Every Tongue Got To Confess

In the 1920s, Zora Neale Hurston travelled the US collecting folk stories from Black Americans.

They were published, posthumously, nearly 50 years later, under the title Every Tongue Got to Confess.

Contemporary Black writers create new tales inspired by these stories.

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Episodes

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AR01War Stories2004080220051106

In the 1920s, Zora Neale Hurston travelled the US collecting folk stories from Black Americans.

They were published, posthumously, nearly 50 years later, under the title Every Tongue Got to Confess.

Contemporary Black writers create new tales inspired by these stories.By Othniel Smith, read by Paul Barber.

A former soldier fights a battle of words with his teenage daughter.

AR02Baby Talk2004080320051113

By Angela Turvey, read by Rakie Ayola.

When a grandma-to-be calls round with calaloo soup, her daughter discovers that it's not just a baby that's born, a mother is born too, just as helpless and bewildered as her child.

AR03Devil's Own Luck2004080420051120

By Cheryl Martin, read by Tanya Moodie.

Leroy's life is on the line, and when Ernestine wins the lottery, his very soul is at stake too.

By Cheryl Martin

Read by Tanya Moodie.

AR04The Strangest Fruit2004080520051127

Written and read by Pauline Black.

Now a successful businesswoman, Rhoda dreams of buying a farm where inner city black kids can come and enjoy country life.

But her visit to Chinaberry Farm makes it plain that the locals aren't going to welcome her plan with open arms.

Produced by Kate McAll.

AR05 LASTMama B And The Devil2004080620051204

By Patricia Cumper.

Mama B grew up in the islands where the church taught her how to stay out of the reach of the devil's mischief.

Now she's an immigrant in the big city and works like a slave

to give her three sons a good start in this new life.

But how will she teach them to withstand the devil's temptations when she isn't sure she can still recognise his face?

Read by Angela Wynter.

Producer Kate McAll.

Now she's an immigrant in the big city and works like a slave to give her three sons a good start in this new life.