jenkins.

Producer: Amanda Ashton

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930616]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930622]

Can South Africa's police force be persuaded to back the country's moves towards multi-party democracy? Reporter Tom Carver. Producer Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930622]

Reporter: Tom Carver.

Producer: Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930623]

Can South Africa's police force be persuaded to back the country's moves towards multi-party democracy? Reporter Tom Carver.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930623]

Reporter: Tom Carver.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930706]

Important events at home and abroad. Reporter Caroline Beck. Producer David Ross

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930706]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930707]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930713]

Reporter Mark Halliley. Producer Amanda Ashton

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930713]

Reporter: Mark Halliley.

Producer: Amanda Ashton

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930714]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930720]

Reporter Jolyon Jenkins. Producer Liz Camey

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930720]

Reporter: Jolyon Jenkins.

Producer: Liz Camey

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930721]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930727]

Major issues, changing attitudes, and important events at home and abroad. Reporter Tim Llewellyn. Producer Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930727]

Reporter: Tim Llewellyn.

Producer: Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930728]

Reporter Tim Llewellyn.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930728]

Reporter: Tim Llewellyn.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930803]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930803]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930804]

3.42 R S V P

The last in the series in which Matthew Parris investigates intriguing letters that have no known reply.

After 13 years Tchaikovsky's patron abruptly ended her intimate correspondence with the composer. He expressed his sorrow in a last letter. Producer Julia Gillett

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930804]

Unknown: Matthew Parris

Producer: Julia Gillett

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930921]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Reporter Jolyon Jenkins.

Producer Liz Carney

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930921]

Reporter: Jolyon Jenkins.

Producer: Liz Carney

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930922]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad. Reporter Jolyon Jenkins.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930922]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930928]

Reporter Mark Halliley.

Producer Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930928]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930929]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19930929]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931005]

Reporter Jenny Cuffe.

Producer David Ross

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931005]

Reporter: Jenny Cuffe.

Producer: David Ross

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931006]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931012]

Reporter Paul Campbell.

Producer Liz Camey

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931012]

Reporter: Paul Campbell.

Producer: Liz Camey

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931013]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931019]

Major issues, changing attitudes, and important events at home and abroad. Reporter Jolyon Jenkins. Producer Peter Croasdale

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931019]

Reporter: Jolyon Jenkins.

Producer: Peter Croasdale

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931020]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931026]

Reporter Roisin McAuley.

Producer David Ross

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931026]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931027]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931102]

With reporter Jenny Cuffe. Producer Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931102]

Reporter: Jenny Cuffe.

Producer: Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931103]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931109]

Reporter Stephen Titherington.

Producer Liz Camey

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931109]

Reporter: Stephen Titherington.

Producer: Liz Camey

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931110]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931116]

Reporter Jolyon Jenkins.

Producer Peter Croasdale

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931116]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931117]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931124]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931130]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931130]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931201]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931207]

Reporter Stephen Titherington. Producer Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931207]

Reporter: Stephen Titherington.

Producer: Lynne Jones

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931208]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931214]

Last in the present series. Reporter Terry Dignan. Producer David Haggie

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931214]

Reporter: Terry Dignan.

Producer: David Haggie

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931215]

Last in the present series.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970128]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad. In the first programme of the new series, Julian O'Halloran examines the reasons for the rising number of E Coli cases. The Scottish food poisoning scare, which has cost 16 lives and made hundreds ill, is close to being the world's worst outbreak of its kind. But the incidents of E Coli have rocketed over the past ten years, leaving a trail of deaths and kidney-damaged children. Tonight's programme asks whether lives could have been saved if the government had imposed some basic food and health measures.

Producer Sarah Lewthwaite

Repeated Saturday 5.00pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970128]

Unknown: Julian O'Halloran

Producer: Sarah Lewthwaite

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970201]

Presented by Julian O'Halloran. Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970201]

Presented by Julian O'Halloran. Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970201]

Presented By: Julian O'Halloran.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970201]

Presented By: Julian O'Halloran.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970204]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad. Repeated Saturday 5.00pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970204]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad. Repeated Saturday 5.00pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970208]

Current affairs magazine. Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970208]

Current affairs magazine. Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970211]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad. Reporter Jonathan Rugman. Producer Kim Barrington

Repeated Saturday 5.00pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970211]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad. Reporter Jonathan Rugman. Producer Kim Barrington

Repeated Saturday 5.00pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970211]

Reporter: Jonathan Rugman.

Producer: Kim Barrington

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970211]

Reporter: Jonathan Rugman.

Producer: Kim Barrington

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970215]

Reporter Jonathan Rugman. Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970215]

Reporter Jonathan Rugman. Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970215]

Reporter: Jonathan Rugman.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970215]

Reporter: Jonathan Rugman.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970218]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad. Reporter Mark Whitaker. Producer Gregor Stewart

Repeated Saturday 5.00pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970218]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad. Reporter Mark Whitaker. Producer Gregor Stewart

Repeated Saturday 5.00pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970218]

Reporter: Mark Whitaker.

Producer: Gregor Stewart

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970218]

Reporter: Mark Whitaker.

Producer: Gregor Stewart

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970222]

Major issues at home and abroad. Reporter Mark Whitaker. Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970222]

Major issues at home and abroad. Reporter Mark Whitaker. Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970222]

Reporter: Mark Whitaker.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970222]

Reporter: Mark Whitaker.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970225]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad. Reporter Julian O'Halloran. Producer Justin Rowlatt

Repeated Saturday 5.00pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970225]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad. Reporter Julian O'Halloran. Producer Justin Rowlatt

Repeated Saturday 5.00pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970225]

Reporter: Julian O'Halloran.

Producer: Justin Rowlatt

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970225]

Reporter: Julian O'Halloran.

Producer: Justin Rowlatt

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970301]

Reporter Julian O'Halloran. Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970301]

Reporter Julian O'Halloran. Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970301]

Reporter: Julian O'Halloran.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970301]

Reporter: Julian O'Halloran.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970304]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad. Reporter Jenny Cuffe. Last in the series.

Producer Sarah Lewthwaite Repeated Saturday 5.00pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970304]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad. Reporter Jenny Cuffe. Last in the series.

Producer Sarah Lewthwaite Repeated Saturday 5.00pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970304]

Reporter: Jenny Cuffe.

Producer: Sarah Lewthwaite

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970304]

Reporter: Jenny Cuffe.

Producer: Sarah Lewthwaite

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970308]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad. Reporter Jenny Cuffe. Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970308]

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad. Reporter Jenny Cuffe. Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970308]

Reporter: Jenny Cuffe.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970308]

Reporter: Jenny Cuffe.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970408]

Last month a House of Commons

Committee criticised the Ministry of Defence's failure to provide full information on "Gulf War Syndrome". In the first of a new series of File on 4, Julian O'Halloran examines how much is now known about the causes of veterans' illnesses. Producer Gregor Stewart

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970408]

Unknown: Julian O'Halloran

Producer: Gregor Stewart

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970415]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970422]

Major issues, changing attitudes and important events at home and abroad. Reporter Mark Whitaker. Producer Justin Rowlatt

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970422]

Reporter: Mark Whitaker.

Producer: Justin Rowlatt

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970429]

Major issues, changing attitudes and important events at home and abroad. Reporter Jolyon Jenkins. Producer Sarah Lewthwaite

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970429]

Reporter: Jolyon Jenkins.

Producer: Sarah Lewthwaite

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970506]

Major issues, changing attitudes and important events at home and abroad. Reporter Jenny Cuffe. Producer David Lewis

Repeated Saturday 5.00pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970506]

Reporter: Jenny Cuffe.

Producer: David Lewis

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970510]

Reporter Jenny Cuffe. Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970510]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970513]

Major issues, changing attitudes and important events at home and abroad. Reporter Jonathan Rugman. Producer Gregor Stewart. Rptd Saturday 5pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970513]

Reporter: Jonathan Rugman.

Producer: Gregor Stewart.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970517]

With Jonathan Rugman. Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970517]

Unknown: Jonathan Rugman.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970520]

Major issues, changing attitudes and important events at home and abroad. Reporter Liz Carney. Producer Kim Barrington Repeated Saturday 5pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970520]

Reporter: Liz Carney.

Producer: Kim Barrington

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970524]

With reporter Liz Carney. Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970524]

Reporter: Liz Carney.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970527]

With Richard Watson.

Producer Justin Rowlatt

Repeated Saturday 5pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970527]

Unknown: Richard Watson.

Producer: Justin Rowlatt

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970531]

With Richard Watson.

Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970531]

Unknown: Richard Watson.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970603]

With Mark Whitaker. Producer David Lewis

Repeated Saturday 5pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970603]

Unknown: Mark Whitaker.

Producer: David Lewis

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970607]

With Mark Whitaker. Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970607]

Unknown: Mark Whitaker.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970610]

Major issues, changing attitudes and important events at home and abroad. Reporter Jenny Cuffe. Producer Sarah Lewthwaite Repeated Saturday 5pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970610]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970614]

With Jenny Cuffe.

Producer Sarah Lewthwaite Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970614]

Unknown: Jenny Cuffe.

Producer: Sarah Lewthwaite

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970617]

Major issues, changing attitudes and important events at home and abroad. Reporter Jonathan Rugman. Producer Gregor Stewart Repeated Saturday 5pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970617]

Reporter: Jonathan Rugman.

Producer: Gregor Stewart

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970621]

With Jonathan Rugman. Producer Gregor Rugman. Rptd from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970621]

Unknown: Jonathan Rugman.

Producer: Gregor Rugman.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970624]

Major issues, changing attitudes and important events at home and abroad. Reporter Jolyon Jenkins. Producer Liz Carney

Repeated Saturday 5pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970624]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970628]

With Jolyon Jenkins.

Producer Liz Carney. Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970628]

Unknown: Jolyon Jenkins.

Producer: Liz Carney.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970701]

Major issues, changing attitudes and important events at home and abroad. Reporter Mark Whitaker. Producer Kim Barrington Repeated Saturday 5pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970701]

Reporter: Mark Whitaker.

Producer: Kim Barrington

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970705]

With Mark Whitaker. Producer Kim Barrington Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970705]

Unknown: Mark Whitaker.

Producer: Kim Barrington

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970708]

With Justin Rowlatt.

Producer David Lewis. Repeated Saturday 5pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970708]

Unknown: Justin Rowlatt.

Producer: David Lewis.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970712]

With Justin Rowlatt. Producer David Lewis. Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970712]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970715]

Major issues, changing attitudes and important events at home and abroad. Reporter Julian O'Halloran. Producer Gregor Stewart Repeated Saturday 5pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970715]

Reporter: Julian O'Halloran.

Producer: Gregor Stewart

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970719]

With Julian O'Halloran.

Producer Gregor Stewart. Rptd from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970719]

Unknown: Julian O'Halloran.

Producer: Gregor Stewart.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970923]

The Labour government has committed itself to a "zero-tolerance" policy towards failing schools and inadequate teachers. Mark Whitaker asks what lessons Britain can learn from Chicago's public education system. Once deemed the worst in America, it is currently being revolutionised in the name of improved classroom performance. Producer Deborah Hawkes Repeated Saturday 5pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970923]

Unknown: Mark Whitaker

Producer: Deborah Hawkes

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970927]

Mark Whitaker asks what lessons

Britain can learn from Chicago's public education system.

Repeated from yesterday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970927]

Unknown: Mark Whitaker

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970930]

Richard Watson reports on major issues, changing attitudes and important events at home and abroad. Producer Kim Barrington Repeated Saturday 5pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970930]

Unknown: Richard Watson

Producer: Kim Barrington

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971004]

Richard Watson reports on major issues at home and abroad.

Producer Kim Barrington Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971004]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19971007]

Liz Carney reports on major issues, changing attitudes and important events at home and abroad. Producer Andy Denwood Repeated Saturday 5pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971007]

Unknown: Liz Carney

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971011]

Liz Camey reports on major issues and important events at home and abroad.

Producer Andy Denwood

Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971011]

Unknown: Liz Camey

Producer: Andy Denwood

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971014]

Peter Hetherington reports on major issues at home and abroad.

Producer Gregor Stewart. Rptd Saturday 5pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971014]

Unknown: Peter Hetherington

Producer: Gregor Stewart.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971018]

Peter Hetherington reports on major issues at home and abroad.

Producer Gregor Stewart Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971018]

Unknown: Peter Hetherington

Producer: Gregor Stewart

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971021]

Mark Whittaker examines the record of the Environment Agency, which was created 18 months ago and integrated the work of the anti-pollution agencies for water, air and land. Producer Deborah Hawkes Repeated Saturday 5pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971021]

Unknown: Mark Whittaker

Producer: Deborah Hawkes

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971025]

Mark Whitaker examines the record of the Environment Agency. Producer Deborah Hawkes

Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971025]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19971028]

Lesley Curwen reports on major issues, changing attitudes and important events at home and abroad. Producer Kim Barrington Repeated Saturday 5pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971028]

Unknown: Lesley Curwen

Producer: Kim Barrington

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971101]

Investigation into the work of the World Trade Organisation. With Lesley Curwen. Producer Kim Barrington. Rptd from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971101]

Unknown: Lesley Curwen.

Producer: Kim Barrington.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971104]

Richard Watson reports on major issues, changing attitudes and important events both at home and abroad.

Producer Andy Denwood Repeated Saturday 5pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971104]

Unknown: Richard Watson

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971108]

Richard Watson reports on major issues at home and abroad.

Producer Andy Denwood. Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971108]

Unknown: Richard Watson

Producer: Andy Denwood.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971111]

Liz Carney reports on major issues, changing attitudes and important events at home and abroad. Producer Christine Morgan Repeated Saturday 5pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971111]

Unknown: Liz Carney

Producer: Christine Morgan

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971115]

Liz Carney reports on major issues at home and abroad.

Producer Christine Morgan Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971115]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19971118]

The civil war in Sudan is the longest-running conflict in Africa and has claimed at least 1.5 million lives. As yet another attempt to broker a peace deal gets under way, Maurice Walsh assesses the chances for peace.

Producer David Lewis. Repeated Saturday 5pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971118]

Unknown: Maurice Walsh

Producer: David Lewis.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971122]

The civil war in Sudan has claimed at least 1.5 million lives. Maurice Walsh assesses the chances for peace. Producer Christine Morgan Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971122]

Unknown: Maurice Walsh

Producer: Christine Morgan

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971125]

Mark Whitaker reports on major issues, changing attitudes and important events at home and abroad. Producer Gregor Stewart Repeated Saturday 5pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971125]

Unknown: Mark Whitaker

Producer: Gregor Stewart

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971129]

Mark Whitaker reports on major issues at home and abroad. Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971129]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19971202]

Lesley Curwen reports on major issues, changing attitudes and important events at home and abroad. Producer Deborah Hawkes Repeated Saturday 5pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971202]

Unknown: Lesley Curwen

Producer: Deborah Hawkes

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971206]

Lesley Curwen reports on major issues at home and abroad. Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971206]

Unknown: Lesley Curwen

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971209]

Julian O'Halloran reports on major issues, changing attitudes and important events at home and abroad. Producer Christine Morgan Repeated Saturday 5pm

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971209]

Unknown: Julian O'Halloran

Producer: Christine Morgan

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971213]

Julian O'Halloran reports on major issues at home and abroad. Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971213]

Unknown: Julian O'Halloran

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971216]

Liz Carney reports on major issues; changing attitudes and important ' events at home and abroad. Producer Andy Denwood

Repeated Saturday 5pm ;

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971216]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19971220]

Liz Carney reports on major issues at home and abroad. Repeated from Tuesday

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971220]
Green Doubts Over Role For Coal *2008061020080615

Julian O'halloran reports on the calls for a new generation of coal-fired power stations by electricity generating companies.

The demands are fuelled by concern over energy security and rocketing gas prices, but opposition is widespread.

Green On Blue2012092520120930

In the first of a new series, Gerry Northam investigates the rising number of so called "green on blue" attacks in which Afghan soldiers and policemen have turned their guns on British and other international troops.

With more than 50 NATO troops killed in insider attacks this year, is enough being done to protect those working as mentors?

The US has invested over $50 billion on developing independent Afghan security forces but according to a US Government audit, the majority of Afghan troops remain heavily reliant on American help and support. Even widespread illiteracy remains a problem.

Meanwhile the impact of the recent attacks is huge - undermining the trust that's needed between the Afghan forces and the coalition troops getting them ready to take over the security in 2014.

So how reliable is the screening of new Afghan recruits? And, with continuing questions over their loyalties and capabilities, can there be an effective withdrawal in two years' time?

Presenter: Gerry Northam

Producer: David Lewis.

Why are growing numbers of allied soldiers being killed by their Afghan allies?

Grooming: A Life Sentence?2013061120130616

In the latest high profile grooming trial, 7 men from Oxford will be sentenced later this month for sexually exploiting and raping 6 schoolgirls. Police said the girls - some as young as 12 - were 'abused to the point of torture' for years. One girl was injected with heroin. Another was forced to have a backstreet abortion.

The police praised the young women for finding the strength to give evidence against the gang and protect other girls.

But, after the legal process ends, what support is there for victims?

After a string of such abuse cases around the country, Jane Deith finds there are many young women who say they've been let down by the authorities and are struggling, alone, with mental health problems and difficulties with education and housing.

More victims of grooming are being rescued. But does being sexually exploited as a child mean a life sentence?

