Discovering Music

Episodes

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20090719
20040320

In the first of three programmes focusing on Mozart and the classical style, conductor Charles Hazlewood, his period instrument orchestra Harmonieband and pianist Ronald Brautigam perform one of the composer's greatest piano concertos - the D minor Concerto , K466.

In this audience workshop, Charles Hazlewood reveals the richness of the invention and the intensity of the emotional thrust of a work that 'almost like no other the child within the mature young man'.

20040320

In the first of three programmes focusing on Mozart and the classical style, conductor Charles Hazlewood, his period instrument orchestra Harmonieband and pianist Ronald Brautigam perform one of the composer's greatest piano concertos - the D minor Concerto , K466.

In this audience workshop, Charles Hazlewood reveals the richness of the invention and the intensity of the emotional thrust of a work that 'almost like no other the child within the mature young man'.

20040327

Mozart composed what were to be his last three symphonies in just ten weeks during the summer of 1788.

Charles Hazlewood and his period instrument orchestra Harmonieband begin this workshop session with the thought that these three final masterpieces form a single span of inspiration, from the imposing slow opening to Symphony No 39 in E flat introduction to the resplendent climax at the end of the Jupiter Symphony, No 41.

Today's programme focuses on the Symphony No 39 in E flat.

20040327

Mozart composed what were to be his last three symphonies in just ten weeks during the summer of 1788.

Charles Hazlewood and his period instrument orchestra Harmonieband begin this workshop session with the thought that these three final masterpieces form a single span of inspiration, from the imposing slow opening to Symphony No 39 in E flat introduction to the resplendent climax at the end of the Jupiter Symphony, No 41.

Today's programme focuses on the Symphony No 39 in E flat.

20040403

Mozart's Symphony No 40 in G minor was the second of the triptych of symphonies which he completed in the summer of 1788.

In today's workshop session, Charles Hazlewood and his period instrument orchestra The Mozart Collective explore the thematic and harmonic intricacies of this the most personal of Mozart's great symphonies.

20040403

Mozart's Symphony No 40 in G minor was the second of the triptych of symphonies which he completed in the summer of 1788.

In today's workshop session, Charles Hazlewood and his period instrument orchestra The Mozart Collective explore the thematic and harmonic intricacies of this the most personal of Mozart's great symphonies.

20040417

... And All That Jazz

Charles Hazlewood continues his exploration of the impact made by jazz and dance music in European music during the 1920s and '30s. In today's audience workshop, the focus is on two of the most characteristic examples from France, Darius Milhaud's ballet La Creaton du Monde and Jacques Ibert's Divertissement, in which he is joined by members of the BBC Concert Orchestra.

20040508

Stephen Johnson leads a workshop on the Preludes and Fugues of Bach and Shostakovich, recorded in Manchester last month as part of the Royal Northern College of Music's mini-festival exploring Bach and counterpoint. Stephen is joined by Gary Cooper (harpsichord), who plays extracts from the second book of Bach's 48 Preludes and Fugues, and by pianist Alexander Melnikov, who performs four of the set of 24 Preludes and Fugues which Shostakovich composed in homage to Bach.

20040515

Mahler's youthful song cycle Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen (Songs of a Wayfarer) is in the spotlight in this workshop session.

Composed in the 1880s with piano accompaniment and to his own poems, Mahler seems not to have made the final orchestral version until 1896.

Charles Hazlewood is joined by baritone Roderick Williams and the BBC National Orchestra of Wales to explore the way the songs evolved and the connection between them and the First Symphony.

20040515

Mahler's youthful song cycle Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen (Songs of a Wayfarer) is in the spotlight in this workshop session.

Composed in the 1880s with piano accompaniment and to his own poems, Mahler seems not to have made the final orchestral version until 1896.

Charles Hazlewood is joined by baritone Roderick Williams and the BBC National Orchestra of Wales to explore the way the songs evolved and the connection between them and the First Symphony.

Mahler's youthful song cycle Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen (Songs of a Wayfarer) is in the spotlight in this workshop session. Composed in the 1880s with piano accompaniment and to his own poems, Mahler seems not to have made the final orchestral version until 1896. Charles Hazlewood is joined by baritone Roderick Williams and the BBC National Orchestra of Wales to explore the way the songs evolved and the connection between them and the First Symphony.

20040605

Beethoven's Piano and Cello Sonata in C major, Op 102 No 1, is the focus of today's workshop session, recorded last month at the Royal Northern College of Music during the MANCHESTER International Cello Festival.

Stephen Johnson is joined by cellist Frans Helmerson and pianist Peter Frankl in this exploration of one of the most compact and original of Beethoven's late works.

20040605

Beethoven's Piano and Cello Sonata in C major, Op 102 No 1, is the focus of today's workshop session, recorded last month at the Royal Northern College of Music during the MANCHESTER International Cello Festival.

Stephen Johnson is joined by cellist Frans Helmerson and pianist Peter Frankl in this exploration of one of the most compact and original of Beethoven's late works.

Beethoven's Piano and Cello Sonata in C major, Op 102 No 1, is the focus of today's workshop session, recorded last month at the Royal Northern College of Music during the Manchester International Cello Festival.

Stephen Johnson is joined by cellist Frans Helmerson and pianist Peter Frankl in this exploration of one of the most compact and original of Beethoven's late works.

20040612

Stephen Johnson considers the 'tragic' nature of Schubert's Fourth Symphony - what did the composer mean by this title and what does it tell us about Schubert?

Musical illustrations and a complete performance of the symphony are provided by the BBC Philharmonic conducted by Douglas Boyd.

20040612

Stephen Johnson considers the 'tragic' nature of Schubert's Fourth Symphony - what did the composer mean by this title and what does it tell us about Schubert?

Musical illustrations and a complete performance of the symphony are provided by the BBC Philharmonic conducted by Douglas Boyd.

Stephen Johnson considers the 'tragic' nature of Schubert's Fourth Symphony - what did the composer mean by this title and what does it tell us about Schubert?

Musical illustrations and a complete performance of the symphony are provided by the BBC Philharmonic conducted by Douglas Boyd.

20040619

Schoenberg's early masterpiece for strings Verklärte Nacht Op 4, Transfigured Night, is the subject of today's audience workshop, which was recorded last month in the BRISTOL Old Vic Theatre.

Charles Hazlewood is joined by his own chamber orchestra, Excellent Device, and together they reveal how the composer used Richard Dehmel's expressionist poem as the template for one of the musical icons of German late romanticism.

20040619

Schoenberg's early masterpiece for strings Verklärte Nacht Op 4, Transfigured Night, is the subject of today's audience workshop, which was recorded last month in the BRISTOL Old Vic Theatre.

Charles Hazlewood is joined by his own chamber orchestra, Excellent Device, and together they reveal how the composer used Richard Dehmel's expressionist poem as the template for one of the musical icons of German late romanticism.

20040626

Vaughan-Williams: Mass in G minor

Stephen Johnson joins the BBC Singers for a look at one of the great glories of the English choral repertory - Vaughan-Williams' Mass in G minor - in which the composer pays homage to the traditions of Tudor church music while remaining distinctively twentieth century.

20040911

Words and Music

To begin a new season of programmes, Charles Hazlewood is joined by mezzo soprano Pamela Helen Stephen, tenor James Gilchrist and the BBC Concert Orchestra for a workshop session exploring the many different ways composer over the past three hundred years have approached the setting of words in opera arias and in song.

Purcell: See, see the many coloured fields ("The Fairy Queen")

Handel: Svegliatevi ne core ("Julius Caesar")

Mozart: Dies bildnis ("The Magic Flute")

Berlioz: Spectre de la rose ("Nuits d'ete")

Britten: Midnight's Bell ("Nocturne")

Finzi: It was a lover and his lass

20040918

The Four Last Songs

In the 1940's, Richard Strauss entered what has become known as his "Indian Summer", writing a series of serene, nostalgic masterpieces. The Four Last Songs were his farewell to composition. In this studio edition, Charles Hazelwood reveals something of their autumnal character, contrasting them with two songs, also composed for Strauss's favourite soprano voice, from much earlier in his career.

Rebecca Evans (soprano)

BBC Philharmonic

Jason Lai (conductor)

Strauss:Morgen; Zueignung; Four Last Songs

20041016

Gospel Roots!

In this audience workshop, recorded last week, Stephen Johnson is joined by Ken Burton and the London Adventist Chorale to reveal the roots of gospel choral singing. Taking a number of contemporary arrangements and compositions as their starting point, they consider the function of the gospel singing in Christian worship and examine how the gospel style evolved through influences and traditions from Africa, from European hymnology, from the spiritual, from jazz and from improvisation.

20041023

The jazz pianist and composer Julian Joseph looks at the role of the piano in the story of jazz.

Following a whistle-stop history of "jazz-piano", Joseph focuses his attention on three major artists - Earl Hines, Duke Ellington and Herbie Hancock, each of whom has had a major influence on Joseph's own music.

He then deconstructs their music at the piano offering listeners a fascinating insight into how jazz works; what jazz-piano is; and what some of the musical subtleties are that audiences should listen for - while at the same time evaluating the distinct contribution that each of his three chosen legendary artists has made in the development of piano jazz.

The programme ends with Joseph's own "summary": one of his own compositions performed especially for the programme by the Julian Joseph Quartet.

20041023

The jazz pianist and composer Julian Joseph looks at the role of the piano in the story of jazz.

Following a whistle-stop history of "jazz-piano", Joseph focuses his attention on three major artists - Earl Hines, Duke Ellington and Herbie Hancock, each of whom has had a major influence on Joseph's own music.

He then deconstructs their music at the piano offering listeners a fascinating insight into how jazz works; what jazz-piano is; and what some of the musical subtleties are that audiences should listen for - while at the same time evaluating the distinct contribution that each of his three chosen legendary artists has made in the development of piano jazz.

The programme ends with Joseph's own "summary": one of his own compositions performed especially for the programme by the Julian Joseph Quartet.

The jazz pianist and composer Julian Joseph looks at the role of the piano in the story of jazz. Following a whistle-stop history of "jazz-piano", Joseph focuses his attention on three major artists - Earl Hines, Duke Ellington and Herbie Hancock, each of whom has had a major influence on Joseph's own music. He then deconstructs their music at the piano offering listeners a fascinating insight into how jazz works; what jazz-piano is; and what some of the musical subtleties are that audiences should listen for - while at the same time evaluating the distinct contribution that each of his three chosen legendary artists has made in the development of piano jazz. The programme ends with Joseph's own "summary": one of his own compositions performed especially for the programme by the Julian Joseph Quartet.

