Disposable Brides [Radio Scotland]

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
1

120110403

1/3

From St Kilda, no-one can hear you scream. That was the fate of Rachel, Lady Grange, who crossed her husband once too often and was snatched away from her children to the remote island. Amelia Murray, didn't cross her husband, she crossed her family, by desperately trying to hang on to normality in the aftermath of a rape. Her family kidnapped her and shut her away. Little Margaret Duff got no say at all, she was married at eleven years old to her twenty-something cousin, a lawyer on the make. Susan Morrison searches for their stories in Disposable Brides.

. Bad romance 18th century-style with Susan Morrison.

120110719

1/3

From St Kilda, no-one can hear you scream. That was the fate of Rachel, Lady Grange, who crossed her husband once too often and was snatched away from her children to the remote island. Amelia Murray, didn't cross her husband, she crossed her family, by desperately trying to hang on to normality in the aftermath of a rape. Her family kidnapped her and shut her away. Little Margaret Duff got no say at all, she was married at eleven years old to her twenty-something cousin, a lawyer on the make. Susan Morrison searches for their stories in Disposable Brides.

. Bad romance 18th century-style with Susan Morrison.

0120110719

1/3

From St Kilda, no-one can hear you scream.

That was the fate of Rachel, Lady Grange, who crossed her husband once too often and was snatched away from her children to the remote island.

Amelia Murray, didn't cross her husband, she crossed her family, by desperately trying to hang on to normality in the aftermath of a rape.

Her family kidnapped her and shut her away.

Little Margaret Duff got no say at all, she was married at eleven years old to her twenty-something cousin, a lawyer on the make.

Susan Morrison searches for their stories in Disposable Brides.

Bad romance 18th century-style with Susan Morrison.

0120110719

1/3

From St Kilda, no-one can hear you scream.

That was the fate of Rachel, Lady Grange, who crossed her husband once too often and was snatched away from her children to the remote island.

Amelia Murray, didn't cross her husband, she crossed her family, by desperately trying to hang on to normality in the aftermath of a rape.

Her family kidnapped her and shut her away.

Little Margaret Duff got no say at all, she was married at eleven years old to her twenty-something cousin, a lawyer on the make.

Susan Morrison searches for their stories in Disposable Brides.

Bad romance 18th century-style with Susan Morrison.

0120111226

1/3

From St Kilda, no-one can hear you scream. That was the fate of Rachel, Lady Grange, who crossed her husband once too often and was snatched away from her children to the remote island. Amelia Murray, didn't cross her husband, she crossed her family, by desperately trying to hang on to normality in the aftermath of a rape. Her family kidnapped her and shut her away. Little Margaret Duff got no say at all, she was married at eleven years old to her twenty-something cousin, a lawyer on the make. Susan Morrison searches for their stories in Disposable Brides.

Bad romance 18th century-style with Susan Morrison

0120111226

1/3

From St Kilda, no-one can hear you scream. That was the fate of Rachel, Lady Grange, who crossed her husband once too often and was snatched away from her children to the remote island. Amelia Murray, didn't cross her husband, she crossed her family, by desperately trying to hang on to normality in the aftermath of a rape. Her family kidnapped her and shut her away. Little Margaret Duff got no say at all, she was married at eleven years old to her twenty-something cousin, a lawyer on the make. Susan Morrison searches for their stories in Disposable Brides.

Bad romance 18th century-style with Susan Morrison

012011033020110403

1/3

From St Kilda, no-one can hear you scream.

That was the fate of Rachel, Lady Grange, who crossed her husband once too often and was snatched away from her children to the remote island.

Amelia Murray, didn't cross her husband, she crossed her family, by desperately trying to hang on to normality in the aftermath of a rape.

Her family kidnapped her and shut her away.

Little Margaret Duff got no say at all, she was married at eleven years old to her twenty-something cousin, a lawyer on the make.

Susan Morrison searches for their stories in Disposable Brides.

012011033020110403

1/3

From St Kilda, no-one can hear you scream.

That was the fate of Rachel, Lady Grange, who crossed her husband once too often and was snatched away from her children to the remote island.

Amelia Murray, didn't cross her husband, she crossed her family, by desperately trying to hang on to normality in the aftermath of a rape.

Her family kidnapped her and shut her away.

Little Margaret Duff got no say at all, she was married at eleven years old to her twenty-something cousin, a lawyer on the make.

Susan Morrison searches for their stories in Disposable Brides.

