The Etymologicon

Episodes

EpisodeFirst
Broadcast
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0120111219

Abridged by Jane Marshall.

A circular stroll through the fascinating and amusing connections of the English language by the author of the popular Inky Fool blog, Mark Forsyth.

In the first episode the glorious insanities of our language are explored as a turn up for the books starts a chain reaction which leads to gambling in medieval France, the link between gonads and testifying by oath and the derivation of the word avocado.

Read by Hugh Dennis.

Produced by Jane Marshall

A Jane Marshall Production for BBC Radio 4.

From a turn-up for the books to avocado, via gambling in medieval France.

0220111220

The author of the Inky Fool blog leads us on a fascinating journey tracing the connection between seemingly unrelated words and uncovers the links between the 'proof of a pudding', 'sausage-shaped poison', being hoist by a 'petard' and 'feisty heroines'.

Read by Hugh Dennis

Produced by Jane Marshall

A Jane Marshall Production for BBC Radio 4.

The links between the proof of a pudding, sausage-shaped poison and feisty heroines.

0320111221

The Etymologicon takes a festive turn as we discover the origins of turkey, punch, and pink champagne.

And look at the difference between balderdash and rumbullion.

Read by Hugh Dennis

Produced by Jane Marshall

A Jane Marshall Production for BBC Radio 4.

The Etymologicon takes a festive turn with the origins of turkey, punch, and champagne.

0420111222

Before you can say Jack Robinson the Etymologicon uncovers who Jack Robinson was and what his link is to The Tower of London, derricks and guillotines.

Read by Hugh Dennis

Produced by Jane Marshall

A Jane Marshall Production for BBC Radio 4.

The Etymologicon looks at the link between Jack Robinson, Thomas Derrick and Dr Guillotin.

05 LAST20111223

Our circular stroll through the English language takes us to Venice and Ancient Rome, to Germany and the Hudson River, in search of the derivations of magazines and salt cellars, fast bucks and bucks that are passed -as we finally end up in the office of President Harry S Truman.

Read by Hugh Dennis

Produced by Jane Marshall

A Jane Marshall Production for BBC Radio 4.

The Etymologicon takes us to Venice, ancient Rome and the Hudson River.