20041106

Stephen Johnson leads a workshop on the Preludes and Fugues of Bach and Shostakovich, recorded in MANCHESTER earlier this year as part of the Royal Northern College of Music's mini-festival exploring Bach and counterpoint.

Stephen is joined by Gary Cooper (harpsichord), who plays extracts from the second book of Bach's 48 Preludes and Fugues, and by pianist Alexander Melnikov, who performs four of the set of 24 Preludes and Fugues which Shostakovich composed in homage to Bach.

20041106

Stephen Johnson leads a workshop on the Preludes and Fugues of Bach and Shostakovich, recorded in MANCHESTER earlier this year as part of the Royal Northern College of Music's mini-festival exploring Bach and counterpoint.

Stephen is joined by Gary Cooper (harpsichord), who plays extracts from the second book of Bach's 48 Preludes and Fugues, and by pianist Alexander Melnikov, who performs four of the set of 24 Preludes and Fugues which Shostakovich composed in homage to Bach.

Stephen Johnson leads a workshop on the Preludes and Fugues of Bach and Shostakovich, recorded in Manchester earlier this year as part of the Royal Northern College of Music's mini-festival exploring Bach and counterpoint. Stephen is joined by Gary Cooper (harpsichord), who plays extracts from the second book of Bach's 48 Preludes and Fugues, and by pianist Alexander Melnikov, who performs four of the set of 24 Preludes and Fugues which Shostakovich composed in homage to Bach.

20041120

Elgar and the orchestra

Three great British composers of the 20th century died in 1934 - Elgar, Delius and Holst. Over the next three weeks the orchestral music of each of them is put under the microscope. Today conductor Mark Elder and the Halle Orchestra explore the unique sound world of Elgar's orchestra focussing on the extrovert concert overture inspired by an Italian holiday, "In the South".

20041127

Delius and the Orchestra

Frederick Delius was a truly international composer - born in Bradford of German parents, lived for much of his life in rural France and was greatly inspired painters and landscapes. His orchestral style is also a unique amalgam of sensuous imagery and intuition. Today conductor Martyn Brabbins and the BBC Symphony Orchestra examine the way Delius's orchestral music works, focusing on three contrasting pieces, "On hearing the first cuckoo in spring", "The walk to the Paradise Garden" and Dance Rhapsody No 2.

20041204

Holst and the orchestra

Gustav Holst is thought of as a quintessentially English composer of the 20th Century. But his ancestry was German and he was as interested in ancient Hindu writings, astrology and mysticism as he was in English folk song and literature. Today Stephen Johnson focuses on three of Holst's orchestral landscapes - the Fugal Overture, the Suite "Beni Mora" and his masterpiece "Egdon Heath". The BBC Symphony Orchestra is conducted by Vernon Handley.

20050108

The Confession of Isobel Gowdie

With Stephen Johnson.

In 1662 Isobel Gowdie, from Nairn in Scotland, was strangled at the stake and burned in pitch after having confessed to being a witch and consorting with the devil. Composer James MacMillan was drawn by the dramatic potential of this horrific event to compose what he has described as a "complicated act of contrition - the requiem that Isobel Gowdie never had". James MacMillan joins Stephen Johnson to reveal how the work was composed and the ways in which he has tried to capture the soul of Scotland in music. The composer also conducts the BBC Philharmonic in extracts and a complete performance of the work.

20050122

Charles Hazlewood focuses on one the great British works for string orchestra of the last century, Tippett's Fantasia Concertante on a theme of Corelli.

Composed in 1953 to celebrate the tercentenary of Corelli's birth, this richly textured work explores, in Corelli's words, "the brilliance of the violin".

Tippett himself described Corelli's adagio as "dark and passionate".

In this workshop session, we hear this journey from "the dark to the light", as Charles and his own orchestra, Excellent Device, reveal the extent to which Tippett views the string music of the baroque through distinctly twentieth century eyes.

20050122

Charles Hazlewood focuses on one the great British works for string orchestra of the last century, Tippett's Fantasia Concertante on a theme of Corelli.

Composed in 1953 to celebrate the tercentenary of Corelli's birth, this richly textured work explores, in Corelli's words, "the brilliance of the violin".

Tippett himself described Corelli's adagio as "dark and passionate".

In this workshop session, we hear this journey from "the dark to the light", as Charles and his own orchestra, Excellent Device, reveal the extent to which Tippett views the string music of the baroque through distinctly twentieth century eyes.

20050129

Charles joins the BBC National Orchestra of Wales for a workshop on Estonian composer Arvo Part, whose work has a profoundly spiritual quality.

20050129

Charles joins the BBC National Orchestra of Wales for a workshop on Estonian composer Arvo Part, whose work has a profoundly spiritual quality.

20050212

Beethoven's Piano and Cello Sonata in C major, Op 102 No 1

Beethoven's Piano and Cello Sonata in C major, Op 102 No 1, is the focus of today's workshop session, recorded last year at the Royal Northern College of Music during the Manchester International Cello Festival. Stephen Johnson is joined by cellist Frans Helmerson and pianist Peter Frankl in this exploration of one of the most compact and original of Beethoven's late works.

20050226

John Dowland's Lachrymae

Andrew Manze takes a close look at the music and ideas behind the seven pavans from John Dowland's Lachrymae or Seven Teares, published in 1605 for lute and viol consort. The profoundly intimate and expressive music has been described as the renaissance equivalent to Beethoven's late quartets and is performed by the viol group Concordia.

20050305

Chopin's piano Preludes Opus 28

Stephen Johnson and the Radio 3 New Generation artist Llyr Williams appear before an audience in the Turner Simms Concert Hall in Southampton for an exploration of Chopin's celebrated cycle of Opus 28 Preludes for the piano.

20050312

With Stephen Johnson.

Bruckner Motets

Anton Bruckner was a devout CHRISTIAN as well as a great composer.

He dedicated his own skills to the service of God and the Church.

His masses and motets occupy as important a place in his career as the symphonies he composed later in life, as Bruckner authority Stephen Johnson reveals in this workshop session.

Locus iste

Ave Maria (1861)

Vexilla regis

Os justi

Christus factus est (1884)

BBC Singers

Bob Chilcott (conductor).

20050312

With Stephen Johnson.

Bruckner Motets

Anton Bruckner was a devout CHRISTIAN as well as a great composer.

He dedicated his own skills to the service of God and the Church.

His masses and motets occupy as important a place in his career as the symphonies he composed later in life, as Bruckner authority Stephen Johnson reveals in this workshop session.

Locus iste

Ave Maria (1861)

Vexilla regis

Os justi

Christus factus est (1884)

BBC Singers

Bob Chilcott (conductor).

With Stephen Johnson.

Bruckner Motets

Anton Bruckner was a devout Christian as well as a great composer. He dedicated his own skills to the service of God and the Church. His masses and motets occupy as important a place in his career as the symphonies he composed later in life, as Bruckner authority Stephen Johnson reveals in this workshop session.

Locus iste

Ave Maria (1861)

Vexilla regis

Os justi

Christus factus est (1884)

BBC Singers

Bob Chilcott (conductor)

20050326

In this workshop session recorded in the Turner Sims Concert Hall, University of Southampton, pianist David Owen Norris uses a recently restored piano (originally built in 1887) to delve into the musical and symbolic detail in the collection of piano pieces composed by Brahms in 1892, Op 118.

20050326

In this workshop session recorded in the Turner Sims Concert Hall, University of Southampton, pianist David Owen Norris uses a recently restored piano (originally built in 1887) to delve into the musical and symbolic detail in the collection of piano pieces composed by Brahms in 1892, Op 118.

In this workshop session recorded in the Turner Sims Concert Hall, University of Southampton, pianist David Owen Norris uses a recently restored piano (originally built in 1887) to delve into the musical and symbolic detail in the collection of piano pieces composed by Brahms in 1892, Op 118.

20050409

Charles Hazlewood and his ensemble Excellent Device explore the musical detail behind Richard Strauss's Metamorphosen, a very personal work for 23 solo strings.

20050409

Charles Hazlewood and his ensemble Excellent Device explore the musical detail behind Richard Strauss's Metamorphosen, a very personal work for 23 solo strings.

20050416

Michael Tippett's Concerto for Double String Orchestra: Tadaaki Otaka and the BBC Symphony Orchestra join Stephen Johnson to examine one of Tippett's most exuberant works.

20050423

In the late 1920s and early 30s, towards the end of his life, Edward Elgar assembled a number of pages of short sketches and fragments for a Piano Concerto.

Over the past few years, composer Robert Walker has worked on a realisation of those fragments of Elgar, expanding them into a 36-minute work for David Owen Norris to perform.

Robert Walker and David Owen Norris examine the process of composing a romantic piano concerto out of the characteristic elements that Elgar left to posterity.

The BBC Concert Orchestra is conducted by David Lloyd Jones.

20050423

In the late 1920s and early 30s, towards the end of his life, Edward Elgar assembled a number of pages of short sketches and fragments for a Piano Concerto.

Over the past few years, composer Robert Walker has worked on a realisation of those fragments of Elgar, expanding them into a 36-minute work for David Owen Norris to perform.

Robert Walker and David Owen Norris examine the process of composing a romantic piano concerto out of the characteristic elements that Elgar left to posterity.

The BBC Concert Orchestra is conducted by David Lloyd Jones.

In the late 1920s and early 30s, towards the end of his life, Edward Elgar assembled a number of pages of short sketches and fragments for a Piano Concerto.

Over the past few years, composer Robert Walker has worked on a realisation of those fragments of Elgar, expanding them into a 36-minute work for David Owen Norris to perform. Robert Walker and David Owen Norris examine the process of composing a romantic piano concerto out of the characteristic elements that Elgar left to posterity.

The BBC Concert Orchestra is conducted by David Lloyd Jones.

20050430

Serenades and Symphonies

Charles Hazlewood explores the very different ways in which Richard Strauss and Igor Stravinsky approached writing for the wind ensemble. He compares the youthful and the mature Strauss through the Serenade and Sonatina No 1, and examines how Stravinsky marshalled his larger forces in the iconic Symphonies of Wind Instruments.