03 LAST20110721

3/3

In the 19th century it was accepted that men were allowed to use violence to control their wives and that it was part of working class behaviour.

The courts and the press gave the impression that wife-beating was not a serious crime and gave out light sentences.

The press gave more column inches to beating your horse than it did your wife and believed that women were to blame 'Pity the poor husbands, unless wives hold their tongues and tempers and their conduct they will continue to be beaten'.

In the 20th century things started to change with the rise of feminism and women's refuges.

But how far have we really come?

Bad marriages 19th century-style: how the press and courts condoned wife-beating.

03 LAST20110721

3/3

In the 19th century it was accepted that men were allowed to use violence to control their wives and that it was part of working class behaviour.

The courts and the press gave the impression that wife-beating was not a serious crime and gave out light sentences.

The press gave more column inches to beating your horse than it did your wife and believed that women were to blame 'Pity the poor husbands, unless wives hold their tongues and tempers and their conduct they will continue to be beaten'.

In the 20th century things started to change with the rise of feminism and women's refuges.

But how far have we really come?

Bad marriages 19th century-style: how the press and courts condoned wife-beating.

03 LAST20120102

3/3

In the 19th century it was accepted that men were allowed to use violence to control their wives and that it was part of working class behaviour. The courts and the press gave the impression that wife-beating was not a serious crime and gave out light sentences. The press gave more column inches to beating your horse than it did your wife and believed that women were to blame 'Pity the poor husbands, unless wives hold their tongues and tempers and their conduct they will continue to be beaten'. In the 20th century things started to change with the rise of feminism and women's refuges. But how far have we really come?

Bad marriages 19th century-style: how the press and courts condoned wife-beating.

03 LAST20120102

3/3

In the 19th century it was accepted that men were allowed to use violence to control their wives and that it was part of working class behaviour. The courts and the press gave the impression that wife-beating was not a serious crime and gave out light sentences. The press gave more column inches to beating your horse than it did your wife and believed that women were to blame 'Pity the poor husbands, unless wives hold their tongues and tempers and their conduct they will continue to be beaten'. In the 20th century things started to change with the rise of feminism and women's refuges. But how far have we really come?

Bad marriages 19th century-style: how the press and courts condoned wife-beating.

03 LAST2011041320110417

Bad marriages 19th century-style: how the press and courts condoned wife-beating.

3/3

In the 19th century it was accepted that men were allowed to use violence to control their wives and that it was part of working class behaviour.

The courts and the press gave the impression that wife-beating was not a serious crime and gave out light sentences.

The press gave more column inches to beating your horse than it did your wife and believed that women were to blame 'Pity the poor husbands, unless wives hold their tongues and tempers and their conduct they will continue to be beaten'.

In the 20th century things started to change with the rise of feminism and women's refuges.

But how far have we really come?

03 LAST2011041320110417

Bad marriages 19th century-style: how the press and courts condoned wife-beating.

3/3

In the 19th century it was accepted that men were allowed to use violence to control their wives and that it was part of working class behaviour.

The courts and the press gave the impression that wife-beating was not a serious crime and gave out light sentences.

The press gave more column inches to beating your horse than it did your wife and believed that women were to blame 'Pity the poor husbands, unless wives hold their tongues and tempers and their conduct they will continue to be beaten'.

In the 20th century things started to change with the rise of feminism and women's refuges.

But how far have we really come?

120111226

1/3

From St Kilda, no-one can hear you scream. That was the fate of Rachel, Lady Grange, who crossed her husband once too often and was snatched away from her children to the remote island. Amelia Murray, didn't cross her husband, she crossed her family, by desperately trying to hang on to normality in the aftermath of a rape. Her family kidnapped her and shut her away. Little Margaret Duff got no say at all, she was married at eleven years old to her twenty-something cousin, a lawyer on the make. Susan Morrison searches for their stories in Disposable Brides.

. Bad romance 18th century-style with Susan Morrison.

120110330

1/3

From St Kilda, no-one can hear you scream. That was the fate of Rachel, Lady Grange, who crossed her husband once too often and was snatched away from her children to the remote island. Amelia Murray, didn't cross her husband, she crossed her family, by desperately trying to hang on to normality in the aftermath of a rape. Her family kidnapped her and shut her away. Little Margaret Duff got no say at all, she was married at eleven years old to her twenty-something cousin, a lawyer on the make. Susan Morrison searches for their stories in Disposable Brides.

