Document

Programmes using documentary evidence to throw new light on past events -

investigating an event in history through new or recently released evidence.

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
20070228

1/3. The Marriage Cordiale

The extraordinary tale of the 1956 French offer to turn Britain and France into one country. Previously secret documents reveal that the French Prime Minister, Guy Mollet, made the offer to Anthony Eden who discussed it with his Cabinet.

Mollet even suggested Elizabeth II could be head of the French state. What motivated Mollet's offer and how close did his plan come to being realised?

Mike Thomson investigates a time when the fate of France, the shape of Europe, and the balance of global power hung in the balance.

20070307

The investigative history series continues.

2/3. The Woman Who Never Was

Mike Thomson re-visits a document that split the country in two and ended a politician's career. When Enoch Powell made his infamous 'Rivers of Blood' speech in April 1968, he quoted from a letter he had received, describing the isolation and fear in which a constituent of his was living.

In spite of a massive media hunt, Powell made it a point of principle never to reveal her name and he took the secret of her identity with him to the grave. But now, in the light of new evidence, Mike Thomson travels to Wolverhampton in search of the woman Enoch Powell defended.

20070314

The investigative history series continues.

3/3. Franco's British Friends

Mark Thompson uncovers evidence that a group of British aristocrats and celebrities helped the fascist leader General Franco during the Spanish Civil War, secretly delivering aircraft from a base near London. They included a famous flying ace, a top racing driver and an aristocrat whose brother later shot to fame after Rudolf Hess parachuted onto his estate during World War II.

20070328

Series using documentary evidence to throw new light on past events. Kenya's Bloody Summer: A tale of murder and cover-up by the British Army in Kenya 50 years ago.

20070404

Series using documentary evidence to throw new light on past events.

A Laudable Invasion?

The story of a flawed dossier and an unlawful invasion. The Laudabiliter was a papal letter which for 800 years became the legal precedent for English occupation of Ireland.

20070411

Series using documentary evidence to throw new light on past events.

A Date with Bevin

In 1946, the British Secret Service was concerned about a plot by Jewish terrorists to assassinate the Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin. Mike Thomson tracks down former members of the outlawed Irgun and the Stern Gang terrorist groups and discovers that it was not just Bevin who was in danger.

20080409

Mike Thomson presents the series using documentary evidence to throw new light on past events.

1/3. Operation Safe Haven

In 1948, a representative of the Dutch airline KLM asked Swiss police to ease travel restrictions for Germans travelling to Argentina. It is claimed that this was part of a covert plan to help Nazis flee Europe following the war.

20080416

Mike Thomson presents the series using documentary evidence to throw new light on past events.

2/3. Broadcasts from the Bunker

At the height of the Cold War, the BBC devised a programme schedule to be transmitted in the event of a nuclear attack. To be broadcast from the BBC's own secret bunker and featuring music, drama and comedy, the schedule was designed to boost the morale of survivors in a post-apocalyptic world.

20080423

Mike Thomson presents the series using documentary evidence to throw new light on past events.

3/3. Stop Pakistan

How close did America come to launching a pre-emptive attack in order to prevent Pakistan from becoming a nuclear power?

20090406

Mike investigates why black African soldiers, who had shed their blood for France and formed two thirds of Charles de Gaulle's Free French army, were denied the glory of liberating Paris in August 1944.

Documents written in the lead up to the liberation indicate just how far the Allies went to ensure that the troops marching into the capital were white.

The Tiralleurs Senegalais - soldiers from West Africa who had signed up to fight for France - were turned away from the capital, stripped of their uniforms and made to languish in holding camps before being shipped back to their own countries.

20091116

Mike Thomson presents the series using documentary evidence to throw new light on past events.

Mike tracks down formerly secret reports from MI5 that describe how brainwashing techniques were being used inside British intelligence bases in North Africa during the Second World War.

There, prisoners were exposed to truth drugs and other methods that shocked even a senior agent who went on to head the secret service.

Allegations appeared in the press in 1960 and questions were asked in parliament.

The claims were denied by then prime minister Harold Macmillan, but Document has evidence that he misled the country.

How Harold Macmillan misled parliament in 1960 over claims of war prisoner brainwashing.

20091123

Mike Thomson presents the series using documentary evidence to throw new light on past events.

Mike investigates Britain's role during the 1970 coup in oil-rich Oman.

History records that it was a family affair, but documents reveal London's hidden hand.

Offically, the architect of the coup was the Sultan's son, but in papers seen by the programme, Britain is seen to be calling the shots.

Worried that the country's faltering regime could fall to communism and so threaten its vital oil interests, London decided to act.

Formerly secret documents clearly show British civil servants and military leaders plotting regime change in Oman, by the use of force if necessary.

They concealed their plans and only now can the real story be told.

Mike Thomson investigates Britain's role during the 1970 coup in oil-rich Oman.

20091130

Mike Thomson presents the series using documentary evidence to throw new light on past events.

Mike uncovers Winston Churchill's paper trail of secret deals, bribes and broken promises in wartime Spain.

If Spain entered the war, Britain's supply lines would have been cut and Gibraltar and the entire North Africa campaign put in peril.

Desperate to stop this happening, the prime minister paid Franco's top generals multi-million pound bribes.

Churchill believed disaster could only be averted by using vast sums of money and a shady entrepreneur known as the Last Pirate of the Mediterranean.

Mike Thomson on Churchill's desperate efforts to keep Spain out of the Second World War.

20100308

Mike Thomson presents the series using documentary evidence to throw new light on past events.

In May 1964 prime minister Sir Alec Douglas-Home declared in the House of Commons that British policy in the North Yemen Civil War was one of non-intervention.

But with the security of British interests in Aden and South Arabia under threat, rumours spread of London's covert involvement in the war.

Mike unravels the extent of Britain's underhand engagement in the region, told through high-level secret Whitehall documents, private papers and eyewitness accounts.

As Yemen returns once more to the news headlines, Mike looks back at Britain's policy in the 1960s that went on to have far-reaching consequences for the Yemen of today.

Mike Thomson investigates Britain's secret involvement in the North Yemen Civil War.

20100315

Mike Thomson investigates the story behind the German prisoners of war forced to work in Britain for three years after the Second World War had ended.

The International Red Cross condemned the ongoing use of forced PoW labour after the end of hostilities and the British public and the press voiced strong opinions about the deployment of 'slave labour'.

But the government had other plans: there was a drastic shortage of manpower after the war - with one million British troops still posted overseas - and the availability of nearly 400,000 PoWs in camps on British soil was seen as the quickest solution to the crisis.

Before long, German forced labour made up a quarter of the nation's agricultural workforce.

They were put to work on the roads and they even made up a third of the workers who prepared Wembley for the 1948 Olympics.

Mike unravels the political and moral debate about the repatriation of the Germans; he also hears some of the unintended consequences of captivity by meeting a former PoW who decided to stay behind once he fell in love with both the Scottish Borders and his future wife.

Mike Thomson investigates the story behind the German PoWs forced to work in Britain.

20100322

Mike Thomson presents the series using documentary evidence to throw new light on past events.

With the Bloody Sunday Inquiry due to submit its report to the secretary of state for Northern Ireland, Mike investigates how the tragic events of 30th January 1972 sparked a murky propaganda battle which was fought in the world's media.

Mike discovers how a secretive foreign office department working alongside a covert army intelligence unit spun stories against Republicans and Loyalists in the years after Bloody Sunday: stories which are now known to be untrue.

He hears how this black propaganda campaign included tall tales of devil-worshipping among paramilitary groups and deliveries of Soviet weapons to the IRA.

Through documents from the time and eyewitness testimonies, Mike finds out just how far this blending of fact and fiction went to distort what was really happening in Northern Ireland during the Troubles.

Mike Thomson investigates the shadowy world of black propaganda in Northern Ireland.

20100816

Mike Thomson returns with Radio 4's investigative history series, examining documents which shed new light on past events.

The news series begins with a paper trail surrounding an oil disaster - not the most recent example in the Gulf of Mexico - but one much closer to home, in the North Sea.

Whilst President Obama has told BP that it will be held fully responsible for cleaning up the damage caused by the massive oil spill off the American coast, papers seen by Document show that the oil company Occidental got off far more lightly after the Piper Alpha disaster in 1988 off the Scottish coast, which left 167 people dead.

After seeing the recently released documents, the environmental pressure group Greenpeace claims too little was done to deal with more than five tons of highly toxic chemicals released in the disaster, marine contamination that led the Government to consider a fishing ban and which has had a lasting impact on the North Sea.

The documents also shed light on the decision to topple the remains of the Piper Alpha platform, an operation which threatened to worsen contamination and which was fiercely opposed by relatives who wanted the search for bodies to continue.

Mike Thomson speaks to marine biologists, politicans from the time and survivors to find out if more should have been done to clean up after the disaster.

Producer: Julia Johnson.

What happened to the toxic chemicals released in the Piper Alpha oil disaster in 1988?

Mike Thomson returns with Radio 4's investigative history series, examining documents which shed new light on past events. The news series begins with a paper trail surrounding an oil disaster - not the most recent example in the Gulf of Mexico - but one much closer to home, in the North Sea.

After seeing the recently released documents, the environmental pressure group Greenpeace claims too little was done to deal with more than five tons of highly toxic chemicals released in the disaster, marine contamination that led the Government to consider a fishing ban and which has had a lasting impact on the North Sea. The documents also shed light on the decision to topple the remains of the Piper Alpha platform, an operation which threatened to worsen contamination and which was fiercely opposed by relatives who wanted the search for bodies to continue.

20100823

On August 16th 1951 a number of people in the quiet southern French town of Pont St.Esprit began to fall ill.

Stomach pains were soon followed by violent and often terrifying hallucinations.

Local hospitals were soon overwhelmed and more than thirty people were taken to asylums in nearby towns.

It was soon decided that the cause was bread poisoning and the evidence pointed to just one Bakery.

The reason, it was believed was 'ergot', a fungal infection found in Rye bread which had often caused mass poisonings in Medieval times.

But documents obtained by the American writer Hank Albarelli suggest that rather than simple 'ergot' there was a strong possibility that the symptoms and the nature of the outbreak were not a tragic accident.

In his research in to the mysterious death of the CIA biochemist Frank Olson and his post-war work on LSD and its uses as a biochemical weapon he got hold of papers implying Olson's connection with the Pont St Esprit outbreak.

Mike follows up the claims talking to experts in LSD and its impact, historians of the cold-war search for the perfect biochemical weapon and agricultural scientists specialising in ergot poisoning.

He also visits the town of Pont St Esprit and talks to one survivor, the local postman Leon Armundier, about the events of 1951.

Leon describes of the horrors he faced as a young man, being forced into a straight-jacket for a week as burning sensations and images of snakes raged around him.

Many in the town are uneasy at re-opening the old story about Le Pain Maudit - the evil bread - preferring the establishment 'truth' that it was just a tragic accident.

But there are some who believe a proper examination of the facts still hasn't taken place.

Mike Thomson explores claims that the poisoning of a French town in 1951 was an LSD trial.

On August 16th 1951 a number of people in the quiet southern French town of Pont St.Esprit began to fall ill. Stomach pains were soon followed by violent and often terrifying hallucinations. Local hospitals were soon overwhelmed and more than thirty people were taken to asylums in nearby towns. It was soon decided that the cause was bread poisoning and the evidence pointed to just one Bakery. The reason, it was believed was 'ergot', a fungal infection found in Rye bread which had often caused mass poisonings in Medieval times.

But documents obtained by the American writer Hank Albarelli suggest that rather than simple 'ergot' there was a strong possibility that the symptoms and the nature of the outbreak were not a tragic accident. In his research in to the mysterious death of the CIA biochemist Frank Olson and his post-war work on LSD and its uses as a biochemical weapon he got hold of papers implying Olson's connection with the Pont St Esprit outbreak.

