Duty Free

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0120120731

Read before a live studio audience in the BBC Radio Theatre by Meera Syal.

As every woman knows, matchmaking is no easy job. Particularly when you're trying to find a girl for your dull, balding, freshly-divorced cousin and on top of that manage a house full of servants, shop for contraband Prada goods and attend parties every night. Not to mention the fact that your husband's work trips are becoming increasingly frequent, your city is under attack, and your friends can't be trusted. How is a girl to cope?

Jane Austen's Emma is transported to the outrageous social melee of 21st-century Lahore. "Our plucky heroine's cousin, Jonkers, has been dumped by his low-class, slutty secretary, and our heroine has been charged with finding him a suitable wife -- a rich, fair, beautiful, old-family type. Quickly. But, between you, me and the four walls, who wants to marry poor, plain, hapless Jonkers?"

As our heroine social-climbs her way through weddings-sheddings, GTs (get togethers, of course) and ladies' lunches trying to find a suitable girl from the right bagground, she discovers to her dismay that her cousin has his own ideas about his perfect mate. And secretly, she may even agree.

Full of wit and wickedness, Duty Free is a delightful romp through Pakistani high society - although, even as it makes you cry with laughter, it makes you wince at the gulf between our heroine's glitteringly shallow life and the country that is falling apart around her Louboutin-clad feet.

Moni Mohsin, already a huge bestseller in India, has been hailed as a modern-day Jane Austen, and compared to Nancy Mitford and Helen Fielding. Duty Free is social satire at its biting best.

In today's episode; against a backdrop of escalating violence, a Lahore socialite reluctantly takes on a difficult family challenge.

Abridged by Eileen Horne

Produced by Clive Brill

A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.

Amid escalating violence, a Lahore socialite takes on a difficult family challenge.

0220120801

The Marriage Committee targets its first potential bride.

Read before a live studio audience in the BBC Radio Theatre by Meera Syal.

In today's episode; the Marriage Committee targets its first potential bride and an introduction to the blushing groom is arranged...

As every woman knows, matchmaking is no easy job. Particularly when you're trying to find a girl for your dull, balding, freshly-divorced cousin and on top of that manage a house full of servants, shop for contraband Prada goods and attend parties every night. Not to mention the fact that your husband's work trips are becoming increasingly frequent, your city is under attack, and your friends can't be trusted. How is a girl to cope?

Jane Austen's Emma is transported to the outrageous social melee of 21st-century Lahore. "Our plucky heroine's cousin, Jonkers, has been dumped by his low-class, slutty secretary, and our heroine has been charged with finding him a suitable wife -- a rich, fair, beautiful, old-family type. Quickly. But, between you, me and the four walls, who wants to marry poor, plain, hapless Jonkers?"

As our heroine social-climbs her way through weddings-sheddings, GTs (get togethers, of course) and ladies' lunches trying to find a suitable girl from the right bagground, she discovers to her dismay that her cousin has his own ideas about his perfect mate. And secretly, she may even agree.

Full of wit and wickedness, Duty Free is a delightful romp through Pakistani high society - although, even as it makes you cry with laughter, it makes you wince at the gulf between our heroine's glitteringly shallow life and the country that is falling apart around her Louboutin-clad feet.

Moni Mohsin, already a huge bestseller in India, has been hailed as a modern-day Jane Austen, and compared to Nancy Mitford and Helen Fielding. Duty Free is social satire at its biting best.

Abridged by Eileen Horne

Produced by Clive Brill

A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.

0320120802

Two weeks into the campaign to find Jonkers a bride, the groom's proving less than willing

Read before a live studio audience in the BBC Radio Theatre by Meera Syal.

In today's episode; two weeks into the campaign to find Jonkers a bride, the groom is proving to be less than willing, while the streets of Lahore are becoming ever more dangerous, after a wave of suicide bombings.