Reporter: Jane Deith Producer: Sally Chesworth.

Gun Crime2003101420031019

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad, with reporter Gerry Northam

H M Customs2004031620040321

Two years ago File on 4 revealed details of a police investigation into the way HM Customs had handled major drugs cases.

Now, Gerry Northam examines new claims of even more serious misconduct and asks whether this once-great agency can survive further scandals.

Highways Agency2012112020121125

With the CBI calling for it to be scrapped, Allan Urry examines the Highways Agency.

Fed up with road works? Stuck in a queue of traffic? The Government is promising big improvements for drivers who use motorways and major roads. It's looking for ways to increase private sector involvement and to boost investment. So what future for the body that currently manages the network in England? With the CBI calling for it to be scrapped, and with criticism from local authorities and motoring organisations, Allan Urry road asks whether it's the end of the road for the Highways Agency?

Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane.

Homes But No Loans2011012520110130

Despite the threat of a new slide in house prices and rising levels of negative equity, the number of property-buyers having their homes repossessed has declined over the past year.

But now many economists predict interest rates will rise in the course of 2011, fuelling fears that Britain's housing market could be facing a double dip.

With banks chasing profits and affordable mortgages harder to find.

Michael Robinson asks what impact the new housing freeze will have on Britain's already battered economy.

Producer: Andy Denwood.

How will the mortgage freeze hit Britain's already battered economy?

Hospitals - Open All Hours?2013012220130127

The government and senior medical figures want consultants to be more hands on in hospitals at weekends and at night. It follows evidence patients are less likely to receive prompt treatment and more likely to die if they are admitted to hospital on a Saturday or Sunday. A recent survey of hospital chief executives showed they had significant doubts their hospitals were as safe at weekends as during the week.

Jane Deith examines cases which raise concerns about out of hours care in hospitals. Is there enough senior medical support for junior doctors and how effective is the on-call system where consultants are available to give advice over the phone from home?

While departments such as accident and emergency, intensive care and obstetrics, already have consultants working in hospitals during the weekend, some medical colleges believe the time has come for 24 hour, seven days a week consultant cover on the wards. Jane visits hospitals trying to achieve this and hears the challenges they face.

The programme also investigates what this increased consultant presence might cost the NHS and whether there will be enough senior doctors available to make it happen. The College of Emergency Medicine, for example, says accident and emergency departments are facing a recruitment crisis and it does not expect to see the required number of consultants until 2030.

Producer: Paul Grant.

Housing Blight?2015060920150614 (R4)

How can we build more houses and still protect our countryside? Allan Urry investigates.

With the urgent need for more housing, Britain's planning laws are under pressure like never before. Greenbelt land and even sites designated as Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, are being earmarked for development. So how far can we protect the countryside when the need for houses is so acute? Allan Urry reveals new figures on scale of the problem and investigates claims that the planning system is being stretched to breaking point.

Reporter: Allan Urry

Producer: Emma Forde.

How To Close Guantanamo?2007111320071118

Jon Manel looks at the potential problems in closing the US's controversial detention facility and investigates claims that the US is already breaking international law by sending detainees to countries where thay may face abuse and torture.

How to Close Guantanamo?

Hs2: Winners And Losers2013100820131013

Who are the winners and losers from high-speed rail?

The government is stepping up its support for HS2, the high-speed rail project due to link London and Birmingham by 2026 with extensions to Manchester and Leeds by 2032.

The cost is officially estimated to be £42.6bn and could rise to more than £51bn if, as expected, the scheme incurs VAT. Opponents foresee further increases and have predicted an eventual bill of £80bn for taxpayers.

Who stands to gain from the project and who will be the losers?

The government has published detailed maps of the route to be taken by the first stage, leading to calamitous falls in the value of many nearby properties.

Towns and cities which are near the route but not linked to HS2 fear that their economies will suffer as businesses are attracted to Birmingham and the northern ends of the line. Current fast train services are due to suffer drastic cuts in the wake of HS2 and some major development plans are now deemed to be at risk.

Meanwhile, economic advisers in the three major cities are planning for billions of pounds worth of benefits as travel-times and congestion on the existing network are reduced.

Gerry Northam reports from areas which expect to benefit from HS2 and those which could lose out and asks what lessons can be learned from the impact of Britain's first high-speed rail project - HS1 in Kent.

Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane

Editor: David Ross.

Illicit Arms Trade2013011520130120

The recent conviction of an arms broker from Yorkshire has raised serious concerns about the murky world of the international weapons trade. Gary Hyde was sentenced to seven years imprisonment for one of the largest illegal arms deals ever uncovered: 80,000 guns and 32 million rounds of ammunition shipped from China to Nigeria - enough to equip a small army. But no-one knows where they ended up. Britain has strict regulations governing the sale and export of firearms, so how did he manage it? Where have the guns gone?

File on 4 investigates the British arms dealers brokering weapons for some of the world's most dangerous regimes. Some have done work for the Ministry of Defence. One was even a firearms advisor to the Home Office. Allan Urry asks what this means for the UK's licensing and arms export regimes, claimed to be among the best in the world.

Producer: Gail Champion.

In The Shadows20150922
In The Shadows2015092220150927 (R4)

Simon Cox meets migrants working in Britain illegally.

With the Government cracking down on migrants working illegally, Simon Cox investigates Britain's shadow economy. He meets illegal workers to ask whether the get-tough message is putting them off. And he reveals the ways in which both employers and workers are getting round the law. So can the UK Border Force deliver on ministers' promises to make the UK an "unattractive" place for those who want to work illegally?

Reporter: Simon Cox Producer: David Lewis.

Inside The Abattoir2014061720140622

The recent furore over halal meat has focused attention on how our meat is killed and processed.

But beyond the ethical and religious debate over halal, are there bigger concerns about how abattoirs are regulated and policed?

Companies have been fined for failing to remove body parts associated with the human form of mad cow disease, BSE.

Now there are plans to shake-up the inspection process which critics say this could lead to more infected animals entering the food chain.

There are also claims that vets based in abattoirs to monitor animal welfare - and inspectors who check meat we eat is safe - regularly face threats and intimidation.

Allan Urry investigates the grim realities of the slaughterhouse.

Producer: Carl Johnston.

After the recent debate over halal meat, Allan Urry investigates Britain's abattoirs.

Insolvency Practitioners20101017

Do Insolvency Practitioners measure up to the high standards expected of them when they are called in to a stricken business? Allan Urry examines concerns that some IP's don't always act in the best interests of creditors who are owed money when companies fail.

Are landlords right to complain they've been getting a raw deal because some corporate undertakers side too much with their retail paymasters, who are pushing for reduced rents because their businesses are in trouble.

The Office of Fair Trading is calling for far reaching reforms amid concerns about high fees and low recovery rates for some creditors.

So is there proper oversight of a profession which takes a billion pounds in fees each year, but isn't subjected to much public scrutiny?

PRODUCER: Paul Grant.

Allan Urry investigates concerns about the role of insolvency practitioners.

Insurance And Child Abuse2015022420150301 (R4)

With a growing number of compensation claims arising from cases of historic sexual abuse and more recent high profile cases of sexual grooming, Tim Whewell investigates the key role which insurance companies play. In representing the local authorities where scandals occurred, insurers naturally seek to limit liability but are they doing so at a cost to victims? Lawyers say they have to battle to get access to files and other information - causing further distress and delaying help for those damaged by abuse. Some say the fight is getting harder as insurance companies have toughened their approach in recent years. And, with a national inquiry into historic cases of child sex abuse, how much influence did insurance companies have on the way some past investigations were carried out? File on 4 talks to senior local authority insiders who say they were told to alter their approach to abuse investigations to protect the insurers' interests. But was that at the expense of children at risk?

Reporter: Tim Whewell Producer: Sally Chesworth.

Intensive Care2004022420040229

With doctors and the Government at loggerheads over claims of a crisis in NHS intensive care, Matthew Hill asks why, despite extra funding, some patients are still being put at risk.

Iranian Sanctions2012021420120219

With the EU poised to ban oil imports from Iran, Allan Urry assesses the impact of international sanctions on Britain and Europe.

Designed to curb Iran's nuclear programme, the oil embargo could further push up the cost of fuel.

Iranian companies are involved in a number of joint ventures that bring energy into European homes and factories: File on 4 examines what will happen to these vital projects as the new round of trade restrictions begins to bite.

And British companies that trade legitimately with Iran are already finding it harder to do business. They warn that it could lead to job losses.

How will the sanctions affect Europe at a time when many economies are in recession or are just stagnating?

And how effective are the new restrictions likely to be given Iran's experience of finding ways around international controls on what it can buy and sell.

Producer: David Lewis.

How will a European ban on Iranian oil affect Britain during a period of economic gloom?

Iran's Nuclear Standoff2013052820130602

There's mounting concern over the Iranian nuclear programme. Is Tehran is simply playing cat and mouse with the international community and buying time until it is ready to develop a nuclear weapon? Evidence is emerging that Iran is co-operating with North Korea, a country which has already developed its own weapon.

The latest report from the UN's international watchdog, the IAEA, is due out next month - but has the IAEA been strong enough in its dealings with Tehran and Pyongyang?

Reporter Rob Broomby charts the history of concealment of Iran's nuclear activities and its refusal to abandon the most controversial parts of its programme, despite numerous UN Security Council resolutions and a raft of sanctions. In a detailed interview with File on 4, Iran's ambassador dealing with nuclear matters, Ali Ashgar Soltanieh, denies his country is a "serial offender". But can protestations of innocence be taken seriously when Iran still refuses inspectors access to key sites and documents?

The programme also examines the role of the IAEA in dealing with Iran and hears from former nuclear inspectors, ex-Whitehouse officials, diplomats and experts. Is the Agency up to the job of preventing states from acquiring the bomb?

Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane.

Islamic State: Looting For Terror2015021720150222 (R4)

Satellite images reveal the extent to which sites of important historical interest have been looted in Syria. Some of these are in areas controlled by Islamic State where looters are believed to pay a tax to allow them to operate. Iraqi military say evidence from a senior IS member revealed the group is making millions of pounds from the trafficking of looted antiquities

Simon Cox investigates the global trade in stolen artefacts and traces smuggling routes through Turkey and Lebanon and onto the international antiquities market.

He hears concerns that dealers and collectors are not doing enough to verify the provenance of ancient works of art and asks whether the authorities in the UK and elsewhere are doing enough to prevent the trade.

Why, for example, does the UK remain the most significant military power not to have ratified a UN convention to protect cultural property during armed conflict?

Reporter: Simon Cox Producer: Paul Grant.

Jarvis And The Private Finance Initiative2003111120031116

Jarvis plc pulled out of its railway track maintenance contracts last month.

But how good is Jarvis's reputation in its other huge contracts under the PFI? Gerry Northam reports.

/ When Jarvis plc pulled out of its railway track maintenance contracts last month, it said it was doing so because of the risk to public confidence in the company.

But how good is Jarvis' reputation in its other huge contracts under the Private Finance Initiative?

Kick Starting Recovery?2011080920110814

The Government's strategy to boost local enterprise in England began poorly.

The Director of the CBI criticised it as 'a shambles' and Business Secretary Vince Cable admitted it was 'Maoist and chaotic'.

Now 36 Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEPs) have been established with the aim of supporting economic growth and innovation and encouraging a network of Enterprise Zones.

But some experts remain sceptical.

They claim that the policy has failed to put business interests first and that in some parts of the country it has been hijacked by local politicians.

Others complain that areas of deprivation have been overlooked in favour of more affluent neighbours.

There is also concern that the strategy is not implementing the government's policy of localism.

Can LEPs deliver the economic fruits they promise? Or will some just fizzle out, as one insider fears? Gerry Northam reports.

Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane

Editor: David Ross.

Can the government's strategy to boost local enterprise recover from a 'chaotic' start?

Killers Released From Secure Wards2004030920040314

Each year, scores of killings are carried out by people with a history of mental illness, some of them patients released from secure wards against the advice of doctors.

For almost a decade, both Tory and Labour ministers have pledged new measures to cut the death toll - so why then has so little been done.

Julian O'halloran reports.

Late Payments2014070820140713

Last month, in the Queen's Speech, the Government announced a series of measures to support small businesses -- including proposals to deal with the problem of late payment of bills by larger companies.

It follows a long history of horror stories about major high street names leaving suppliers and sub-contractors out of pocket because of delays in settling accounts.

Figures produced by the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills revealed that 85 per cent of small and medium sized businesses said they had experienced late payment in the last two years and that, in total, there was £30bn outstanding to them.

But File on 4 has found that it's not just in private business that serious problems are occurring.

The programme speaks to business owners who say that that ineffective rules and sanctions have left them badly out of pocket on contracts undertaken in the public sector.

Local authorities, the NHS and other Government departments have strict rules about how long they should take to pay their contractors.

But Jenny Chryss reveals how some small firms are having to cut back on staff because bills still aren't being settled promptly.

And she reveals how big contractors who do get paid on time, often delay before passing the money down the supply chain.

So are critics right when they say the Government's proposed new measures still aren't enough to deal with the problem?

Reporter: Jenny Chryss Producer: Emma Forde.

Learning And Skills Council2007022020070225

The government has been spending billions of pounds trying to equip young people with the skills industry says it needs to stay competitive.

So why are we still so short of plumbers and plasterers? Allan Urry examines the performance of the Learning and Skills Council, Britain's largest quango, and asks whether it can fix it.

Links Between Government And The Defence Industry2003051320030518

Allan Urry investigates how the war in Iraq has created a boom time for the defence industry.

and reveals new evidence of the extent of the links between Government and the industry.

Liquid Assets2014011420140119

As water companies submit their spending plans for the next five years, Lesley Curwen investigates what happens to the money once the household water bill has been paid.

Half of England's water companies are now in the ownership of global investment funds. In many cases these corporate bodies are run and financed from abroad behind closed doors. They use a web of companies some in off-shore tax havens to provide a steady flow of dividends to their shareholders.

But is their mechanism for generating shareholder income at the expense of the customers who are looking for lower bills and sustained investment in their water supply?

Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane.

Madrassas20111023

Earlier this year, an imam working in Stoke-on-Trent was jailed for raping a 12 year old boy at his mosque.

In the wake of the case, File on 4 investigates whether the thousands of children who visit mosques and madrassas each week to study the Quran are being properly protected.

The leader of the Muslim Parliament of Great Britain has warned that without urgent action, his religion could face an "avalanche" of historic cases similar to the ones which have swamped the Roman Catholic church.

Already, several other abusers whose crimes remained undetected for decades have been brought to court.

How can parents be sure their children are safe in unregulated madrassas where no-one ensures proper criminal record checks are made on staff and volunteers? And should the ban on corporal punishment in schools be extended to cover madrassas when some children still face physical punishment?

Fran Abrams investigates.

Producer: Sally Chesworth.

Are children at risk of abuse in Britain's unregulated madrassa schools?

Mali: Europe's Terror Threat2013031220130317

The French authorities acknowledge their intervention in Mali has made them terrorist target number one. In recent weeks, the country has raised its threat level - with high visibility police patrols at tourist destinations and government buildings - and a number of people suspected of planning to join Islamic extremists in Mali have been arrested.

Jenny Cuffe examines concerns in France both about the rise of Islamist extremism and the tough action the authorities are taking in response. Last October, police uncovered bomb making equipment following a grenade attack on a Jewish butchers in Paris. Eight months earlier, extremist Mohamed Merah killed three soldiers and a rabbi and three children outside a Jewish school in Toulouse. Meanwhile more than 100 imams deemed to be dangerous have been deported in the last ten years and several more are currently under threat of being expelled.

The programme also examines the threat to the UK. Jihadist groups in North Africa have warned that they will target supporters of the French action in Mali. The British Government is currently seeking to deport a number of Algerian terror suspects and authorities are also investigating reports that a British man has been arrested trying to make his way to join jihadists fighting in Mali.

Presenter: Jenny Cuffe

Producer: Paul Grant.

Memory On Trial2011032920110403

Do we understand enough about how memory works to properly assess evidence in sex abuse cases when allegations date back decades? Can juries make decisions based on their common sense in complex cases?

The number of so called "historic abuse cases" making their way through the coruts has increased in recent years following changes in the law that make it easier to bring them to trial and a greater willingness on behalf of victims to come forward.

These are among the most difficult cases the justice system handles given the highly sensitive nature of the allegations being made and the often lengthy gap between the events in question and the prosecution.

Many cases now turn on one person's word against another and therefore rely heavily on the quality of memory evidence each side can bring.

But even the memory experts are divided on how the court process should assess memory evidence.

Whist many victims never forget their abuse, some psychologists say people can genuinely block out or forget abuse and then remember it in detail later in life.

But others warn of "false memory syndrome" and claim that in some cases allegations are wrongly based on ideas that have arised during therapy or from third party experiences which complainants adopt as their own.

In this week's File on 4, Jackie Long examines concerns from across the criminal justice system - from lawyers who claim the system is creating "a new genre of miscarriages of justice" because defendants cannot get a fair trial, from victims who say their long-held memories are being branded as false in court and from psychologists who question how well equipped our courts are to consider such evidence.

So how much do we know about how memory works? And is the courtroom the right place to get to the truth?

Producer Sally Chesworth.

Can memory evidence alone deliver justice in sex abuse cases when claims go back decades?