Strauss: Serenade, 1881 and Romance and Minuet, 1943

Stravinsky: Symphonies of Wind Instruments, 1926

BBC National Orchestra of Wales

Douglas Boyd (conductor)

20050514

The Golden Spinning Wheel

Stephen Johnson joins the members of the BBC Symphony Orchestra and conductor Neil Thomson for a look at the workings and inspiration behind Antonin Dvorak's fairy-tale inspired tone poem, The Golden Spinning Wheel.

20050528

Bernstein Season

Serenade after Plato's Symposium (1954)

Leonard Bernstein's five movement concerto for violin, strings and percussion is one of his most personal compositions. It was inspired by Plato's Symposium, a discourse on love in all its aspects, and was presented in the form of a series of statements by celebrated guests at a banquet.

In this workshop session Charles Hazlewood explores the relationship between Bernstein's music and the source of his inspiration.

Antje Weithaas (violin)

BBC Concert Orchestra

Charles Hazlewood (conductor)

20050604

Beethoven's Missa Solemnis

As a prelude to The Beethoven Experience, Charles Hazlewood presents a workshop on the three movements of Beethoven's great choral work, which he grouped together for a concert performance on 1824 - Kyrie, Gloria and Agnus Dei.

Beethoven considered the Missa Solemnis to be his greatest work.

A complete performance conducted by Leonard Bernstein can be heard in Performance on 3 next Wednesday, 8th June.

Beethoven: Kyrie; Gloria; Agnus Dei, from Missa Solemnis in D, Op 123

Sarah Fox (soprano)

Sara Fulgoni (mezzo soprano)

Mark Wilde (tenor)

Matthew Hargreaves (baritone)

Tallis Chamber Choir

Harmonieband

Charles Hazlewood (conductor).

20050604

Beethoven's Missa Solemnis

As a prelude to The Beethoven Experience, Charles Hazlewood presents a workshop on the three movements of Beethoven's great choral work, which he grouped together for a concert performance on 1824 - Kyrie, Gloria and Agnus Dei.

Beethoven considered the Missa Solemnis to be his greatest work.

A complete performance conducted by Leonard Bernstein can be heard in Performance on 3 next Wednesday, 8th June.

Beethoven: Kyrie; Gloria; Agnus Dei, from Missa Solemnis in D, Op 123

Sarah Fox (soprano)

Sara Fulgoni (mezzo soprano)

Mark Wilde (tenor)

Matthew Hargreaves (baritone)

Tallis Chamber Choir

Harmonieband

Charles Hazlewood (conductor).

20050702

Stephen Johnson joins the members of the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra conducted by Christopher Austin and the traditional folk singer Martin Carthy for a look at the imaginative ways in which Percy Grainger and Ralph Vaughan-williams have used folk song material in their compositions.

The programme includes a complete performance of Five Variants on Dives and Lazarus by Vaughan-Williams.

BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra

Martin Carthy (folk singer)

Christopher Austin (conductor).

20050702

Stephen Johnson joins the members of the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra conducted by Christopher Austin and the traditional folk singer Martin Carthy for a look at the imaginative ways in which Percy Grainger and Ralph Vaughan-williams have used folk song material in their compositions.

The programme includes a complete performance of Five Variants on Dives and Lazarus by Vaughan-Williams.

BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra

Martin Carthy (folk singer)

Christopher Austin (conductor).

Stephen Johnson joins the members of the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra conducted by Christopher Austin and the traditional folk singer Martin Carthy for a look at the imaginative ways in which Percy Grainger and Ralph Vaughan-Williams have used folk song material in their compositions. The programme includes a complete performance of Five Variants on Dives and Lazarus by Vaughan-Williams.

BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra

Martin Carthy (folk singer)

Christopher Austin (conductor)

20050709

Mozart's last Piano Concerto

In January 1791, Mozart completed what was to be his last piano concerto, K 595 in B flat. In this workshop session, Charles Hazlewood and pianist Ronald Brautigam explore the extent to which Mozart was expanding the boundaries of the classical concerto.

Ronald Brautigam (piano)

BBC Philharmonic

Charles Hazlewood (conductor)

20050716

In a workshop recorded at the Cheltenham Festival, conductor and presenter Charles Hazlewood, his chamber orchestra Excellent Device and pianist Rolf Hind delve into the vivid musical detail of the piano concerto composed by Russian Alfred Schnittke in 1979.

20050716

In a workshop recorded at the Cheltenham Festival, conductor and presenter Charles Hazlewood, his chamber orchestra Excellent Device and pianist Rolf Hind delve into the vivid musical detail of the piano concerto composed by Russian Alfred Schnittke in 1979.

In a workshop recorded at the Cheltenham Festival, conductor and presenter Charles Hazlewood, his chamber orchestra Excellent Device and pianist Rolf Hind delve into the vivid musical detail of the piano concerto composed by Russian Alfred Schnittke in 1979.

20050723

Stephen Johnson joins the pianist Ashley Wass alongside piano students from the Royal Northern College of Music and the Chethams School in Manchester for a look at Beethoven's last published work for solo piano - the Six Bagatelles, Opus 126.

20050723

Stephen Johnson joins the pianist Ashley Wass alongside piano students from the Royal Northern College of Music and the Chethams School in Manchester for a look at Beethoven's last published work for solo piano - the Six Bagatelles, Opus 126.

Stephen Johnson joins the pianist Ashley Wass alongside piano students from the Royal Northern College of Music and the Chethams School in Manchester for a look at Beethoven's last published work for solo piano - the Six Bagatelles, Opus 126.

20050806

Charles Hazlewood Discovering Music

... and all that jazz

Charles Hazlewood begins a three part exploration of the impact made by jazz and dance music in European music during the 1920s and 30s. He is joined by soprano Tara Harrison, tenor Alan Oke and the BBC Concert Orchestra for an audience workshop on the little known but highly personal music Kurt Weill composed for Georg Kaiser's 1933 anti-Third Reich play with music Der Silbersee, (The Silver Lake).

20050813

And All that Jazz

Charles Hazlewood continues his exploration of the impact made by jazz and dance music in European music during the 1920s and 30s. In today's audience workshop, the focus is on two of the most characteristic examples from France, Darius Milhaud's ballet La Creation du Monde and Jacques Ibert's Divertissement, in which he is joined by members of the BBC Concert Orchestra.

20050820

And All That Jazz

Charles Hazlewood concludes his exploration of the impact made by jazz and dance music in European music of the 1920s and 30s, with a profile of the English composer Constant Lambert, born in 1905.

In the audience workshop, Charles is joined by pianist David Owen Norris and the BBC Concert Orchestra, for an exploration of two of Lambert's youthful piano works, the Elegiac Blues and the extraordinarily precocious Piano Concerto No 1, which he composed as an 18-year-old student. The programme also includes Lambert's arrangement of his friend William Walton's overture, Portsmouth Point.

20050827

Brahms: Variations on a theme of Haydn (The St Anthony Choral)

Stephen Johnson joins the BBC Symphony Orchestra and conductor Grant Llewellyn for a look at Brahms' pioneering set of orchestral variations. Just as Mozart and Beethoven before him had used variation form to demonstrate their skills as performers, so Brahms used the form to show off his skills as a composer.

20050903

Charles Hazlewood is joined by mezzo-soprano Jane Irwin and the BBC Concert Orchestra for a workshop session and performance on the five songs that Wagner composed to poems by Mathilde Wesendonck.

Mathilde was Wagner's muse; Wagner was her creative mentor.

The intensity of their collaboration is enshrined in these five love songs.

20050903

Charles Hazlewood is joined by mezzo-soprano Jane Irwin and the BBC Concert Orchestra for a workshop session and performance on the five songs that Wagner composed to poems by Mathilde Wesendonck.

Mathilde was Wagner's muse; Wagner was her creative mentor.

The intensity of their collaboration is enshrined in these five love songs.

20050910

Listening to Webern

As we approach the 60th anniversary of Webern's death, Stephen Johnson takes a close look at the music of this great Austrian figure who still provokes bewilderment in certain quarters. What is there to hear in Webern?

20050917

Elgar and the Orchestra

Three great British composers of the 20th century died in 1934 - Elgar, Delius and Holst. In this programme, conductor Mark Elder and the Halle Orchestra explore the unique sound world of Elgar's orchestra focussing on the extrovert concert overture inspired by an Italian holiday, 'In the South'.

20050924

Charles Hazlewood joins the BBC National Orchestra of Wales for a workshop exploring the music of Estonian composer Arvo Pärt, whose music has a profoundly spiritual quality. Much of his work is also underpinned by rigorous mathematical principles and Charles and the orchestra explore these and other techniques in three works: Collage on Bach, Cantus in Memory of Benjamin Britten and Silouan's Song.

20051001

Arvo Part at 70

Stephen Johnson leads a workshop on Part's distinctive approach to the writing of sacred choral music. He is joined by the distinguished choral conductor Paul Hillier and by Estonia's leading professional choir, which has made performing the music of their most famous national composer something of a speciality.

Magnificat

Which was the Son of...

Kanon 3 (Kanon Pokajanen)

Nunc Dimittis

Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir

Paul Hillier (musical director)

20051008

Kind of Blue: Miles Davis' 1959 album is one of the most significant achievements in the history of post war jazz. Geoffrey Smith dissects the different numbers on the album.

20051015

White Man Sleeps

The composer Kevin Volans achieved early fame with his evocative and unusually scored chamber piece White Man Sleeps, inspired by the traditional music of his native Southern Africa. Stephen Johnson meets the composer with an ensemble of musicians for a special workshop exploring some of the work's ideas.

20051022

Xhosa Songs of South Africa

Charles Hazlewood leads a workshop on the rich and varied musical tradition of the Xhosa people of the Western Cape.

1/2. Music Director Dimpho di Kopane talks about the region's unique musical heritage, and there are songs performed by his award-winning music theatre company.

20051029

2/2. North meets South

In a unique fusion of European themes and ideas with South African spirit and language, the award-winning music and theatre company Dimpho di Kopane performs a selection of music based on productions of The Mysteries, U-Carmen, The Snow Queen and The Beggar's Opera.

20051105

A Soldier's Tale

Samuel West and the ensemble Excellent Device join Charles Hazlewood to explore aspects of Stravinsky's dramatic masterpiece, ahead of a complete performance in the Sunday Gala.

