Elgar's 150th Anniversary

In the week marking Elgar's 150th anniversary, four commentators reflect on aspects of Elgar in the context of his time and after, exploring the contradictions and enigmas in his complex and paradoxical personality.

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
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01Elgar And Academe2007060420080728

Elgar was appointed the first Peyton Professor of Music at Birmingham University in 1905 and in a series of lectures outlined, among other things, his view of the future for English Music.

Julian Rushton, a former Professor of Music at the University of Leeds, takes this as his staring point to examine Elgar's relationship with the musical academic world, both during his lifetime and afterwards.

Elgar was appointed the first Peyton Professor of Music at Birmingham University in 1905 and in a series of lectures outlined, among other things, his view of the future for English Music.

01Elgar And Academe2007060420080728

Elgar was appointed the first Peyton Professor of Music at Birmingham University in 1905 and in a series of lectures outlined, among other things, his view of the future for English Music.

Julian Rushton, a former Professor of Music at the University of Leeds, takes this as his staring point to examine Elgar's relationship with the musical academic world, both during his lifetime and afterwards.

Elgar was appointed the first Peyton Professor of Music at Birmingham University in 1905 and in a series of lectures outlined, among other things, his view of the future for English Music.

02Elgar And Religion2007060520080729

Elgar's masterpiece The Dream of Gerontius was given a notoriously inadequate first performance, which may have undermined his Catholic faith.

After Gerontius, he began work on a trilogy of oratorios based on the life of Christ and his Apostles, but completed only two of them, The Apostles and The Kingdom.

Pianist and conductor Stephen Hough, himself a Catholic, wonders how deeply rooted Elgar's faith actually was.

02Elgar And Religion2007060520080729

Elgar's masterpiece The Dream of Gerontius was given a notoriously inadequate first performance, which may have undermined his Catholic faith.

After Gerontius, he began work on a trilogy of oratorios based on the life of Christ and his Apostles, but completed only two of them, The Apostles and The Kingdom.

Pianist and conductor Stephen Hough, himself a Catholic, wonders how deeply rooted Elgar's faith actually was.

03Elgar And The Establishment2007060620080730

Elgar was the son of a local Worcester shop-keeper, yet became a pillar of the establishment as Sir Edward Elgar of Broadheath, OM.

David Cannadine, Professor of British History at the University of London's Institute of Historical Research, reflects on the images Elgar cultivated of himself and how far these are relevant or helpful today.

03Elgar And The Establishment2007060620080730

Elgar was the son of a local Worcester shop-keeper, yet became a pillar of the establishment as Sir Edward Elgar of Broadheath, OM.

David Cannadine, Professor of British History at the University of London's Institute of Historical Research, reflects on the images Elgar cultivated of himself and how far these are relevant or helpful today.

04 LASTElgar And Englishness *2007060720080731

Ernest Newman described Elgar's music as expressive of 'the very soul of our race'.

Nalini Ghuman, Professor of Music at Mills College California, argues that the critical obsession with identifying in Elgar's music an essential Englishness has served to confine the music within the nation's boundaries.

04 LASTElgar And Englishness *2007060720080731

Ernest Newman described Elgar's music as expressive of 'the very soul of our race'.

Nalini Ghuman, Professor of Music at Mills College California, argues that the critical obsession with identifying in Elgar's music an essential Englishness has served to confine the music within the nation's boundaries.