Mercury And Autism2003062420030629

Gerry Northam investigates claims that the mercury in some injections given to babies is linked to the rise in autism.

Minding The Gap: Mental Healthcare2015051920150524 (R4)

Mental health services are facing a period of unprecedented change. The Department of Health has committed itself to reducing the disparity between spending on physical and mental illness, and a new payment system means services will be funded differently in the future. In the meantime there are concerns that vulnerable patients are dying because of pressures to release them from hospital too quickly, and a failure to provide adequate support in the community.

Can a new focus on what has traditionally been dubbed a 'Cinderella service' reverse the impact of years of cuts?

Reporter: Adrian Goldberg

Producer: Gail Champion.

Miscarriage Of Justice2014052020140525

How effective is the system for investigating miscarriages of justice in England and Wales?

Critics say the Criminal Cases Review Commission, the body charged with examining potential wrongful convictions, lacks teeth and needs to be thoroughly reformed.

Are they right?

Allan Urry examines cases in which prisoners, campaigners and lawyers say the CCRC doesn't do enough for those who continue to protest their innocence.

Should the Commission be making more use of the latest DNA techniques to re-examine verdicts which relied on circumstantial evidence?

And why did the CCRC twice refuse to pursue the case of a man who spent 17 years in prison for a serious sex crime he didn't commit?

Producer: Rob Cave.

Missing Medicines2015092920151004 (R4)

Allan Urry investigates why the NHS is running short of some life-saving medicines.

Why is the NHS struggling to get hold of some life-saving medicines for its patients? Allan Urry reveals serious concern over the availability of some drugs used in the treatment of cancer and for pain control. Pharmacists and doctors say they face a daily battle to get access to a range of medicines and either end up buying alternatives at a greater cost to the health service or using less effective alternatives which can compromise patient care. So is the Government doing enough to ensure essential supplies are available? And has Whitehall's drive to push down the NHS drugs bill deterred some manufacturers from supplying the UK?

Reporter: Allan Urry Producer: Emma Forde.

Mosques And Abuse2004072020040725

Zaiba Malik investigates claims that physical and financial abuses are going unchecked in some of Britain's mosques.

The Government is planning to bring in new measures to regulate imams, but do the proposals go far enough?

Murder Rates2003061720030622

The murder rate in England and Wales has risen by more than twenty per cent in the last five years, and some police forces are so stretched, they're having to hire retired detectives to lead murder inquiries.

Allan Urry asks whether we're losing the fight against the most serious of all crimes.

Neonatal Care2003022520030302

Medical errors contribute to the deaths of four babies in Britain every day.

Matthew Hill asks why we still lag behind other European countries in standards of neonatal care.

Nhs Contracts: Tender Issues20160126
Nhs Contracts: Tender Issues2016012620160131 (R4)

File on 4 investigates the collapse of one of the NHS's biggest healthcare contracts.

File on 4 uncovers the story behind the collapse of one of the biggest health contracts ever put out to tender. Last April an NHS consortium of Cambridge University Hospitals and Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust successfully bid to run older peoples' health services. But in December the £800m, five year contract ended without warning, with local commissioners saying only that it was "no longer financially sustainable." Jane Deith asks what the failure of the Cambridgeshire contract means for the broader policy of trying to improve NHS services by opening massive contracts to competition between Trusts and the private sector.

Reporter: Jane Deith Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane.

Nhs Procurement20111002

The Department of Health wants to slash £1.2 billion off the bill for hospital supplies -- everything from bandages and rubber gloves to operating tables and medical equipment.

The planned savings form part of the £20 billion in NHS efficiency savings the Government has pledged to make by 2014.

There's plenty of scope for savings.

A recent survey found one Hospital Trust bought 177 different types of surgical gloves.

Across the NHS, hospitals buy more than 1,700 different kinds of canula.

Rationalising this medical shopping list could free-up £500 million a year for investment in patient care, the National Audit Office estimates.

But can the increasingly complex NHS procurement system in England deliver the major savings the Government wants to see?

Critics say Foundation Hospital Trusts increasingly make their own buying decisions, with little or no national co-ordination.

Inside hospitals, managers tasked with purchasing millions of pounds worth of equipment often lack the authority or the support of their superiors to drive through savings.

Meanwhile new private sector companies are moving in to take over the purchase and supply of NHS equipment.

Will the Government's plans for a more devolved health service help or hinder the drive to save taxpayers' money.

Jenny Cuffe investigates.

Producer: Andy Denwood.

Does the NHS spend too much on bandages and syringes? Jenny Cuffe investigates.

Nhs Queues20120612

Hospital waiting times are a key measure of success for the NHS. But do the official figures accurately reflect the reality for patients across the UK?

In Scotland the waiting time data has been called into question after a hospital trust was exposed for manipulating the figures in order to hit its targets. There's now an investigation to see if the practice has become widespread.

In England the Health Secretary has hailed latest statistics showing a fall in the number of people waiting for treatment as a great achievement. However there's evidence which suggests the pressure to meet waiting list targets is leading to gaming of the system.

Jane Deith investigates.

Producer Ian Muir-Cochrane.

Nhs: Pricing Patients2013070220130707

With attention on A&E, is there a bigger problem in the way hospitals are funded?

NHS hospitals in England are back in the spotlight with a crisis in A&E and a growing number of cancelled operations. But does the real problem lie in the way the Government is currently funding them?

The Department of Health uses a system called Payment by Results to try to ensure better patient care is delivered more efficiently. However Allan Urry hears from hospitals which say they're being treated unfairly and losing millions because of perverse tariffs which short-change them. Critics say the payments system is no longer fit for purpose.

So how deep is the financial crisis facing our hospitals? Could budget cuts and the rising costs of admissions push some of them over the edge?

PRODUCER: EMMA FORDE

EDITOR: DAVID ROSS.

Northern Ireland: A Bitter Legacy2014061020140615

How well is Northern Ireland dealing with the legacy of 30 years of sectarian violence?

More than 15 years ago, the Good Friday Agreement came into force - bringing an end to three decades of violence in Northern Ireland.

At the heart of the peace process is a commitment to bring truth and justice to the bereaved. But many families say they're still waiting.

The peace process also promised to bring Protestants and Catholics closer together. But, in some communities still divided by peace walls, there remains a deep mistrust of their neighbours.

So have politicians failed in their promise to deal with the legacy of the past?

And how much do we really know about the deals that have already been done to protect people from prosecution?

BBC correspondent Chris Buckler investigates.

Producer: David Lewis.

Off Track: Network Rail2015070720150712 (R4)

Works behind schedule; costs going up; an inquiry into poor performance announced by the industry regulator. It's a depressingly familiar story on our railways. From brand new station escalators at a standstill in Birmingham, to only 10 per cent of trains on time at one of London's busiest stations, even the Chancellor's planned Northern Powerhouse is threatened as line upgrades between Manchester and York are delayed.

Allan Urry investigates Network Rail's woes as pressure mounts to deliver £24 billion of infrastructure improvements.

Reporter: Allan Urry Producer: Rob Cave.

Organised Crime2003072220030727

Liz Carney reports on the involvement of organised crime in Britain's casual labour market.

Organs Failure?2011032220110327

Is the NHS doing enough to combat the crisis in organ donations for transplants? Allan Urry examines the challenge of ensuring more suitable donors are available at a time when those waiting for life saving operations are increasing.

Surgeons are reporting worse outcomes for some patients, as poorer quality organs have to be used because of chronic shortages.

This comes despite a big drive by the Department of Health to improve availability.

But, are opportunities to recover more organs being missed because of the way doctors manage the care of patients who are close to death?

Producer: Paul Grant.

Is the NHS doing enough to combat the crisis in organ donations? Allan Urry investigates.

Pension Fund Fraud2004080320040808

As companies wrestle with multi-million pound deficits in their pension funds, shareholders and trustees are up in arms and workers have threatened strikes.

Michael Robinson asks why pensions are now the frontline in the battle for financial security.

Petrol Prices2013062520130630

Are petrol prices manipulated to keep them artificially high?

The way in which oil is traded on commodities markets is coming under close scrutiny. Last month, officers of the European Commission raided the London offices of BP and Shell along with Norway's Statoil company and the leading price reporting agency Platts. They said they were investigating claims of collusion to manipulate the prices of oil and biofuels on the international markets.

A leading city insider tells File On 4 that the price-reporting mechanism for oil is 'wide open to abuse'

So are petrol prices being kept artificially high by hidden forces beyond the normal workings of supply and demand ?

Gerry Northam investigates and asks whether British regulators are proving slow to recognise the potential problem.

Producer: David Lewis.

Pfi Profits2011061420110619

For two decades, the Private Finance Initiative has been a controversial way of building new hospitals, schools, roads and prisons.

Well over £200bn of taxpayers' money has been committed to the companies managing these projects.

The coalition government describes some PFI contracts as 'ghastly' and wants some of this cash back.

One cabinet minister says 'the people on the other side must have been laughing all the way to the bank'.

But, while public services are facing cuts, PFI payments are guaranteed under watertight contracts.

So experts say the government can win only small amounts in rebates.

Much of the money has already gone offshore.

Huge profits have been made by selling and reselling many contracts in a secretive 'secondary market' - with none of the proceeds returning to the taxpayer.

Gerry Northam investigates gaps in HM Treasury's knowledge of this trade and asks if PFI represents value for public money.

Producer: Rob Cave.

Have taxpayers lost billions of pounds in the secretive resale of PFI contracts?

Planning Rows20111016

With the Government's controversial reforms under fire from countryside campaigners, Allan Urry investigates radical changes to the planning system.

Ministers insist more housing is needed, fuelling fears of greenfield sites being bulldozed.

But as they begin to slim down bureaucracy to speed up development, how many more homes are actually getting built?

Under the localism agenda, communities are being told they'll get much more say about who builds what in their neighbourhood.

But what happens if it's a waste incinerator or a power station? The programme reveals how local objections are likely to been given much less consideration.

Presenter Allan Urry

Producer: Rob Cave.

Allan Urry investigates the Government's radical changes to the planning system.

Police Racism20120605

Is institutional racism still alive in the police? Black and Asian officers claim discrimination is thwarting progress through the ranks and destroying promising careers.

Police Restraint2012013120120205

Inquests in England are increasingly hearing a new term to explain deaths in police custody: Excited Delirium. It's a diagnosis with origins in the United States, where it has been associated with consumption of massive doses of cocaine. People with ED are said to possess super-human strength and to be largely impervious to pain. They behave bizarrely, sometimes destructively.They often seem paranoid and frequently resist arrest. As police struggle to restrain them they overheat and die.

But critics -- including some British Pathologists -- point out that Excited Delirium is not recognised by the World Health Organisation and that there is a lack of valid research. Civil liberties organisations fear that the diagnosis might be employed to excuse improper use of restraint techniques by police.

For 'File on 4' Angus Stickler has travelled to the cocaine capital of the United States, Miami, where police and scientists are attempting to define and deal with the controversial condition.

And in England he speaks to families whose loved ones have died after being restrained by the police. Is Excited Delirium well-enough understood to be used by courts? And just how many people are dying while being restrained -- either in custody or while being arrested? Are the official figures reliable?

Producer: Andy Denwood.

Angus Stickler investigates deaths in police custody.

Power Corrupts19960130

Mark Whitaker reports on US takeovers of British utilities.

Produced by David LEWIS.

Subject Categories

current affairs programmes (genre)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

amalgamations (private industry)

companies (business)

Broadcast history

30 Jan 1996 BT=1920 (RADIO 4)

03 Feb 1996 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Mark Whitaker

David Lewis (Producer)

Stephen Littlechild (Speaker)

Paul Hilton (Speaker)

Greg Palast (Speaker)

Luis Reyes (Speaker)

Roberta Bass (Speaker)

Kyle Croft (Speaker)

Bill Dahlberg (Speaker)

Bobby Durden (Speaker)

John Horton (brother (spkr)) (Speaker)

Ron Methier (Speaker)

Allen Mosbaugh (Speaker)

Recorded on 1996-01-23.

Practices Under Pressure2014052720140601

GPs are under pressure to do more. The Government wants surgeries to open seven days a week and the Labour Party say they'll ensure people get appointments within 48 hours. But, at the same time, there are warnings that the family doctor service in England is on the brink of extinction because of a "perfect storm" of funding cuts and growing demand.

Jenny Cuffe meets two doctors - one in rural Yorkshire, who is about to lose a quarter of his funding and does not know how he can keep his surgery doors open and the other struggling to cope with the volume of patients in her busy urban practice in Salford.

One in seven primary care practices in England reports having to make redundancies as a result of the Government spending squeeze.

Recruitment for new GPs is still to hit Government targets and more doctors are leaving general practice through retirement or to work abroad.

So are the promises of greater access to your GP really deliverable?

GPs are under pressure do more. The Government wants surgeries to open seven days a week and the Labour Party say they'll ensure people get appointments within 48 hours. But, at the same time, there are warnings that the family doctor service in England is on the brink of extinction because of a "perfect storm" of funding cuts and growing demand.

Reporter: Jenny Cuffe. Producer Ian Muir-Cochrane.

Prison Violence2015011320150118 (R4)

With serious assaults at a record high, is there a crisis unfolding in the prison system?

With serious assaults at a record high, File on 4 investigates the growing tension within Britain's prisons.

In the first of a new series, BBC Home Affairs correspondent Danny Shaw meets recently released prisoners and families of those inside to hear about their safety fears.

And he talks to the Prison Officers Association about their concerns for the frontline members who they say are facing unprecedented levels of pressure and danger in a "chaotic" system.

The Howard League for Penal Reform has used Ministry of Justice figures to calculate that around 40% of prison officer jobs have been cut - leaving inmates spending longer locked in their cells and less time preparing for their release.

Lawyers and campaigners tell File on 4 that overcrowding and gang activity are adding to a "toxic mix" of problems leading to instability and tension.

Twenty five years after the prison system was shaken by a series of riots centring on Strangeways in Manchester, is a new crisis starting to unfold?

Reporter: Danny Shaw Producer: Sally Chesworth.

Private Equity: Winners And Losers2014110420141109 (R4)

Recent high-profile collapses of high street names such as Comet, Phones4U and other companies have left thousands of people out of work and have cost the taxpayer millions in statutory redundancy payments and unpaid taxes. This week File on 4 goes behind the headlines to examine the role of the companies' private equity backers. Were these failed businesses which were bound to have to close? Or might they have survived for longer under different ownership? Fran Abrams investigates.

Producer: Emma Forde.

Private Finance Initiative2004070620040711

As taxpayers spend billions on hospitals, schools and roads under the Private Finance Initiative, the government says we get good value for money.

So how can private companies make multi-million pound windfalls simply by juggling their PFI contracts?

Programme Catalogue - Details: 03 April 199019900403

Next in series: 04 April 1990

Previous in series: 28 March 1990

Description

SBH:Sweden.

A report on strains in the welfare state.

Interviewer: Haig Gordon.

Broadcast history

03 Apr 1990 00:00-00:00 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Haig Gordon (int)

Carl Bildt (Speaker)

Alan Pryke (Speaker)

Lars Ramqvist (Speaker)

Per Edin (Speaker)

Ove Cederlund (Speaker)

Juhan Aare (Speaker)

Ulla Eriksson (Speaker)

Lisbeth Hoby (Speaker)

Bo Krogvig (Speaker)

Helen Mugale (Speaker)

Svante Oberg (Speaker)

Gudrun Schyman (Speaker)

Notes: CAIRS 406873.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 04 April 199019900404

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: CRACK ON THE FRONT LINE

Previous in series: 03 April 1990

Broadcast history

04 Apr 1990 16:05-16:45 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-04-03.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 04 February 199519950204

Producer: K.

BARRINGTON

Next in series: 11 February 1995

Previous in series: 28 January 1995

Broadcast history

04 Feb 1995 17:00-17:40 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1995-01-31.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 04 July 199019900704

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: CHILE

Previous in series: MUSLIM SCHOOLS

Description

Radio 4's investigative documentary series.

David LEVY reports on Risks to Surgeons from the AIDS Virus.

Produced by Rod CROCKER and edited by Gerry Northam.

Subject Categories

documentaries (programme format)

current affairs programmes (genre)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

aids (acquired immune deficiency syndrome)

surgeons

Broadcast history

04 Jul 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

David Levy

Gerry Northam (ed)

Rod Crocker (Producer)

Michael Adler (Speaker)

Derek Ogg (Speaker)

Hacib Aoun (Speaker)

John Peutherer (Speaker)

Michael Hullin (Speaker)

Linda Maccallum (AIDS clinician (spkr)) (Speaker)

Arnold Maran (Speaker)

Neil (drug addict (spkr)) (Speaker)

Phyllis George (Royal College of Surgeons (spk) (Speaker)

Colin Robertson (physician (SPKR)) (Speaker)

Neil Robertson (GP (spkr)) (Speaker)

Recorded on 1990-07-03.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 05 December 199019901205

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: GULF TROOPS

Previous in series: 28 November 1990

Description

Stuart SIMON reports on the electoral implications of economic policies.