Mike follows up the claims talking to experts in LSD and its impact, historians of the cold-war search for the perfect biochemical weapon and agricultural scientists specialising in ergot poisoning. He also visits the town of Pont St Esprit and talks to one survivor, the local postman Leon Armundier, about the events of 1951. Leon describes of the horrors he faced as a young man, being forced into a straight-jacket for a week as burning sensations and images of snakes raged around him.

Many in the town are uneasy at re-opening the old story about Le Pain Maudit - the evil bread - preferring the establishment 'truth' that it was just a tragic accident. But there are some who believe a proper examination of the facts still hasn't taken place.

20100830

In the last of the current series Mike Thomson investigates how Britain covertly manipulated the democratic process in its South American colony, then known as British Guiana in the run up to its independence in 1966.

Mike discovers new documents which show that they deliberately scuppered the outcome of their own conference organised to determine the country's future.

On the face of it the conference, held in London in October 1963, was designed to confirm the constitutional future for what was then British Guiana.

Publicly Britain encouraged the country's Prime Minister Dr Cheddi Jagan - who had been fairly elected in 1961 - and the leader of the opposition Linden Forbes Burnham to agree terms for independence.

However, behind the scenes, the documents reveal that the British were working to a different outcome - to ensure that agreement was never reached.

The British, under pressure from the Kennedy administration which feared Dr Jagan's Marxist leanings, were determined that he would not lead the country to independence.

To this end they suggested a form of proportional representation in forthcoming elections, knowing full well that Dr Jagan would not agree to these terms as they would favour his rival.

When the conference ended in deadlock as the British hoped it would, PR was duly implemented and the following year Dr Jagan was ousted much to the relief of the super powers.

Mike talks to historians, eye witnesses and Guyanese commentators today to discover how democracy itself was destroyed in British Guiana and the legacy of these shady days in today's modern Guyana.

Producer: Paula McGinley.

Mike Thomson investigates how Whitehall undermined democracy in British Guiana.

In the last of the current series Mike Thomson investigates how Britain covertly manipulated the democratic process in its South American colony, then known as British Guiana in the run up to its independence in 1966. Mike discovers new documents which show that they deliberately scuppered the outcome of their own conference organised to determine the country's future.

On the face of it the conference, held in London in October 1963, was designed to confirm the constitutional future for what was then British Guiana. Publicly Britain encouraged the country's Prime Minister Dr Cheddi Jagan - who had been fairly elected in 1961 - and the leader of the opposition Linden Forbes Burnham to agree terms for independence. However, behind the scenes, the documents reveal that the British were working to a different outcome - to ensure that agreement was never reached.

The British, under pressure from the Kennedy administration which feared Dr Jagan's Marxist leanings, were determined that he would not lead the country to independence. To this end they suggested a form of proportional representation in forthcoming elections, knowing full well that Dr Jagan would not agree to these terms as they would favour his rival. When the conference ended in deadlock as the British hoped it would, PR was duly implemented and the following year Dr Jagan was ousted much to the relief of the super powers.

20110801

In 1965, the British colony of Rhodesia broke away from the Empire. Ian Smith led the country's ruling white minority into a Unilateral Declaration of Independence.

But black independence fighters waged a long struggle to oust Smith's regime. By the late 1970s, Joshua Nkomo and his ZAPU party, and Robert Mugabe and his ZANU party, were both engaged in a bush war against Smith's regime.

Resolving the situation had become one of the most pressing issues of British foreign policy. The Foreign Secretary David Owen believed he had to bring all parties to the table if a long-term settlement was to be achieved.

Both Owen and Ian Smith had favoured Joshua Nkomo as the first black majority leader of Rhodesia/ Zimbabwe - until, in 1978, Nkomo's ZAPU fighters brought down a civilian Rhodesian airliner, and butchered a group of survivors.

Mike unearths the famous interview shortly afterwards in which Mr Nkomo was heard to chuckle over this most destructive act in the long-running and increasingly bloody independence struggle.

The Rhodesian special forces immediately stepped up plans to assassinate Nkomo. On 13th April 1979, an audacious raid was launched against Nkomo's house in Lusaka - in Zambian territory - but it failed because he wasn't at home.

Veterans of the Rhodesian forces remain convinced today that their intelligence was good and that Nkomo's escape was the result of a tip-off. And a ZAPU leader agrees with that suspicion.

In this edition of Document, Mike Thomson investigates the accusation that it was the British, informed by someone inside the Rhodesian command, who tipped off Nkomo. And he also examines whether the British later did the same when attempts were made on Robert Mugabe's life in Mozambique.

Did the belief that getting all parties to the table was the only way forward mean that, where possible, men who were responsible for what some saw as terrorism were to be protected?

Memos within the Foreign and Commonwealth Office suggest that the survival of Nkomo and Mugabe was indeed due, in part, to British involvement.

In his bid to uncover the truth, Mike talks to members of the Rhodesian defence forces as well as senior British diplomats involved at the time.

Mike Thomson asks if Britain's part in Zimbabwean peace meant protecting terrorists.

In 1965, the British colony of Rhodesia broke away from the Empire.

Ian Smith led the country's ruling white minority into a Unilateral Declaration of Independence.

But black independence fighters waged a long struggle to oust Smith's regime.

By the late 1970s, Joshua Nkomo and his ZAPU party, and Robert Mugabe and his ZANU party, were both engaged in a bush war against Smith's regime.

Resolving the situation had become one of the most pressing issues of British foreign policy.

The Foreign Secretary David Owen believed he had to bring all parties to the table if a long-term settlement was to be achieved.

The Rhodesian special forces immediately stepped up plans to assassinate Nkomo.

On 13th April 1979, an audacious raid was launched against Nkomo's house in Lusaka - in Zambian territory - but it failed because he wasn't at home.

Veterans of the Rhodesian forces remain convinced today that their intelligence was good and that Nkomo's escape was the result of a tip-off.

And a ZAPU leader agrees with that suspicion.

In this edition of Document, Mike Thomson investigates the accusation that it was the British, informed by someone inside the Rhodesian command, who tipped off Nkomo.

And he also examines whether the British later did the same when attempts were made on Robert Mugabe's life in Mozambique.

20110808

In 1938, Hitler annexed Austria.

As the Nazi repression of Austrian Jews intensified, many were desperately seeking ways of leaving the country.

One option was obtaining a baptismal certificate which offered the hope of making it easier to acquire transit visas and move across borders.

The President of the Los Angeles Holocaust Museum has just discovered, to his surprise, one such baptismal certificate belonging to his great uncle.

Mike Thomson follows this certificate back to the Anglican Church in Vienna, where this and many other baptisms took place in a very short space of time.

He finds people who received these certificates and hears how they were useful in aiding their escape from Austria.

He finds out about the Chaplains who came up against the Gestapo as a result of conducting these baptisms, and asks what motivated them.

He also unravels the arguments in the Church of England over what should be done to help Jews trying to escape Nazi Europe.

Producer: Neil McCarthy.

Mike Thomson investigates the secret baptism of Jews in Vienna's Anglican church, in 1938.

In 1938, Hitler annexed Austria. As the Nazi repression of Austrian Jews intensified, many were desperately seeking ways of leaving the country.

He finds out about the Chaplains who came up against the Gestapo as a result of conducting these baptisms, and asks what motivated them. He also unravels the arguments in the Church of England over what should be done to help Jews trying to escape Nazi Europe.

20110815

Mike Thomson investigates the collapse of the US UK special relationship in 1973, via a revealing transcript of a phone call between President Nixon and Henry Kissinger which suggests the split was deeper and more severe than previously thought.

As Britain joined the EEC, US Secretary of State Henry Kissinger became increasingly annoyed at the lack of support by Edward Heath's government for American foreign policy.

Mike uncovers papers which suggest that in retaliation, the US switched off the supply of intelligence to the UK.

Among those Mike speaks to are former Defence and Foreign Secretary Lord Carrington and Lord Powell, later Margaret Thatcher's Private Secretary.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

Mike Thomson investigates the collapse of the US UK special relationship in 1973.

As Britain joined the EEC, US Secretary of State Henry Kissinger became increasingly annoyed at the lack of support by Edward Heath's government for American foreign policy. Mike uncovers papers which suggest that in retaliation, the US switched off the supply of intelligence to the UK.

20130910

Mike Thomson examines controversies surrounding the disclosure of the Hanslope files, British government papers detailing brutality against Kenyans during the Mau Mau crisis of the 1950s.

The Hanslope papers had been airlifted back to the UK as Kenyan Independence approached - but were never incorporated into the National Archives.

Mike Thomson looks at the story behind the disclosure of documents and examines the implications for the keeping of public records in the UK.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

20130917

Mike Thomson explores the implications of a secret CIA report made in the 1960s that suggested British and American diplomatic cables and reports were being decrypted by the Japanese with the help of an American Cryptologist.

He tells the story of the colourful founder of American Cryptology, Herbert O Yardley. Yardley's publication of a book explaining his cryptographic success, particularly against the Japanese was a cause celebre in 1931. However, new documents coming to light suggest that Yardleys work for the Japanese continued long after, and that he may have been involved in deciphering British and American diplomatic messages giving the Japanese a clear understanding of the lack of preparedness for the attacks on Pearl Harbour and Singapore.

Producer - Tom Alban.

2014072820141125 (R4)

In the first of the new series of Document, Gordon Corera travels to Stockholm to investigate theories about the 1986 assassination of Swedish Prime Minister Olof Palme.

He begins with newly-discovered documents written by the late novelist and investigator of the far-right, Stieg Larsson.

But the trail leads him to the role of various secret services, to questions about elements of the Stockholm police, to South African dirty tricks, and ultimately back to Britain, where he makes a surprising discovery.

Producer: Phil Tinline.

20150714

Sanchia Berg uncovers the career of an MI5 agent who risked violence to expose British fascists and kidnap in postwar Vienna - only to find himself frozen out by his own Service.

Producer: Tom Alban.

20150721

Dominic Streatfeild tells the story of The Strange Voyage of the 'Blonde Angel'. Captain Alfredo Astiz had waged a very dirty part of Argentina's 'Dirty War'. As part of the notorious ESMA he had kidnapped and disappeared mothers, daughters, sons - even nuns. As part of 'Operation Alpha' Astiz led a detachment of Argentine commandos to seize South Georgia island, raising the Argentine flag on 2 April 1982, a crucial act in the escalation of the Falklands conflict. His surrender and capture quickly became a problem for the British. Both the French and Swedish governments were under public pressure to discover the fate of their own nationals who Astiz had disappeared, but Britain, anxious over the fate of its own P.O.Ws in Argentine hands and bound by the Geneva convention, felt it could do little to help. What happened next was an extraordinary voyage to Britain for Astiz, the first P.O.W. to be held on British soil since World War Two.

Using newly declassified documents, the writer and historian Dominic Streatfeild explores the dilemmas that Astiz posed and finds those who dealt with the 'Blonde Angel of Death'.

Producer

Mark Burman.

20150728

In the 1940s and 50s, as technology raced forwards and the Cold War intensified, many states came to rely on encryption machines to keep their secrets safe.

But what if a leading code-machine company gave the US National Security Agency secret access to their best machines - machines they were selling to states across the world?

Gordon Corera reveals new evidence of a secret deal, and examines its implications at the height of the Cold War.

PRODUCER: PHIL TINLINE.

*20090323

Mike uncovers papers which accused the BBC of biased reporting as Iran descended into revolution in 1978 and 1979.

The documents show that the BBC's Persian Service found itself attacked on all sides, with the most vociferous critics claiming that the Corporation was not simply reporting events but influencing them in favour of regime change.

As Ayatollah Khomeini sat in exile in Paris, the BBC stood charged with galvanising the radical cleric's supporters and acting as his mouthpiece in Tehran.

Featuring interviews with then Foreign Secretary Lord Owen, the then Iranian Ambassador, senior BBC figures and academic experts.