As every woman knows, matchmaking is no easy job. Particularly when you're trying to find a girl for your dull, balding, freshly-divorced cousin and on top of that manage a house full of servants, shop for contraband Prada goods and attend parties every night. Not to mention the fact that your husband's work trips are becoming increasingly frequent, your city is under attack, and your friends can't be trusted. How is a girl to cope?

Jane Austen's Emma is transported to the outrageous social melee of 21st-century Lahore. "Our plucky heroine's cousin, Jonkers, has been dumped by his low-class, slutty secretary, and our heroine has been charged with finding him a suitable wife -- a rich, fair, beautiful, old-family type. Quickly. But, between you, me and the four walls, who wants to marry poor, plain, hapless Jonkers?"

As our heroine social-climbs her way through weddings-sheddings, GTs (get togethers, of course) and ladies' lunches trying to find a suitable girl from the right bagground, she discovers to her dismay that her cousin has his own ideas about his perfect mate. And secretly, she may even agree.

Full of wit and wickedness, Duty Free is a delightful romp through Pakistani high society - although, even as it makes you cry with laughter, it makes you wince at the gulf between our heroine's glitteringly shallow life and the country that is falling apart around her Louboutin-clad feet.

Moni Mohsin, already a huge bestseller in India, has been hailed as a modern-day Jane Austen, and compared to Nancy Mitford and Helen Fielding. Duty Free is social satire at its biting best.

Abridged by Eileen Horne

Produced by Clive Brill

A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.

0420120803

Read before a live studio audience in the BBC Radio Theatre by Meera Syal.

In today's episode; at a huge society wedding, surely a prospective wife for Jonkers can be found in the crowd...but will she have the right bagground?

As every woman knows, matchmaking is no easy job. Particularly when you're trying to find a girl for your dull, balding, freshly-divorced cousin and on top of that manage a house full of servants, shop for contraband Prada goods and attend parties every night. Not to mention the fact that your husband's work trips are becoming increasingly frequent, your city is under attack, and your friends can't be trusted. How is a girl to cope?

Jane Austen's Emma is transported to the outrageous social melee of 21st-century Lahore. "Our plucky heroine's cousin, Jonkers, has been dumped by his low-class, slutty secretary, and our heroine has been charged with finding him a suitable wife -- a rich, fair, beautiful, old-family type. Quickly. But, between you, me and the four walls, who wants to marry poor, plain, hapless Jonkers?"

As our heroine social-climbs her way through weddings-sheddings, GTs (get togethers, of course) and ladies' lunches trying to find a suitable girl from the right bagground, she discovers to her dismay that her cousin has his own ideas about his perfect mate. And secretly, she may even agree.

Full of wit and wickedness, Duty Free is a delightful romp through Pakistani high society - although, even as it makes you cry with laughter, it makes you wince at the gulf between our heroine's glitteringly shallow life and the country that is falling apart around her Louboutin-clad feet.

Moni Mohsin, already a huge bestseller in India, has been hailed as a modern-day Jane Austen, and compared to Nancy Mitford and Helen Fielding. Duty Free is social satire at its biting best.

Abridged by Eileen Horne

Produced by Clive Brill

A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.

At a huge society wedding, surely a prospective wife for Jonkers can be found in the crowd

0520120806

Read before a live studio audience in the BBC Radio Theatre by Meera Syal.

In today's episode; the clock is ticking, wedding season is upon us, and in downtown Lahore, it's time to check out Bride Number Two...but is this a set-up by false friend Mulloo?

As every woman knows, matchmaking is no easy job. Particularly when you're trying to find a girl for your dull, balding, freshly-divorced cousin and on top of that manage a house full of servants, shop for contraband Prada goods and attend parties every night. Not to mention the fact that your husband's work trips are becoming increasingly frequent, your city is under attack, and your friends can't be trusted. How is a girl to cope?

Jane Austen's Emma is transported to the outrageous social melee of 21st-century Lahore. "Our plucky heroine's cousin, Jonkers, has been dumped by his low-class, slutty secretary, and our heroine has been charged with finding him a suitable wife -- a rich, fair, beautiful, old-family type. Quickly. But, between you, me and the four walls, who wants to marry poor, plain, hapless Jonkers?"