Subject Categories

investigative programmes (presentation style)

elections

economic policy

Broadcast history

05 Dec 1990 11:02-11:42 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Stuart Simon

Rod Crocker (Producer)

Graham Mather (Speaker)

Jacques Arnold (Speaker)

David Kern (Speaker)

Trevor Cass (Speaker)

Alistair Hatchett (Speaker)

Graham Cole (Kent Today (spkr)) (Speaker)

Gavyn Davies (goldman sachs (spkr)) (Speaker)

Jack Davies (blue circle cement (spkr)) (Speaker)

David Sanders (essex uni (spkr)) (Speaker)

Recorded on 1990-12-04.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 06 February 199619960206

Producer: L.

JONES

Next in series: 13 February 1996

Previous in series: POWER CORRUPTS

Description

Jane DODGE reports on deaths of the mentally ill.

Produced by Lynne JONES.

Subject Categories

current affairs programmes (genre)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

victims

death

mental disorders

Broadcast history

06 Feb 1996 19:20-20:00 (RADIO 4)

10 Feb 1996 17:00-17:40 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Jane Dodge

Lynne Jones (Producer)

M (Speaker)

Trevor Turner (Speaker)

Elaine Murphy (Speaker)

Jeremy Holmes (Speaker)

Sue Simmons (Speaker)

Gary Blackler (Speaker)

William Boyd (doctor (spkr)) (Speaker)

Janey Antoniou (Speaker)

Andy Gage (Speaker)

Sylvester George (Speaker)

Denis Hext (Speaker)

Sharon Kehoe (Speaker)

Janet Richardson (Hackney community health counc) (Speaker)

Carol Schiller (Speaker)

John Schiller (Speaker)

Alan Francis (patient (spkr)) (Speaker)

Recorded on 1996-01-30.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 06 February 199619960210

First broadcast on 1996-02-06

Producer: L.

JONES

Next in series: 13 February 1996

Previous in series: POWER CORRUPTS

Description

Jane DODGE reports on deaths of the mentally ill.

Produced by Lynne JONES.

Subject Categories

current affairs programmes (genre)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

victims

death

mental disorders

Broadcast history

06 Feb 1996 19:20-20:00 (RADIO 4)

10 Feb 1996 17:00-17:40 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Jane Dodge

Lynne Jones (Producer)

M (Speaker)

Trevor Turner (Speaker)

Elaine Murphy (Speaker)

Jeremy Holmes (Speaker)

Sue Simmons (Speaker)

Gary Blackler (Speaker)

William Boyd (doctor (spkr)) (Speaker)

Janey Antoniou (Speaker)

Andy Gage (Speaker)

Sylvester George (Speaker)

Denis Hext (Speaker)

Sharon Kehoe (Speaker)

Janet Richardson (Hackney community health counc) (Speaker)

Carol Schiller (Speaker)

John Schiller (Speaker)

Alan Francis (patient (spkr)) (Speaker)

Recorded on 1996-01-30.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 06 June 199019900606

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: 13 June 1990

Previous in series: HIGH SPEED RAILWAYS

Description

Radio 4's investigative documentary series.

Haig GORDON reports on the Economic Impact of Urban Regeneration on Glasgow.

Produced by Lynne JONES and edited by Gerry Northam.

Subject Categories

documentaries (programme format)

current affairs programmes (genre)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

Broadcast history

06 Jun 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Haig Gordon

Gerry Northam (ed)

Lynne Jones (Producer)

Pat Lally (Speaker)

Alf Young (Speaker)

Morag Gillespie (Speaker)

Hugh Savage (Speaker)

Eileen Mckay (Castlemilk Partnership (spkr)) (Speaker)

Robin Boyle (Strathclyde University (spkr)) (Speaker)

David Macdonald (Glasgow Action (spkr)) (Speaker)

Ron Harrison (student loans (spkr)) (Speaker)

Erskine Mckay (Speaker)

Mary Miller (Castlemilk Umbrella Group (spk) (Speaker)

Billy Morton (Speaker)

Gerry Dixon (Emporio Armani (spkr)) (Speaker)

Douglas Loan (Speaker)

Recorded on 1990-06-05.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 07 February 199019900207

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: 14 February 1990

Previous in series: 30 January 1990

Description

Liz CARNEY investigates the 51m programme of community projects planned for Docklands.

Subject Categories

docklands action group

Broadcast history

07 Feb 1990 16:05-16:45 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Linda Alexander

Liz Carney (Producer)

Margaret Thatcher (Speaker)

Stephen Timms (Speaker)

Connie Hunt (Speaker)

Yve Amor (Speaker)

Jonathan Matthews (Speaker)

David Dickinson (stanhope properties (spkr)) (Speaker)

Chris Dobbing (Speaker)

Sally Edwards (housing refurbishment officer) (Speaker)

Elizabeth Filkin (community services director (s) (Speaker)

Michael Honey (LDDC (spkr)) (Speaker)

Marie James (public affairs (spkr)) (Speaker)

Richard Roberts (Barley Mow tenants assoc (spkr) (Speaker)

Limbert Spencer (Speaker)

Recorded on 1990-02-06.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 07 March 199019900307

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: PRO-LIFE CAMPAIGNERS

Previous in series: SHIPBUILDING IN SUNDERLAND

Broadcast history

07 Mar 1990 16:05-16:45 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-03-06.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 07 November 199019901107

Producer: L.

WALKER

Next in series: 14 November 1990

Previous in series: 31 October 1990

Description

David NISBET investigates the allocation of council housing in Oldham.

Produced by Lynne JONES

Subject Categories

investigative programmes (presentation style)

local government

Broadcast history

07 Nov 1990 11:02-11:47 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

David Nisbet

Lynne Jones (Producer)

Duncan Forbes (Speaker)

Valerie Karn (Speaker)

Richard Seager (Speaker)

Brian Lund (Speaker)

John Maudsley (Speaker)

Dave Cochrane (Speaker)

Abdul Chowdry (Speaker)

Mohammad Athar (Speaker)

Phil Atherton (Speaker)

Maggie Harding (Speaker)

Melanie Kilroy (Speaker)

Abdul Kuyyum (Speaker)

Abdul Mumin (Speaker)

Recorded on 1990-11-06.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 10 January 199019900110

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: 17 January 1990

Previous in series: 20 December 1989

Description

Helen BOADEN investigates 'Banbury School'

Subject Categories

documentaries (programme format)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

Broadcast history

10 Jan 1990 16:05-16:45 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Helen Boaden

Gerry Northam (Producer)

Sarah Eldridge (Producer)

Angela Rumbold (Speaker)

Richard Pring (Speaker)

Anita Higham (Speaker)

Brian Gardiner (parent governor (spkr)) (Speaker)

Chris Green (halls brewery (spkr)) (Speaker)

Donna Burton-Wilcock (Speaker)

Stuart Mason (teacher (spkr)) (Speaker)

Michael Preston (banbury school (spkr)) (Speaker)

Malcolm Smith (financial advisor (spkr)) (Speaker)

Jackie Whitehouse (Banbury Guardian (spkr)) (Speaker)

Recorded on 1990-01-09.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 11 February 199519950211

Producer: D.

ROSS

Next in series: FARMING, HEALTH SCARES

Previous in series: 04 February 1995

Description

Radio 4's investigative documentary series.

Alison HILLIARD looks at a Proposed Licensing System for Private Landlords.

Produced by David ROSS.

Subject Categories

documentaries (programme format)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

licences (customs)

rented accomodation

buildings (architecture)

renting personnel (business)

Broadcast history

11 Feb 1995 17:00-17:40 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Alison Hilliard

David Ross (Producer)

Geoffrey Cutting (Speaker)

Paul Grimshaw (Speaker)

Russell Campbell (Speaker)

Susan Devlin (Speaker)

Mike Friel (Speaker)

Joe Conway (fireman (spkr)) (Speaker)

Brendan Devlin (father (spkr)) (Speaker)

John Downie (councillor (spkr)) (Speaker)

Charlene Bronson (Speaker)

Paul Blizzard (Speaker)

Bill Jones (summerfield consultants (spkr)) (Speaker)

Sarah Nodes (Speaker)

Bob Pulford (Speaker)

Recorded on 1995-02-07.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 13 February 199619960213

Producer: J.

FRAZER

Next in series: CHILD ABUSE

Previous in series: 06 February 1996

Description

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Julian

Subject Categories

documentaries (programme format)

current affairs programmes (genre)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

military power (military art and science)

engineering (applied sciences)

Broadcast history

13 Feb 1996 19:20-20:00 (RADIO 4)

17 Feb 1996 17:00-17:40 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Julian O'halloran

David Ross (ed)

Jan Frazer (Producer)

Ann Clwyd (Speaker)

Paul Beaver (Speaker)

Andrew Tyrie (Speaker)

Alan Clarke (Speaker)

Keith Hartley (Speaker)

Harriet Lamb (Speaker)

John Reed (Speaker)

Charles Masefield (Speaker)

David Findlay (Speaker)

Ian Dixon (Willmott Dixon (spkr)) (Speaker)

Nick Prest (Speaker)

Recorded on 1996-02-06.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 13 February 199619960217

First broadcast on 1996-02-13

Producer: J.

FRAZER

Next in series: CHILD ABUSE

Previous in series: 06 February 1996

Description

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Julian

Subject Categories

documentaries (programme format)

current affairs programmes (genre)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

military power (military art and science)

engineering (applied sciences)

Broadcast history

13 Feb 1996 19:20-20:00 (RADIO 4)

17 Feb 1996 17:00-17:40 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Julian O'halloran

David Ross (ed)

Jan Frazer (Producer)

Ann Clwyd (Speaker)

Paul Beaver (Speaker)

Andrew Tyrie (Speaker)

Alan Clarke (Speaker)

Keith Hartley (Speaker)

Harriet Lamb (Speaker)

John Reed (Speaker)

Charles Masefield (Speaker)

David Findlay (Speaker)

Ian Dixon (Willmott Dixon (spkr)) (Speaker)

Nick Prest (Speaker)

Recorded on 1996-02-06.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 13 June 199019900613

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: MUSLIM SCHOOLS

Previous in series: 06 June 1990

Description

Radio 4's investigative documentary series.

Winifred Robinson looks at the state of the Labour Party in London.

Produced by Liz CARNEY and edited by Gerry Northam.

Subject Categories

documentaries (programme format)

current affairs programmes (genre)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

greater london labour party

Broadcast history

13 Jun 1990 16:05-16:45 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Winifred Robinson

Gerry Northam (ed)

Liz Carney (Producer)

David Blunkett (Speaker)

Tony Banks (Speaker)

Margaret Hodge (Speaker)

Tony Travers (Speaker)

Sally Keeble (Speaker)

Terry Ashton (Speaker)

John Mcternan (Speaker)

Lil Patrick (Speaker)

Neil Wilkinson (Speaker)

Micky Bryant (Speaker)

Andy Troke (Speaker).

Programme Catalogue - Details: 14 February 199019900214

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: 20 February 1990

Previous in series: 07 February 1990

Description

Eric ROBSON reports on the future of Britain's 11 national parks.

Subject Categories

investigative programmes (presentation style)

national parks (landscape)

Broadcast history

14 Feb 1990 16:05-16:45 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Eric Robson

Gerry Northam (Producer)

Nicola Meyrick (Producer)

John Williams (Speaker)

Fiona Reynolds (Speaker)

Jim Hunter (Speaker)

John Toothill (Speaker)

Michael Dower (Speaker)

Amanda Nobbs (Speaker)

Esme Kirby (Speaker)

Phil Belden (Speaker)

Chris Passmore (Speaker)

David Griffiths (leisure consultant (spkr)) (Speaker)

Mike Francis (Lewes council (spkr)) (Speaker)

John Bramley (laporte industries (spkr)) (Speaker)

Bill Roberts (developer (spkr)) (Speaker)

Roland Smith (Pead park (spkr)) (Speaker)

Howard White (Pead park (spkr)) (Speaker)

Recorded on 1990-02-13.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 14 November 199019901114

Producer: L.

WALKER

Next in series: 21 November 1990

Previous in series: 07 November 1990

Description

Radio 4's investigative documentary series.

Helen BOADEN reports on NHS hospital waiting lists.

Produced by Rod Crocker and Gerry Northam.

Taking part: Ben GRIFFITHS (man awaiting operation), Chris HAM (Fellow, The King's Fund College), Anthony MCKEEVER (Mersey Regional Health Authority), David Wilson (Mersey Regional Health Authority), Helen GREY (Royal Liverpool Hospital), Robert TINSTON (Royal Liverpool Hospital), Howard DAVIES (The Audit Commission), Sam LEINSTER (Royal Liverpool Hospital), John YATES (Health Service Management Consultant), Martin CLIFTON (Surgeon, West Essex District Health Authority), Micahel MORGAN (Surgeon, West Essex).

Subject Categories

documentaries (programme format)

current affairs programmes (genre)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

queues

hospitals

Broadcast history

14 Nov 1990 11:02-11:42 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Chris Ham (Speaker)

Robert Sells (Speaker)

Sam Leinster (Speaker)

Robert Tinston (Speaker)

Anthony Mckeever (Speaker)

Martin Clifton (Speaker)

Ben Griffiths (patient (spkr)) (Speaker)

Michael Morgan (doctor (spkr)) (Speaker)

Helen Grey (Speaker)

David Wilson (hospital spokesman (spkr)) (Speaker)

John Yates (health administrator (spkr)) (Speaker)

Recorded on 1990-11-13.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 17 January 199019900117

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: 24 January 1990

Previous in series: 10 January 1990

Description

Liz MCCALLUM investigates 'the young homeless'

Subject Categories

documentaries (programme format)

current affairs programmes (genre)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

children

welfare of destitute

Broadcast history

17 Jan 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Liz Mccallum

Gerry Northam (Producer)

Liz Carney (Producer)

Christopher Chope (Speaker)

Gillian Shepherd (Speaker)

Gwyther Rees (Speaker)

Andy Mudd (keyhouse hostel (spkr)) (Speaker)

Mike Campbell (economist (spkr)) (Speaker)

Jackie Coutts (Speaker)

Bob Hayden (salem training workshop (spkr)) (Speaker)

Cheryl Hine (Speaker)

Bill Killgallen (Speaker)

Mike Turner (ymca (spkr)) (Speaker)

Phil Watson (nightstop (spkr)) (Speaker)

Recorded on 1990-01-16.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 17 October 199019901017

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: 24 October 1990

Previous in series: BUSH AND GULF

Description

SBH:Scottish Fishing.

A report on fears that EEC regulations could further the decline of Scotland's fishing fleet.

Reporter: David Nisbet.

A programme in the above series.

Broadcast history

17 Oct 1990 11:02-11:47 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

David Nisbet (int)

Rod Crocker (Producer)

David Curry (Speaker)

Peter Bruce (Speaker)

Robert Shaw (Speaker)

Willie Morgan (Speaker)

John Patterson (Speaker)

Manuel Marin (Speaker)

Bob Allan (Speaker)

George Forman (Speaker)

John Forman (Speaker)

Ray Beverton (Speaker)

Grant Chisholm (Speaker)

Raymond Frazer (Speaker)

Ronnie Gilland (Speaker)

Fred Surcheck (Speaker)

John Tumelty (Speaker)

Bernhard Vaske (Speaker)

Notes: CAIRS 541187.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 18 July 199019900718

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: 25 July 1990

Previous in series: CHILE

Description

Radio 4's investigative documentary series.

Helen BOADEN reports on the Employment Training Programme.

Produced by Nicola Meyrick & Gerry Northam.

Taking part: Norman HARVEY (ET Trainee), Anna DUHIG (Inner City Training), Sarah MORGAN (fmr ET Trainee), Harry QUINTON (ICT), Trevor MENDEZ (Carpentry Trainer, ICT), Nalini MAYNE (fmr ICT), Timothy EGGAR (Minister of State for Employment), Paul CONVERY (Unemployment Unit), Judith KIDD (South East Training), John MABBOTT (National Council for Voluntary Organisations), Victor HAUSNER (Economic Consultant), David WELLS (British Gas South Eastern Chair & Chair of planned South London TEC).

Subject Categories

documentaries (programme format)

current affairs programmes (genre)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

training (employment)

ets (employment training scheme)

Broadcast history

18 Jul 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Tim Eggar (Speaker)

Paul Convery (Speaker)

Victor Hausner (Speaker)

John Mabbott (Speaker)

Norman Harvey (employment trainee (spkr)) (Speaker)

Judith Kidd (Speaker)

Anna Duhig (Speaker)

Nalini Mayne (Speaker)

Trevor Mendez (Speaker)

Sarah Morgan (employment trainee (spkr)) (Speaker)

Harry Quinton (Speaker)

David Wells (British Gas (spkr)) (Speaker)

Recorded on 1990-07-17.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 19 December 199019901219

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: 30 January 1991

Previous in series: GULF TROOPS

Description

Radio 4's investigative documentary series.

Eric ROBSON reports on British Steel and the future of Ravenscraig.

Produced by Liz Carney and Gerry Northam.

Taking part: John Potter (Church of Scotland's Industrial Chaplain at Ravenscraig works, Motherwell), Ian LIVINGSTONE (Lanarkshire Development Agency), Jim STEVENS (Fraser of Allander Institute, Univ of Strathclyde), Hamish MORRISON (Scottish Council), Michael HIRST (Scottish Conservative Assoc), Alec GARDNER (Motherwell Council), Jeremy FLETCHER (Beddows & Co, Steel Analysts), Tommy BRENNAN (Trade Unionist), William POWELL (Tory MP).