Fu Bingchang's Diaries2016071920170418 (R4)

Fu Bingchang witnessed the seeds of the Cold War being sown at the beginning of 1946 as the USSR, the UK and USA and negotiated at the UN Peace Conference about the presence of Soviet Troops in Iran. His granddaughter Yee Wah Foo opens up his diaries for the first time.

Fu Bingchang was the Chinese ambassador to Moscow as the Second World War became the Cold War. During his time in Moscow, as the two great communist powers felt their way towards their own kind of post-war settlement, Fu Bingchang kept a personal diary in which he recorded not just the details of his meetings and engagements, but also about his personal life and private hopes and fears for the future.

There are very few records of the birth of post-war Chinese diplomacy, and the diaries are an important piece in the jigsaw of national alignments during the 1940s. In this Cold War edition of Document, his granddaughter Yee Wah Foo of the University of Lincoln opens up the diaries to the public for the first time and shares the inner thoughts of China's man in Moscow.

Producer: Hannah Loy.

Fu Bingchang's Diaries20170418

The diaries of Fu Bingchang, Chinese Ambassador to the Soviet Union as the Cold War began.

Fu Bingchang was the Chinese ambassador to Moscow as the Second World War became the Cold War. During his time in Moscow, as the two great communist powers felt their way towards their own kind of post-war settlement, Fu Bingchang kept a personal diary in which he recorded not just the details of his meetings and engagements, but also about his personal life and private hopes and fears for the future.

There are very few records of the birth of post-war Chinese diplomacy, and the diaries are an important piece in the jigsaw of national alignments during the 1940s. In this Cold War edition of Document, his granddaughter Yee Wah Foo of the University of Lincoln opens up the diaries to the public for the first time and shares the inner thoughts of China's man in Moscow.

Producer: Hannah Loy.

Gchq: Keeping The Last Great Secret20121105

A document left in a pub, its chance discovery and scandals already facing the secret services in post-war Britain are the subject of the latest in Mike Thomson's Document series.

The document was a journalist's notebook. Passing through the hands of a barmaid, a landlord and the local police, it got perilously close to disclosing vital secrets about British surveillance - secrets that thousands of workers had taken strenuous efforts to preserve.

Why had a journalist been able to conduct interviews about all this? What impact would the revelations have had on the secret services, our foreign policy and our relations with America?

These questions confronted senior security service officials at a moment when they were already deep in the greatest peacetime crisis they faced in the twentieth century.

The last thing they needed, in the fevered weeks after the flight to Moscow of the Soviet spies Guy Burgess and Donald Maclean, was the threat of yet another major breach of security.

In this edition of Document, Mike discovers exactly how close they came to facing a fresh calamity.

Producer: Tom Alban.

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930826]

Five programmes using documentary evidence to throw new light on the recent past.

1: The Unspeakable Atrocity. If evidence of the Nazi death camps was acknowledged as early as 1942, why did the BBC and the British Government keep so quiet? Denys Blakeway examines BBC and Foreign Office records and explores the motives of the people involved. Producer Nigel Acheson

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930826]

Unknown: Denys Blakeway

Producer: Nigel Acheson

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930902]

2: The Quest for Lenin. Lenin's biographer Robert Service reveals secrets still explosive for Russia's fragile politics. Producer Julian Hale

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930902]

Producer: Julian Hale

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930909]

3: The Year of Living Dangerously. In September 1965, seven Indonesian anti-communist generals were targeted by military kidnap gangs in a leftist attempt to seize power. After the coup failed a wave of 'killings followed in which probably half a million communist sympathizers were killed. Who was behind the coup? John Keay talks to Abdul Haris Nasution , the only targeted general to have escaped with his life, and sifts through the evidence. Producer David Perry

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930909]

Talks: John Keay

Unknown: Abdul Haris Nasution

Producer: David Perry

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930916]

4: It Is with Very Great Regret. In the First World War, some 350 men were executed for desertion and cowardice. The Prime Minister says there was no legal impropriety, but Julian Putkowski has uncovered papers that tell a different story. Producer Matt Thompson

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930916]

Unknown: Julian Putkowski

Producer: Matt Thompson

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930923]

5: The Casement Diaries. In 1916 Sir Roger Casement , Irish patriot and champion of human rights, was hanged fortreason. An appeal for clemency appeared to reveal that he was a homosexual. Roisin McAuley considers the implications of adocument believed in Ireland to be a forgery. Producer Nigel Acheson

Genome: [r4 Bd=19930923]

Unknown: Sir Roger Casement

Unknown: Roisin McAuley

Producer: Nigel Acheson

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931202]

Rve programmes that use documentary evidence to throw new light on the past. 1: It Is with Very Great Regret. In the First World War some 350 men were executed for desertion and cowardice. But were some suffering from shell-shock? Julian Putkowski reports. Producer Matt Thompson

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931202]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931209]

Series using documentary evidence to throw new light on the recent past. 2: The Unspeakable Atrocity. Why did the BBC and the British government keep quiet about the Nazi death camps in spite of early evidence? Denys Blakeway reports. Producer Nigel Acheson

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931209]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931216]

Series that uses documentary evidence to throw new light on the recent past.

3: The Quest for Lenin. Deep in the vaults of Moscow's party archives lie all the recorded remains of the Soviet Union's founder. His biographer, Robert Service, reveals some explosive secrets. Producer Julian Hale

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931216]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19931223]

5: In 1916 Irish patriot Sir Roger Casement was hanged for treason. A plea for mercy failed after pages from his private diary seemed to reveal that he was homosexual. Rosin McAuley considers the implications of this document. Producer Nigel Acheson

Genome: [r4 Bd=19931223]

Unknown: Sir Roger Casement

Unknown: Rosin McAuley

Producer: Nigel Acheson

Genome: [r4 Bd=19940915]

Six programmes using documentary evidence to review past events.

1: Suez: the Propagation of Truth. The BBC is proud of its record of editorial independence during the Suez crisis of 1956. Examining newly released documents, Gerald Butt traces the short but ignominious life of "the Voice of Britain".

Producers Nigel Acheson and Joanne Cayford

Genome: [r4 Bd=19940915]

Unknown: Gerald Butt

Producers: Nigel Acheson

Producers: Joanne Cayford

Genome: [r4 Bd=19940922]

Six programmes using documentary evidence to review past events. 2: A Judge Remembers. Did Lord

Mountbatten act in India's favour to change the "independent" boundary award before the 1947 partition?

Historian Andrew Roberts is convinced that the rules and the frontier were bent. Producer Julian Hale

Genome: [r4 Bd=19940922]

Unknown: Andrew Roberts

Producer: Julian Hale

Genome: [r4 Bd=19940929]

Six programmes using documentary evidence to review past events.

The Quiet Man (How Civil Servants Won the Peace). The 1921 truce in Ireland was engineered by brilliant, but middle-ranking British civil servants who risked everything to meet the IRA. It was a secret even from those who could protect them, the British Army. Julian Putowski investigates. Producer Matt Thompson

Genome: [r4 Bd=19940929]

Unknown: Julian Putowski

Producer: Matt Thompson

Genome: [r4 Bd=19941006]

Six programmes using documentary evidence to review past events. 4: The Mandelstam File. Osip

Mandelstam, regarded as the greatest Russian poet of the 20th century, is believed to have died in the Siberian Gulag, but nobody is sure of the details. Oliver Walston goes to Siberia in an attempt to discover the truth. Producer Daniel Snowman

Genome: [r4 Bd=19941006]

Unknown: Oliver Walston

Producer: Daniel Snowman

Genome: [r4 Bd=19941013]

5: Getting Their Own Back. Aniva Gold remembers the large office block in central Berlin which housed her grandfather's thriving fur business in the 1920s. Now her family has assembled a dossier of documents to support their claim that the building was forcibly sold in 1936, under a regime which targeted Jewish property. Roisin McAuley investigates. Producer Nigel Acheson

Genome: [r4 Bd=19941013]

Unknown: Roisin McAuley

Producer: Nigel Acheson

Genome: [r4 Bd=19941020]

Last in the series. The MarburgFiles. In the spring of 1945 Allied forces seized 400 tons of Nazi files documenting German foreign relations before and during World War Two. Denys Blakeway explores the tension between historial objectivity and political interference. Producer Nigel Acheson

Genome: [r4 Bd=19941020]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19950907]

Six programmes using documentary evidence to throw new light on past events.

The Lord, the Sword and the Guru. Having successfully annexed the Punjab to the British Empire in 1849, Lord Dalhousie, the Governor-General of India, had a large collection of Sikh arms and relics shipped back to Britain. What happened to these precious items? Were they legally acquired? Mark Tully traces an allegory of Anglo-Indian relations from London, via Scotland, to Delhi.

Producers Nigel Acheson and Rani Singh

Genome: [r4 Bd=19950907]

Unknown: Mark Tully

Producers: Nigel Acheson

Producers: Rani Singh

Genome: [r4 Bd=19950914]

Six programmes using documentary evidence to throw light on past events. 2: Through a Glass Darkly.

Patrick Wright reads the hidden depths lying in the stained glass windows of St Mary's Church, Swaffham Prior, Cambridgeshire. Erected as a memorial to 23 villagers who died in the Great War, they contain some surprising messages. Producer Neil Trevithick

Genome: [r4 Bd=19950914]

Unknown: Patrick Wright

Producer: Neil Trevithick

Genome: [r4 Bd=19950921]

Six programmes using documentary evidence to throw light on past events. 3: Mata Hari - the Fatal Lover. Why was Mata Hari executed in October 1917? As a new campaign to overturn her guilty verdict gets underway, author Julie Weelwright explores the fact and fantasy behind the legendary spy, courtesan and exotic dancer. Producer Mark Burman

Genome: [r4 Bd=19950921]

Unknown: Julie Weelwright

Producer: Mark Burman

Genome: [r4 Bd=19950928]

Six programmes using documentary evidence to throw light on past events. 4: Question of Trust. Gerry Kennedy traces members of a Moscow group which defied the Soviet authorities and contacted western peace movements during the early 1980s. Producer Nigel Acheson

Genome: [r4 Bd=19950928]

Unknown: Gerry Kennedy

Producer: Nigel Acheson

Genome: [r4 Bd=19951005]

Six programmes using documentary evidence to throw light on past events. 5: The GAL Affair. After a tip-off, two Spanish journalists prise open a hidden trunk. Inside are forged documents - proof of "official" anti-ETA death squads. Matthew Carr retraces the human and political drama at the heart of Spain's latest crisis. Producer Julian Hale

Genome: [r4 Bd=19951005]

Unknown: Matthew Carr

Producer: Julian Hale

Genome: [r4 Bd=19951012]

Last of the series which throws new light on past events.

White House E-mails. As a collection of declassified messages relating to the Iran-Contra scandal is about to be published, Sue Ellicott logs on to the world of Washington cyberpolitics. Producer Jim Clarke

Genome: [r4 Bd=19951012]

Unknown: Sue Ellicott

Producer: Jim Clarke

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970206]

Six new investigations whose starting-point is a piece of intriguing documentary evidence.

1: The Letters in the Mirror. A secondhand mirror from a North London junk shop shatters to reveal a cache of 50-year-old letters written in Dutch. They are sent to Liz Barnes and her Dutch husband, who set out to piece together the puzzle the letters reveal - the heart-rending tale of the Hemelrijk family in the occupied

Netherlands during the darkest days of the war.

Producer Simon Elmes

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970206]

Unknown: Liz Barnes

Producer: Simon Elmes

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970213]

Six new investigations where the starting-point is a piece of intriguing documentary evidence.

2: They Kept Diaries. Julian Putkowski examines a collection of diaries, uncovered by historian Dr John Barber , that shed light on how the people of Leningrad resisted the Wehrmacht's attempts to starve them out. Producer Matt Thompson

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970213]

Unknown: Julian Putkowski

Unknown: Dr John Barber

Producer: Matt Thompson

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970220]

A series of six new investigations.

