Fi Sci - Fiction Science Not Science Fiction

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Genome: [r4 Bd=19970812]

Pudd'nhead Wilson. Published in 1894, Mark Twain 's story of identical twins exchanged in the cradle and later accused of murder was right up to date in its use of science. Geneticist

Steve Jones asks why Twain was so fascinated with questions of inheritance and examines how relevant those questions remain today. Producer Erika Wright

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970812]

Unknown: Mark Twain

Unknown: Steve Jones

Producer: Erika Wright

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970819]

Middlemarch. As George Eliot was writing her tome, another world opened up to her with the invention of the microscope. Steve Jones revisits one of his favourite novels to discover how science and literature meet in the figure of George Eliot 's young doctor, Lydgate. And he talks to Dr Jonathan Miller , who reveals how

Lydgate's ambitious researches into disease are central to this classic tale. Producer Erika Wright

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970819]

Unknown: George Eliot

Unknown: Steve Jones

Unknown: Dr Jonathan Miller

Producer: Erika Wright

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970826]

The Water Babies. When

Charles Kingsley told of a young boy who fell into a stream and became a water-baby, he was writing more than a fairy tale. Darwin's The Origin of Species had sent shock waves through Victorian society just four years earlier. Geneticist Steve Jones talks to AS Byatt and Stephen Jay Gould about how Kingsley's book can be read as an evolutionary tale. Producer Erika Wright

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970826]

Unknown: Charles Kingsley

Talks: Steve Jones

Talks: Stephen Jay Gould

Producer: Erika Wright

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970902]

Aldous Huxley 's first American novel, After Many a Summer, is more than just a vicious satire of a society obsessed with ageing. His science was spot on - the importance of bacteria in the gut, the dangers of cholesterol, and the reasons we should eat fish. Geneticist Steve Jones re-examines the novel and asks whether mortality will ever be defied. Producer Erika Wright

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970902]

Unknown: Aldous Huxley

Unknown: Steve Jones

Producer: Erika Wright

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970909]

In the last of six programmes, geneticist Steve Jones and guests AS Byatt, Stephen Jay Gould and Jonathan Miller discuss whether science has a place in the contemporary novel. Producer Erika Wright

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970909]

Unknown: Steve Jones

Unknown: Stephen Jay Gould

Unknown: Jonathan Miller

Producer: Erika Wright

A01The Third Policeman19970805

Geneticist Steve Jones shows how his favourite literature has been influenced by scientific thinking.

Flann O'Brien's darkly comic novel `The Third Policeman', published 30 years ago, imagines people turning into bicycles and the universe as a sausage.

Steve Jones gets on his bike to talk to writers and physicists about how O'Brien used the physics of his day in his bizarre plot and asks how much our understanding of his science has changed.

A02Pudd19970812

`Pudd'nhead Wilson'.

Published in 1894, Mark Twain's story of identical twins exchanged in the cradle and later accused of murder was right up to date in its use of science.

Geneticist Steve Jones asks why Twain was so fascinated with questions of inheritance and examines how relevant those questions remain today.

A03Middlemarch19970819

`Middlemarch'.

Steve Jones revisits one of his favourite novels to discover how science and literature meet in the figure of George Eliot's young doctor, Lydgate.

And he talks to Dr Jonathan Miller who reveals how Lydgate's ambitious researches into disease are central to this classic tale.

A04The Water Babies19970826

`The Water Babies'.

When a young boy falls into a stream and becomes a water-baby, Charles Kingsley was writing more than a fairy tale.

Darwin's `The Origin of Species' had sent shock waves through Victorian society just four years earlier.

Geneticist Steve Jones talks to novelist A S Byatt and zoologist Stephen Jay Gould about how Kingsley's book can be read as an evolutionary tale.

A05After Many A Summer19970902

Aldous Huxley's first American novel, `After Many a Summer', is more than just a vicious satire of a society obsessed with ageing.

His science was spot on - the importance of bacteria in the gut, the dangers of cholesterol and the reasons we should eat fish.

Geneticist Steve Jones re-examines the novel and asks whether mortality will ever be defied.

A06 LAST19970909

In the last of six programmes, geneticist Steve Jones and guests AS Byatt, Stephen Jay Gould and Jonathan Miller discuss whether science has a place in the contemporary novel.