Subject Categories

documentaries (programme format)

current affairs programmes (genre)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

steel industry

british steel corporation

job losses at corus

factory closures

Broadcast history

19 Dec 1990 11:02-11:42 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Tommy Brennan (Speaker)

Jeremy Fletcher (Speaker)

Ian Livingstone (Lanarkshire Enterprise (spkr)) (Speaker)

Michael Hirst (scottish conservative associat) (Speaker)

Alec Gardner (Speaker)

Hamish Morrison (scottish council (spkr)) (Speaker)

John Potter (reverend (spkr)) (Speaker)

William Powell (politician (spkr)) (Speaker)

Jim Stevens (academic (spkr)) (Speaker)

Recorded on 1990-12-18.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 1990050919900509

09 May 1990

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: 16 May 1990

Previous in series: CRACK ON THE FRONT LINE

Description

Radio 4's investigative documentary series.

Stuart SIMON reports on arms conversion.

Produced by Gerry Northam & Lynne Jones.

Taking part: Jack DROMEY (Transport & General Workers' Union), Andrew DUNCAN (International Institute for Strategic Studies), Paul Rogers (Univ of Bradford), Piers WHITEHEAD (Rober Fleming Securities), Gerald BOXALL (Vickers Defence Systems), James LUCK (Westair), John LOVERING (Univ of Bristol), Derek BRADDON (Bristol Polytechnic), Andy DANFORD (Manufacturing, Science and Finance Union), Jonathan SAYEED (Tory MP), Peter HULME (Defence Technology Enterprises), Martin O'NEILL (Labour MP), Peter SOUTHWOOD (Defence Expert).

Subject Categories

documentaries (programme format)

current affairs programmes (genre)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

defence (ethics)

arms (military equipment)

marketing

Broadcast history

09 May 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Martin O'Neill (Speaker)

Jack Dromey (Speaker)

Jonathan Sayeed (Speaker)

Derek Braddon (Speaker)

Andy Danford (Speaker)

James Luck (Speaker)

Piers Whitehead (Speaker)

Andrew Duncan (retired colonel (spkr)) (Speaker)

Gerald Boxall (vickers (spkr)) (Speaker)

John Lovering (academic (spkr)) (Speaker)

Peter Southwood (Speaker)

Peter Hulme (defence technology enterprises) (Speaker)

Recorded on 1990-05-08.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 1990051619900516

16 May 1990

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: 23 May 1990

Previous in series: 09 May 1990

Description

Radio 4's investigative documentary series.

Winifred Robinson examines Care In The Community.

Produced by Sarah ELDRIDGE & edited by Gerry Northam.

Subject Categories

documentaries (programme format)

current affairs programmes (genre)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

social groups

conservative party policy

governments

services (social)

health services

Broadcast history

16 May 1990 16:05-16:45 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Winifred Robinson

Gerry Northam (ed)

Sarah Eldridge (Producer)

Virginia Bottomley (Speaker)

Norman Warner (Speaker)

Howard Glennerster (Speaker)

John Davies (Medway Social Services (spkr)) (Speaker)

Cyril Appleton (Cadetcare (spkr)) (Speaker)

Elsie Day (anonymous programme contributo) (Speaker)

Janice Hall (social worker (spkr)) (Speaker)

Roger Hargreaves (Tameside Social Services (spkr) (Speaker)

Trish Harlow (Speaker)

Linda C (Care in the Community patient) (Speaker)

Freda Manning (Speaker)

Sue Milne (Kent Social Services (spkr)) (Speaker)

Recorded on 1990-05-15.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 1990052319900523

23 May 1990

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: HIGH SPEED RAILWAYS

Previous in series: 16 May 1990

Description

Radio 4's investigative documentary series.

Robin LUSTIG looks at the Future of the Polish Economy.

Produced by Liz CARNEY & edited by Gerry Northam.

Subject Categories

documentaries (programme format)

current affairs programmes (genre)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

polish economy

Broadcast history

23 May 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Robin Lustig

Gerry Northam (ed)

Liz Carney (Producer)

Zdzislaw Sadowski (Speaker)

Jan Winiecki (Speaker)

Marcin Kroll (Speaker)

Andrej Wrublewski (Speaker)

Christoff Lis (Speaker)

Stash Odrowospinozek (Speaker)

Aloizy Szablewski (Speaker)

Janusz Savicki (Speaker)

Jusef Rutkowski (Speaker)

Goshia Grant (tr)

Recorded on 1990-05-22.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 20 February 199019900220

Next in series: 21 February 1990

Previous in series: 14 February 1990

Description

SBH:The Green Party: if the environment is a top political issue, why is it so low in the polls? Reporter: Robin Lustig.

Broadcast history

20 Feb 1990 00:00-00:00 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Robin Lustig (int)

David Taylor (Speaker)

Tom Burke (Speaker)

Sara Parkin (Speaker)

Richard Lawson (Speaker)

Derek Wall (Speaker)

Christopher Rose (Speaker)

Duncan Mccanlis (Speaker)

Dave Gee (Speaker)

Brian Perry (Speaker)

Andy Ellis (Speaker)

Julia Hales (Speaker)

Jenny Shearon (Speaker)

Ralph Strather (Speaker)

Notes: CAIRS 501319.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 21 February 199019900221

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: 28 February 1990

Previous in series: 20 February 1990

Broadcast history

21 Feb 1990 16:05-16:45 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-02-20.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 21 November 199019901121

Producer: L.

WALKER

Next in series: WINNIE MANDELA AND THE FOOTBALL CLUB

Previous in series: 14 November 1990

Description

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Robin

Subject Categories

documentaries (programme format)

current affairs programmes (genre)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

palestinian israeli relations

Broadcast history

21 Nov 1990 11:02-11:42 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Robin Lustig

Gerry Northam (ed)

Nicola Meyrick (Producer)

Moshe Arens (Speaker)

Faisal Husseini (Speaker)

Sari Nusseibeh (Speaker)

Haim Ramon (Speaker)

Isaac Mizrahi (Speaker)

Shoshana (jerusalem resident (spkr)) (Speaker)

Sheldon Kilmist (Speaker)

Shlomo Slonim (Speaker)

Sister Teresa (language school coordinator (s) (Speaker)

Recorded on 1990-11-20.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 24 January 199019900124

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: 30 January 1990

Previous in series: 17 January 1990

Description

Stuart Simon looks at next month's elections in Nicaragua - will the Sandinistas win amid a wave of hostility to the USA.

Subject Categories

nicaragua (central america)

documentaries (programme format)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

nicaraguan election rallies (1990)

nicaraguan presidential elections (1990)

nicaraguan problem

Broadcast history

24 Jan 1990 16:05-16:45 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Stuart Simon

Gerry Northam (Producer)

Nicola Meyrick (Producer)

Daniel Ortega (Speaker)

Adolfo Calero (Speaker)

Xavier Gorostiaga (Speaker)

Alejandro Bendana (Speaker)

Alfredo Cesar (Speaker)

Adrian Fernando (Speaker)

Socorro Garcia (Speaker)

Moises Hassan (Speaker)

Jennifer Mccoy (Speaker)

Ronald Meyreina (Speaker)

Recorded on 1990-01-23.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 24 October 199019901024

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: 31 October 1990

Previous in series: 17 October 1990

Description

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Helen

Subject Categories

documentaries (programme format)

current affairs programmes (genre)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

child abuse

sexuality (biological)

Broadcast history

24 Oct 1990 11:02-11:42 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Helen Boaden

Gerry Northam (ed)

Liz Carney (Producer)

Eileen Vizard (Speaker)

Norman Tutt (Speaker)

Jane Wynne (Speaker)

Jennifer Temkin (Speaker)

Anne Bannister (Speaker)

Les Vasey (Speaker)

Steve Maher (Speaker)

Alastair Babbington (Speaker)

Judy Bawton (Speaker)

Recorded on 1990-10-23.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 25 July 199019900725

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: 31 July 1990

Previous in series: 18 July 1990

Description

Radio 4's investigative documentary series.

David NISBET reports on the effects of interest rates on credit and debt.

Produced by Lynne Jones & Gerry Northam.

Taking part: Eileen WALKINGTON (Bath Chamber of Commerce), Nigel JONES (Bath Retailers' Assoc), Peter GILES (Bath Travel Agency), Roger BOOTLE (Economist), Alan CHARLESWORTH (Signal International), Alan LEWIS (Univ of Bath), Jane ASPDEN (Citizens' Advice Bureau), Phil PARKYN (Avon County Council), Barry BENNINGTON (Solicitor), Rodney HODGMAN (Bath Investment & Building Soc), Simon JOHNSON (National Debtline), Adrian COLES (Building Societies Assoc), Ann BRADY (Univ of Bath).

Subject Categories

documentaries (programme format)

current affairs programmes (genre)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

credit

interest rates

british economy

debtors

increases in debt

Broadcast history

25 Jul 1990 16:05-16:45 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Roger Bootle (Speaker)

Adrian Coles (Speaker)

Jane Aspden (Speaker)

Phil Parkyn (Speaker)

Eileen Walkington (Speaker)

Peter Giles (travel industry (spkr)) (Speaker)

Alan Charlesworth (business person (spkr)) (Speaker)

Simon Johnson (National Debtline (spkr)) (Speaker)

Nigel Jones (retailers' association (spkr)) (Speaker)

Alan Lewis (academic (spkr)) (Speaker)

Barry Bennington (Speaker)

Rodney Hodgman (Speaker)

Recorded on 1990-07-24.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 28 February 199019900228

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: SHIPBUILDING IN SUNDERLAND

Previous in series: 21 February 1990

Description

Stuart SIMON investigates - will emerging democracies of Eastern Europe really take Thatcherism as their guiding light?

Subject Categories

investigative programmes (presentation style)

governments

Broadcast history

28 Feb 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Stuart Simon

Sarah Eldridge (Producer)

Margaret Thatcher (Speaker)

Neil Kinnock (Speaker)

George Robertson (Speaker)

John Redwood (Speaker)

Graham Mather (Speaker)

Mike Gapes (Speaker)

Martin Jacques (Speaker)

Jan Urban (Speaker)

Stanislaw Gomulka (Speaker)

Mario Nuti (Speaker)

Tom Spencer (Conservative (spkr)) (Speaker)

Tadeusz Diem (Speaker)

Istvan Veto (Speaker)

Recorded on 1990-02-27.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 28 January 199519950128

Producer: UNKNOWN

Next in series: 04 February 1995

Previous in series: 17 December 1994

Description

Major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Gerry

Subject Categories

documentaries (programme format)

current affairs programmes (genre)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

fatal accident enquiries (inquests)

lockerbie air crash of boeing 747 (lockerbie) (dec 1988)

Broadcast history

28 Jan 1995 17:00-17:40 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Gerry Northam

Helen Boaden (ed)

David Haggie (Producer)

Peter Strachan (Speaker)

Vincent Cannistraro (Speaker)

Lee Kreindler (Speaker)

Wilfred Borg (Speaker)

Edgar Mizzi (Speaker)

Gerry Bremer (Speaker)

Michael Jones (pan am security manager (spkr)) (Speaker)

Emanual Mallia (Speaker)

Joseph Mifsud (Speaker)

Clinton Coddington (Speaker)

Dennis Phipps (Speaker)

Wolfgang Weil (Speaker)

Recorded on 1995-01-24.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 28 March 199019900328

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: 03 April 1990

Previous in series: 21 March 1990

Description

Eric ROBSON reports on the future of the British Coal Industry

Subject Categories

future of coal industry

documentaries (programme format)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

Broadcast history

28 Mar 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Eric Robson

Lynne Jones (Producer)

Gerry Northam (Producer)

Margaret Thatcher (Speaker)

Arthur Scargill (Speaker)

Cecil Parkinson (Speaker)

Roy Lynk (Speaker)

Robert Haslam (Speaker)

Gordon Mckerron (Speaker)

John Baker (national power (spkr)) (Speaker)

Steve Brunt (miner (spkr)) (Speaker)

Keith Harris (miner (spkr)) (Speaker)

Brian Hunt (national power (spkr)) (Speaker)

Andrew Saville (Speaker)

Hugh Whitehead (Speaker)

Stephen Witt (Speaker)

Recorded on 1990-03-27.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 28 November 199019901128

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: 05 December 1990

Previous in series: WINNIE MANDELA AND THE FOOTBALL CLUB

Broadcast history

28 Nov 1990 11:02-11:47 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-11-27.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 30 January 199019900130

Producer: G.

NORTHAM

Next in series: 07 February 1990

Previous in series: 24 January 1990

Description

Helen BOADEN investigates 'civil rights in the USA'

Subject Categories

documentaries (programme format)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

Broadcast history

30 Jan 1990 19:20-20:00 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Gerry Northam (Producer)

Richard Arrington (Speaker)

Amos Isaac (Speaker)

Natalie Davis (teacher (spkr)) (Speaker)

Mary Hardy (principal (spkr)) (Speaker)

Joseph Boohaker (Speaker)

Terrell Mcginnis (Speaker)

Chris Mcnair (Speaker)

Bob Wiggins (lawyer (spkr)) (Speaker)

Ken Wilks (Speaker)

Recorded on 1990-01-29.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 31 July 199019900731

Next in series: BSE

Previous in series: 25 July 1990

Description

SBH:FILE ON FOUR - BSE: 'Mad Cow' Disease.

A report on the disease & the implications for the single European market.

Act.

of John Gummer in Commons (PARLIAMENTARY RESTICTIONS APPLY); cows mooing; knife being sharpened in knacker's yard.

Reader: Peter Wheeler.

Presenter & interviewer: Eric Robson

Broadcast history

31 Jul 1990 00:00-00:00 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Eric Robson (int)

John Gummer (Speaker)

Jerry Wiggin (Speaker)

Bob Taylor (Speaker)

Paul Howell (Speaker)

Tim Green (Speaker)

Tony Andrews (Speaker)

Ray Bradley (Speaker)

Paul Cheale (Speaker)

Ron Wilson (Speaker)

Robin Craddock (Speaker)

Jean Fontaine (Speaker)

Jacques Adroit (Speaker)

Alastair Steele-Bodger (Speaker)

Juliet Davies (Speaker)

Notes: CAIRS 201103.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 31 October 199019901031

Producer: L.

WALKER

Next in series: 07 November 1990

Previous in series: 24 October 1990

Description

Radio 4's investigative documentary series.

Stuart SIMON reports on the Effects of Movement in the Housing Market on the National Economy.

Produced by Nicola MEYRICK.

Subject Categories

documentaries (programme format)

current affairs programmes (genre)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

house prices

Broadcast history

31 Oct 1990 11:02-11:47 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Stuart Simon

Nicola Meyrick (Producer)

John Major (Speaker)

Michael Spicer (Speaker)

George Walden (Speaker)

John Banham (Speaker)

Sheila Mckechnie (Speaker)

Elizabeth Anson (Speaker)

Gary Marsh (Speaker)

Clifford Chetwood (Speaker)

Peter Spencer (economist (spkr)) (Speaker)

Elaine Barber (council house tenant (spkr)) (Speaker)

Dave Averre (Speaker)

Ron Barber (council house tenant (spkr)) (Speaker)

Mike Ford (Oxford council (spkr)) (Speaker)

Matthew Manders (Speaker)

Kate Norman (programme contributor (spkr)) (Speaker)

Robin Paterson (estate agent (spkr)) (Speaker)

VAl Smith (Oxford council (spkr)) (Speaker)

Recorded on 1990-10-30.

Programme Catalogue - Details: Bse19900801

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: EGYPT

Previous in series: 31 July 1990

Broadcast history

01 Aug 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-07-31.

Programme Catalogue - Details: Bush And Gulf19901010

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: 17 October 1990

Previous in series: EGYPT

Description

Radio 4's investigative documentary series.

Stuart SIMON asks whether President George Bush has tied his own political future to the fate of Saddam HUSSEIN.

Produced by Lynne JONES.

Subject Categories

documentaries (programme format)

current affairs programmes (genre)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

Broadcast history

10 Oct 1990 11:02-11:47 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Stuart Simon

Lynne Jones (Producer)

George Bush (Speaker)

Richard Perle (Speaker)

Zbigniew Brzezinski (Speaker)

Lee Hamilton (Speaker)

Edward Luttwak (Speaker)

Geoffrey Kemp (Speaker)

James Webb (Speaker)

William Quandt (Speaker)

Peter Defazio (Speaker)

John Kelly (US milit spokesman 1990 07 31) (Speaker)

Gregory Copley (Speaker)

John Kelly (US milit spokesman 1990 09 18) (Speaker)

Recorded on 1990-10-09.

Programme Catalogue - Details: Child Abuse19960220

Producer: D.

ROSS

Next in series: 27 February 1996

Previous in series: 13 February 1996

Description

Liz CARNEY looks at how British justice deals with Child sex offenders.

Prod.