3: And Sheep May Safely Graze. After the Chernobyl nuclear explosion of 1986, thousands of British sheep were found to be radioactive and banned from our food chain. But was all that contamination from an event far closer to home, nearly 30 years earlier? Rob Edwards of the New

Scientist investigates the Windscale fire in 1957. Producer Jane Ray

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970220]

Unknown: Rob Edwards

Producer: Jane Ray

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970227]

Six new investigations whose starting-point is a piece of intriguing documentary evidence.

4: The Art of the Impossible. George Fischer investigates how in the late eighties the covert political and diplomatic initiatives of a few reform-minded Hungarian Communists played an unforeseen but essential part in the fall of the Berlin Wall. German Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich Genscherand Hungarian Prime

Minister Miklos Nemeth recollect their secret meetings and negotiations. Producer Louise Greenberg

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970227]

Unknown: George Fischer

Unknown: Miklos Nemeth

Producer: Louise Greenberg

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970306]

Six new investigations whose starting-point is a piece of intriguing documentary evidence.

5: How Did Davy Die ? Fraser Harrison investigates the authenticity of a Mexican officer's diary which questions the popular myth of Davy Crockett 's heroic death at the Alamo. Producer Hilary Dunn

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970306]

Unknown: Davy Die

Unknown: Fraser Harrison

Unknown: Davy Crockett

Producer: Hilary Dunn

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970313]

The last of six new investigations the starting-point of which is a piece of intriguing documentary evidence. Chocolate Soldier from the USA

One night in May 1944, Leroy Henry , a black US soldier in Britain, went Awol. He was picked up, accused of rape, found guilty and sentenced to be hanged, even though rape was not a capital offence in Britain. Using the trial transcript and new research from America, George Pixley reveals some disturbing aspects of US military justice in the Second World War. Producer Marc Jobst

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970313]

Unknown: Leroy Henry

Unknown: George Pixley

Producer: Marc Jobst

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971106]

Six programmes employing documentary evidence to throw new light on past events.

1: The Greatest Hangover in History Far from being the climax of a great social revolution, the Russian

Revolution of 1917 was a Bolshevik coup d'etat, characterised by vandalism, random violence and looting. Helen Weinstein talks to controversial historian Orlando Figes. author of A People's Tragedy: the Russian Revolution, about the event.

Producers Helen Weinstein and Mark Burman

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971106]

Talks: Helen Weinstein

Unknown: Orlando Figes.

Producers: Helen Weinstein

Producers: Mark Burman

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971113]

Using documentary evidence to throw new light on past events.

2: Thin Ice. In 1984, Stephen Weeks was directing a major feature film in India, when he received reports from London that all the film rushes were unusable. He tried to salvage the film, only but his work had fallen prey to a massive insurance fraud. Producer Jules Wilkinson

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971113]

Unknown: Stephen Weeks

Producer: Jules Wilkinson

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971120]

Five programmes using documentary evidence to throw new light on past events. 3: The Rre Is in Our Hearts Inspired by a book he found at a jumble sale, Alan Dein uncovers a chain of events which led to a mass pupils' strike in support of an inspirational teacher in 1971. Producer Mark Burman

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971120]

Unknown: Alan Dein

Producer: Mark Burman

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971127]

Five programmes using documentary evidence to throw new light on past events. 4: My Home, My Land

Fifty years ago today, the United

Nations voted to partition Palestine and give a home to the Jews. The story of the events leading up to that crucial vote is told by the people whose lives it changed. Presented by Roisin McAuley.

Producer Ronit Knoble

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971127]

Presented By: Roisin McAuley.

Producer: Ronit Knoble

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971204]

The last of five programmes using documentary evidence to throw new light on past events.

The Ring of Remembrance. American airman Larry Dundon was killed when his bomber crashed on a hill in Belfast in 1944. Historian

Malcolm Gaskill finds out how an astonishing discovery led to him being remembered 50 years after his death. Producer Helen Weinstein

Genome: [r4 Bd=19971204]

Unknown: Larry Dundon

Unknown: Malcolm Gaskill

Producer: Helen Weinstein

Knowing Jurgen Kuczynski2016071220170411 (R4)

When Anne McElvoy met and wrote about the East German Economist Jurgen Kuczynski back in the 1980s she was aware of his reputation as a fringe player in the collection of Soviet spies operating in Britain in the years leading up to the 2nd World War. Now, with the help of recently released documents from MI5 and the intelligence services in both the US and Germany, Anne pieces together a fuller story of Kuczynski, his family and their role in the Atomic bomb spy scandals that rocked the British in the years after the second World War. She talks to academics who have been exploring the way the Kuczynski family were able to operate in spite of a full and detailed operation by MI5 intended to keep them under surveillance and she talks to surviving members of the family about Jurgen and his sister Ruth, better known as the soviet spy Sonya, and why they never felt any need to excuse the work they did in allowing a Stalinist regime in Moscow to dramatically accelerate their development of Nuclear Weapons.

Producer: Tom Alban.

Leyland Buses, Cuba And The Cia20090330

Mike Thomson presents the series using documentary evidence to throw new light on past events.

Mike examines allegations that CIA agents sabotaged consignments of British Leyland buses bound for Cuba in the 1960s.

The British government's support of a deal to export hundreds of buses to the island, which was in the early days of its revolution, incensed the American government, which was trying to enforce its economic blockade.

With anti-Castro rhetoric and communist fears mounting within the Kennedy administration, the CIA was given special powers to undermine the regime in Cuba.

Mike examines official papers which point towards concerns that the coveted Leyland buses had been sabotaged on Cuban soil or en route to Cuba.

With 'spymania' in the air, these fears were heightened when in October 1964 a ship carrying 42 buses to Havana was struck by another ship on the Thames and sunk.

The programme investigates just how far the US was prepared to go to sabotage the Cuban economy and asks whether the CIA could really have sent the buses to the bottom of the Thames.

Mike examines allegations that the CIA sabotaged a shipment of buses from Britain to Cuba.

Mi6 And The Media20130304

Jeremy Duns examines leaked documents which suggest close links between MI6 and the British press during the Cold War.

In December 1968, the British media was shaken by a series of secret documents leaked to Soviet state newspapers. The documents claimed a range of key Fleet Street correspondents and news chiefs were working for the intelligence services. Further papers alleged close links between the BBC and MI6.

At the time, the documents were dismissed by the British media as forgeries, part of an escalating propaganda battle played out in the Russian press. In this edition of Document, Jeremy Duns uncovers evidence which suggests that the papers were genuine and examines how they might have found their way into Soviet hands.

Notorious spies George Blake and Kim Philby are among those under suspicion of having leaked the documents.

Jeremy Duns speaks to distinguished Sunday Times journalist Phillip Knightley, and historian of the intelligence services Professor Christopher Andrew.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

Mi6's Secret Slush Fund20171120

Gordon Corera investigates a secret fund belonging to the MI6 chief in the 1950s.

BBC Security Correspondent Gordon Corera investigates a secret slush fund belonging to the Chief of British Intelligence in the years after World War Two. What did it make possible? Who was the mysterious American who donated it - and why did they do it?

With: Dr Rory Cormac, Stephen Dorril, Gill Bennett, Hugh Wilford

Producer: Phil Tinline.

Programme Catalogue - Details: 1. The Lord, The Sword And The Guru19950907

Producer: N. ACHESON

Next in series: THROUGH A GLASS DARKLY

Previous in series: THE MARBURG FILE

Description

Programme using documentary evidence to shed new light on past events. Mark TULLY looks at the shipping of a large collection of Sikh arms and relics to Britain in 1849. What happened to these items? Were they legally acquired?

Subject Categories

history programmes (genre)

sikh artefacts

Broadcast history

07 Sep 1995 19:20-20:00 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Mark Tully

Nigel Acheson (Producer)

Rani Singh (Producer)

Anthony Hyde (rdr)

Josh Towb (rdr)

Jeffrey Whitehead (rdr)

John Keay (Speaker)

Jeevan Deol (Speaker)

Kuldip Nayar (Speaker)

Robert Skelton (Speaker)

Sue Stronge (Speaker)

Harbans Singh (Sikh diplomat) (Speaker)

Gurbax Singh Anandpuri (Speaker)

Baba Sing Ji Sahib (Singh teacher) (Speaker)

Ikbhal Singh (Speaker)

Kushwant Singh (Sikh historian) (Speaker)

Nahar Singh (Indian Archives researcher) (Speaker)

Christian Broun-Lindsay (Speaker)

Richard Bingle (Doctor) (Speaker)

Ludovic Broun-Lindsay (Speaker)

Programme Catalogue - Details: A Question Of Trust19950928

Producer: N. ACHESON

Next in series: THE GAL AFFAIR

Previous in series: MATA HARI - THE FATAL LOVER

Description

SBH:A Question of Trust. Gerry Kennedy revisits the former USSR and talks former members of the Trust Group, a group of Moscow writers, academics and refuseniks who challenged the Soviet authorities by maintaining dialogue with Western peace movements.

OTN:SLN539/95FT4642 TXN/TDT:R4 28-Sep-1995

Broadcast history

28 Sep 1995 19:20-20:00 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Gerry Kennedy (Speaker)

Ann Pettit (Speaker)

Nigel Wade (Speaker)

Olga Medvedkova (Speaker)

Deborah Lubar (Speaker)

Dina Dudkin (Speaker)

Yuri Medvedkova (Speaker)

Misha Ostrovsky (Speaker)

Sergei Batovrin (Speaker)

Alexander Shtravka (Speaker)

Notes: CAIRS 658507

Programme Catalogue - Details: Mata Hari19950921

- THE FATAL LOVER

Producer: BURMAN, Mark

Next in series: A QUESTION OF TRUST

Previous in series: THROUGH A GLASS DARKLY

Description

SBH:Mata Hari - The Fatal Lover. Julie Wheelwright explores the fact and the fantasy behind the life and death of the legendary spy, courtesan and exotic dancer. With 1940s recordings of Mata Hari's prosecutors. A programme in the series Document.

Broadcast history

21 Sep 1995 00:00-00:00 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Julie Wheelwright (Author)

Mark Burman (Producer)

Geoffrey Whitehead (rdr)

Jonathan Keeble (rdr)

Andrew Branch (rdr)

Imogen Stubbs (rdr)

Vernon Dobtcheff (rdr)

Sandrine Morvan (Speaker)

Natalie Barney (Speaker)

John Kieger (Speaker)

Pierre Bouchardon (Speaker)

Andre Bouchardon (Speaker)

Andre Mornet (Speaker)

Jean Mouriel (Speaker)

Sam Waagenaar (Speaker)

George Reid Grant (Speaker)

Leon Schirmann (Speaker)

Kate Paviot (tr)

Steve Evans (translator (tr)) (tr)

Notes: CAIRS 709128

Programme Catalogue - Details: Through A Glass Darkly19950914

Producer: N. TREVITHICK

Next in series: MATA HARI - THE FATAL LOVER

Previous in series: 1. THE LORD, THE SWORD AND THE GURU

Description

Patrick WRIGHT reads the hidden depths lying in the stained glass windows of

Subject Categories

documentaries (programme format)

artifacts (commemorative)

stained glass

st mary the virgin (church) (swaffham prior)

Broadcast history

14 Sep 1995 19:20-20:00 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Patrick Wright

Neil Trevithick (Producer)

John Clarke (Speaker)

Peter Cormack (Speaker)

Mark Howarth (Speaker)

Fred Day (Speaker)

Mrs Budden (Speaker)

Violet Betts (Speaker)

Andrew Camps (Speaker)

Aurea Cazenove (Speaker)

Alice Day (Speaker)

Alan Akroyd (Speaker)

Philip Leeson (Speaker)

Annie Lowe (Speaker)

Bob Sheldrick (Speaker)

Recorded on 1995-08-01

Programme Catalogue - Station

Radio 4

Scotland's Lord Haw Haw20171127

Jo Fox discovers the transcripts of a Nazi secret radio station broadcasting to Scotland.

