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0120141006The correspondence of Dorothy Hodgkin (1910-1994), broadcast for the first time to celebrate the 50th anniversary of her winning the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1964. To this day, Dorothy remains the only British woman to have been awarded a Nobel Prize for science.
Her letters, introduced by biographer Georgina Ferry, reveal an intimate portrait of a strikingly modern woman, juggling pioneering research in x-ray crystallography with bringing up three children, while her husband Thomas spent most of his time in Africa.
From an early age, she ran the family home, looking after her younger siblings while her parents travelled the world. As a young woman, she enjoyed archaeology and painstakingly completed intricate paintings of ancient mosaics. Her distant and loving mother repeatedly warned her not to work too hard.
Dorothy was passionately committed to resolving the enigma of chemical structures, as was her lover, the Communist physicist, J.D. Bernal. She tackled hugely complex molecules that were biologically useful, penicillin, vitamin B12 and insulin.
Somerville College, Oxford invented maternity leave for her: a benefit she accepted with some reluctance. Later in life, she wrote to one of her most famous students, Margaret Thatcher urging her to introduce a total ban on chemical weapons.
An active campaigner for peace, she travelled to China and Russia during the Cold War and made strong contacts with scientists working in communist countries.
A passionate and gentle woman and a scientific pioneer.
Producer: Anna Buckley.
0220141007The correspondence of Dorothy Hodgkin (1910-1994), broadcast for the first time to celebrate the 50th anniversary of her winning the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1964. To this day, Dorothy remains the only British woman to have been awarded a Nobel Prize for science.
Her letters, introduced by biographer Georgina Ferry, reveal an intimate portrait of a strikingly modern woman, juggling pioneering research in x-ray crystallography with bringing up four children, while her husband Thomas spent most of his time in Africa.
From an early age, she ran the family home, looking after her younger siblings while her parents travelled the world. As a young woman, she enjoyed archaeology and painstakingly completed intricate paintings of ancient mosaics. Her distant and loving mother repeatedly warned her not to work too hard.
Dorothy was passionately committed to resolving the enigma of chemical structures, as was her lover, the Communist physicist, J.D. Bernal. She tackled hugely complex molecules that were biologically useful, penicillin, vitamin B12 and insulin.
Somerville College, Oxford invented maternity leave for her: a benefit she accepted with some reluctance. Later in life, she wrote to one of her most famous students, Margaret Thatcher urging her to introduce a total ban on chemical weapons.
An active campaigner for peace, she made strong contacts with Chinese and Russian scientists, travelling to these countries during the Cold War. Despite her Nobel Prize, she was denied a visa to the US.
A passionate and gentle woman and a scientific pioneer.
Producer: Anna Buckley.
0320141008The correspondence of Dorothy Hodgkin (1910-1994), broadcast for the first time to celebrate the 50th anniversary of her winning the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1964. To this day, Dorothy remains the only British woman to have been awarded a Nobel Prize for science.
Her letters, introduced by biographer Georgina Ferry, reveal an intimate portrait of a strikingly modern woman, juggling pioneering research in x-ray crystallography with bringing up four children, while her husband Thomas spent most of his time in Africa.
From an early age, she ran the family home, looking after her younger siblings while her parents travelled the world. As a young woman, she enjoyed archaeology and painstakingly completed intricate paintings of ancient mosaics. Her distant and loving mother repeatedly warned her not to work too hard.
Dorothy was passionately committed to resolving the enigma of chemical structures, as was her lover, the Communist physicist, J.D. Bernal. She tackled hugely complex molecules that were biologically useful, penicillin, vitamin B12 and insulin.
Somerville College, Oxford invented maternity leave for her: a benefit she accepted with some reluctance. Later in life, she wrote to one of her most famous students, Margaret Thatcher urging her to introduce a total ban on chemical weapons.
An active campaigner for peace, she made strong contacts with Chinese and Russian scientists, travelling to these countries during the Cold War. Despite her Nobel Prize, she was denied a visa to the US.
A passionate and gentle woman and a scientific pioneer.
Producer: Anna Buckley.
0420141009The correspondence of Dorothy Hodgkin (1910-1994), broadcast for the first time to celebrate the 50th anniversary of her winning the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1964. To this day, Dorothy remains the only British woman to have been awarded a Nobel Prize for science.
Her letters, introduced by biographer Georgina Ferry, reveal an intimate portrait of a strikingly modern woman, juggling pioneering research in x-ray crystallography with bringing up four children, while her husband Thomas spent most of his time in Africa.
From an early age, she ran the family home, looking after her younger siblings while her parents travelled the world. As a young woman, she enjoyed archaeology and painstakingly completed intricate paintings of ancient mosaics. Her distant and loving mother repeatedly warned her not to work too hard.
Dorothy was passionately committed to resolving the enigma of chemical structures, as was her lover, the Communist physicist, J.D. Bernal. She tackled hugely complex molecules that were biologically useful, penicillin, vitamin B12 and insulin.
Somerville College, Oxford invented maternity leave for her: a benefit she accepted with some reluctance. Later in life, she wrote to one of her most famous students, Margaret Thatcher urging her to introduce a total ban on chemical weapons.
An active campaigner for peace, she made strong contacts with Chinese and Russian scientists, travelling to these countries during the Cold War. Despite her Nobel Prize, she was denied a visa to the US.
A passionate and gentle woman and a scientific pioneer.
Producer: Anna Buckley.
05 LAST20141010The correspondence of Dorothy Hodgkin (1910-1994), broadcast for the first time to celebrate the 50th anniversary of her winning the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1964. To this day, Dorothy remains the only British woman to have been awarded a Nobel Prize for science.
Her letters, introduced by biographer Georgina Ferry, reveal an intimate portrait of a strikingly modern woman, juggling pioneering research in x-ray crystallography with bringing up four children, while her husband Thomas spent most of his time in Africa.
From an early age, she ran the family home, looking after her younger siblings while her parents travelled the world. As a young woman, she enjoyed archaeology and painstakingly completed intricate paintings of ancient mosaics. Her distant and loving mother repeatedly warned her not to work too hard.
Dorothy was passionately committed to resolving the enigma of chemical structures, as was her lover, the Communist physicist, J.D. Bernal. She tackled hugely complex molecules that were biologically useful, penicillin, vitamin B12 and insulin.
Somerville College, Oxford invented maternity leave for her: a benefit she accepted with some reluctance. Later in life, she wrote to one of her most famous students, Margaret Thatcher urging her to introduce a total ban on chemical weapons.
An active campaigner for peace, she made strong contacts with Chinese and Russian scientists, travelling to these countries during the Cold War. Despite her Nobel Prize, she was denied a visa to the US.
A passionate and gentle woman and a scientific pioneer.
Producer: Anna Buckley.

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  • Documentaries / Factual / Life Stories / Science and Technology / Science and Nature