Sharon KEATLEY

Subject Categories

investigative programmes (presentation style)

criminals (criminology)

social services

sexuality (biological)

Broadcast history

20 Feb 1996 19:20-20:00 (RADIO 4)

24 Feb 1996 17:00-17:40 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Liz Carney

Sharon Keatley (Producer)

John Wadham (Speaker)

Ray Wyre (Speaker)

Howard Parker (Speaker)

Kenneth Dibble (Speaker)

Andy Brown (policeman (spkr)) (Speaker)

Ian White (Herts social services (spkr)) (Speaker)

Ted O'Sullivan (Speaker)

Terry Thomas (Leeds Metro University (spkr)) (Speaker)

Mike Hames (Speaker)

John Lambert (parent (spkr)) (Speaker)

Judith Unell (Speaker)

Colin Bailey (Charity Commission (spkr)) (Speaker)

Recorded on 1996-02-13.

Programme Catalogue - Details: Child Abuse19960224

First broadcast on 1996-02-20

Producer: D.

ROSS

Next in series: 27 February 1996

Previous in series: 13 February 1996

Description

Liz CARNEY looks at how British justice deals with Child sex offenders.

Prod.

Sharon KEATLEY

Subject Categories

investigative programmes (presentation style)

criminals (criminology)

social services

sexuality (biological)

Broadcast history

20 Feb 1996 19:20-20:00 (RADIO 4)

24 Feb 1996 17:00-17:40 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Liz Carney

Sharon Keatley (Producer)

John Wadham (Speaker)

Ray Wyre (Speaker)

Howard Parker (Speaker)

Kenneth Dibble (Speaker)

Andy Brown (policeman (spkr)) (Speaker)

Ian White (Herts social services (spkr)) (Speaker)

Ted O'Sullivan (Speaker)

Terry Thomas (Leeds Metro University (spkr)) (Speaker)

Mike Hames (Speaker)

John Lambert (parent (spkr)) (Speaker)

Judith Unell (Speaker)

Colin Bailey (Charity Commission (spkr)) (Speaker)

Recorded on 1996-02-13.

Programme Catalogue - Details: Chile19900711

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: 18 July 1990

Previous in series: 04 July 1990

Description

Will the investigation into journalist Jonathan MOYLE's death in Santiago prove a test of Chile's emerging democracy? Can the civilian administration succeed in controlling human rights violations & booming arms sales?

Subject Categories

documentaries (programme format)

current affairs programmes (genre)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

murder

marketing

Broadcast history

11 Jul 1990 16:05-16:45 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

David Lomax

Liz Carney (Producer)

Tim Sainsbury (Speaker)

Jose Zalaquett (Speaker)

Tony Moyle (Speaker)

Carlos Cardoen (Speaker)

Malcolm Coad (Speaker)

Alfredo Etcheberry (Speaker)

Annette Kissenbeck (Speaker)

Martin Pace (journalist (spkr)) (Speaker)

Pedro Del Fierro (Speaker)

Carmen Serranno (Speaker)

Alexandro Solis (Speaker)

Toro (Speaker)

Ian Williams (journalist (spkr)) (Speaker)

Recorded on 1990-07-10.

Programme Catalogue - Details: Crack On The Front Line19900410

Next in series: 09 May 1990

Previous in series: 04 April 1990

Description

SBH:Crack On the Front Line - An investigation into police tactics in dealing with the growing use of the drug Crack.

Reporter: Helen Boaden.

Broadcast history

10 Apr 1990 00:00-00:00 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Colin Sykes (rdr)

Mark Rowlinson (rdr)

Paul Sapins (rdr)

Helen Boaden (Speaker)

Roy Ramm (Speaker)

Derek Todd (Speaker)

Barry Price (Speaker)

Steve Tippell (Speaker)

Rod Ellis (Speaker)

Chris Flint (Speaker)

Angel Feliciano (Speaker)

Notes: CAIRS 453966.

Programme Catalogue - Details: Egypt19901003

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: BUSH AND GULF

Previous in series: BSE

Description

Radio 4's investigative documentary series.

Helen BOADEN reports - Egypt wants to emerge from the Gulf Crisis as a pivotal power in the Middle East, but are there risks in President Mubarak's tough stand against Iraq? Produced by Nicola Meyrick & Gerry Northam.

Taking part: Heba SALEH (Exec Ed "Cairo Today"), Alan RICHARDS (American Univ in Cairo), Hassan KAMY (Cairo Travel Agent), Atif ABEID (Minister of State for Cabinet Affairs), Boutros BOUTROS GHALI (Minister of State for Foreign Affairs), Saad EDDIN IBRAHIM (Sec Gen, Arab Thought Forum), Ahmed EL MALT (Muslim Brotherhood), Takshin BASHIR (fmr Ambassador to Arab League & spksprsn to Presidents Nasser & Sadat), Jeffrey PHILLIPS (BBC camera person in Cairo).

Subject Categories

middle east

documentaries (programme format)

current affairs programmes (genre)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

invasion of kuwait by iraq (august 1990)

Broadcast history

03 Oct 1990 11:02-11:47 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Boutros Boutros Ghali (Speaker)

Ahmed El Malt (Speaker)

Takshin Bashir (Speaker)

Saad Eddin Ibrahim (Speaker)

Atif Abeid (Speaker)

Hassan Kamy (Speaker)

Jeffrey Phillips (camera person (spkr)) (Speaker)

Alan Richards (academic (spkr)) (Speaker)

Heba Saleh (Egypt journalist (spkr)) (Speaker)

Recorded on 1990-10-02.

Programme Catalogue - Details: Gulf Troops19901212

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: 19 December 1990

Previous in series: 05 December 1990

Description

Helen BOADEN investigates the Gulf crisis - what would a war mean for Britain?

Subject Categories

documentaries (programme format)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

invasion of kuwait by iraq (august 1990)

Broadcast history

12 Dec 1990 11:02-11:42 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Helen Boaden

Lynne Jones (Producer)

Max Hastings (Speaker)

Ivor Crewe (Speaker)

Julian Thompson (Speaker)

Nik Gowing (Speaker)

Brian Hitchen (Speaker)

Michael Dewar (Speaker)

Graham Jones (journalist (spkr)) (Speaker)

David Cook (Royal Artilery (spkr)) (Speaker)

Paul Rogers (Bradford Uni (spkr)) (Speaker)

Recorded on 1990-12-11.

Programme Catalogue - Details: High Speed Railways1990052919900530

Producer: MEYRICK, Nicola

Next in series: HIGH SPEED RAILWAYS

Previous in series: 23 May 1990

Description

SBH:FILE ON FOUR: High Speed Railways.

Reporter Eric Robson appraises the international role of Britain's railway system, standing as it does, only 3 years from the opening of the Channel Tunnel link with Europe's integrated high-speed rail network.

Produced by Nicola Meyrick.

Series Editor: Gerry Northam.

Broadcast history

29 May 1990 00:00-00:00 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Eric Robson (int)

Gerry Northam (Producer)

Nicola Meyrick (Producer)

John Prescott (Speaker)

Cecil Parkinson (Speaker)

Richard Hope (Speaker)

John Banham (Speaker)

Gerald Bowden (Speaker)

Stuart Cole (Speaker)

Colin Stannard (Speaker)

David Starkie (Speaker)

Karel Miert (Speaker)

Angela Bebb (Speaker)

Regis Caillaux (Speaker)

Gerard Pinel (Speaker)

Notes: CAIRS 596383

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: 06 June 1990

Previous in series: HIGH SPEED RAILWAYS

30 May 1990 16:05-16:45 (RADIO 4)

Recorded on 1990-05-29

Programme Catalogue - Details: Muslim Schools19900620

Producer: L.

ALKER

Next in series: 04 July 1990

Previous in series: 13 June 1990

Description

Radio 4's investigative documentary series.

Robin LUSTIG investigates Islamic Education in Britain.

Produced by Nicola MEYRICK and produced by Gerry Northam.

Subject Categories

documentaries (programme format)

current affairs programmes (genre)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

islam

denominational schools

Broadcast history

20 Jun 1990 16:05-16:30 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Robin Lustig

Gerry Northam (ed)

Nicola Meyrick (Producer)

Stephen Byers (Speaker)

Angela Rumbold (Speaker)

Derek Fatchett (Speaker)

Timothy Raison (Speaker)

Sher Azam (Speaker)

Caroline Cox (Speaker)

Hannana Siddiqui (Speaker)

Kalim Siddiqui (Speaker)

Sahib Bleher (Speaker)

Nighat Mirza (Speaker)

Azam Baig (Speaker)

Michael Ash (Speaker)

John Eggleston (professor (spkr)) (Speaker)

George Benham (Speaker)

Sarah Hutchinson (Islamia Schools Trust (spkr)) (Speaker)

Recorded on 1990-06-19.

Programme Catalogue - Details: Power Corrupts19960203

First broadcast on 1996-01-30

Producer: D.

LEWIS

Next in series: 06 February 1996

Previous in series: 16 December 1995

Description

Mark Whitaker reports on US takeovers of British utilities.

Produced by David LEWIS.

Subject Categories

current affairs programmes (genre)

investigative programmes (presentation style)

amalgamations (private industry)

companies (business)

Broadcast history

30 Jan 1996 19:20-20:00 (RADIO 4)

03 Feb 1996 17:00-17:40 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Mark Whitaker

David Lewis (Producer)

Stephen Littlechild (Speaker)

Paul Hilton (Speaker)

Greg Palast (Speaker)

Luis Reyes (Speaker)

Roberta Bass (Speaker)

Kyle Croft (Speaker)

Bill Dahlberg (Speaker)

Bobby Durden (Speaker)

John Horton (brother (spkr)) (Speaker)

Ron Methier (Speaker)

Allen Mosbaugh (Speaker)

Recorded on 1996-01-23.

Programme Catalogue - Details: Shipbuilding In Sunderland19900306

Next in series: 07 March 1990

Previous in series: 28 February 1990

Description

SBH:Shipbuilding in Sunderland: a year after the men left the yards for the last time, Helen Boaden asks whether the government was right to abandon the industry & if, as its critics claim, the D.T.I.

actively prevented private enterprise from re-opening the shipyard.

Includes act.

of Margaret Thatcher at ship launch 26.4.86 & Trade & Industry Sec.

Anthony Newton announcing closure of year (Commons 7.12.88); ints.

with local people, critics of the deal & Minister Douglas Hogg, who defends the DTI's action.

Broadcast history

06 Mar 1990 00:00-00:00 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Margaret Thatcher (Speaker)

Tony Newton (Speaker)

Douglas Hogg (Speaker)

Helen Boaden (Speaker)

Kenneth Warren (Speaker)

Alastair Balls (Speaker)

Bob Clay (Speaker)

Charles Slater (Speaker)

Michael Ranken (Speaker)

Geoff Maughan (Speaker)

Alan Dickenson (Speaker)

Kevin Dolan (Speaker)

Martin Stopford (Speaker)

Notes: CAIRS 432157.

Programme Catalogue - Details: Winnie Mandela And The Football Club1990112719901201

Producer: J.

DREWRY

Next in series: 28 November 1990

Previous in series: 21 November 1990

Description

SBH:File on Four - WINNIE MANDELA AND THE FOOTBALL CLUB.

John Carlin reports on allegations that link Winnie Mandela & some of her bodyguards to the kidnappings & beatings of young people, incl.

the death of 14-year-old 'Stompie' Moeketsi Seipei.

Some of the young men from the club speak out about the courts & hit squads.

Producer: John Drury.

Broadcast history

27 Nov 1990 19:20-20:03 (RADIO 4)

01 Dec 1990 22:15-23:00 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

John Drury (Producer)

Peter Wheeler (rdr)

Jabu Mbala (rdr)

Nelson Mandela (Speaker)

Winnie Mandela (Speaker)

John Carlin (Speaker)

Murphy Morobe (Speaker)

Katiza Cebekhulu (Speaker)

Dudu Chili (Speaker)

Nomavenda Mathiane (Speaker)

Lerothodi Ikaneng (Speaker)

Ntombane Msoni (Speaker)

Mr Sono (Speaker)

Notes: CAIRS 444520

First broadcast on 1990-11-27

Pro-life Campaigners19900314

As Parliament prepares for another debate on abortion, Gordon Haig reports on the growing militancy of pro-life campaigners.

Incl.

act.

of anti-abortion demonstration and clip of Rescue UK training video.

Contributors

Haig Gordon (int)

Gerry Northam (Producer)

Ann Widdecombe (Speaker)

David Alton (Speaker)

Audrey Wise (Speaker)

Liz Davies (Speaker)

Diane Munday (Speaker)

James Morrow (Speaker)

Phyllis Bowman (Speaker)

David Paintin (Speaker)

Leonora Lloyd (Speaker)

Christopher Whitehouse (Speaker).

Public Interest Immunity2003120220031207

sometimes known as a 'gagging order' - is increasingly used by the Government and its agencies to prevent juries from seeing sensitive information.

But, after criticism from the European Count of Human Rights, Fran Abrams asks whether British justice is being corroded by a culture of secrecy.

Public, Private And Profitable2012102320121028

After the West Coast rail debacle, Michael Robinson investigates government outsourcing.

The midnight collapse of the Government's plans for the West Coast main railway line once again raises questions about the outsourcing of public services to private providers.

Public bodies of all kinds now face massive budget cuts and are under pressure to deliver savings. As a result, across the country, public services of all kinds are now up for tender in the hope they can be delivered more cheaply by the private sector.

With relatively straightforward things such as refuse collection, there's general agreement that experience to date shows outsourcing can work, and can save the taxpayer money.

But with complex services in education, health or transport, the picture is far less clear.

Michael Robinson investigates the outsourcing of these complex public services and uncovers another, as yet unreported, example of huge profits being earned by major private companies at taxpayers' expense.

Producer: Rob Cave.

Recoiling The Arab Spring2012101620121021

What threat does a growing fundamentalist branch of Islam pose to Arab Spring countries?

The ultra-conservative Salafist movement, which is said to be the fastest growing branch of Islam, has been blamed for being behind many of the recent violent protests over an anti-Muslim film which appeared on the internet. Jenny Cuffe investigates the spread of Salafism across the countries of the Arab Spring. She asks what threat it poses to democracy in the whole region and also examines concerns in Europe that Salafists now represent a significant security risk.

Presenter: Jenny Cuffe

Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane.

Recruiting Terrorists2004021020040215

With continuing concern over the threat posed by al Qaeda and other terrorist organisations, Paul Kenyon investigates the methods which have been used to recruit would-be bombers in Britain, and asks whether militant groups still have too much freedom to operate here.

Repeat Offenders2014021820140223

Probation staff are currently being told where they will be working under a radical reform of the service. The government is transferring the management of low and medium risk offenders to private companies and high risk cases will be handled by a national probation service.

The Justice Secretary, Chris Grayling, says the reforms are necessary to cut reoffending rates and save money which will be ploughed back into providing support to all prisoners who have served less than 12 months.

But opponents claim the reforms are being rushed in and will put the public at risk.

Last month, it was announced the plans have been delayed. They were due to come into effect in May but the start date has been put back until July.

The new private providers will only be paid in full if they achieve a reduction in reoffending. The programme speaks to one of the companies bidding for the contracts which says payment by results will lead to innovation and visits a prison which says it is already achieving success in a pilot scheme working with prisoners serving under 12 months.

But Home Affairs correspondent Danny Shaw also talks to probation staff about their fears for the future of partnership working and hears why some of them are threatening to quit the service.

Producer: Paul Grant.

Revolving Doors2011072620110731

Each year scores of senior civil servants and ex-government ministers quit Whitehall for higher-paid posts in business.

Companies in the fields of defence, health, energy and transport are particularly keen to recruit experienced politicians, policy makers and managers with close links to the wheels of power and procurement.

This is the so-called "revolving door" between government and the world of commerce and industry.

In recent years a free flow of talent both ways has been encouraged in the name of both efficiency and better communication between Whitehall and the wider world.

But Government orders for goods and services are worth billions of £'s every year, and critics say the system is vulnerable to abuse and conflict of interest.

For 'File on 4' Julian O'Halloran examines the effectiveness of the independent committee whose job it is to police the divide and protect the public interest.

Producer: Andy Denwood.

Is there a conflict of interest when public servants take private sector jobs?

Rigged Markets?2014092320140928

Is a new scandal about to engulf the UK's banking industry? Was LIBOR just the tip of the iceberg?

Regulators around the world are looking at the way important financial benchmarks have been calculated. These are used to set the value of pension funds, investments and international contracts worth billions of pounds. Financial regulators in the UK, across Europe and in the US are investigating whether the benchmarks have been rigged to increase bank profits - and to short change their customers.

Banks are already receiving big fines over the LIBOR interest rate scandal but the focus is now shifting to the way prices in the foreign exchange, gold and interest rate swap markets have been set. Reporter Lesley Curwen assesses the evidence that banks have got together to manipulate the markets and asks what it means for the reputation of London as a global financial sector and public confidence in banking.

Producer: David Lewis.

Rising Crime Against Asian Britains2004061520040620

Barnie Choudhury reveals how British Asians are being hit by a rise in serious and violent crime, and gets exclusive access to the elite police unit at the head of the fight-back.

Rochdale Abuse: Failed Victims?2013032620130331

The high profile child sex abuse case in Rochdale last summer - in which nine men were jailed for more than 70 years for grooming underage girls - has been defined as a watershed moment in how the authorities deal with this kind of abuse.

But were there crucial failings?

In an exclusive interview for File on 4, one of the police officers involved in the case claims that flaws in the way it was handled meant important witness evidence was dropped and some abusers were never prosecuted - leaving a new generation of girls potentially at risk and victims seriously let down.