Radio played a key role in the propaganda campaigns of Nazi Germany. The most notorious personality in this radio war was William Joyce, or 'Lord Haw-Haw' - who came to be known as the English voice of Nazi Germany. But he wasn't alone in this effort.
Professor Jo Fox of Durham University discovers the lost transcripts of Radio Caledonia, a 'secret station' designed to disseminate defeatist propaganda to the people of Scotland and sow seeds of dissent among its listeners. Set up by the German Propaganda Ministry in 1940, the presenter was Scottish national Donald Grant.
Jo Fox examines the Nazis' attempts to appeal to Scottish nationalist feeling through these broadcasts and asks why, unlike Joyce, Donald Grant was spared execution.

Producer: Sarah Shebbeare.

The Albania Operation2016070520170404 (R4)

As part of Radio 4's Cold War season, Document unearths new evidence from key moments in the 1940s and 1950s.

In the first edition of the series, Gordon Corera re-examines the CIA's attempt to subvert Albania's communist government in the early 1950s.

The failure of the operation has been blamed for decades on the Soviet spy Kim Philby. But with the help of new evidence provided by historian Steve Long, Gordon investigates whether this story really stands up.

And he asks why, at the height of the Cold War, the CIA was secretly meeting agents of a communist power.

With: Steve Long, Beatrice Heuser, Rory Cormac, Albert Lulushi.

PRODUCER: Phil Tinline.

The Bbc And The Hungarian Holocaust20121112

Mike Thomson investigates the role of the BBC Hungarian Service in World War II.

In March 1944 German troops occupied Hungary. In doing so they brought the Final Solution to the largest remaining Jewish population in Europe. Within months over 400,000 people were deported and killed by a now almost perfect mass killing machine.

Mike Thomson investigates documents which suggest that the BBC was directed not to broadcast crucial information and examines claims that it could have saved thousands of lives.

The British Gunner And The Irish Civil War20121029

Mike Thomson returns with Radio 4's investigative history series.

Dublin 1922. Irish rebel leader Michael Collins has signed a new Treaty with Britain. The new Irish Free State is taking shape.

But even as Collins was establishing the Free State, a rebellion from within Irish Republican ranks broke out against the new state and the Treaty with Britain. The anti-Treaty forces seized the 'Four Courts' legal complex in central Dublin.

Meanwhile, in London, the former Chief of the Imperial General Staff, Sir Henry Wilson, was assassinated by Republicans outside his Chelsea home.

The British Government urged Michael Collins their recent foe - and now fellow national leader - to act.

Mike visits Dublin to examine what a soldier's forgotten memoir reveals about Britain's true role at the start of the Irish Civil War.

Producer: Neil McCarthy.

The Gibraltar Diary Of Squadron Leader Mallory20171204

A document in French leads Nick Rankin to the exploits of an SOE operative in Gibraltar.

Nick Rankin examines a detailed document, written in French and discovered in the wartime files of the Iberia Section of S.O.E., the Special Operations Executive. This personal account by Squadron-Leader Hugh Mallory Falconer tells how he established a secret wireless network covering the Western Mediterranean and linking Gibraltar with North African cities including Casablanca, Tangier and Oran. This network not only helped pave the way for Operation TORCH, the Anglo-American invasion of Vichy French North Africa in November 1942, but when the US armed forces went into combat, it was Falconer's radio network that held up when the other Allied communications systems failed. For three days in was the low level radio post housed in a cave in the Rock of Gibraltar that kept the Allied Commander Eisenhower in touch with his ground forces. In an increasingly challenging situation Mallory's network helped ensure this pivotal moment in the war did not turn into a disaster. Later in the North Africa campaign, Falconer was captured by the Germans on an S.O.E. mission in Tunisia and was held in a variety of prisoner of war camps until he was liberated in 1945.
Nick talks to historians of the period, operators who explain the challenges and brilliance of the S.O.E. operatives and he tracks down Falconer's daughter who has her own recollections of her father's wartime exploits. She had no idea that Downing Street, in a memo of 19th May 1943 had described the work of Mallory and his team in glowing terms. 'It is abundantly clear that the operators handling the signals... were as essential to the operations as the organ blower to the cathedral organist.'

Producer: Tom Alban.

The Hague Warning2014081120141209 (R4)

When Rodney Dennys, a counter-intelligence officer working in the feverish atmosphere of The Hague in July 1939 received a phone call from a German agent working for the British and warning that Germany would invade Poland in just over seven weeks time, he insured the message was cyphered back to Britain immediately. In the event the warning was accurate to within days, in spite of a sustained belief that Hitler might still be placated.

Historian Heather Jones explores the document in which Rodney Dennys recalls his intelligence coup and the subsequent inaction of the British authorities. She asks why it was that the Foreign office and leading figures in the Joint Intelligence Committee failed to act on such a detailed warning and she finds out about the German agent, Wolfgang Zu Putlitz who gave it. It was the last in a long series of accurate intelligence reports he'd supplied by way of his link on the British side, a certain Klop Ustinov, father of the famous actor and playwright, Peter.

The programme examines the state of the British intelligence community at the time, the split between appeasers and those who distrusted every German move and why this Document and the later Venlo incident in which two British intelligence officers walked into a trap laid by the Germans, was a Secret Intelligence Crisis.

When Rodney Dennys, a counter-intelligence officer working in the feverish atmosphere of The Hague in July 1939 received a phone call from a German agent working for the British and warning that Germany would invade Poland in just over seven weeks time, he insured the message was ciphered back to Britain immediately. In the event the warning was accurate to within days, in spite of a sustained belief that Hitler might still be placated.

Historian Helen Jones explores the document in which Rodney Dennys recalls his intelligence coup and the subsequent inaction of the British authorities. She asks why it was that the Foreign office and leading figures in the Joint Intelligence Committee failed to act on such a detailed warning and she finds out about the German agent, Wolfgang Zu Putlitz who gave it. It was the last in a long series of accurate intelligence reports he'd supplied by way of his link on the British side, a certain Klop Ustinov, father of the famous actor and playwright, Peter.

The Hyderabad Massacre20130924

Using recently discovered documents, Mike Thomson investigates a largely forgotten massacre in independent India. It happened a year after the Partition violence and took place right in the heart of India, in the large state of Hyderabad. 30,000 people were killed. This was a time when the Muslim prince of Hyderabad was resisting integration with India and the Indian Army was sent in to overthrow his forces. When, a few months later, Prime Minister Nehru heard reports of massacres of thousands of Muslims by Hindus he commissioned a report to find out what had happened. That report was called The Sunderlal Report and it has been rarely seen by scholars since 1948. 'Document' has obtained a copy. Thomson shows it to historians of the period and hears from first hand witnesses as he pieces together the real story of the 'Hyderabad Massacre'.

Producer Neil McCarthy.

The Saur Death List Of Afghanistan2014080420141202 (R4)

David Loyn investigates how a lost document is helping Afghanistan come to terms with its painful past.

It revolves around the lesser known moment when Afghanistan began to fall apart: 1978, two years before the Soviet invasion. Lesser known, partly because the world wasn't really paying attention but also because evidence of state murder and disappearance was covered up after the co-called Saur Revolution. That is, until now. A war crimes trial in the Netherlands has unearthed a list of 5000 prisoners detained, tortured and killed by the radical communist regime in 1978 / 79.

This 'Death List' has less than half the total number of people unaccounted for during that period but it has finally given families of the disappeared confirmation of the fate of their loved ones and allowed them to mourn. The reverberations of this are being felt strongly in Afghanistan. This story is told through the eyes of a remarkable survivor of these purges whose name is on the list of the dead.

This 'Death List' leads us to the issue of justice and accountability for war crimes in Afghanistan, not just from 1978 but over the following three decades. Post 9/11 the West dealt with warlords whose very poor human rights records went unquestioned and many of them now hold powerful government positions in Afghanistan. It raises the question: when will the country be able to face the crimes of its recent past and bring the perpetrators to justice? It's a question on the lips of many ordinary Afghans.

Producer Neil McCarthy.

Votes For Victorian Women2013031820141216 (R4)

Popular history tells us that women did not get the vote until 1918.

Though they could technically vote in local elections before that, many historians have argued that in practice they had no vote until the 1860s at the earliest. And evidence that they ever did vote has proved almost impossible to find.

But now a poll book, discovered in a box of papers in a local record office, clearly shows 25 women voting in elections for important local posts in Lichfield in 1843.

In this week's Document, the historian Sarah Richardson follows the trail of these women, to reveal a picture of Victorian women's involvement in politics which challenges many of our assumptions.

She discovers that they represented a surprising cross-section of society - old and young, poor and prosperous - and attempts to trace their descendants today.

She finds out how, when even universal manhood suffrage was seen as a radical, dangerous idea, these women may have been just a few of many more who could vote at a local level.

And she explores how, decades later, campaigners for Votes for Women at the Westminster level had to contend with this complex legacy.

Producer: Phil Tinline.

0120120305

Mike Thomson returns with Radio 4's investigative history series, examining documents which shed new light on past events.

In the first programme of the new series, Mike investigates the role played by the French Government and defence industry during the Falklands War.

30 years on, it's well documented that French President Francois Mitterrand was supportive of the British war effort - not least in the memoirs of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. Yet Mike discovers papers which suggest there was a deep split within the French government.

Producer: Laurence Grissell.

Mike Thomson investigates the role the French government played in the 1982 Falklands War.

01The Bomb, The Chancellor And Britain's Nuclear Secrets20110314

Mike Thomson returns with Radio 4's investigative history series.

In the first edition of a new series, Mike investigates documents which suggest that Labour Chancellor Denis Healey was kept in the dark over plans to modernise Polaris, Britain's nuclear weapons system in the mid-1970s.

Dubbed Chevaline, the upgrade programme was top secret and highly controversial, that would eventually cost hundreds of millions of pounds more than originally estimated.

And all this at a time of economic hardship.

Striving to keep his split party together on the highly sensitive issue of nuclear weapons, Prime Minister Harold Wilson restricted decision-making to a small circle of ministers.

But Thomson discovers papers which suggest that officials may have gone to extreme lengths to ensure that Chevaline was kept on track, proposing to withold key information from a sceptical Chancellor on the "need to know" basis.

Was national security the real reason or were other motives at play?

Mike puts the claims to former Cabinet Ministers Tony Benn and Lord Owen, formerly David Owen, Foreign Secretary in the late 70s.

Producer: Laurence Grissell

Also in this series, Mike Thomson will shed new light on what some regard as the first shots in the Cold War between Britain and Soviet Russia: an alleged plot to overthrow the Bolshevik regime in 1918 and to kill its leaders, Lenin and Trotsky.

Mike Thomson explores documents which shed light on plans to update Polaris in the mid-70s

1. The Bomb, the Chancellor and Britain's Nuclear Secrets

Dubbed Chevaline, the upgrade programme was top secret and highly controversial, that would eventually cost hundreds of millions of pounds more than originally estimated. And all this at a time of economic hardship. Striving to keep his split party together on the highly sensitive issue of nuclear weapons, Prime Minister Harold Wilson restricted decision-making to a small circle of ministers.

But Thomson discovers papers which suggest that officials may have gone to extreme lengths to ensure that Chevaline was kept on track, proposing to withold key information from a sceptical Chancellor on the "need to know" basis. Was national security the real reason or were other motives at play?

0220110321

In 1918 Russia was in turmoil and that summer the Soviet leader, Vladimir Lenin, was shot and very nearly killed.

The following morning, the British representative in Moscow was arrested.

The Soviet secret services accused him of being at the centre of a dastardly imperialist plot to overthrow the young, fragile Bolshevik regime and to assassinate both Lenin and Trotsky.

And that is a story the Russians have stuck to ever since.

The British, on the other hand, have consistently dismissed the Soviet allegations as far-fetched propaganda.

But were the Russians right? The alleged plot soured Anglo-Soviet relations for years afterwards - even to the present day.

Using as yet unpublished archives, Mike Thomson investigates the truth behind this "plot."

Producer: John Murphy.

Mike Thomson reveals the truth behind an alleged British plot to kill Lenin.