As our heroine social-climbs her way through weddings-sheddings, GTs (get togethers, of course) and ladies' lunches trying to find a suitable girl from the right bagground, she discovers to her dismay that her cousin has his own ideas about his perfect mate. And secretly, she may even agree.

Full of wit and wickedness, Duty Free is a delightful romp through Pakistani high society - although, even as it makes you cry with laughter, it makes you wince at the gulf between our heroine's glitteringly shallow life and the country that is falling apart around her Louboutin-clad feet.

Moni Mohsin, already a huge bestseller in India, has been hailed as a modern-day Jane Austen, and compared to Nancy Mitford and Helen Fielding. Duty Free is social satire at its biting best.

Abridged by Eileen Horne

Produced by Clive Brill

A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.

It's time to check out Bride Number Two, but is this a set-up by false friend Mulloo?

0620120807

With violence hampering the social season, how's a girl to concentrate on matchmaking?

Read before a live studio audience in the BBC Radio Theatre by Meera Syal.

In today's episode; with sectarian violence hampering the social season, how's a girl to concentrate on matchmaking? And now the terrorist threat comes very close to home...

As every woman knows, matchmaking is no easy job. Particularly when you're trying to find a girl for your dull, balding, freshly-divorced cousin and on top of that manage a house full of servants, shop for contraband Prada goods and attend parties every night. Not to mention the fact that your husband's work trips are becoming increasingly frequent, your city is under attack, and your friends can't be trusted. How is a girl to cope?

Jane Austen's Emma is transported to the outrageous social melee of 21st-century Lahore. "Our plucky heroine's cousin, Jonkers, has been dumped by his low-class, slutty secretary, and our heroine has been charged with finding him a suitable wife -- a rich, fair, beautiful, old-family type. Quickly. But, between you, me and the four walls, who wants to marry poor, plain, hapless Jonkers?"

As our heroine social-climbs her way through weddings-sheddings, GTs (get togethers, of course) and ladies' lunches trying to find a suitable girl from the right bagground, she discovers to her dismay that her cousin has his own ideas about his perfect mate. And secretly, she may even agree.

Full of wit and wickedness, Duty Free is a delightful romp through Pakistani high society - although, even as it makes you cry with laughter, it makes you wince at the gulf between our heroine's glitteringly shallow life and the country that is falling apart around her Louboutin-clad feet.

Moni Mohsin, already a huge bestseller in India, has been hailed as a modern-day Jane Austen, and compared to Nancy Mitford and Helen Fielding. Duty Free is social satire at its biting best.

Abridged by Eileen Horne

Produced by Clive Brill

A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.

0720120808

Read before a live studio audience in the BBC Radio Theatre by Meera Syal.

In today's episode; a near-death experience gives our heroine a moment of fame...And with time running out, Bride Number One's mother is pressing for a decision about her daughter, while the prospective groom has some big news...

As every woman knows, matchmaking is no easy job. Particularly when you're trying to find a girl for your dull, balding, freshly-divorced cousin and on top of that manage a house full of servants, shop for contraband Prada goods and attend parties every night. Not to mention the fact that your husband's work trips are becoming increasingly frequent, your city is under attack, and your friends can't be trusted. How is a girl to cope?

Jane Austen's Emma is transported to the outrageous social melee of 21st-century Lahore. "Our plucky heroine's cousin, Jonkers, has been dumped by his low-class, slutty secretary, and our heroine has been charged with finding him a suitable wife -- a rich, fair, beautiful, old-family type. Quickly. But, between you, me and the four walls, who wants to marry poor, plain, hapless Jonkers?"

As our heroine social-climbs her way through weddings-sheddings, GTs (get togethers, of course) and ladies' lunches trying to find a suitable girl from the right bagground, she discovers to her dismay that her cousin has his own ideas about his perfect mate. And secretly, she may even agree.