Composed in the years after the First World War, the Soldier's Tale is a masterpiece of brevity and economy, telling the Faustian story of the soldier returning from war to sell his violin - his soul - to the devil. In this workshop, Charles and his small company perform extracts from the complete work.

20051112

The Bernstein Beat

Charles Hazlewood and the Ulster Orchestra are joined by guest Jamie Bernstein for a special edition designed to introduce younger listeners to the music of her father Leonard. This workshop focuses on the rhythmic vitality and the energy of some of Bernstein's dance-based theatre music, with extracts from On the Town, Candide, Mass and West Side Story.

20051119

Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra explore the key ingredients of the classical symphony, for which Joseph Haydn was predominantly responsible.

They use as their example Haydn's Symphony No 60 in C (Il Distratto) - a six movement work from 1774 fashioned from incidental music which he had composed for an adaptation of a French play - Le Distrait, by Francois Regnard.

Part of a workshop session designed to complement A-Level and Scottish Highers studies.

20051119

Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra explore the key ingredients of the classical symphony, for which Joseph Haydn was predominantly responsible.

They use as their example Haydn's Symphony No 60 in C (Il Distratto) - a six movement work from 1774 fashioned from incidental music which he had composed for an adaptation of a French play - Le Distrait, by Francois Regnard.

Part of a workshop session designed to complement A-Level and Scottish Highers studies.

Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra explore the key ingredients of the classical symphony, for which Joseph Haydn was predominantly responsible.

They use as their example Haydn's Symphony No 60 in C (Il Distratto) - a six movement work from 1774 fashioned from incidental music which he had composed for an adaptation of a French play - Le Distrait, by Francois Regnard.

Part of a workshop session designed to complement A-Level and Scottish Highers studies.

20051126

Stephen Johnson joins the BBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Alexander Briger, and cellist Christian Poltera, for a look behind the notes of Elgar's Cello Concerto.

20051126

Stephen Johnson joins the BBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Alexander Briger, and cellist Christian Poltera, for a look behind the notes of Elgar's Cello Concerto.

20051203

Stephen Johnson joins the BBC SO and conductor Grant Llewellyn in a programme looking at the background and the structure of Rachmaninov's great symphonic tone poem Isle of the Dead.

20051203

Stephen Johnson joins the BBC SO and conductor Grant Llewellyn in a programme looking at the background and the structure of Rachmaninov's great symphonic tone poem Isle of the Dead.

Stephen Johnson joins the BBC SO and conductor Grant Llewellyn in a programme looking at the background and the structure of Rachmaninov's great symphonic tone poem Isle of the Dead.

20051210

Tippett's Songs for Dov

Charles Hazlewood is joined by members of the BBC Philharmonic to unravel the complexities of Tippett's song cycle.

The composer regarded Songs for Dov as one of his most personal works, revealing much about his 'take' on the musical and cultural world of the 1960s. Taking on the demanding role of Dov is tenor Nigel Robson, who sang the work for the composer on many occasions.

20051231

Music from the Russian Ballet

In this workshop session, recorded in St David's Hall, Cardiff, Charles is joined by David Nixon, Artistic Director of the Northern Ballet Theatre, and the BBC National Orchestra of Wales for an exploration of key moments in the evolution of the Russian Ballet, from the time of ballet-master Petipa and composer Tchaikovsky in the 1870s, to the ground-breaking contributions of impressario Diaghilev and composer Stravinsky in the early years of the 20th century, and the new wave of 'realistic' ballets in the Soviet Union.

The music comes from Tchaikovsky's three ballets, Stravinsky's Petrushka, Gliere's The Red Poppy and Shostakovich's The Golden Age.

20060107

Stephen Johnson joins the BBC Philharmonic orchestra and conductor Yasuo Shinozaki in front of an invited audience to explore some of the mysteries of Sibelius' profound last symphony - the Symphony No 7.

Sibelius: Symphony No 7

BBC Philharmonic Orchestra

Yasuo Shinozaki (conductor).

20060107

Stephen Johnson joins the BBC Philharmonic orchestra and conductor Yasuo Shinozaki in front of an invited audience to explore some of the mysteries of Sibelius' profound last symphony - the Symphony No 7.

Sibelius: Symphony No 7

BBC Philharmonic Orchestra

Yasuo Shinozaki (conductor).

Stephen Johnson joins the BBC Philharmonic orchestra and conductor Yasuo Shinozaki in front of an invited audience to explore some of the mysteries of Sibelius' profound last symphony - the Symphony No 7.

Sibelius: Symphony No 7

BBC Philharmonic Orchestra

Yasuo Shinozaki (conductor)

20060121

Music and Meaning in the Magic Flute

As a prelude to the opera Live from the Met, Charles Hazlewood leads a workshop recorded in Cardiff in which he explores the music and meaning of Mozart's great singspiel, through three of the principal characters - Pamina, Tamino and Papageno.

Pamina ...... Aylish Tynan (soprano)

Tamino ...... James Gilchrist (tenor)

Papageno ...... Roderick Williams (baritone)

Students from the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama

BBC National Orchestra of Wales

Charles Hazlewood (conductor)

20060128

Mozart's Sinfonia Concertante, K364

Mozart 'discovered' the sinfonia concertante or concertos involving more than one soloist in Mannheim, played by the fine orchestra there, in 1778. Back in Salzburg a year or so later he wrote one of his own - the Sinfonia Concertante in E flat, which is one of the greatest and most original of all his concertos.

In this workshop and performance, Charles Hazlewood conducts the BBC National Orchestra of Wales, with soloists Lesley Hatfield (violin) and Steven Burnard (viola).

20060204

Metamorphosen

Richard Strauss conceived his late masterpiece for 23 solo strings as a memorial for a lost musical culture, particularly the bombing of the Munich Opera House, the scene of so many of his operatic triumphs.

In this workshop session, Charles Hazlewood and his ensemble Excellent Device explore the musical detail behind this very personal work, revealing in the process how strongly the shadow of Beethoven is cast over the music, particularly the Eroica Symphony.

20060211

Virtually everything that Hector Berlioz composed was inspired by a literary or theatrical idea.

Even when he came to write his first symphony, he wrote it with a subtext - An Episode in the Life of an Artist.

Stephen Johnson considers the different components that make up the Symphonie Fantastique, helped along by the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Yan Pascal Tortelier.

20060211

Virtually everything that Hector Berlioz composed was inspired by a literary or theatrical idea.

Even when he came to write his first symphony, he wrote it with a subtext - An Episode in the Life of an Artist.

Stephen Johnson considers the different components that make up the Symphonie Fantastique, helped along by the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Yan Pascal Tortelier.

Virtually everything that Hector Berlioz composed was inspired by a literary or theatrical idea. Even when he came to write his first symphony, he wrote it with a subtext - An Episode in the Life of an Artist.

Stephen Johnson considers the different components that make up the Symphonie Fantastique, helped along by the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Yan Pascal Tortelier.

20060218

Haydn Trumpet Concerto

Stephen Johnson takes the trumpet concerto as his subject, journeying from the baroque with a concerto by Telemann to Haydn's ground breaking masterpiece. Phillipe Schartz is the soloist who at one point even ventures to play an original keyed bugle - the instrument that inspired Haydn to put pen to paper.

The BBC NOW is conducted by Kenneth Woods.

20060225

Composing for the Silver Screen

Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Concert Orchestra are joined by film composer Debbie Wiseman to uncover what's involved in composing music for movies. Featured music used includes extracts from Debbie's own score for Wilde.

Plus some iconic film moments where music carries the drama - the opening scene of On the Waterfront, with music by Leonard Bernstein; the Shower scene from Psycho, with music by Bernard Hermann; and the main theme from Harry Potter, by John Williams.

20060304

Shall We Dance?

Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Concert Orchestra reveal the extent to which the forms and styles of classical and modern dance music provided the basis for great works for the concert hall.

We follow the evolution of the modest Minuet into symphonic Scherzo - courtesy of Mozart, Haydn and Beethoven; the journey of the Landler into the waltz - with Johan Strauss II and Tchaikovsky; and the transformation of the Habanera into the Tango - from Bizet to Piazolla.

20060311

When Shostakovich wrote his 8th Quartet, he believed it would be his musical valedictory. Stephen Johnson joins members of the Royal String Quartet in Norwich for a closer look at the work.

20060318

Shostakovich: Cello Concerto No 1

Written for Mstislav Rostropovich in the early 1960s, Shostakovich's First Cello Concerto quickly established itself as a first division piece in the cellist's repertory. Stephen Johnson joins the BBC Philharmonic - conducted by Lancelot Fuhry, with Swiss cellist Christian Poltera - in an exploration of the personal and practical aspects of this dynamic work.

20060325

A Guide to the Orchestra

In 1947, Benjamin Britten composed his celebrated Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra - in which he 'took the whole orchestra to pieces and then put it back together again' in order to give the listener a better understanding of how it works.

Charles Hazlewood offers the same material as a starting point, and probes the subject a little deeper.

20060408

David Owen Norris joins tenor Andrew Kennedy and pianist Christopher Glynn to probe the workings of Schubert lieder. The songs chosen are Die Forelle, Du Bist die Rüh, Doppelganger and Erlkönig.

20060415

Stephen Johnson explores the varied moods and impressions conveyed by Sibelius in two of his greatest tone poems - The Oceanides and Pohjola's Daughter.

The Oceanides is a haunting seascape inspired by his first Atlantic crossing, while Pohjola's Daughter is a vivid fantasy inspired by one of the legends from the Finnish national epic, the Kalevala.

Performances are provided by the BBC Philharmonic, conducted by Tecwin Evans..

20060422

Stephen Johnson explores the motets of Anton Bruckner. His masses and motets occupy as important a place in his career as the symphonies he composed later in life. Featuring the BBC Singers, conducted by Bob Chilcott.

Locus iste

Ave Maria (1861)

Vexilla regis

Os justi

Christus factus est (1884)

20060429

Stephen Johnson joins the BBC Symphony Orchestra conducted by Edward Gardner and Radio 3 New Generation Artist Alina Ibragimova in front of an invited audience for an exploration into the workings of one of Max Bruch's most inspired compositions.

Bruch Violin Concerto No 1

20060506

Britten's Les Illuminations: Tenor Daniel Norman joins Charles Hazlewood and the strings of the BBC Philharmonic to explore the music meaning of Britten's youthful settings of Rimbaud's poetry.