In 1918 Russia was in turmoil and that summer the Soviet leader, Vladimir Lenin, was shot and very nearly killed. The following morning, the British representative in Moscow was arrested. The Soviet secret services accused him of being at the centre of a dastardly imperialist plot to overthrow the young, fragile Bolshevik regime and to assassinate both Lenin and Trotsky. And that is a story the Russians have stuck to ever since. The British, on the other hand, have consistently dismissed the Soviet allegations as far-fetched propaganda. But were the Russians right? The alleged plot soured Anglo-Soviet relations for years afterwards - even to the present day. Using as yet unpublished archives, Mike Thomson investigates the truth behind this "plot."

0220120312

Mike Thomson presents Radio 4's investigative history series, examining documents which shed new light on past events.

In 1946, against the general post-Second World War retreat from Empire, Britain acquired a new territory: Sarawak on the island of Borneo.

Before its cession to the British, Sarawak had, for over a hundred years, been ruled over by the so-called White Rajahs.

They were, in fact, the Brooke family from Dorset and the decision by Vyner Brooke to hand over to British rule was a controversial one both within his family and within the country of Sarawak in general.

By 1949 it appeared that those opposed to the handover or 'cession', led by Anthony Brooke, were losing the argument.

It was then that a new governor, Duncan Stewart, was appointed. But a few short weeks after his arrival, he was fatally stabbed while inspecting a school in the provincial town of Sibu.

Stewart bravely tried to hide his injury and was flown out to Singapore. He clung to life long enough to see his wife who had hurried from London to see him.

The death of a young and promising British officer was blamed on the final, violent convulsion of the anti-cession movement, with the implication that Anthony Brooke should share some of the responsibility.

But was that really the motive for the attack? With the help of documents discovered by historian Simon Ball, Mikr Thomson explores the British attempts to play down and even hide the real reason for the assassination.

And Mike speaks to Anthony Brooke's grandson and Duncan Stewart's daughter about the legacy left to them by this forgotten outburst of colonial violence.

Producer: Tom Alban.

Mike Thomson unearths the motives behind the 1949 murder of a British colonial governor.

0320110328

Mike Thomson explores newly released documents which suggest that Éamon de Valera's Fianna Fáil government secretly co-operated with the British to crush the IRA in the 1930s.

In January 1939 the IRA launched a devastating bombing campaign across England for the cause of a united Ireland.

Bombs left at power stations, in litter bins and empty cinemas caused havoc in London, Manchester, Birmingham and other major cities.

In August 1939 Coventry suffered the worst explosion when a bomb carried by a bicycle brought carnage to the streets and left five dead.

Ireland's Prime Minister Éamon de Valera was in a difficult position as he had turned his back on the militant republicanism of his youth in favour of constitutional politics.

With war looming he also wanted to keep Ireland neutral.

Faced with an IRA campaign that was undermining his political efforts and ratcheting up the violence - at one stage the IRA even considered recruiting volunteers for "death squads" - documents show that de Valera was secretly co-operating with his arch enemy - the British government - to stamp out his former brothers in arms.

Producer: Paula McGinley.

Mike Thomson investigates secret Anglo-Irish co-operation against the IRA in the 1930s.

In January 1939 the IRA launched a devastating bombing campaign across England for the cause of a united Ireland. Bombs left at power stations, in litter bins and empty cinemas caused havoc in London, Manchester, Birmingham and other major cities. In August 1939 Coventry suffered the worst explosion when a bomb carried by a bicycle brought carnage to the streets and left five dead.

Ireland's Prime Minister Éamon de Valera was in a difficult position as he had turned his back on the militant republicanism of his youth in favour of constitutional politics. With war looming he also wanted to keep Ireland neutral. Faced with an IRA campaign that was undermining his political efforts and ratcheting up the violence - at one stage the IRA even considered recruiting volunteers for "death squads" - documents show that de Valera was secretly co-operating with his arch enemy - the British government - to stamp out his former brothers in arms.

0320120319

Mike Thomson continues Radio 4's investigative history series, examining documents which shed new light on past events.

In 1942, the Vichy regime ruled a large part of France, after striking a deal with Hitler when France fell in June 1940. This left France officially neutral, with a severely limited 'Armistice Army'. Yet British troops were fighting Vichy forces in Madagascar, as they had done in Syria in1941. France, it seems, was more neutral towards Germany than towards Britain; here its collaborationist regime, under Marshall Petain, was viewed with contempt by Winston Churchill and the British people, who instead supported Charles De Gaulle, leader of the Free French.

Yet in this edition of Document, Mike Thomson presents evidence that, not only were the British Chiefs of Staff meeting with representatives of the Vichy army to discuss supplying them with arms, but they were doing so behind the backs of Prime Minister Churchill and the Foreign Secretary, Anthony Eden.

To investigate, Mike enlists the help of Eric Grove - Professor of Naval History at the University of Salford, Vichy historians Robert Paxton, Henry Rousso and Simon Kitson, eminent French historian Jean-Louis Cremieux-Brilhac - who was one of De Gaulle's intelligence officers, and military historians Max Hastings and Colin Smith, as well as Gerald Bryan, who was badly injured fighting Vichy forces in Syria.

Producer: Marya Burgess.

Why were the British Chiefs of Staff in secret contact with enemy Vichy France in 1942?

195C01The Lord, The Sword And The Guru19950907

Producer: N.

ACHESON

Next in series: THROUGH A GLASS DARKLY

Previous in series: THE MARBURG FILE

Description

Programme using documentary evidence to shed new light on past events.

Mark Tully looks at the shipping of a large collection of Sikh arms and relics to Britain in 1849.

What happened to these items? Were they legally acquired?

Subject Categories

history programmes (genre)

sikh artefacts

Broadcast history

07 Sep 1995 19:20-20:00 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Mark Tully

Nigel Acheson (Producer)

Rani Singh (Producer)

Anthony Hyde (rdr)

Josh Towb (rdr)

Jeffrey Whitehead (rdr)

John Keay (Speaker)

Jeevan Deol (Speaker)

Kuldip Nayar (Speaker)

Robert Skelton (Speaker)

Sue Stronge (Speaker)

Harbans Singh (Sikh diplomat) (Speaker)

Gurbax Singh Anandpuri (Speaker)

Baba Sing Ji Sahib (Singh teacher) (Speaker)

Ikbhal Singh (Speaker)

Kushwant Singh (Sikh historian) (Speaker)

Nahar Singh (Indian Archives researcher) (Speaker)

Christian Broun-Lindsay (Speaker)

Richard Bingle (Doctor) (Speaker)

Ludovic Broun-Lindsay (Speaker).

195C02The Bunker1995091420040801
195C02Through A Glass Darkly1995091420040801

Another chance to hear the investigative documentary series.

Somewhere under the streets of a housing estate in Reading, a dark secret may be lurking.

Producer: N.

TREVITHICK

Next in series: MATA HARI - THE FATAL LOVER

Previous in series: 1.

THE LORD, THE SWORD AND THE GURU

Description

Patrick WRIGHT reads the hidden depths lying in the stained glass windows of

Subject Categories

documentaries (programme format)

artifacts (commemorative)

stained glass

st mary the virgin (church) (swaffham prior)

Broadcast history

14 Sep 1995 19:20-20:00 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Patrick Wright

Neil Trevithick (Producer)

John Clarke (Speaker)

Peter Cormack (Speaker)

Mark Howarth (Speaker)

Fred Day (Speaker)

Mrs Budden (Speaker)

Violet Betts (Speaker)

Andrew Camps (Speaker)

Aurea Cazenove (Speaker)

Alice Day (Speaker)

Alan Akroyd (Speaker)

Philip Leeson (Speaker)

Annie Lowe (Speaker)

Bob Sheldrick (Speaker)

Recorded on 1995-08-01.

195C03Mata Hari19950921

- THE FATAL LOVER

Producer: BURMAN, Mark

Next in series: A QUESTION OF TRUST

Previous in series: THROUGH A GLASS DARKLY

Description

SBH:Mata Hari - The Fatal Lover.

Julie Wheelwright explores the fact and the fantasy behind the life and death of the legendary spy, courtesan and exotic dancer.

With 1940s recordings of Mata Hari's prosecutors.

A programme in the series Document.

Broadcast history

21 Sep 1995 00:00-00:00 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Julie Wheelwright (Author)

Mark Burman (Producer)

Geoffrey Whitehead (rdr)

Jonathan Keeble (rdr)

Andrew Branch (rdr)

Imogen Stubbs (rdr)

Vernon Dobtcheff (rdr)

Sandrine Morvan (Speaker)

Natalie Barney (Speaker)

John Kieger (Speaker)

Pierre Bouchardon (Speaker)

Andre Bouchardon (Speaker)

Andre Mornet (Speaker)

Jean Mouriel (Speaker)

Sam Waagenaar (Speaker)

George Reid Grant (Speaker)

Leon Schirmann (Speaker)

Kate Paviot (tr)

Steve Evans (translator (tr)) (tr)

Notes: CAIRS 709128.

195C04A Question Of Trust19950928

Producer: N.

ACHESON

Next in series: THE GAL AFFAIR

Previous in series: MATA HARI - THE FATAL LOVER

Description

SBH:A Question of Trust.

Gerry Kennedy revisits the former USSR and talks former members of the Trust Group, a group of Moscow writers, academics and refuseniks who challenged the Soviet authorities by maintaining dialogue with Western peace movements.

OTN:SLN539/95FT4642 TXN/TDT:R4 28-Sep-1995

Broadcast history

28 Sep 1995 19:20-20:00 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Gerry Kennedy (Speaker)

Ann Pettit (Speaker)

Nigel Wade (Speaker)

Olga Medvedkova (Speaker)

Deborah Lubar (Speaker)

Dina Dudkin (Speaker)

Yuri Medvedkova (Speaker)

Misha Ostrovsky (Speaker)

Sergei Batovrin (Speaker)

Alexander Shtravka (Speaker)

Notes: CAIRS 658507.

197D01The Greatest Hangover In History19971106

Programmes using documentary evidence to throw new light on past events -

investigating an event in history through new or recently released evidence.Far from being the Utopian climax of a great social revolution, the Russian Revolution of 1917 was characterised by crime and random violence.

In an attempt to separate fact from fiction, Helen Weinstein questions controversial historian Orlando Figes, author of `A People's Tragedy: the Russian Revolution'.

197D02Thin Ice19971113

In 1984, Stephen Weeks was directing a major feature film, `The Bengal Lancers', in India, when he received reports from London that all the film rushes were out of focus and unusable.

He tried desperately to salvage the film, before finding out that his work had fallen prey to a massive insurance fraud.

197D03The Fire Is In Our Hearts19971120

Inspired by a book he found at a jumble sale in an East London school, Alan Dein uncovers a chain of events which led to a mass pupils' strike in support of an inspirational teacher in 1971.

197D04My Home, My Land19971127

Fifty years ago today, the United Nations voted to partition Palestine and give a home to the Jews.

The story of the events leading up to that crucial vote is told by the people whose lives it changed.

Presented by Roisin McAuley.

197D05 LASTThe Ring Of Remembrance19971204

American airman Larry Dundon was killed when his bomber crashed on a hill in Belfast in 1944.

He now lies buried in a Cambridge cemetery.

Historian Malcolm Gaskill finds out how an astonishing discovery caused him to be remembered again 50 years after his death.

198C01Scholars And Spies19980730

Professor Bill Sherman explores some unexpected connections between the court of Elizabeth I and the corridors of the CIA.

198C02The Third Room19980806

Christopher Cook pieces together the strange Cold War history of the Information Research Department and George Orwell's contribution to it.

198C03The Last Witch In England19980813

Helen Weinstein explores the psychic world of Helen Duncan, the last witch to be tried and sentenced in England in 1944.

198C04 LASTRorke's Drift19980820

The film `Zulu' portrayed the gallantry of the Welsh soldiers as they faced Zulu warriors at the battle of Rorke's Drift in 1879.