. Bad romance 18th century-style with Susan Morrison.

2

220110410

. Susan Morrison continues with infidelity, debt and divorce.

0220110720

2/3

When Elizabeth Rannie wrote her fateful letter confessing to a fling with a handsome army officer, she was starting a career as a fallen woman which would span 69 years.

She would lose her home, her wealth, her children and end up scratching a living, and herself (she got bad case of scabies in her poverty-stricken existence).

Exiled as far away as possible from Scotland, she was reduced to eating mouldy fruit, thin soup and salt pork so bad it was blackened, and threatening to prostitute herself, if her relations didn't send money.

For the wife of Scotland's most powerful man, used to living in graceful Melville Castle, it was a calamitous fall.

Find out what divorce 18th century style and its aftermath was like with Susan Morrison.

Susan Morrison continues with infidelity, debt and divorce.

0220110720

2/3

When Elizabeth Rannie wrote her fateful letter confessing to a fling with a handsome army officer, she was starting a career as a fallen woman which would span 69 years.

She would lose her home, her wealth, her children and end up scratching a living, and herself (she got bad case of scabies in her poverty-stricken existence).

Exiled as far away as possible from Scotland, she was reduced to eating mouldy fruit, thin soup and salt pork so bad it was blackened, and threatening to prostitute herself, if her relations didn't send money.

For the wife of Scotland's most powerful man, used to living in graceful Melville Castle, it was a calamitous fall.

Find out what divorce 18th century style and its aftermath was like with Susan Morrison.

Susan Morrison continues with infidelity, debt and divorce.

0220111227

2/3

When Elizabeth Rannie wrote her fateful letter confessing to a fling with a handsome army officer, she was starting a career as a fallen woman which would span 69 years. She would lose her home, her wealth, her children and end up scratching a living, and herself (she got bad case of scabies in her poverty-stricken existence). Exiled as far away as possible from Scotland, she was reduced to eating mouldy fruit, thin soup and salt pork so bad it was blackened, and threatening to prostitute herself, if her relations didn't send money. For the wife of Scotland's most powerful man, used to living in graceful Melville Castle, it was a calamitous fall. Find out what divorce 18th century style and its aftermath was like with Susan Morrison.

Susan Morrison continues with infidelity, debt and divorce.

0220111227

2/3

When Elizabeth Rannie wrote her fateful letter confessing to a fling with a handsome army officer, she was starting a career as a fallen woman which would span 69 years. She would lose her home, her wealth, her children and end up scratching a living, and herself (she got bad case of scabies in her poverty-stricken existence). Exiled as far away as possible from Scotland, she was reduced to eating mouldy fruit, thin soup and salt pork so bad it was blackened, and threatening to prostitute herself, if her relations didn't send money. For the wife of Scotland's most powerful man, used to living in graceful Melville Castle, it was a calamitous fall. Find out what divorce 18th century style and its aftermath was like with Susan Morrison.

Susan Morrison continues with infidelity, debt and divorce.

220110406

2/3

When Elizabeth Rannie wrote her fateful letter confessing to a fling with a handsome army officer, she was starting a career as a fallen woman which would span 69 years. She would lose her home, her wealth, her children and end up scratching a living, and herself (she got bad case of scabies in her poverty-stricken existence). Exiled as far away as possible from Scotland, she was reduced to eating mouldy fruit, thin soup and salt pork so bad it was blackened, and threatening to prostitute herself, if her relations didn't send money. For the wife of Scotland's most powerful man, used to living in graceful Melville Castle, it was a calamitous fall. Find out what divorce 18th century style and its aftermath was like with Susan Morrison.

. Susan Morrison continues with infidelity, debt and divorce.

022011040620110410

Susan Morrison continues with infidelity, debt and divorce.

2/3

When Elizabeth Rannie wrote her fateful letter confessing to a fling with a handsome army officer, she was starting a career as a fallen woman which would span 69 years.

She would lose her home, her wealth, her children and end up scratching a living, and herself (she got bad case of scabies in her poverty-stricken existence).

Exiled as far away as possible from Scotland, she was reduced to eating mouldy fruit, thin soup and salt pork so bad it was blackened, and threatening to prostitute herself, if her relations didn't send money.

For the wife of Scotland's most powerful man, used to living in graceful Melville Castle, it was a calamitous fall.

Find out what divorce 18th century style and its aftermath was like with Susan Morrison.

022011040620110410

Susan Morrison continues with infidelity, debt and divorce.