20060513

Joseph Haydn and the Classical Style

In this workshop session designed to complement A-Level and Scottish Highers studies, Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra explore the key ingredients of the classical symphony.

They use as their exemplar Haydn's Symphony No 60 in C, Il Distratto - a six movement work from 1774, fashioned from incidental music which he had composed for an adaptation of a French play, Le Distrait, by Francois Regnard.

20060520

Poulenc Mass in G

Stephen Johnson takes a look at the workings and influences upon Francis Poulenc's distinctive and virtuosic unaccompanied setting of the mass with the BBC Singers conducted by Bob Chilcott.

20060527

Miles Davis Celebration - Kind of Blue

Miles Davis' 1959 album Kind of Blue is one of the most significant achievements in the history of post-War jazz. Geoffrey Smith dissects the different numbers on the album to discover what makes them such landmark pieces.

20060603

Stephen Johnson considers the different components that make up Berlioz's Symphonie Fantastique, helped along by the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Yan Pascal Tortelier.

20060610

Ravel's Mother Goose

Stephen Johnson joins the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra in Glasgow for an exploration of the musical thinking behind Ravel's Mother Goose. It's a work that began life as an amusement at the piano, and developed into an orchestral ballet score inspired by the fairy tales of Charles Perrault.

20060617

Stephen Johnson looks at the trumpet concerto, journeying from the baroque with a concerto by Telemann to Haydn's ground breaking masterpiece.

Phillipe Schartz is the soloist who at one point even ventures to play an original keyed bugle - the instrument that inspired Haydn to put pen to paper.

20060701

Charles Hazlewood and the BBC National Orchestra of Wales explore the ways in which a teenage Schubert learnt from the past to help him fashion his Symphony No 5.

20060708

Charles Hazlewood and members of his ensemble Harmonieband are in the Chapel of Greenwich's Old Royal Naval College to take a closer look at Mozart's Serenade in Cm, K388.

20060805

Charles Hazlewood conducts the sixteen wind soloists of the BBC Concert Orchestra as they delve in the world of Richard Strauss' Sonatina No 1, written when the composer was nearly 80 years old.

20060812

Schoenberg's String Quartet No 2

Recorded in front of an audience at West Road Concert Hall in Cambridge with the Quatuor Parisii and the soprano Rachel Nichols, Stephen Johnson explores the ideas behind one of Arnold Schoenberg's most extraordinary pieces, the Second String Quartet, in which the composer takes the listener on a journey from the music of late romanticism to the expressionism of the early twentieth century.

20060819

Stephen Johnson faces an invited audience at the Royal Northern College of Music alongside Russian pianist Evgenia Rubinova in a detailed look at Rachmaninov's 2nd Piano Sonata.

20060819

Stephen Johnson faces an invited audience at the Royal Northern College of Music alongside Russian pianist Evgenia Rubinova in a detailed look at Rachmaninov's 2nd Piano Sonata.

Stephen Johnson faces an invited audience at the Royal Northern College of Music alongside Russian pianist Evgenia Rubinova in a detailed look at Rachmaninov's 2nd Piano Sonata.

20060826

Bernstein - Fancy Free

In 1943, Leonard Bernstein was approached by Jerome Robbins, an up-and-coming choreographer, who had an idea for a ballet featuring three sailors on shore leave for 24 hours in wartime Manhattan. The result was Fancy Free, the ballet that launched Bernstein's composing career. Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Concert Orchestra delve into the world of this youthful American masterpiece.

20060902

Iain Burnside joins the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Tim Weiss, and baritone Jeremy Huw Williams for a look at John Adams' The Wound Dresser. It's a powerful setting of words by Walt Whitman, inspired by his work in a field hospital during the American Civil War.

20060909

Charles Hazlewood is joined by the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra and soloist Clio Gould to explore an early work by Kurt Weill - his Violin Concerto. It's a piece in which Weill was influenced by the two main musical minds of the 1920s - Arnold Schoenberg and Igor Stravinsky.

20060916

Mozart's Sinfonia Concertante, K364

In this workshop and performance, Charles Hazlewood conducts the BBC National Orchestra of Wales, with soloists Lesley Hatfield (violin) and Steven Burnard (viola).

Mozart discovered the sinfonia concertante - or concertos involving more than one soloist - in Mannheim, played by the fine orchestra there in 1778. Back in Salzburg a year or so later, he wrote one of his own - the Sinfonia Concertante in E flat, which is one of the greatest and most original of all his concertos.

20060923

Mezzo-soprano Ann Murray joins Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Philharmonic to explore the tragic music of Mahler's song cycle, Kindertotenlieder.

20060923

Mezzo-soprano Ann Murray joins Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Philharmonic to explore the tragic music of Mahler's song cycle, Kindertotenlieder.

Mezzo-soprano Ann Murray joins Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Philharmonic to explore the tragic music of Mahler's song cycle, Kindertotenlieder.

20060930

Stephen Johnson and BBC New Generation Artists the Ebène Quartet look at Béla Bartók's second String Quartet, a work he finished in 1917 during the hardships of the First World War.

20060930

Stephen Johnson and BBC New Generation Artists the Ebène Quartet look at Béla Bartók's second String Quartet, a work he finished in 1917 during the hardships of the First World War.

Stephen Johnson and BBC New Generation Artists the Ebène Quartet look at Béla Bartók's second String Quartet, a work he finished in 1917 during the hardships of the First World War.

20061007

Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Concert Orchestra explore the world of Haydn's Symphony No 100 in G - 'the military'.

20061014

Copland Clarinet Concerto: David Owen Norris explores Aaron Copland's jazz-infused piece with celebrated American clarinettist Richard Stoltzman.

David Lockington conducts the Northern Sinfonia at the Sage Gateshead.

20061021

Faure's setting of poems by Paul Verlaine, La Bonne Chanson, is one of the composer's greatest masterpieces.

Stephen Johnson unravels some of its subtleties with baritone Jeremy Huw Williams, Quatuor Parisii and double bass player Stephen Williams.

20061021

Faure's setting of poems by Paul Verlaine, La Bonne Chanson, is one of the composer's greatest masterpieces.

Stephen Johnson unravels some of its subtleties with baritone Jeremy Huw Williams, Quatuor Parisii and double bass player Stephen Williams.

Faure's setting of poems by Paul Verlaine, La Bonne Chanson, is one of the composer's greatest masterpieces.

Stephen Johnson unravels some of its subtleties with baritone Jeremy Huw Williams, Quatuor Parisii and double bass player Stephen Williams.

20061028

As part of the inaugural year of the BBC Electric Proms, Stephen Johnson explores two electro-acoustic works by Jonathan Harvey, one of the most skilled and imaginative composers using the electronic medium today.

He joins Stephen Johnson in the studio at London's Roundhouse to delve into two pieces that span the last 12 years of his career.

Pianist Clive Williamson and trumpeter Markus Stockhausen are the two solo performers in Tombeau de Messiaen and Other Presences.

20061028

As part of the inaugural year of the BBC Electric Proms, Stephen Johnson explores two electro-acoustic works by Jonathan Harvey, one of the most skilled and imaginative composers using the electronic medium today.

He joins Stephen Johnson in the studio at London's Roundhouse to delve into two pieces that span the last 12 years of his career.

Pianist Clive Williamson and trumpeter Markus Stockhausen are the two solo performers in Tombeau de Messiaen and Other Presences.

As part of the inaugural year of the BBC Electric Proms, Stephen Johnson explores two electro-acoustic works by Jonathan Harvey, one of the most skilled and imaginative composers using the electronic medium today.

He joins Stephen Johnson in the studio at London's Roundhouse to delve into two pieces that span the last 12 years of his career.

Pianist Clive Williamson and trumpeter Markus Stockhausen are the two solo performers in Tombeau de Messiaen and Other Presences.

20061104

Schubert's Symphony No 5

In a workshop session recorded in Cardiff, Charles Hazlewood and the BBC National Orchestra of Wales explore the ways in which the 19-year-old Schubert learned from examples in his recent past, especially Mozart's Symphony No 40, that helped him fashion his most engaging early symphony.

20061111

From the Sage Gateshead, Stephen Johnson joins members of the Northern Sinfonia and conductor Thomas Zehetmair for a workshop on one of Bartok's most popular and original works.

20061111

From the Sage Gateshead, Stephen Johnson joins members of the Northern Sinfonia and conductor Thomas Zehetmair for a workshop on one of Bartok's most popular and original works.

From the Sage Gateshead, Stephen Johnson joins members of the Northern Sinfonia and conductor Thomas Zehetmair for a workshop on one of Bartok's most popular and original works.

20061118

Bernstein Chichester Psalms

Charles Hazlewood explores Leonard Bernstein's 1964 commission by the cathedrals of Chichester and Salisbury, for a piece set from the Book of Psalms. Chichester Psalms is the work in which Bernstein rediscovered tonality after a brief foray into serialism.

Countertenor William Towers, BBC National Orchestra of Wales and Chamber Choir of the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama assist Hazlewood in his exploration of this serene masterpiece.

20061125

Poulenc Organ Concerto

Charles Hazlewood conducts the BBC National Orchestra of Wales in an exploration of Francis Poulenc's Concerto for Organ, Strings and Timpani. Organ soloist is David Goode.

20061202

Brahms: Variations on a theme of Haydn (The St Anthony Chorale).

Stephen Johnson joins the BBC Symphony Orchestra and conductor Grant Llewellyn for a look at Brahms's pioneering set of orchestral variations.

Just as Mozart and Beethoven before him had used variation form to demonstrate their skills as performers, Brahms used the form to show off his skills as a composer.

20061209

Sibelius: Tapiola.

Stephen Johnson joins the BBC Philharmonic, conducted by Martyn Brabbins, for a workshop on the great Finnish composer's final orchestral work.

The tone poem Tapiola was inspired by the legends and atmosphere of the great Finnish forests.

20061216

Charles Hazlewood conducts the BBC Concert Orchestra and soloist David Owen Norris in an exploration of Felix Mendelssohn's second (and lesser known) Piano Concerto.

20061216

Charles Hazlewood conducts the BBC Concert Orchestra and soloist David Owen Norris in an exploration of Felix Mendelssohn's second (and lesser known) Piano Concerto.

Charles Hazlewood conducts the BBC Concert Orchestra and soloist David Owen Norris in an exploration of Felix Mendelssohn's second (and lesser known) Piano Concerto.

