Fathers And Sons

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0120090928

Douglas Hodge reads from the novel by Ivan Turgenev.

First published in 1862, this story of a young man's return from university, accompanied by his radical friend Bavarov, shocked its early readers.

Turgenev's characterisation of the outspoken young nihilist who criticises the older generation of 'romantics' and rejects 'everything' was both an alarmingly realistic depiction of the changing times he saw around him and an uncomfortable reflection of the eternal difficulties between generations.

Arkady returns to his doting father and uncle in the country.

But the guest he brings with him looks set to ruffle feathers.

Translated by Peter Carson and abridged by Sally Marmion.

Arkady returns to his doting father and uncle in the country with a guest in tow.

0220090929

Douglas Hodge reads from the novel by Ivan Turgenev.

First published in 1862, this story of a young man's return from university, accompanied by his radical friend Bavarov, shocked its early readers.

Turgenev's characterisation of the outspoken young nihilist who criticises the older generation of 'romantics' and rejects 'everything' was both an alarmingly realistic depiction of the changing times he saw around him and an uncomfortable reflection of the eternal difficulties between generations.

The powerful influence that Arkady's new friend Bavarov exerts on the young graduate, and the radical views he holds, begin to become clear to both Arkady's doting father, Nikolay, and his fastidious uncle, Pavel.

Translated by Peter Carson and abridged by Sally Marmion.

The influence of Arkady's new friend Bavarov becomes clear to Arkady's father and uncle.

0320090930

Douglas Hodge reads from the novel by Ivan Turgenev.

First published in 1862, this story of a young man's return from university, accompanied by his radical friend Bavarov, shocked its early readers.

Turgenev's characterisation of the outspoken young nihilist who criticises the older generation of 'romantics' and rejects 'everything' was both an alarmingly realistic depiction of the changing times he saw around him and an uncomfortable reflection of the eternal difficulties between generations.

Increasingly irritated by Bavarov's dismissal of the older generation and all they stand for, Pavel Petrovich determines to have a set-to with him - but the results are not as he would have hoped.

Translated by Peter Carson and abridged by Sally Marmion.

Increasingly irritated by Bavarov, Pavel Petrovich determines to have a set-to with him.

04*20091001

Douglas Hodge reads from the novel by Ivan Turgenev.

First published in 1862, this story of a young man's return from university, accompanied by his radical friend Bavarov, shocked its early readers.

Turgenev's characterisation of the outspoken young nihilist who criticises the older generation of 'romantics' and rejects 'everything' was both an alarmingly realistic depiction of the changing times he saw around him and an uncomfortable reflection of the eternal difficulties between generations.

Arkady and Bavarov abandon the older generation for the delights of town, the governor's ball and independent women.

Translated by Peter Carson and abridged by Sally Marmion.

Arkady and Bavarov abandon the older generation for the delights of town.

0520091002

Douglas Hodge reads from the novel by Ivan Turgenev.

First published in 1862, this story of a young man's return from university, accompanied by his radical friend Bavarov, shocked its early readers.

Turgenev's characterisation of the outspoken young nihilist who criticises the older generation of 'romantics' and rejects 'everything' was both an alarmingly realistic depiction of the changing times he saw around him and an uncomfortable reflection of the eternal difficulties between generations.

Arkady and Bavarov carry out their proposed visit to Anna Sergeyevna Odintsova's country estate and find that time flies in good company.

Translated by Peter Carson and abridged by Sally Marmion.

Arkady and Bavarov carry out their visit to Anna Sergeyevna Odintsova's country estate.

0620091005

Douglas Hodge reads from the novel by Ivan Turgenev.

First published in 1862, this story of a young man's return from university, accompanied by his radical friend Bavarov, shocked its early readers.

Turgenev's characterisation of the outspoken young nihilist who criticises the older generation of 'romantics' and rejects 'everything' was both an alarmingly realistic depiction of the changing times he saw around him and an uncomfortable reflection of the eternal difficulties between generations.

Bazarov's cool and clinical approach to life fails him, and the idyll of the past few weeks is broken up.

Translated by Peter Carson and abridged by Sally Marmion.

Bazarov's cool and clinical approach to life fails him.

0720091006

Douglas Hodge reads from the novel by Ivan Turgenev.

First published in 1862, this story of a young man's return from university, accompanied by his radical friend Bavarov, shocked its early readers.

Turgenev's characterisation of the outspoken young nihilist who criticises the older generation of 'romantics' and rejects 'everything' was both an alarmingly realistic depiction of the changing times he saw around him and an uncomfortable reflection of the eternal difficulties between generations.

His heart broken, Bazarov makes his own prodigal return to his doting parents, with Arkady as his guest.

But friendship and filial duty soon begin to pall.

Translated by Peter Carson and abridged by Sally Marmion.

Heartbroken, Bazarov makes his own prodigal return to his doting parents.

0820091007

Douglas Hodge reads from the novel by Ivan Turgenev.

First published in 1862, this story of a young man's return from university, accompanied by his radical friend Bavarov, shocked its early readers.

Turgenev's characterisation of the outspoken young nihilist who criticises the older generation of 'romantics' and rejects 'everything' was both an alarmingly realistic depiction of the changing times he saw around him and an uncomfortable reflection of the eternal difficulties between generations.

Without Arkady at Marino, Bazarov oversteps the bounds.

An outraged Pavel Petrovich demands satisfaction.

Translated by Peter Carson and abridged by Sally Marmion

0920091008

Douglas Hodge reads from the novel by Ivan Turgenev.

First published in 1862, this story of a young man's return from university, accompanied by his radical friend Bavarov, shocked its early readers.

Turgenev's characterisation of the outspoken young nihilist who criticises the older generation of 'romantics' and rejects 'everything' was both an alarmingly realistic depiction of the changing times he saw around him and an uncomfortable reflection of the eternal difficulties between generations.

Happy amidst the parklands of Nikolskoye, Arkady lays bare his heart and Anna Sergeyevna finds her expectations confounded.

Translated by Peter Carson and abridged by Sally Marmion.

Arkady lays bare his heart and Anna Sergeyevna finds her expectations confounded.

10 LAST20091009

Douglas Hodge reads from the novel by Ivan Turgenev.

First published in 1862, this story of a young man's return from university, accompanied by his radical friend Bavarov, shocked its early readers.

Turgenev's characterisation of the outspoken young nihilist who criticises the older generation of 'romantics' and rejects 'everything' was both an alarmingly realistic depiction of the changing times he saw around him and an uncomfortable reflection of the eternal difficulties between generations.

Bazarov returns home and seems to be finding a new way when a moment's carelessness leads to tragedy.

Translated by Peter Carson and abridged by Sally Marmion.

Bazarov seems to be finding a new way when a moment's carelessness leads to tragedy.