2/3

When Elizabeth Rannie wrote her fateful letter confessing to a fling with a handsome army officer, she was starting a career as a fallen woman which would span 69 years.

She would lose her home, her wealth, her children and end up scratching a living, and herself (she got bad case of scabies in her poverty-stricken existence).

Exiled as far away as possible from Scotland, she was reduced to eating mouldy fruit, thin soup and salt pork so bad it was blackened, and threatening to prostitute herself, if her relations didn't send money.

For the wife of Scotland's most powerful man, used to living in graceful Melville Castle, it was a calamitous fall.

Find out what divorce 18th century style and its aftermath was like with Susan Morrison.

2Disposable Brides20110720

2/3

When Elizabeth Rannie wrote her fateful letter confessing to a fling with a handsome army officer, she was starting a career as a fallen woman which would span 69 years. She would lose her home, her wealth, her children and end up scratching a living, and herself (she got bad case of scabies in her poverty-stricken existence). Exiled as far away as possible from Scotland, she was reduced to eating mouldy fruit, thin soup and salt pork so bad it was blackened, and threatening to prostitute herself, if her relations didn't send money. For the wife of Scotland's most powerful man, used to living in graceful Melville Castle, it was a calamitous fall. Find out what divorce 18th century style and its aftermath was like with Susan Morrison.

. Susan Morrison continues with infidelity, debt and divorce.

2Disposable Brides20111227

2/3

When Elizabeth Rannie wrote her fateful letter confessing to a fling with a handsome army officer, she was starting a career as a fallen woman which would span 69 years. She would lose her home, her wealth, her children and end up scratching a living, and herself (she got bad case of scabies in her poverty-stricken existence). Exiled as far away as possible from Scotland, she was reduced to eating mouldy fruit, thin soup and salt pork so bad it was blackened, and threatening to prostitute herself, if her relations didn't send money. For the wife of Scotland's most powerful man, used to living in graceful Melville Castle, it was a calamitous fall. Find out what divorce 18th century style and its aftermath was like with Susan Morrison.

. Susan Morrison continues with infidelity, debt and divorce.

3 LAST

3 LAST20110417

. Bad marriages 19th century-style: how the press and courts condoned wife-beating.

3/3

In the 19th century it was accepted that men were allowed to use violence to control their wives and that it was part of working class behaviour. The courts and the press gave the impression that wife-beating was not a serious crime and gave out light sentences. The press gave more column inches to beating your horse than it did your wife and believed that women were to blame 'Pity the poor husbands, unless wives hold their tongues and tempers and their conduct they will continue to be beaten'. In the 20th century things started to change with the rise of feminism and women's refuges. But how far have we really come?

. Bad marriages 19th century-style: how the press and courts condoned wife-beating.

3 LAST20110721

3/3

In the 19th century it was accepted that men were allowed to use violence to control their wives and that it was part of working class behaviour. The courts and the press gave the impression that wife-beating was not a serious crime and gave out light sentences. The press gave more column inches to beating your horse than it did your wife and believed that women were to blame 'Pity the poor husbands, unless wives hold their tongues and tempers and their conduct they will continue to be beaten'. In the 20th century things started to change with the rise of feminism and women's refuges. But how far have we really come?

. Bad marriages 19th century-style: how the press and courts condoned wife-beating.

3 LAST20120102

3/3

In the 19th century it was accepted that men were allowed to use violence to control their wives and that it was part of working class behaviour. The courts and the press gave the impression that wife-beating was not a serious crime and gave out light sentences. The press gave more column inches to beating your horse than it did your wife and believed that women were to blame 'Pity the poor husbands, unless wives hold their tongues and tempers and their conduct they will continue to be beaten'. In the 20th century things started to change with the rise of feminism and women's refuges. But how far have we really come?

. Bad marriages 19th century-style: how the press and courts condoned wife-beating.

3 LAST20110413

3/3

In the 19th century it was accepted that men were allowed to use violence to control their wives and that it was part of working class behaviour. The courts and the press gave the impression that wife-beating was not a serious crime and gave out light sentences. The press gave more column inches to beating your horse than it did your wife and believed that women were to blame 'Pity the poor husbands, unless wives hold their tongues and tempers and their conduct they will continue to be beaten'. In the 20th century things started to change with the rise of feminism and women's refuges. But how far have we really come?

. Bad marriages 19th century-style: how the press and courts condoned wife-beating.