20061223

Charles Hazlewood and the BBC National Orchestra of Wales explore Prokofiev's Lieutenant Kije.

20061230

Mozart the Improviser: David Owen Norris and pianist Ashley Wass consider the qualities that governed how Mozart improvised at the piano drawing on clues from his published scores.

20070106

Recorded in front of an audience at West Road Concert Hall in Cambridge with the Quatuor Parisii and soprano Rachel Nichols, Stephen Johnson explores the ideas behind one of Arnold Schoenberg's most extraordinary pieces, the Second String Quartet.

It takes the listener on a journey from the music of late romanticism to the expressionism of the early 20th Century.

20070106

Recorded in front of an audience at West Road Concert Hall in Cambridge with the Quatuor Parisii and soprano Rachel Nichols, Stephen Johnson explores the ideas behind one of Arnold Schoenberg's most extraordinary pieces, the Second String Quartet. It takes the listener on a journey from the music of late romanticism to the expressionism of the early 20th Century.

Recorded in front of an audience at West Road Concert Hall in Cambridge with the Quatuor Parisii and soprano Rachel Nichols, Stephen Johnson explores the ideas behind one of Arnold Schoenberg's most extraordinary pieces, the Second String Quartet.

It takes the listener on a journey from the music of late romanticism to the expressionism of the early 20th Century.

20070120

Stephen Johnson joins the members of the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra and conductor Stefan Solyom to explore Sibelius' Symphony No 2, one of the great Finnish masterpieces.

20070203

Tchaikovsky's Symphonie Pathetique (first movement)

Tchaikovsky's Symphony No 6 begins with a section which is as compelling as any tone poem. Charles Hazlewood explores this great movement with the BBC Philharmonic.

20070218

Charles Hazlewood conducts Emma Johnson and the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra in an exploration of Mozart's Clarinet Concerto.

20070225

Puccini: La Boheme

The great Italian composer is revered as one of music's great tunesmiths, but Catherine Bott reveals there is much more to his art as she explores his Parisian masterpiece with singers Katie van Kooten and Peter Auty. Edward Gardner conducts the BBC Symphony Orchestra.

20070304

Charles Hazlewood is joined by cellist Matthew Barley and the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra to explore William Walton's Cello Concerto.

20070311

Stephen Johnson joins pianist Ashley Wass and piano students from the Royal Northern College of Music and the Chethams School in Manchester to examine Beethoven's last published work for solo piano, Six Bagatelles, Op 126.

20070311

Stephen Johnson joins pianist Ashley Wass and piano students from the Royal Northern College of Music and the Chethams School in Manchester to examine Beethoven's last published work for solo piano, Six Bagatelles, Op 126.

Stephen Johnson joins pianist Ashley Wass and piano students from the Royal Northern College of Music and the Chethams School in Manchester to examine Beethoven's last published work for solo piano, Six Bagatelles, Op 126.

20070318

Charles Hazlewood conducts the BBC Concert Orchestra in an exploration of Antonin Dvorak's masterpiece his Symphony No 9, to which the composer gave the subtitle From the New World.

20070325

Shostakovich 8th String Quartet

When Shostakovich wrote his 8th quartet he believed it would be his musical valedictory. Stephen Johnson joins the members of the Royal String Quartet in Norwich for a closer look at the ideas behind this, the composer's most often performed quartet.

20070401

Vaughan Williams Flos Campi

Charles Hazlewood conducts the BBC National Orchestra and Chorus of Wales with violist Philip Dukes in an exploration of Ralph Vaughan Williams suite for solo viola, small chorus and orchestra.

20070408

Nielsen Flute Concerto

Nielsen composed his witty and imaginative flute concerto for a member of the Danish Wind Quintet, conveying much of the character and personality of the player in the piece. Radio 3 New Generation Artist Sharon Bezalay is the soloist in this workshop with BBC NOW conducted by Ken Woods.

Presented by Stephen Johnson.

20070415

Nielsen's Clarinet Concerto

Stephen Johnson takes a closer look at Carl Nielsen's last major orchestral work, his clarinet concerto, with clarinetist John Bradbury and the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Petri Sakari.

20070422

Britten Sea Interludes and Passacaglia

Charles Hazlewood conducts the BBC Concert Orchestra in an exploration of the Four Sea Interludes and Passacaglia that Benjamin Britten extracted from his opera Peter Grimes.

20070429

Chopin's Piano Concerto No 1 in E minor

Stephen Johnson joins pianist Piers Lane and members of BBC National Orchestra of Wales conducted by Kenneth Woods for an investigation into a distinct genre of concerto.

20070506

Handel's Ode for the Birthday of Queen Anne

Charles Hazlewood is in the heart of Handel's London at St James's, Piccadilly, to explore the maestro's Ode for the Birthday of Queen Anne. He is joined by soloists Rebecca Outram, Iestyn Davies, Michael George, a small chorus and his period ensemble Harmonieband.

20070513

Schoenberg's String Quartet No 2

Stephen Johnson explores the ideas behind one of Schoenberg's most extraordinary pieces, the Second String Quartet, in which the composer takes the listener on a journey from the music of late Romanticism to the Expressionism of the early 20th century.

Recorded in front of an audience at West Road Concert Hall in Cambridge with the Quatuor Parisii and soprano Rachel Nichols.

20070520

Mark-Anthony Turnage's Momentum and Kai

Charles Hazlewood is joined by cellist Matthew Barley and the BBC Philharmonic to explore the music of contemporary British composer Mark-Anthony Turnage through his works Momentum for orchestra and Kai for solo cello and ensemble.

The programme also includes a look back over a week at Eccles College in Salford, where Matthew, Charles and members of the orchestra worked with amateur groups on their own piece inspired by Turnage's music.

20070527

Haydn Trumpet Concerto

Stephen Johnson takes the trumpet concerto as his subject, journeying from the baroque with a concerto by Telemann, to Haydn's ground breaking masterpiece. Soloist Philippe Schartz at one point even ventures to play an original keyed bugle, the instrument that inspired Haydn to put pen to paper. The BBC NOW is conducted by Kenneth Woods.

"Haydn Trumpet Concerto

Stephen Johnson takes the trumpet concerto as his subject, journeying from the baroque with a concerto by Telemann, to Haydn's ground breaking masterpiece. Soloist Philippe Schartz at one point even ventures to play an original keyed bugle, the instrument that inspired Haydn to put pen to paper. The BBC NOW is conducted by Kenneth Woods."

20070603

Stravinsky: Symphony in Three Movements

Stephen Johnson is joined by the Scottish Symphony Orchestra conducted by Alexander Shelley, for an exploration of some of the ideas behind Stravinsky's wartime orchestral masterpiece.

20070610

Barber Piano Concerto

Stephen Johnson is joined by pianist Andrew Zolinsky and the BBC SO conducted by David Robertson for a look at some of the many contrasting ideas that influenced Samuel Barber's composition of his virtuosic Piano Concerto.

20070624

Beethoven's 6th Symphony: Charles Hazlewood conducts the BBC Concert Orchestra in an in-depth exploration of Beethoven's Pastoral Symphony.

20070701

Beethoven's 7th Symphony: With the help of his period orchestra Harmonieband, Charles Hazlewood delves into a Beethovenian paean to rhythm, his 7th Symphony.

20070708

John Dowland's Lachrymae

Andrew Manze takes a close look at the music and ideas behind the seven pavans from John Dowland's Lachrymae or Seven Teares, published in 1605 for lute and viol consort.

The profoundly intimate and expressive music has been described as the renaissance equivalent to Beethoven's late quartets, and is performed here by viol group Concordia.

20070715

Ravel's Gaspard de la Nuit

Stephen Johnson and Radio 3 New Generation Artist pianist Cedric Tiberghien consider some of the ingredients that define the piano music of Maurice Ravel with particular emphasis on what is arguably the greatest French 'sonata' for the piano, his Gaspard de la Nuit.

20070722

Stephen Johnson joins the members of the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra and conductor Stefan Solyom to explore Sibelius's Symphony No 2, one of the great Finnish masterpieces.

20070729

Prokofiev's Classical Symphony

Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Concert Orchestra explore the world of Prokofiev's Symphony No 1 in D, which was inspired by the classical style of Haydn. The programme also includes movements from Haydn's Symphonies Nos 93, 95, 100 and 101.

20070819

John Adams

Stephen Johnson looks at the music of the award-winning American composer John Adams ahead of the premiere of his new work at the Proms.

There's also another chance to hear Iain Burnside's examination of Adams' The Wound Dresser, a powerful setting of words by Walt Whitman, with the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra and baritone Jeremy Huw Williams, conducted by Tim Weiss.

20070826

Haydn Symphony No 98 and Piano Variations

Stephen Johnson joins the BBC Philharmonic and conductor Nicholas Kraemer for an exploration of Haydn's wit and invention in the Symphony No 98 in B flat, and fortepianist Matthew Halls looks at the wonderfully inventive F minor Variations.

20070902

Walton's Cello Concerto: Cellist Matthew Barley joins Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra to delve into the world of Walton's bittersweet Cello Concerto.

20070909

Gesualdo's Madrigals: Stephen Johnson is joined by the vocal group Exaudi to take a closer look at the extraordinary music of Carlo Gesualdo.

20070916

Brahms Symphony No 3: Stephen Johnson explores the workings of Brahms's 'free but happy' Third Symphony with the BBC Symphony Orchestra conducted by Douglas Boyd.

20070923

Britten's Variations on a Theme of Frank Bridge

Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Concert Orchestra examine Britten's Variations on a Theme of Frank Bridge alongside Bridge's own Three Idylls.

20070930

Monteverdi's L'Orfeo: Robert Hollingworth joins a special group of period performers for an exploration of some of the pioneering musical ideas behind the operatic masterpiece.

20071007

Bartok's Music for Strings Percussion and Celeste

Stephen Johnson joins members of the Northern Sinfonia and conductor Thomas Zehetmair for a workshop on one of Bartok's most popular, atmospheric and original works.

20071014

Sibelius: The Swan of Tuonela, and Night Ride and Sunrise

Stephen Johnson is joined by the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra and conductor Petri Sakari to explore one of Sibelius' most gripping tone poems, Night Ride and Sunrise, and The Swan of Tuonela, the most famous part of the composer's Lemminkainen Suite.