Jane Deith also hears complaints that witnesses were left without adequate support to help them re-build their lives.

Earlier this month the Director of Public Prosecutions, Keir Starmer, published new guidelines for police and prosecutors in such cases. But have they come too late for many victims?

Producer: Sally Chesworth

Reporter: Jane Deith.

Rumanian Child Slavery2003120920031214

Jenny Cuffe reports on major issues, changing attitudes, important events at home and abroad.

Russian Riches2013020520130210

London is home for many rich Russians. But how much are they vetted on arrival?

Surrey police are probing the mystery death of a Russian exile who was helping to locate millions of dollars missing from the Russian treasury. City experts claim London is one of the routes for those laundering the proceeds of Russian crime. Britain is also now a destination of choice for many wealthy Russians. But how much do we know about some of those who choose to settle here? Internationally, there's tension between Washington and Moscow over the Magnitsky Act, in which the US introduced new sanctions for Russian officials suspected of corruption, freezing their assets and barring their entry to America. Prominent MPs are arguing for similar measures here. So is Britain too lax in cases where suspicions are raised?

Reporter: Julian O'Halloran

Producer: David Lewis.

Second-class Patients?2012110620121111

Are people with learning disabilities dying unnecessarily because of poor care in the NHS?

Britain has 1.5 million people with learning difficulties, and the number is growing. Campaigners say the health service is struggling to cope: the number of specialist nurses is falling, and though extra support is supposed to be available for this vulnerable group, hospitals and other health facilities often struggle even to identify them.

Families say their relatives have been left to die in pain - and in some cases people who were not dying have had 'do not resuscitate' orders placed on their notes without being told. The learning disabled are more likely to be ill, more likely to be obese or underweight and more likely to die prematurely. And with health service cuts starting to bite, are things set to get worse? Fran Abrams reports.

Producer: Gail Champion.

Secrecy And Surveillance2013092420130929

What rights do people have when they feel they've been unfairly put under surveillance?

Recent revelations about secret mass surveillance programmes have raised fears about potential abuses of individual privacy in favour of national security.

With requests to intercept personal communications data on the rise, just who is collecting the information and for what purpose?

Even local authorities can now use surveillance powers to track employees and monitor the activities of residents.

So what rights do people have when they feel they have been unfairly targeted?

Jenny Chryss examines the role of the Investigatory Powers Tribunal - the little known body that considers complaints from those who've been under surveillance by the state.

Critics talk of an "Orwellian system" in which cases are shrouded in too much secrecy. The Tribunal usually sits in private, with claimants barred from hearing evidence and with little detailed explanation of its decisions.

So where should the balance lie between openness and effective oversight?

Producer: Gail Champion.

Secret Justice2012061920120624

Are plans for secrecy in some civil courts necessary to protect national security?

Ministers want to extend secret hearings to Britain's civil courts - so judges can deal with the increasing number of cases involving the intelligence services.

Justice Secretary Ken Clarke says it is the only way that judges can hear the testimony of spies working for MI5, MI6 or GCHQ. Getting them to give evidence in open court is not an option, he says.

A small number of courts already hold secret sessions to consider appeals from individuals facing deportation on evidence compiled by the security services. But how well does the system work? File on 4 hears evidence from lawyers who are concerned about the quality of some of the testimony given behind closed doors.

And the programme has learned of a growing number of closed justice cases being heard in Employment Tribunals where people are claiming they were sacked because they pose a risk to national security. Because the Tribunals are hearing evidence in secret, the claimants are unable to get further details of why they were dismissed.

Gerry Northam explores the operation of secret justice in British courts and asks whether its extension to more cases would be in the national interest.

Producer: David Lewis.

Shaken Babies?2011020820110220
Shaken Babies?20110215
Shaken Babies?20110215

Each year, around 250 parents and carers are accused of killing or injuring children by shaking them or inflicting some other form of head injury. But an acrimonious scientific debate over the theory behind so-called Shaken Baby Syndrome, has turned toxic among the expert witnesses whose evidence is so critical in determining guilt or innocence.

Andrew Hosken examines claims of a campaign of dirty tricks to discredit those who question the orthodoxy and hears calls from one of the country's leading pathologists for an inquiry.

Producer Paul Grant.

Short-selling Students?2014060320140608

With fees costing as much as £9,000 a year, universities must operate in an increasingly cut-throat market place. At a time when budgets in some institutions are being stretched, students are demanding more for their money.

Against a backdrop of rising complaints, the new Competition and Markets authority is considering whether to launch an investigation.

So are students getting what they pay for? And when they don't, can they get the problem fixed in a timely manner?

Why are some students taking to the courts to try to get redress?

Fran Abrams has been examining the universities' record.

Which of them have seen the biggest rise in student concerns, and which have managed to buck the trend?

Producer: Emma Forde.

Sick Of School2015031720150322 (R4)

Is the pressure on teachers reaching crisis point?

Record numbers are leaving the classroom and thousands of teachers recently responded to the Government's workload survey to say they were struggling with their workload. They blamed the pressure of Ofsted inspections and pressure from school management.

Official absence statistics are silent on the causes of sick leave - but now File on 4 reveals new figures on the number of teachers off long-term because of stress.

Jane Deith hears from those who say they were pushed to the brink by the pressure - some suicidal and others hospitalized or diagnosed with depression.

Teaching has always involved long hours and heavy workloads but, with schools' performance open to unprecedented scrutiny, some education academics argue that the 'surveillance culture' is now seriously harming teacher's health and their ability to provide high quality education.

Are they right? How alarmed should we be about the mental well-being of our children's teachers?

Reporter: Jane Deith Producer: Matt Precey.

Smuggling Bushmeat2004102620041031

With bushmeat now big business in parts of the UK, there's growing concern that the illegal trade could spread deadly diseases to humans and the animal population here.

Angus Stickler investigates the supply chain from West Africa into Britain, and asks whether enough is being done to crack down on those who hunt and smuggle some of the world's most endangered species for the dinner table.

Street Slaves2014051320140518

The Government has introduced a draft Modern Slavery Bill which is aimed at making it simpler to prosecute human traffickers and which will bring in life sentences for such offences.

But who are the victims of modern day slavery in the UK and how organised are the gangs who prey upon them?

While much concern has focused on people trafficked into the country, Jane Deith reveals how the most vulnerable in society such as the homeless and people with learning difficulties are being targeted by gangs who pick them off the streets with the offer of money and accommodation. But many say they end up working long hours for little or no pay and are too frightened to leave. Some - including people from the UK - are taken abroad to countries such as Sweden and Norway to pave driveways and other labouring jobs. Others are working in the construction industry here but being paid much less than the minimum wage.

Police say the traffickers and those who exploit the homeless and vulnerable are highly organised and often use their victims' identities to open bank accounts and commit further crimes such as benefit fraud, netting thousands of pounds and leaving their victims with huge debts.

So who's monitoring the marginalised? Will the new Bill do enough to deal with the dark side of Britain's labour market?

Reporter: Jane Deith

Producer: Paul Grant.

Superbugs2013052120130526

In the first of a new series, File on 4 asks whether recent stark warnings about the threat posed by growing resistance to antibiotics have come too late.

The Chief Medical Officer of England, Professor Dame Sally Davies, has painted an apocalyptic picture where routine operations could become deadly in just 20 years if we lose the ability to fight infection.

But the programme discovers growing concern among doctors that bugs found in our hospitals have already developed the ability to withstand drugs which are effectively the last line of defence.

Has the Government drive to eradicate MRSA and C-Difficile left the back door open for more challenging strains of superbug to take hold? Does the health service know why numbers of healthcare infections of E. Coli are rising? And where are the new medicines to tackle the resistant strains? The programme hears there's little incentive for drug companies to produce new antibiotics because they won't be able to make enough money.

Allan Urry meets the medics on the front line in the battle to stop infection killing patients. Can the NHS win the war against the microbes?

Producer: Paul Grant.

Targeting The Vulnerable20150505
Targeting The Vulnerable2015050520150510 (R4)

How sexual abusers are increasingly targeting people with learning difficulties.

It's taken a long time to break through the culture of denial, but child sexual exploitation cases from Rochdale to Oxford have shown that grooming of children can happen in any community.

There seems to be a growing acceptance that what the Deputy Children's Commissioner says is true: 'there isn't a town, village of hamlet in which children are not being sexually exploited'.

Councils that thought they were immune from groomers and traffickers, are now training staff to spot child sexual exploitation. And children are being taught how to avoid falling prey.

But, as children become more aware of grooming, are abusers increasingly turning their attention to people with learning disabilities?

In the first of a new series, File on 4 hears warnings from disability workers and detectives that abusers are increasingly targeting people with disabilities - because they're less likely to know what grooming is, less likely to tell, and if they do, their case is far less likely to go to court.

Jane Deith visits the only safe house in the UK for women with learning disabilities who've been victims of rape and sexual exploitation, and hears even this secret address is now on the radar of gangs trying to groom the residents.

Women with learning disabilities tell their stories of being groomed and exploited, how they eventually broke their silence, only to be told the crimes would not be prosecuted. Of an estimated 1400 cases of sexual abuse each year, only 1% result in a conviction.

If offenders aren't being punished, can we prevent the abuse by protecting those at risk? Councils worried someone is being exploited can go to the Court of Protection for permission to restrict their relationships on the grounds they don't have the mental capacity to consent to sex. But it's a difficult thing to rule on. File on 4 hears from disability workers who say men and women are being left open to rape and abuse, but also from campaigners who say the state is denying people their fundamental human right to sexual relationships.

Reporter: Jane Deith Producer: Sally Chesworth.

Tax Avoidance2012031320120318

How strong is the government's commitment to ending schemes set up to minimise tax? A number of schemes have proved popular in the private sector, including Employee Benefit Trusts. These have been used by football clubs for tax planning purposes, but are now in the sights of HMRC as it attempts to recoup what it sees as unpaid tax. But how widespread are these trust schemes and why are they so popular with companies that have large government contracts?

As the Treasury reviews tax avoidance by senior government employees, it has emerged that employees in other parts of the public sector are using payment schemes that keep them off the payroll. There is growing concern that paying public servants through personal service companies may be inappropriate.

How tax-compliant are the citizens of the United Kingdom? Is there a risk that publicity about the tax-avoidance schemes of the rich, coupled with easier access to information via the internet, could lead to more people trying to cut their contributions?

Presenter: Fran Abrams

Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane.

As the Treasury reviews tax avoidance, Fran Abrams asks - how widespread is the problem?

Taxing Questions2013012920130203

After a series of controversies over the tax bills of multinationals such as Google and Starbucks, ministers have been talking tough about avoidance. But as new tax rules come into operation, Fran Abrams looks at the reality behind the rhetoric. Will these new regulations halt the decline in corporate tax revenues? And why were so many major companies involved in writing them - even as their own tax affairs were coming under scrutiny?

Producer: Rob Cave.

Tennis: Game, Set And Fix?2016011920160124 (R4)

Have the tennis authorities done enough to investigate allegations of match-fixing?

File on 4 reveals secret evidence of match fixing in tennis and investigates claims that sport's governing bodies have failed to act on repeated warnings about suspect players. The programme has seen confidential documents which reveal how some were linked to gambling syndicates in Russia and Italy which won hundreds of thousands of pounds betting on matches they played in. A number of those who have been repeatedly flagged on fixing lists passed to the game's Tennis Integrity Unit have continued to attract highly suspicious gambling activity. Reporter Simon Cox also has an exclusive interview with one of the most high profile players to be banned for match fixing who says the problem is widespread in the sport.

Reporter Simon Cox Producer Paul Grant.

The Accountant Kings2014030420140309

The UK is said to have more accountants than almost any other nation on earth. Thanks to reforms in the way the public sector is run, the "Big Four" accountancy firms and the accountancy profession generally has become more powerful and more influential than ever before. But what do these accountants actually do and what does it mean for taxpayers?

To find out, Simon Cox meets the residents of Birmingham, who are dealing with the reality of the accountants' decisions. And he speaks to the nation's top accountants to ask how their profession is changing and what the future holds.

The last 20 years have seen many services which used to be run by local councils outsourced to the private sector. Capita, formed by a former government accountant, has taken the lion's share of these contracts, which often involve a team of Capita accountants deciding where to make cuts in local services. In Birmingham a massive IT and 'business transformation' contract between Capita and the City Council is proving highly controversial - with claims that it is diverting money away from public services and into private sector profit.

Private Finance Initiatives (PFIs) form another kind of management model which accountants helped create and which added to the growth of the Big Four accountancy firms - Deloitte, Ernst and Young, KPMG and PriceWaterhouseCoopers - over the last two decades. Birmingham is home to one of the biggest PFI contracts ever signed, with a private contractor in charge of roads, trees and street lights. Have the accountants engineered a good deal for Birmingham?

The next big growth area for the accountants is the NHS as doctors seek their help in commissioning and managing local services under the health service reforms. But what does this mean for the people on the NHS front line?

Reporter: Simon Cox

Producer: Lucy Proctor.

The Aid Business20150630

The Aid Business2015063020150705 (R4)

The UK's £12 billion pound foreign aid budget is one of the few areas of Government spending protected from cuts. The commitment to spend 0.7% of Britain's gross national income on aid means at least 60 billion pounds will be spent on overseas development in the next five years. Many of these projects are delivered by large companies that receive tens of millions of pounds from DFID (the Department for International Development). They can charge over a thousand pounds a day for a consultant and their directors earn six figure salaries but how effective are they are and the programmes they are paid to deliver? Simon Cox investigates the UK's aid industry and asks how taxpayers can know that they're getting value for money.

Reporter: Simon Cox Producer: Gail Champion.

The Billion-dollar Aid Question20151027
The Billion-dollar Aid Question2015102720151101 (R4)

The UK is giving a billion pounds of aid to Syrian refugees. But is it being well spent?

The Billion-dollar Aid Question20151027

The Billion-dollar Aid Question20151027
The Billion-dollar Aid Question20151027

As the crisis in Syria deepens and refugees flock westwards, the UK government insists it is helping with a £1.1bn aid package to neighbouring countries - but is it being spent wisely?

Simon Cox tracks money going from the UK to projects on the ground in Syria, Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey, trying to find out how much eventually gets to refugees. It's easy to see how funding an NGO to build new homes for Syrians is money well spent. But can the same be said for the hundreds of millions of pounds that go through the United Nations?

The programme hears from aid workers, UN officials, refugees and UN investigators about cuts to food rations against a backdrop of high salaries and overheads.

So is the UN up to the job of managing a modern-day refugee crisis?

Producer: Lucy Proctor.

The Cost Of A Cuppa2015090820150913 (R4)

Tea is still the UK's favourite drink - but what's the human cost of a cuppa?

In the first of a new series of File on 4, Jane Deith reports from Assam on the plight of workers on tea plantations which help supply some of Britain's best known brands.

India is one of the largest tea producers in the world with an industry worth billions of pounds - but critics say pickers often have to endure long working hours and insanitary conditions, leading to poor health and high levels of maternal and infant mortality.

Producer: Sally Chesworth.

The Dangers Of Modern Apprenticeship2004071320040718

The government claims its Apprenticeship scheme is the way forward for out of work youngsters who are hard to employ.

But James Silver reveals that - beyond the costly publicity - the programme is plagued by poor results, shoddy training and inappropriate placements that put young lives at risk.

The Export Credit Guarantee Department2004113020041205

File on 4 investigates Whitehall's Export Credit Guarantee Department, the department that underpins British contracts abroad.

With the government accused of back-tracking on its own anti-corruption rules, is enough being done to keep business clean?

Fran Abrams reports.

The Great Train Robbery?2010111620101121

It's been dubbed the Great Train Robbery, but Allan Urry asks who's robbing who?

With fares set to rise, the programme examines why Britain's railways are so much more expensive than other European countries.

Passengers in some parts of the UK complain they are caught out by a complex and confusing system of ticketing, which unfairly penalises them.

Does it have to be so difficult to find out what the restrictions are on your journey?

Why aren't there enough carriages for commuters travelling at peaks times? Overcrowding's got so bad, some are left behind on the platform.

Much of the criticism is aimed at the Train Operating Companies, but how much are they to blame? And why does Network Rail, the company responsible for the national infrastructure, soak up the bulk of the 5 billion pounds of taxpayer's subsidy, yet according to its regulator, is 40 per cent less efficient than its EU rivals?

Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane.

Why do Britain's railways cost more than elsewhere in Europe? Allan Urry investigates.

The Last Taboo?2014102820141102 (R4)

Is there a hidden problem of child sex abuse within Britain's Asian communities?

As inquiries into child abuse in Rotherham continue, File on 4 investigates claims of a hidden problem of sexual abuse within Britain's Asian communities.

While the victims of recent grooming scandals have mostly been white girls, campaigners say Asian boys and girls have also been subjected to abuse over many years.

Male and female survivors tell Manveen Rana there's a powerful culture of denial stopping many speaking out and getting justice. They say communities too often close ranks and ostracise or threaten those who complain, while leaving perpetrators to carry on.

Reporter: Manveen Rana

Producer: Sally Chesworth

Assistant Producer: Yasminara Khan.

The Somali Connection20101107

Jenny Cuffe investigates how British-based Somalis are being lured into fighting for the al-Qaeda-linked Islamists of al-Shabaab.