Historian David Rattray revisits the site of the battle and examines the British and Zulu actions in the light of documents and oral history handed down by both sides.

200A01The Agent And His Archive20000127

Helen Weinstein meets Vasili Mitrokhin, the man who was once in charge of the KGB's most secret documents.

He tells the story of how he changed from being a loyal KGB bureaucrat to a covert and compulsive noter of the files that crossed his desk.

200A02A Letter To The Times20000203

Between June 1970 and October 1971 there was an extraordinary turnabout in public opinion in favour of Britain's entering the European Economic Community.

How was this achieved, and why? Christopher Cook discovers a memo which takes us to the dark heart of political spin.

With Sir Edward Heath, Lord Rees Mogg and Lord Hattersley.

200A03Uncovering The Saints20000210

An oak panel discovered in a Suffolk stable is revealed to be one of the rarest medieval paintings in England.

Where did it come from, and how did it get to be forgotten in a wood pile? Martin Wainwright talks to historians and restorers.

200A04Happy Hearts Club Banned20000217

Alan Dein investigates the world's greatest underground rock album - Egon Bondy's `Happy Hearts Club Banned'.

The title was strange enough, but who were the Plastic People of the Universe and why were they in jail? Just two of the questions that raced through Dein's mind 21 years ago as he took home this intriguing LP.

200A05 LASTTaking Sides With The Enemy20000224

Martin Wainwright tells the story behind a triumphal arch in Leeds which celebrates the independence of North America.

Who was jubilant at the humiliating defeat of the English army and the loss of the American colonies...?

200D01Valentiner's Watch2000111620040725

When Jos Finer was given his uncle's watch, he was intrigued by the eagle on its back, holding beneath its talons a swastika.

Finer and Mike Thomson undertake a journey to trace the watch's original owner, Hans Valentiner, captain of the U385.

The story of an eagle and a swastika engraved on a watch.

Mike Thomson explores the lives of the men who died building the Forth Bridge in the 1880s, a casualty list far higher than previously thought.

Local historian Jim Walker was giving lectures locally on the construction of the bridge when he became aware that there was no memorial erected to the men who died building it - officially recorded as 57 men.

But when he and his colleagues in the Queensferry History Group started to look for the names of these men, the records took them to 57 and way beyond.

The group have now identified over 80 deaths though to be connected to the bridge's construction, and the work is still continuing.

200D02A Letter In The Street20001123

A neat, hand-written letter which was found abandoned in Charing Cross Road sets Mike Thomson off on a trail that leads him along health service corridors of power.

200D03Who Killed The Albatross?20001130

When Coleridge's Ancient Mariner shoots the albatross, history has assumed that the finger on the trigger was the genius of the poet.

But not so, as Mike Thomson discovers when he reopens the journals of Captain Cook and his explorers, whose minds were warped by scurvy and sinister imaginings.

200D04 LASTCamping With Hitler20001207

Mike Thomson investigates Nazi efforts to forge associations with British boy scouts in the late 30s, uncovering a series of exchange visits, joint rallies and camping trips.

201C01The Day They Made It Rain2001083020040822

On 15 August 1952, in the picturesque Devon village of Lynmouth, a devastating flood cost 34 lives.

It rained so hard it didn't seem entirely natural and some said it wasn't.

Document looks at new evidence on the imprecise science of cloud seeding.

It reveals who had secrets to keep an what the implications are now for us all.

Mike Thomson looks at new evidence on the imprecise science of cloud seeding.

Netherlands during the darkest days of the war.

201C02Calling Agent Kitty20010906

Mike Thomson uses the archives to piece together the life of Kitty Harris, a KGB agent said to have been the secret lover of spy Donald MacLean and implicated in leaking nuclear secrets in the 30s and 40s.

Netherlands during the darkest days of the war.

201C03Threads Of Hope20010913

Mike Thomson uncovers the history of a piece of cloth, six by three feet, which was left in an office drawer for decades.

201C04Barbed Wire Love20010920

A punk rock record takes Mike Thomson back to the Belfast of the late 1970s.

201C05The Day They Made It Rain2001083020040822
201C05 LASTChurchill's Finest Folly20010927

Mike Thomson uncovers how close Churchill came to sinking the bulk of the British fleet in the spring of 1940.

202C01The Bone Harvest20020822

From the mid-1950s to the early 70s, extensive radiation tests were carried out on the bones of dead babies.

202C02The Secret Spangled British2002082920020905

With Mike Thomson.

By 1957, Britain had acquired the H-bomb, and was demonstrating the fact to the world's press on Christmas Island.

But things were not quite as they seemed.

Mike Thomson presents the investigative series.

2: `The Secret Spangled British'.

The national anthem of the United States is as American as mom's apple pie - or is it?

202C03Alice's Annulment2002091920040808

In 1433 a "sufficiently pretty" woman who was "scarcely 26" gathered together seven female witnesses to testify in the church court at York Minster that her husband John was impotent.

How the seven women came to be so sure and what conclusions the judge drew from their certainty make the basis of a fascinating tale that reveals a great deal about women's lib in the middle ages.

How, in 1433, a young woman gathered together seven other women to testify to her husband's impotence in the church court at York Minster.

202C03The Secrets Of The Icewhale20020912

What is the connection between an experimental vessel, a specially adapted bomber, a toilet seat, a powder puff and thousands of weather balloons?

202C04Alice's Annulment2002091920040808
202C05 LASTHarold Wilson: The Letter And The Lie?20020926

Mike Thomson finds evidence that Wilson deceived Parliament and the country over sanctions to former Rhodesia.

203C01Mosquito Wars20030908

The award-winning investigative series returns, in which Mike Thomson takes a document as a starting-point to shed new light on past events.

When the Germans flooded the Pontine Marshes, south of Rome in the autumn of 1943, a malarial epidemic followed which infected more than 100,000 allied soldiers and local Italians.

Some say this was all a dreadful accident, but Mike Thomson travels through Italy in search of documents that tell a very different story; one that points to what may be the first recorded case of biological warfare in the 20th Century.

203C02Sisters Of Kali2003091520040815

Why would a respected Irish headmistress travel to India and change her name to Sister Nivedita? It means The Dedicated One and, 100 years later, the repercussions of her remarkable dedication can still be felt.

Mike Thomson follows a trail of documents from Calcutta to Galway, New York and eventually into the heart of the Sri Lankan jungle where he comes face to face with arguably today's most ruthless terrorists of all.

203C03An Organist's Tale20030922

With Mike Thomson.

Though a local hero in Monmouthshire, the only account of James Parry's life and loves is his own kiss-and-tell memoir published in 1741.

203C04Lucilla And The Lost Lands20030929

Miss Lucilla Reeve took her own life in 1950.

Her grave, our document, cannot be visited without a special permit because it now lies in the Standford Battle area.

The inhabitants of 6 villages in the Breckland district of Norfolk received letters saying they had to be evacuated within 7 days.

Similar letters were being received in Wales, Dorset and Wiltshire.

The army and RAF desperately needed somewhere to train.

The implication was that the villagers would be allowed back once the war was over.

Miss Reeve, a farmer and land agent, refused to leave but eventually gave up the fight.

The lost villages of Breckland have never been returned and Mike Thomson investigates why.

203C04Sisters Of Kali2003091520040815
203C05 LASTThe Bunker2003100620040801

Another chance to hear the investigative documentary series.

Somewhere under the streets of a housing estate in Reading, a dark secret may be lurking.

Producer: N.

TREVITHICK

Next in series: MATA HARI - THE FATAL LOVER

Previous in series: 1.

THE LORD, THE SWORD AND THE GURU

Description

Patrick WRIGHT reads the hidden depths lying in the stained glass windows of

Subject Categories

documentaries (programme format)

artifacts (commemorative)

stained glass

st mary the virgin (church) (swaffham prior)

Broadcast history

14 Sep 1995 19:20-20:00 (RADIO 4)

Contributors

Patrick Wright

Neil Trevithick (Producer)

John Clarke (Speaker)

Peter Cormack (Speaker)

Mark Howarth (Speaker)

Fred Day (Speaker)

Mrs Budden (Speaker)

Violet Betts (Speaker)

Andrew Camps (Speaker)

Aurea Cazenove (Speaker)

Alice Day (Speaker)

Alan Akroyd (Speaker)

Philip Leeson (Speaker)

Annie Lowe (Speaker)

Bob Sheldrick (Speaker)

Recorded on 1995-08-01.

With Mike Thomson.

The story of unusually high levels of plutonium and uranium in an ordinary suburban house in Reading.

Could the source be a secret bunker buried under a housing estate next door?

204C01Guinea Pig Kids20040830

The award winning investigative history series returns and begins by examining claims that society's most vulnerable children, as young as three months old, have been used to test the safety of drugs by pharmaceutical companies.

The paper chase begins decades ago in Britain, and then takes presenter Mike Thomson to Ireland then across the ocean to America.

On the way he encounters chilling stories as cocktails of powerful drugs are administered to infants and children 'in the care' of the Church or the State.

How could this happen, who is to blame and is it still going on?

204C02The Land Of The Unfree20040906

America has always advertised itself as the Land of the Free, a home to those who sought new lives away from the oppression of the old world.

But this week, Mike Thomson follows a trail of documents across the Atlantic that show that many of the first settlers of the American colonies were not freemen at all.

They were, in fact, some 50,000 of Britain's most dangerous criminals, taken in irons to work as slaves for their colonial masters.

A dark secret in the genealogical past of a nation but will Mike find famous Americans whose ancestors have their roots in the gaols of Georgian England?

The award-winning history series continues as Mike Thomson presents five investigations whose starting point is a piece of intriguing documentary evidence.

2/5. The Land of the Unfree

America has always advertised itself as the Land of the Free, a home to those who sought new lives away from the oppression of the old world. But this week, Mike Thomson follows a trail of documents across the Atlantic that show that many of the first settlers of the American colonies were not freemen at all. They were, in fact, some 50,000 of Britain's most dangerous criminals, taken in irons to work as slaves for their colonial masters. A dark secret in the genealogical past of a nation but will Mike find famous Americans whose ancestors have their roots in the gaols of Georgian England?

204C03Arms And Intelligence20040913

The recent Butler Report into intelligence failures has focussed attention on the relationship between the elected government and security services.

Document flicks back the pages of history to an earlier moment when weapons, spies and public interest collided - and exploded.

Presenter Mike Thomson examines boardroom tussle at arms firm Astra Holdings in the early 1990s, the work of an intelligence agent, speaking for the first time, and the shadowy world of selling weapons - for money, influence and intelligence.

204C04Hitler's Indian Army20040920

Mike Thomson follows a paper trail in pursuit of the Tiger Legion.

The award-winning history series continues as Mike Thomson presents five investigations whose starting point is a piece of intriguing documentary evidence.

4/5. Hitler's Indian Army

204C05 LASTEmma, Queen Of Spin:20040927

Mike Thomson presents the last of five investigations whose starting point is a piece of intriguing documentary evidence.

205C01A Very British Coup20050822

Document reveals the true extent of Britain's involvement in the coup of 1953, which toppled Iran's democratically elected government and replaced it with the tyranny of the Shah.

Iran had just nationalised the very oil fields that had powered Britain through two world wars.

Downing Street wanted them back.

London paid Iranian agents to sow seeds of dissent in Tehran.

Then, to win American support for a coup, the men from the Ministry fanned fears of a Russian invasion.

Even the BBC was used to spearhead Britain's propaganda campaign.

In fact, Auntie agreed to broadcast the very code word that was to spark revolution.

Around a decade ago the American government apologised for its role in the coup.

Yet despite current concerns over oil scandals, regime change and the cost of meddling in Middle East politics, Britain has remained silent.

Document investigates.

1/4. A Very British Coup

Iran had just nationalised the very oil fields that had powered Britain through two world wars. Downing Street wanted them back. London paid Iranian agents to sow seeds of dissent in Tehran. Then, to win American support for a coup, the men from the Ministry fanned fears of a Russian invasion.