20071028

Tallis's Spem in Alium and 40-part Motets

As part of Radio 3's 40th anniversary, Stephen Johnson is joined in the studio by Jeffrey Skidmore, Deborah Roberts and Antony Pitts for an exploration of Thomas Tallis's magnificent 40-part motet Spem in Alium. Including a look at works that may have inspired it and the music which it has itself inspired.

20071104

Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto

Charles Hazlewood is joined by the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra and violinist Alexander Sitkovetsky for an in-depth examination of Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto, a work originally rejected by its dedicatee, violinist Leopold Auer, as unplayable.

20071111

Schumann's Symphony No 3 (Rhenish)

Stephen Johnson is joined by the BBC National Orchestra of Wales conducted by Thierry Fischer to explore one of Schumann's most joyous symphonies, inspired by the romance of the Rhinelands.

20071125

Mark-Anthony Turnage's Momentum and Kai

Charles Hazlewood is joined by cellist Matthew Barley and the BBC Philharmonic to explore the music of contemporary British composer Mark-Anthony Turnage through his works Momentum for orchestra and Kai for solo cello and ensemble.

The programme also includes a look back over a week at Eccles College in Salford, where Matthew, Charles and members of the orchestra worked with amateur groups on their own piece inspired by Turnage's music.

20071202

Elgar Cello Concerto

Stephen Johnson joins the BBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Alexander Briger, and cellist Christian Poltera for a look behind the notes of one of the best loved cello concertos in the repertory.

20071209

Ligeti Violin Concerto

Stephen Johnson is joined by the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra and violinist Ernst Kovacic for an in-depth exploration of Gyorgy Ligeti's Violin Concerto.

Plus Jennifer Martin takes an inside look at a BBC SSO learning programme centred around another challenging work by Ligeti, his Chamber Concerto.

20071223

Schubert's Trout Quintet

Recorded before the Norfolk and Norwich Music Club, Stephen Johnson explores the structure and background of one of Schubert's best loved chamber pieces, the Trout Quintet, with the Gould Piano Trio and friends.

20071230

Grieg Piano Concerto

Grieg was a great miniaturist who struggled with large scale forms. Stephen Johnson with pianist Ronan O'Hora and the Ulster Orchestra conducted by George Vass put this idea to the test.

20080113

Mozart Dissonance Quartet

In a recording made at the Lake District Summer Music Festival, Stephen Johnson is joined by the Royal Quartet to delve into the world of Mozart's Haydn Quartets and, in particular, the famous Dissonance Quartet.

20080120

"Benjamin: Dance Figures

Stephen Johnson meets one of Britain's leading composers, George Benjamin, with the BBC Symphony Orchestra to explore some of the ideas behind his orchestral pieces Dance Figures and Sudden Time."

20080127

Elgar: A Truly English Composer?

Charles Hazlewood is joined by the BBC National Orchestra of Wales to explore three English works for string ensemble: Edward Elgar's Introduction and Allegro, Gustav Holst's Saint Paul's Suite and Elgar's Serenade for Strings, focusing on what makes Elgar's music seem so quintessentially English.

20080203

Britten Sea Interludes and Passacaglia

Charles Hazlewood conducts the BBC Concert Orchestra in an exploration of the Four Sea Interludes and Passacaglia that Benjamin Britten extracted from his opera Peter Grimes.

20080210

Rimsky-Korsakov's Scheherazade

Catherine Bott is joined by the BBC National Orchestra of Wales and conductor Luke Dollman for an in-depth exploration of Scheherazade, a work inspired by Tales of the Arabian Nights.

20080217

Electronic Music

Alwynne Pritchard takes us on a journey through the rich and colourful landscape of electronic music with composer Jonathan Harvey discussing his Mortuos Plango, Vivos Voco and pioneering works by Varese and Stockhausen.

20080224

Ravel's Gaspard de la Nuit

Stephen Johnson and Radio 3 New Generation Artist pianist Cedric Tiberghien consider some of the ingredients that define the piano music of Maurice Ravel with particular emphasis on what is arguably the greatest French 'sonata' for the piano, his Gaspard de la nuit.

20080302

Bartok's Divertimento: Martin Handley teams up with the strings of the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra for an exploration of some of the ideas behind Bartok's Divertimento.

20080309

Henri Dutilleux

Stephen Johnson explores some of the ideas behind the music of one of France's leading composers, Henri Dutilleux, focusing on his second Symphony (Le double). Thierry Fischer conducts a performance given by the BBC National Orchestra of Wales as part of their Discovering Dutilleux festival.

20080316

Spohr's Nonet

Stephen Johnson takes a closer look at two nonets. Paul Allen is in Sheffield's Crucible Studio to explore Louis Spohr's popular Nonet with Ensemble 360, and Stephen delves into Bohuslav Martinu's 1959 Nonet, one of many works the composer wrote in the final year of his life.

20080323

Tango: Charles Hazlewood is joined by the quintet Tango Volcano and members of the BBC Concert Orchestra to explore the world of the tango.

20080330

Schubert's Trout Quintet

Recorded before the Norfolk and Norwich Music Club, Stephen Johnson explores, with the help of the Gould Piano Trio and friends, the structure and background of one of Schubert's best-loved chamber pieces, the Trout Quintet.

20080406

Scriabin's World

William Mival explores the mystic world and rich harmonies of the eccentric Russian composer Alexander Scriabin. The music includes excerpts from Scriabin's piano sonatas and preludes as well as Prometheus, his large work for choir and orchestra.

20080413

History of the Serenade

Charles Hazlewood is joined by the BBC National Orchestra of Wales to explore the history of the serenade.

1/2. Charles looks at the beginnings of the form, focusing on a serenade by the composer who more than any other shaped the form into a staple of the concert hall - Mozart.

20080420

History of the Serenade

Charles Hazlewood is joined by the BBC National Orchestra of Wales to explore the history of the serenade.

2/2. Charles considers what happened to the form after Mozart and is joined by the BBC National Orchestra of Wales to look in depth at two post-Mozartian examples of this music: Dvorak's Serenade for Strings and Martinu's Serenade for Chamber Orchestra.

20080427

Schumann's Symphony No 3 (Rhenish)

Stephen Johnson is joined by the BBC National Orchestra of Wales under Thierry Fischer to explore one of Schumann's most joyous symphonies, inspired by the romance of the Rhinelands.

20080504

Gershwin's Piano Concerto

Charles Hazlewood is joined by pianist Joanna MacGregor and the BBC Concert Orchestra for an exploration of one of Gershwin's first concert masterpieces - the Piano Concerto. Fresh from his success in the concert hall with Rhapsody in Blue and with his triumphs on Broadway running in tandem, Gershwin consolidated his skills to produce a fully fledged piano concerto for the Boston Symphony.

2008051120100103

Charles Hazlewood joins the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra before an audience at Glasgow's City Halls for an exploration of Kodaly's famous Hary Janos, an orchestral suite that in the 1920s established the composer as a musician of international standing. Considered a Hungarian 'nationalist' work, it tells the story of a figure who singlehandedly saves the country from Napoleon's army.

And cimbalom player Heather Corbett joins Charles for a profile of the cimbalom, Hungary's national instrument and a prominent feature in Hary Janos. They consider the development of the instrument from the traditional folk dulcimer, and look at how composers as diverse as Liszt, Stravinsky and Boulez have written for it.

2008051120100103

Charles Hazlewood joins the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra before an audience at Glasgow's City Halls for an exploration of Kodaly's famous Hary Janos, an orchestral suite that in the 1920s established the composer as a musician of international standing. Considered a Hungarian 'nationalist' work, it tells the story of a figure who singlehandedly saves the country from Napoleon's army.

And cimbalom player Heather Corbett joins Charles for a profile of the cimbalom, Hungary's national instrument and a prominent feature in Hary Janos. They consider the development of the instrument from the traditional folk dulcimer, and look at how composers as diverse as Liszt, Stravinsky and Boulez have written for it.

Hary Janos

Charles Hazelwood joins the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra before an audience at Glasgow's City Halls for an exploration of Kodaly's famous Hary Janos, an opera that in the 1920s established the composer as a musician of international standing. Considered a Hungarian 'nationalist' work, it tells the story of a figure who singlehandedly saves the country from Napoleon's army.

And cimbalom player Heather Corbett joins Charles for a profile of the cimbalom, Hungary's national instrument and a prominent feature in Hary Janos. They consider the development of the instrument from the traditional folk dulcimar, and look at how composers as diverse as Liszt, Stravinsky and Boulez have written for it.

20080525

Sibelius: The Swan of Tuonela, and Night Ride and Sunrise

Stephen Johnson is joined by the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra and conductor Petri Sakari to explore one of Sibelius' most gripping tone poems, Night Ride and Sunrise, and The Swan of Tuonela, the most famous part of the composer's Lemminkainen Suite.

20080601

Tavener - The Protecting Veil

Charles Hazlewood and Matthew Barley are joined by the BBC Philharmonic and cellist Josephine Knight to explore John Tavener's seminal work The Protecting Veil, a piece which Tavener describes as trying to 'capture some of the almost cosmic power of the Mother of God'.

The programme also looks at a BBC Philharmonic learning project focusing on The Protecting Veil, which was run alongside Discovering Music at the University of Salford.

"Tavener - The Protecting Veil

Charles Hazlewood and Matthew Barley are joined by the BBC Philharmonic and cellist Josephine Knight to explore John Tavener's seminal work The Protecting Veil, a piece which Tavener describes as trying to 'capture some of the almost cosmic power of the Mother of God'.

The programme also looks at a BBC Philharmonic learning project focusing on The Protecting Veil, which was run alongside Discovering Music at the University of Salford."

20080608

Mendelssohn Overtures

Stephen Johnson is joined by the BBC National Orchestra of Wales and conductor Benjamin Ellin for an exploration of the musical workings of three of Mendelssohn 'symphonic poems' - A Midsummer Night's Dream, Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage and The Hebrides.

20080615

Strauss's Don Quixote

Charles Hazlewood is joined by the BBC Philharmonic and cellist Peter Dixon to explore Richard Strauss's famous tone poem Don Quixote, based on the Cervantes epic novel. Charles also looks at the relationship between Don Quixote and another of Strauss's great tone poems, Ein Heldenleben.

20080622

Monteverdi's Il Combattimento di Tancredi e Clorinda

In a programme made as part of the 2008 Lufthansa Festival of Baroque Music, Robert Hollingworth and his group I Fagiolini explore the background and music to Monteverdi's operatic scena, The Battle of Tancredi and Clorinda, for which the composer claimed to use a new form of musical expression.