Full of wit and wickedness, Duty Free is a delightful romp through Pakistani high society - although, even as it makes you cry with laughter, it makes you wince at the gulf between our heroine's glitteringly shallow life and the country that is falling apart around her Louboutin-clad feet.

Moni Mohsin, already a huge bestseller in India, has been hailed as a modern-day Jane Austen, and compared to Nancy Mitford and Helen Fielding. Duty Free is social satire at its biting best.

Abridged by Eileen Horne

Produced by Clive Brill

A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.

A near-death experience gives our heroine a moment of fame.

0820120809

Read before a live studio audience in the BBC Radio Theatre by Meera Syal.

In today's episode; it's time to go and meet bride Number Three, but this time the groom is doing the choosing - a radical idea for his bossy cousin to take on board...

As every woman knows, matchmaking is no easy job. Particularly when you're trying to find a girl for your dull, balding, freshly-divorced cousin and on top of that manage a house full of servants, shop for contraband Prada goods and attend parties every night. Not to mention the fact that your husband's work trips are becoming increasingly frequent, your city is under attack, and your friends can't be trusted. How is a girl to cope?

Jane Austen's Emma is transported to the outrageous social melee of 21st-century Lahore. "Our plucky heroine's cousin, Jonkers, has been dumped by his low-class, slutty secretary, and our heroine has been charged with finding him a suitable wife -- a rich, fair, beautiful, old-family type. Quickly. But, between you, me and the four walls, who wants to marry poor, plain, hapless Jonkers?"

As our heroine social-climbs her way through weddings-sheddings, GTs (get togethers, of course) and ladies' lunches trying to find a suitable girl from the right bagground, she discovers to her dismay that her cousin has his own ideas about his perfect mate. And secretly, she may even agree.

Full of wit and wickedness, Duty Free is a delightful romp through Pakistani high society - although, even as it makes you cry with laughter, it makes you wince at the gulf between our heroine's glitteringly shallow life and the country that is falling apart around her Louboutin-clad feet.

Moni Mohsin, already a huge bestseller in India, has been hailed as a modern-day Jane Austen, and compared to Nancy Mitford and Helen Fielding. Duty Free is social satire at its biting best.

Abridged by Eileen Horne

Produced by Clive Brill

A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.

It's time to go and meet Bride Number Three, but this time the groom is doing the choosing

09 LAST20120810

Read before a live studio audience in the BBC Radio Theatre by Meera Syal.

In today's episode; can a happy ending really be in store for Jonkers at the eleventh hour, in spite of his furious mother?

As every woman knows, matchmaking is no easy job. Particularly when you're trying to find a girl for your dull, balding, freshly-divorced cousin and on top of that manage a house full of servants, shop for contraband Prada goods and attend parties every night. Not to mention the fact that your husband's work trips are becoming increasingly frequent, your city is under attack, and your friends can't be trusted. How is a girl to cope?

Jane Austen's Emma is transported to the outrageous social melee of 21st-century Lahore. "Our plucky heroine's cousin, Jonkers, has been dumped by his low-class, slutty secretary, and our heroine has been charged with finding him a suitable wife -- a rich, fair, beautiful, old-family type. Quickly. But, between you, me and the four walls, who wants to marry poor, plain, hapless Jonkers?"

As our heroine social-climbs her way through weddings-sheddings, GTs (get togethers, of course) and ladies' lunches trying to find a suitable girl from the right bagground, she discovers to her dismay that her cousin has his own ideas about his perfect mate. And secretly, she may even agree.

Full of wit and wickedness, Duty Free is a delightful romp through Pakistani high society - although, even as it makes you cry with laughter, it makes you wince at the gulf between our heroine's glitteringly shallow life and the country that is falling apart around her Louboutin-clad feet.

Moni Mohsin, already a huge bestseller in India, has been hailed as a modern-day Jane Austen, and compared to Nancy Mitford and Helen Fielding. Duty Free is social satire at its biting best.

Abridged by Eileen Horne

Produced by Clive Brill

A Pacificus production for BBC Radio 4.

Can a happy ending really be in store for Jonkers, in spite of his furious mother?