Even the BBC was used to spearhead Britain's propaganda campaign. In fact, Auntie agreed to broadcast the very code word that was to spark revolution.

Around a decade ago the American government apologised for its role in the coup. Yet despite current concerns over oil scandals, regime change and the cost of meddling in Middle East politics, Britain has remained silent. Document investigates.

205C01Valentiner's Watch2005091220040725

When Jos Finer was given his uncle's watch, he was intrigued by the eagle on its back, holding beneath its talons a swastika.

Finer and Mike Thomson undertake a journey to trace the watch's original owner, Hans Valentiner, captain of the U385.

The story of an eagle and a swastika engraved on a watch.

Mike Thomson explores the lives of the men who died building the Forth Bridge in the 1880s, a casualty list far higher than previously thought.

Local historian Jim Walker was giving lectures locally on the construction of the bridge when he became aware that there was no memorial erected to the men who died building it - officially recorded as 57 men.

But when he and his colleagues in the Queensferry History Group started to look for the names of these men, the records took them to 57 and way beyond.

The group have now identified over 80 deaths though to be connected to the bridge's construction, and the work is still continuing.

4/4. The Forth Bridge

Local historian Jim Walker was giving lectures locally on the construction of the bridge when he became aware that there was no memorial erected to the men who died building it - officially recorded as 57 men. But when he and his colleagues in the Queensferry History Group started to look for the names of these men, the records took them to 57 and way beyond.

205C02A Right Royal Affair20050829

Mike Thomson is on the trail of a royal will that bears the hallmarks of unspeakable scandal.

It belonged to Prince Francis of Teck who died in 1911.

Soon after his sister, Queen Mary, won the right to seal his will.

No reason was ever given and this mysterious privilege is still granted to royals today.

Mike uncovers evidence of adulterous royal affairs and passionate battles over precious gems.

2/4. A Right Royal Affair

Mike Thomson is on the trail of a royal will that bears the hallmarks of unspeakable scandal. It belonged to Prince Francis of Teck who died in 1911. Soon after his sister, Queen Mary, won the right to seal his will. No reason was ever given and this mysterious privilege is still granted to royals today. Mike uncovers evidence of adulterous royal affairs and passionate battles over precious gems.

205C03Dad's Revolutionary Army20050905

Mike Thomson examines the origins of Britain's wartime Home Guard.

What he finds is far from the popular image of TV 's Dad's Army.

Instead of bumbling Corporal Jones and Captain Mainwaring, Mike discovers a left-wing revolutionary army being trained to wage war on Downing Street should Britain ever give in to Hitler.

3/4. Dad's Revolutionary Army

Mike Thomson examines the origins of Britain's wartime Home Guard. What he finds is far from the popular image of TV 's Dad's Army. Instead of bumbling Corporal Jones and Captain Mainwaring, Mike discovers a left-wing revolutionary army being trained to wage war on Downing Street should Britain ever give in to Hitler.

205C04 LASTThe Forth Bridge2005091220040725

The story of an eagle and a swastika engraved on a watch.

Mike Thomson explores the lives of the men who died building the Forth Bridge in the 1880s, a casualty list far higher than previously thought.

Local historian Jim Walker was giving lectures locally on the construction of the bridge when he became aware that there was no memorial erected to the men who died building it - officially recorded as 57 men.

But when he and his colleagues in the Queensferry History Group started to look for the names of these men, the records took them to 57 and way beyond.

The group have now identified over 80 deaths though to be connected to the bridge's construction, and the work is still continuing.

206A01Recruiting The Reich20060109

Mike Thomson uncovers evidence of Britain's secret deals with senior Nazis at the end of the Second World War.

Recruiting the Reich: Mike Thomson uncovers evidence of Britain's secret deals with senior Nazis at the end of the Second World War.

206A0220060116

Series using documentary evidence to throw new light on past events.

206A0320060123

Ever since the Turkish army invaded and occupied Northern Cyprus in 1974, the partition of the island between ethnic Greeks and Turks has seemed set in stone.

But the first green line, through the capital, was drawn ten years earlier by a British general - using a green pencil that happened to be at hand.

Throughout 1964, British troops were on the island, supposedly for peace-keeping.

But were they really bringing peace?

Mike Thomson uncovers the existence of a British spy ring and examines new documents that suggest that the real motives of some of the peacekeepers were less than honourable.

But the first green line, through the capital, was drawn ten years earlier by a British general - using a green pencil that happened to be at hand. Throughout 1964, British troops were on the island, supposedly for peace-keeping. But were they really bringing peace?

206A04 LAST20060130

Mike Thompson uncovers Treasury files from the mid 1970s that show how officials tried to keep the true value of North Sea Oil to a potentially independent Scotland from the public.

206C01Kenya's Bloody Summer2006071020070328

A tale of murder and cover-up by the British Army in Kenya 50 years ago.

Mike Thomson uncovers the facts thanks to a secret file, reluctantly released by the MoD.

But some of its pages are still missing.

What have the authorities got to hide?

Series using documentary evidence to throw new light on past events.

1/3. Kenya's Bloody Summer

A tale of murder and cover-up by the British Army in Kenya 50 years ago. Mike Thomson uncovers the facts thanks to a secret file, reluctantly released by the MoD. But some of its pages are still missing. What have the authorities got to hide?

206C02A Laudable Invasion?2006071720070404

The story of the Laudabiliter, a Papal letter which for 800 years became the legal precedent for English occupation of Ireland.

But Mike Thomson has new evidence which claims that the Laudabiliter was 'sexed-up' and possibly entirely faked.

Could it be that England's claim to Ireland is based on a forged document?

206C03 LASTA Date With Bevin2006072420070411

Radio 4's investigative history series continues with the story of a Jewish bombing campaign in the UK.

Previously secret documents indicate that in 1946, the British Secret Service was concerned about Jewish terrorists destined for Britain on a mission to assassinate Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin.

Mike Thomson tracks down former members of the outlawed Irgun and the Stern Gang terrorist groups, and discovers that it was not just Bevin who was in danger - the question is how near did they get?

3/3. A Date with Bevin

Radio 4's investigative history series continues with the story of a Jewish bombing campaign in the UK. Previously secret documents indicate that in 1946, the British Secret Service was concerned about Jewish terrorists destined for Britain on a mission to assassinate Foreign Secretary Ernest Bevin.

207A01The Marriage Cordiale2007011520070228

The extraordinary tale of the 1956 French offer to turn Britain and France into one country.

Previously secret documents reveal that the French Prime Minister, Guy Mollet, made the offer to Anthony Eden who discussed it with his Cabinet.

Mollet even suggested Elizabeth II could be head of the French state.

What motivated Mollet's offer and how close did his plan come to being realised?

Mike Thomson investigates a time when the fate of France, the shape of Europe, and the balance of global power hung in the balance.

207A02The Woman Who Never Was2007012220070307

Mike Thomson re-visits a document that split the country in two and ended a politician's career.

When Enoch Powell made his infamous 'Rivers of Blood' speech in April 1968, he quoted from a letter he had received, describing the isolation and fear in which a constituent of his was living.

In spite of a massive media hunt, Powell made it a point of principle never to reveal her name and he took the secret of her identity with him to the grave.

But now, in the light of new evidence, Mike Thomson travels to Wolverhampton in search of the woman Enoch Powell defended.

207A03 LASTFranco's British Friends2007012920070314

Mark Thompson uncovers evidence that a group of British aristocrats and celebrities helped the fascist leader, General Franco, during the Spanish Civil War.

Recently released papers from MI5 show that a cast of colourful characters secretly flew planes to Franco from an air-base near London.

Among them was a famous flying ace, a top racing driver and an aristocrat whose brother later shot to fame after Rudolph Hess parachuted onto his estate during Second World War.

The investigative history series continues.

3/3. Franco's British Friends

Recently released papers from MI5 show that a cast of colourful characters secretly flew planes to Franco from an air-base near London. Among them was a famous flying ace, a top racing driver and an aristocrat whose brother later shot to fame after Rudolph Hess parachuted onto his estate during Second World War.

207C01The Ghosts Of Greenham20070716

In June 1980, it was announced that American Cruise missiles were coming to Greenham Common in Berkshire - within months the iconic women's anti-nuclear campaign was born.

But what neither the women nor the local residents knew was that scientists at nearby Aldermaston had concluded in a secret report that Greenham was the most dangerous of all the possible UK sites, with over ten million people at risk in the event of an accident.

Mike Thomson asks why the 'UK-US special relationship' placed American operational needs above the safety of British citizens.

Series using documentary evidence to throw new light on past events.

1/3. The Ghosts of Greenham

207C02The White House Coup20070723

As the Great Depression gripped the US during the 1930s, some of Wall Street's most famous names plotted to replace the new liberal-minded president Franklin Delano Roosevelt with a fascist leader.

Mike Thomson presents the series using documentary evidence to throw new light on past events.

2/3. The White House Coup

207C03 LASTThe Gift Of Democracy?20070730

This edition investigates allegations in the unpublished memoirs of a former colonial civil servant that the British tried to rig Nigeria's first democratic elections before independence in 1960.

Mike Thomson presents the series using documentary evidence to throw new light on past events.

3/3. The Gift of Democracy?

208A01Operation Safe Haven2008012120080409

In 1948, a representative of the Dutch airline KLM asked Swiss police to ease travel restrictions for Germans travelling to Argentina.

It is claimed that this was part of a covert plan to help Nazis flee Europe following the war.

Mike Thomson presents the series using documentary evidence to throw new light on past events.

1/3. Operation Safe Haven

In 1948, a representative of the Dutch airline KLM asked Swiss police to ease travel restrictions for Germans travelling to Argentina. It is claimed that this was part of a covert plan to help Nazis flee Europe following the war.

208A02* Broadcasts From The Bunker2008012820080416

At the height of the Cold War, the BBC devised a programme schedule to be transmitted in the event of a nuclear attack.

To be broadcast from the BBC's own secret bunker and featuring music, drama and comedy, the schedule was designed to boost the morale of survivors in a post-apocalyptic world.

208A03 LASTStop Pakistan2008020420080423

How close did America come to launching a pre-emptive attack in order to prevent Pakistan from becoming a nuclear power?

208C01The Doomsday Document20080911

Mike Thomson presents the series using documentary evidence to throw new light on past events.

In May 1974, the Troubles in Northern Ireland were at their height, but all eyes were on a new power-sharing arrangement.

The highly controversial Sunningdale Executive had recently taken over administration of the province.

Sensing that the Executive would not survive, Prime Minister Harold Wilson drew up a secret plan to cut Northern Ireland adrift from the rest of the UK.

1/3. The Doomsday Document

In May 1974, the Troubles in Northern Ireland were at their height, but all eyes were on a new power-sharing arrangement. The highly controversial Sunningdale Executive had recently taken over administration of the province. Sensing that the Executive would not survive, Prime Minister Harold Wilson drew up a secret plan to cut Northern Ireland adrift from the rest of the UK.

208C02The Case Of The Suez Maru20080918

Mike examines the events surrounding a massacre of Allied POWs by the Japanese in 1943 and peruses the document that allowed the perperators to escape justice.

208C03 LASTBritain's Cuban Missile Crisis *20080925

In the last week of October 1962, the world famously held its breath as two superpowers teetered on the precipice of nuclear war.

The incident has gone down in history as a war of nerves between the Kremlin and the White House, but what role was the British Government playing, and what decisions was Prime Minister Harold Macmillan making on behalf of his people? How close did he bring Britain to all out nuclear war?

Mike Thomson presents the series using documentary evidence to throw new light on past events.

3/3. Britain's Cuban Missile Crisis

In the last week of October 1962, the world famously held its breath as two superpowers teetered on the precipice of nuclear war. The incident has gone down in history as a war of nerves between the Kremlin and the White House, but what role was the British Government playing, and what decisions was Prime Minister Harold Macmillan making on behalf of his people? How close did he bring Britain to all out nuclear war?