There have been consistent rumours that dozens, perhaps scores of British-based Somali men have travelled to Somalia to join the militant Islamist group which was banned by the British Government earlier this year.

In September the rumours were given new urgency when the Director of MI5, Jonathan Evans, warned it was only a matter of time before the UK suffered an act of terrorism committed by al-Shabaab-trained Britons.

File on 4 explores the techniques used by Al-Shabaab to persuade young members of the 250,000-strong British Somali community to sign up for Jihad in Somalia.

Members of the close-knit and reticent British Somali community tell Jenny Cuffe of their fears that youngsters are being seduced through the internet and by shadowy recruiting sergeants for the Horn of Africa's most feared military force.

And the programme travels to the state of Minnesota to see how a vigorous FBI investigation and cooperation from the Somali community have laid-bare a pipeline which first lured, then transported young American Somalis to the training camps and battlefields of Somalia.

Producer: Andy Denwood.

How British Somalis are recruited to fight for the banned Islamist group, al-Shabaab.

The Syrian Connection2013101520131020

Who are the British jihadists fighting in Syria and could they pose a threat to the UK?

It is estimated more than 100 British people could be fighting with opposition forces in Syria. At least one is known to have been killed in action earlier this year. File on 4 investigates who these men are and why they have gone to fight.

While some are believed to have strong Syrian connections and are motivated by personal opposition to the government, there are concerns that others have travelled there to join hardline Islamist groups. Jenny Cuffe examines how fighters are recruited and the routes they use to join up with rebel forces. The programme hears from people who have travelled to Syria and asks what danger, if any, they may pose when they return to the UK.

Producer: Paul Grant.

While some are believed to have strong Syrian connections and are motivated by personal opposition to the government, there are concerns that others have travelled there to join hardline Islamist groups. Jenny Cuffe examines how fighters are recruited and the routes they use to join up with rebel forces. The programme hears from people who have travelled to Syria and friends of those still fighting out there.

It also asks what danger, if any, they may pose when they return to the UK.

The Zombie Effect2012111320121118

What effect are so-called zombie companies having on the UK economy? Hugh Pym investigates

It's estimated there are up to 150,000 so called zombie companies in the UK. They are often defined as businesses which are only able to pay off the interest on their debts and have little prospect of growing without restructuring or an injection of cash.

The BBC's Chief Economics correspondent, Hugh Pym, examines businesses caught in this situation and looks at what effect they are having on the UK economy. He hears from business experts who say these companies are partly responsible for the poor levels of growth. They say banks have huge amounts of capital tied up in businesses which are currently going nowhere and that means they have less money available to invest in more dynamic operations which have the ability to grow and create jobs. They say the banks are also unwilling to lend because they need to build up reserves to absorb losses if these businesses eventually fail.

Private equity investors such as Jon Moulton say in some cases the companies should be allowed to fail in order to let new businesses come through. But Hugh speaks to the head of a major bank's restructuring unit which is responsible for managing companies in distress who argues these companies can be nursed back to health and it is better to keep them alive and save jobs.

This decision often involves what is known as forbearance by the banks - where they ease or modify the terms of the loan to give a company breathing space. This is happening not only in business, but in the mortgage market too where billions of pounds of loans have been converted from repayment to interest only.

Some economists warn many of these debts will never be repaid and this means the banks aren't admitting to the true level of losses they are facing. Even the governor of the Bank of England is now warning of the dangers of forbearance and says banks should ensure they have enough funds to be able to draw a line under their losses.

Presenter: Hugh Pym

Producer: Paul Grant.

Ticket To Hide2015062320150628 (R4)

Sixty thousand people have crossed the Mediterranean and made it to Europe so far this year.

Frontex, the EU border agency, warns that between 500,000 and 1 million people - Eritreans, Syrians, Afghans, Somalis - could be waiting to leave the shores of Libya for Italy.

Its latest report says resources are being devoted to migrants' care but not towards screening and collecting basic information such as their nationality - which means many are quickly moving on to countries like the UK. According to the report, 'this puts the EU internal security at risk'.

There are also fears terrorists belonging to the so-called Islamic State could secrete themselves among the migrants.

So how easy is it for people to avoid security checks as they journey across the EU?

European countries are supposed to stop illegal migrants and enter their fingerprints and details on a central database. EU rules state that the country where people are first fingerprinted must look after them and consider their asylum applications.

This means many migrants set on coming to this country try to stay under the radar in Italy and France, hoping to reach the UK without being processed.

Jane Deith follows the routes used by some of those headed for Britain.

She also investigates the smugglers who help them - from individuals using their own cars, to organized crime gangs offering money back guarantees on a new life in the UK.

Is Europe losing the battle for control?

Reporter: Jane Deith Producer: Paul Grant.

Tobacco: The Lobbyists2013071620130721

Last week, the Government dropped plans to introduce plain packaging for cigarettes in England. It said it wanted to wait and see what happens in Australia where the measure was introduced earlier this year.

Labour and health campaigners accused the Government of caving in to the tobacco lobby. A claim it has denied.

In Europe, too, MEPs are considering a new law aimed at deterring young people from smoking. The Tobacco Products Directive proposes, among other things, a ban on flavoured cigarettes and increasing the size of health warnings.

Jane Deith travels to Brussels and hears claims and counter-claims: of questionable tactics by the tobacco industry and from tobacco lobbyists who say their actions are above board and they have the right to protect their companies' interests.

And she also talks to the main players in an alleged corruption scandal which some say could have brought down the European Commission itself.

Reporter: Jane Deith

Producer: Paul Grant.

As the European Parliament prepares to vote on controversial new tobacco laws, Jane Deith asks if industry lobbying is threatening to derail the legislation.

Tolerating The Intolerant?2011020120110206
Too Many Chiefs?2012103020121104

Ahead of elections for police commissioners, do we need so many separate police forces?

In April next year, the SNP government in Scotland will merge 8 existing constabularies to create a single national police force. This is intended to bring efficiency savings by cutting out duplication of functions and gaining the economies of scale. But the move is proving controversial amid fears that it will damage local accountability and lead to worsening services in some areas.

Next month in England and Wales elections will be held for 41 Police and Crime Commissioners to oversee a continuing patchwork of local forces. The Westminster government sees the Commissioners as signs of its commitment to 'localism'. But seven years ago, Her Majesty's Inspectorate of police said the fragmented network of local forces was 'not fit for purpose'. So, given the cuts the police are facing, is it time for a radical re-organisation south of the border? Gerry Northam investigates.

Producer: Nicola Dowling.

Torturers In The Uk * *2009032420090329

Fran Abrams asks if Britain has become a haven for torturers, and investigates the case for new laws and tougher policing to prevent alleged human rights abusers from taking refuge in this country.

Fran Abrams asks if Britain has become a haven for torturers.

Town Hall Corruption2004030220040307

Tony Blair pledged he would root out corruption in Britain's Town Halls.

But six years after launching the crackdown, is the Government any closer to cleaning up the country's dirty boroughs.

Angus Stickler uncovers evidence of auditors being blocked, whistleblowers hounded out of their jobs and senior council officials prepared to break the law to cover up acts of impropriety.

Trains2004012720040201

At the heart of Britain's privatised railway system, three companies own virtually all of the country's trains.

The companies are subsidiaries of major High Street banks and were set up to help create a modern, reliable network, but are they delivering value for money for both travellers and taxpayers? Alan Whitehouse reports.

Treating Stroke: The Doctors' Dilemma2015061620150621 (R4)

Does a leading stroke drug cause more harm than good?

Later this month the medicines regulator, the MHRA, is due to complete its review into the clot-busting drug Alteplase, the frontline treatment used in many cases of stroke. A number of experts in the UK, US and Canada have raised serious doubts about the drug's safety and effectiveness. They are concerned about potentially fatal harm to patients through an increased risk of bleeding in the brain and they question the credibility of scientific research on which Alteplase was licensed. Supporters and regulators say any risks are outweighed by the benefits of improved recovery. BBC Health Correspondent Adam Brimelow assesses the evidence and the dilemma posed for doctors and their patients.

Producer: Sally Chesworth.

Tuberculosis2012073120120805

Is the NHS failing to tackle the rise in tuberculosis in Britain?

Figures released this month reveal almost 9000 new tuberculosis cases in the United Kingdom last year, the highest level since the 1970s. The disease has risen by more than a third in the past decade. In parts of London, Birmingham and other cities it is already at the level of high-risk countries in the developing world.

Yet in most of the rest of Europe TB rates have been steadily falling in recent years. Health experts have found that cases of TB remain static among people of all ethnicities who were born in Britain. They attribute the national rise in cases to migration from some former British colonies in sub-Saharan Africa and the Indian sub-continent.

Airport screening of migrants, using a chest x-ray, identifies only active cases of the disease in the lungs. It misses the much more numerous cases of latent TB which can progress to become active at any time. An estimated 10,000 cases of latent TB arrive undetected in the UK each year.

A nationwide survey of NHS blood-test screening programmes shows that the areas with populations most at risk are also those with least effort put into screening for latent disease. Patients' groups also question the level of GPs' awareness of the many manifestations of tuberculosis, citing cases of repeated missed diagnosis or misdiagnosis which have left patients suffering as the disease advances with sometimes fatal consequences.

Gerry Northam investigates the resurgence of a condition once thought to be all-but eliminated from the UK and asks if the NHS is failing to tackle it.

Producer: Gail Champion

Reporter: Gerry Northam.

Undercover Cops20121002

How far should undercover police officers go to gather intelligence?

Jane Deith talks exclusively to women suing the Metropolitan police claiming they were tricked into long standing relationships with undercover officers.

The unmasking of undercover cop Mark Kennedy who'd been infiltrating environmental protest groups has led to revelations that other officers had relationships with woman they were spying on. The women argue that the state agents they fell in love with used them physically and emotionally. They say the officers intruded into the most personal aspects of their lives causing them lasting damage. Their lawyer claims the relationships were a breach of the women's right to privacy and their right to form relationships without the interference of the state.

Yet there are no hard guidelines on undercover officers sleeping with 'targets'. The rules of engagement are shrouded in secrecy. Police chiefs have said the officers broke the rules, yet former undercover policemen say sex was sanctioned as a means of gathering intelligence. And the Government has told Parliament affairs like this can be a necessary part of undercover work.

So is forming intimate relationships a legitimate part of a difficult and vital area of policing, or an abuse of power by the state?

And, from environmental protest to serious and organised crime, how much do we really know about the secret methods of undercover policing?

Presenter: Jane Deith

Producer: Sally Chesworth.

Up To The Job?2013110520131110

Is the government's flagship Work Programme working? Gerry Northam investigates.

The Work Programme is the Government's flagship scheme designed to help the long term unemployed off benefits and into lasting jobs. But how well is it working - both for those at whom it is aimed and for the private companies who are paid to deliver it?

Official figures paint a patchy picture and some companies have already been sanctioned for not meeting targets. Their record has been particularly poor for claimants whose illness or disability makes it hard to find a job.

Despite this, the Chancellor recently announced an addition to the scheme - called Help to Work - which places new demands on those the Work Programme has failed to move into employment.

But, with the economy still struggling in many areas, is it asking too much? Gerry Northam investigates.

Producer: Sally Chesworth.

Urban Regeneration2005030820050313

Gerry Northam looks at the government's flagship strategy for urban regeneration.

Some fear that the scheme will hurt the very people it is designed to help.

Vaccination Against Hepatitis B2003102820031102

Matthew Hill investigates a proposal from a government committee that is considering a universal vaccination against the liver disease Hepatitis B.

Violent Veterans2012072420120729

Jane Deith examines new research into violent behaviour by soldiers returning from combat.

Thousands of British troops have been deployed to conflict zones since 2001, in the so-called War on Terror. Research is now beginning to confirm what many people have suspected - that a sizeable minority of returning soldiers - one in ten - are displaying increased levels of violence. This is impacting on families through domestic abuse and is raising the risk of people in the wider community becoming victims. With two years to go before frontline troops are pulled out of Afghanistan, is the Army doing enough to make sure returning soldiers are safe? And is the intensity of deployment to active combat zones making matters worse?

Presenter: Jane Deith Producer: David Lewis.

What Price Cheap Clothes?2013091720130922

In London fashion week, Jane Deith reports from Bangladesh on safety for textile workers.

Will the Rana Plaza factory tragedy mean Bangladeshi garment workers no longer have to work in death traps? It's five months on from the collapse of the 8 storey building in Dhaka, in which more than a thousand workers died, and several thousand lost arms or legs or were paralysed. Jane Deith reports from Dhaka on what's happened since. Just how much medical and financial help have survivors and families of the dead received?

Campaigners said the disaster should be a "game changer" in forcing international brands who source cheap clothes in Bangladesh to take more responsibility for conditions within the factories they use. Safety inspections of hundreds of premises are due to begin in earnest. But the Western manufacturers are split on who should pay for expensive improvements - the clothing brands or the factory owners? It's estimated that it could cost $3bn to bring all the factories up to scratch.

But there are those who argue that Western shoppers who buy the cheap clothes, and the brands that sell them, don't deserve all the blame. The Bangladeshi government continues to limit the power of trade unions and is accused of failing to act against powerful manufacturing bosses when people die in their factories.

The safety campaigners agree that Western brands pulling out of Bangladesh would be the worst result for the country's four million garment workers and the families who rely on their earnings.

So is it possible to keep them in work and keep them safe?

Producer: Sally Chesworth.

What Price Social Housing?2013102220131027

Homes at risk? Are housing associations trying to gamble their way out of a crisis?

Ministers have set a target of 170,000 new affordable homes in the next two years. But the Housing Associations which must take a major part in delivering them are under increasing financial strain.

With their incomes squeezed by benefit reform and grant cuts, many are taking a more commercial approach. But there's concern some are taking too many financial risks.

And MPs have voiced fears that the regulator charged with monitoring the associations' viability is not up to the job.

Fran Abrams investigates.

Reporter: Fran Abrams

Producer: Nicola Dowling.

Where Have All The Nurses Gone?2015012720150201 (R4)

File on 4 looks at the reasons for the nursing shortage in the NHS in England and the cost of plugging the gaps at a time of peak demand.

A decision four years ago to cut training places to save money is still haunting the health service. There's no shortage of people wanting to be nurses but the NHS is badly understaffed.

Recruitment in countries like Spain, Portugal and Italy has quadrupled in the last year as NHS trusts fail to find enough domestic nurses. But with thousands of European nurses encouraged to come here with incentives like relocation bonuses and free accommodation, why are hospitals still breaking guidelines on the level of acceptable vacancies? And how much has that contributed to the winter crisis in Accident and Emergency Units across the country?

Hospitals aren't the only area of concern. Professional bodies like the RCN say there has been a reduction in the number of experienced senior nurses working in the community. Has the recent focus on increasing nurses on hospital wards meant other areas have suffered? And what impact will that have on the Government's long term plan to solve our hospital crisis by caring for more patients at home?

Reporter: Jane Deith Producer: Gemma Newby.

Where have all the nurses gone? File on 4 looks at the reasons for the nursing shortage in the NHS in England and the cost of plugging the gaps at a time of peak demand.

Who Killed Emma?20150512

Emma Caldwell was a young woman from a good home who developed an addiction to heroin after the death of her sister and then descended into street prostitution. When her body was found dumped in a ditch in Lanarkshire in May 2005, the police launched an unprecedented murder hunt. But ten years on, after an investigation costing millions of pounds, no one has ever been convicted of her killing. Eamon O Connor investigates what went wrong.

Producer: Ian Muir-Cochrane.

Who Polices The Police?2010011920100124

Gerry Northam considers the independence of the Independent Police Complaints Commission.

In 2009, 2,445 cases, including allegations of police brutality, deaths in custody and serious negligence, were referred to the Independent Police Complaints Commission. But is it truly independent, and does its record over five years encourage public confidence? Gerry Northam investigates.

Last year 2,445 cases, including allegations of police brutality, deaths in custody and serious negligence, were referred to the Independent Police Complaints Commission.

But is it truly independent, and does its record over five years encourage public confidence? Gerry Northam investigates.

Witness Protection2012032720120401

After details of people under witness protection were leaked to a private investigator, Allan Urry asks if police are doing enough to protect witnesses whose lives are at risk.

Are the police doing enough to protect and look after people under witness protection?

Yarl's Wood20140624

On the day a parliamentary committee is due to take evidence about the Yarl's Wood immigration removal centre, Simon Cox investigates claims of sexual abuse and poor health care for the women held there.

Campaigners and detainees tell File on 4 about "a culture of disbelief" which they say exists among healthcare staff and which they claim is putting women at risk.

Serco - the company that runs the centre - insists it provides a good standard of care, but a former member of staff, speaking publicly for the first time, says concerns he raised were ignored by senior managers.

The programme also investigates claims of inappropriate sexual contact between staff and detainees and allegations of sexual abuse by staff.

Several employees were dismissed last year over sexual encounters with women being held at the centre and the House of Commons Home Affairs select committee have called the managing director of Serco to give evidence about the sexual abuse claims.

Simon Cox investigates - and hears why some MPs believe it is time for the centre to be closed.

Reporter: Simon Cox Producer: Sally Chesworth.

012005053120050605

After the collapse of Rover, Allan Urry investigates other companies that have gone bust, and asks whether Britain does enough to prevent insolvency, debt and job losses caused by business failures.