20080629

Kurtag - Scenes from a Novel

In a programme recorded at the Aldeburgh festival, Stephen Johnson is joined by soprano Maria Husmann and the ensemble Psappha to delve into the musical world of the featured composer of this year's festival - Gyorgy Kurtag. They examine Kurtag's work Scenes from a Novel alongside some of the piano miniatures - Jatekok (Games) and the orchestral work Stele.

20080706

Rimsky-Korsakov's Scheherazade

Catherine Bott is joined by the BBC National Orchestra of Wales and conductor Luke Dollman for an in-depth exploration of Scheherazade, a work inspired by Tales of the Arabian Nights.

20080713

The Marriage of Figaro

Stephen Johnson is joined by singers from the Royal Academy Opera and members of the BBC National Orchestra of Wales with conductor Ewa Strusinska for an exploration of Mozart's musical depiction of character and drama in The Marriage of Figaro.

20080727

Joe Cutler's Music for Cello and Strings and Grieg's Holberg Suite

Charles Hazlewood joins the BBC Concert Orchestra, cellist Robin Michael and composer Joe Cutler to look at Cutler's own Music for cello and strings and Grieg's From Holberg's Time: Suite in the olden style.

20080803

Brahms: Symphony No 1

Following BBC Philharmonic chief conductor Gianandrea Noseda's recent peformance of a complete cycle of the Brahms symphonies, Stephen Johnson takes the opportunity to explore the workings of Brahms' watershed First Symphony from the conductor's perspective.

20080810

Schwanengesang

Baritone Hakan Vramsmo and pianist Julius Drake join Stephen Johnson for an exploration of the musical nuances to be found in Schubert's posthumous song-cycle Schwanengesang, settings of poems by Ludwig Rellstab and Heinrich Heine.

20080824

Vaughan Williams Flos Campi

Charles Hazlewood conducts the BBC National Orchestra and Chorus of Wales with violist Philip Dukes in an exploration of Ralph Vaughan Williams suite for solo viola, small chorus and orchestra.

20080831

Messiaen - St Francis of Assisi

Ahead of next Sunday's broadcast of the complete opera, Alwynne Pritchard explores Messiaen's vast St Francis of Assisi. She is joined by conductor Kent Nagano who worked very closely with Messiaen himself in preparing the original production of the work.

20080921

Elgar: A Very English Composer

Charles Hazlewood is joined by the string section of the BBC National Orchestra of Wales to explore what makes Elgar such a quintessentially 'English' composer, focusing on his 1905 Introduction and Allegro, and the 1892 Serenade for Strings.

As a contrast, Charles also examines the music of Holst, another English composer who was writing in the early part of the 20th century, looking at his Saint Paul's Suite for string orchestra. Could Holst's style possibly be more authentically English than that of Elgar?

20080928

Schubert: Octet. Stephen Johnson examines some of the ideas that inspired Schubert's celebrated masterpiece for wind and strings with members of Britten Sinfonia.

20081005

Charles Hazlewood is joined by his ensemble Excellent Device to explore the music of the waltz king Johann Strauss.

20081012

Grieg Piano Concerto

Grieg was a great miniaturist who struggled with large scale forms. Stephen Johnson with pianist Ronan O'Hora and the Ulster Orchestra conducted by George Vass put this idea to the test.

20081019

Eighteenth Century Tchaikovsky

Charles Hazlewood is joined by the BBC Philharmonic and cellist Robert Cohen to explore two of Tchaikovsky's 18th century-inspired works - the Rococo Variations and the orchestral suite Mozartiana. Tchaikovsky's music appears to embody the romantic passions and storms of the his age, but the composer himself often took solace reflecting idealistically on the sensibilities of the 18th century and in particular on his beloved Mozart.

20081026

Brahms Symphony No 3: Stephen Johnson explores the workings of Brahms's 'free but happy' Third Symphony with the BBC Symphony Orchestra conducted by Douglas Boyd.

20081102

Eight Songs for a Mad King

Charles Hazlewood is joined by the composer Peter Maxwell Davies for an in-depth exploration of his iconic music theatre work Eight Songs for a Mad King. With the ensemble Psappha and baritone Kelvin Thomas.

Considered one of the most celebrated and shocking pieces of British music theatre ever written, the work portrays the tragic madness of King George III.

20081109

Vaughan Williams and the Lost Generation

Stephen Johnson is joined by the BBC National Orchestra of Wales and conductor Michael Seal, with violinist Lesley Hatfield and tenor James Gilchrist for an exploration of the English idyll in the light of some of the music to have appeared in the lead-up to the First World War, specifically Butterworth's A Shrophsire Lad and Vaughan Williams's On Wenlock Edge and The Lark Ascending.

20081116

Vaughan Williams: Symphony No 6

Stephen Johnson explores Vaughan Williams's Sixth Symphony, with excerpts and a complete performance of the work, from the BBC Symphony Orchestra conducted by Martyn Brabbins.

First heard in 1948, the symphony's violence and dissonance came as a huge shock after the serenity of Symphony No 5. Vaughan Williams always denied this work was a 'war' symphony but in some passages war imagery is, for many, hard to ignore. The first three movements are wild and complex both rhythmically and harmonically, while the conclusion is a desolate and haunting epilogue.

20081123

Tango

Charles Hazlewood is joined by the quintet Tango Volcano and members of the BBC Concert Orchestra to explore the world of the tango.

It started life as music of the slums of Buenos Aires in Argentina and took on the form of an earthy and sensual dance. The music exudes strong feelings of sensuality, passion and a tragic romantic element. Essentially the music of exiled people, the themes of tangos are often broken love, the sadness for having left a country behind for a new life, as well as a desire and passion for life.

20090111

Charles Hazlewood with the BBC CO and composer Fung Lam explore his new work Unlocking.

20120309

Arts feature.

20120309

Arts feature.

Arts feature.

20130201

Stephen Johnson explores Stravinsky's ballet Petrushka.

20131015

Programme exploring a different piece of music every week.

*20081005

Charles Hazlewood is joined by his ensemble Excellent Device to explore the music of the waltz king Johann Strauss

*20081005

Charles Hazlewood is joined by his ensemble Excellent Device to explore the music of the waltz king Johann Strauss

* * Tango20080323

Charles Hazlewood is joined by the quintet Tango Volcano and members of the BBC Concert Orchestra to explore the world of the tango.

* * Tango20080323

Charles Hazlewood is joined by the quintet Tango Volcano and members of the BBC Concert Orchestra to explore the world of the tango.

* Bartok's Divertimento *20080302

Martin Handley teams up with the strings of the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra for an exploration of some of the ideas behind Bartok's Divertimento.

* Bartok's Divertimento *20080302

Martin Handley teams up with the strings of the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra for an exploration of some of the ideas behind Bartok's Divertimento.

* Benjamin: Dance Figures20080120

Stephen Johnson meets one of Britain's leading composers, George Benjamin, with the BBC Symphony Orchestra to explore some of the ideas behind his orchestral pieces Dance Figures and Sudden Time.

* Benjamin: Dance Figures20080120

Stephen Johnson meets one of Britain's leading composers, George Benjamin, with the BBC Symphony Orchestra to explore some of the ideas behind his orchestral pieces Dance Figures and Sudden Time.

* Britten Sea Interludes And Passacaglia20080203

Charles Hazlewood conducts the BBC Concert Orchestra in an exploration of the Four Sea Interludes and Passacaglia that Benjamin Britten extracted from his opera Peter Grimes.

* Britten Sea Interludes And Passacaglia20080203

Charles Hazlewood conducts the BBC Concert Orchestra in an exploration of the Four Sea Interludes and Passacaglia that Benjamin Britten extracted from his opera Peter Grimes.

* History Of The Serenade - 120080413

Charles Hazlewood is joined by the BBC National Orchestra of Wales to explore the history of the serenade.

Charles looks at the beginnings of the form, focusing on a serenade by the composer who more than any other shaped the form into a staple of the concert hall - Mozart.

* History Of The Serenade - 120080413

Charles Hazlewood is joined by the BBC National Orchestra of Wales to explore the history of the serenade.

Charles looks at the beginnings of the form, focusing on a serenade by the composer who more than any other shaped the form into a staple of the concert hall - Mozart.

* History Of The Serenade - 2 Last20080420

Charles considers what happened to the form after Mozart and is joined by the BBC National Orchestra of Wales to look in depth at two post-Mozartian examples of this music: Dvorak's Serenade for Strings and Martinu's Serenade for Chamber Orchestra.

* History Of The Serenade - 2 Last20080420

Charles considers what happened to the form after Mozart and is joined by the BBC National Orchestra of Wales to look in depth at two post-Mozartian examples of this music: Dvorak's Serenade for Strings and Martinu's Serenade for Chamber Orchestra.

* Mozart Dissonance Quartet20080113

In a recording made at the Lake District Summer Music Festival, Stephen Johnson is joined by the Royal Quartet to delve into the world of Mozart's Haydn Quartets and, in particular, the famous Dissonance Quartet.

* Mozart Dissonance Quartet20080113

In a recording made at the Lake District Summer Music Festival, Stephen Johnson is joined by the Royal Quartet to delve into the world of Mozart's Haydn Quartets and, in particular, the famous Dissonance Quartet.

* Ravel's Gaspard De La Nuit20080224

Stephen Johnson and Radio 3 New Generation Artist pianist Cedric Tiberghien consider some of the ingredients that define the piano music of Maurice Ravel with particular emphasis on what is arguably the greatest French 'sonata' for the piano, his Gaspard de la nuit.

* Ravel's Gaspard De La Nuit20080224

Stephen Johnson and Radio 3 New Generation Artist pianist Cedric Tiberghien consider some of the ingredients that define the piano music of Maurice Ravel with particular emphasis on what is arguably the greatest French 'sonata' for the piano, his Gaspard de la nuit.

* Rimsky-korsakov's Scheherazade20080210

Catherine Bott is joined by the BBC National Orchestra of Wales and conductor Luke Dollman for an in-depth exploration of Scheherazade, a work inspired by Tales of the Arabian Nights.

* Rimsky-korsakov's Scheherazade20080210

Catherine Bott is joined by the BBC National Orchestra of Wales and conductor Luke Dollman for an in-depth exploration of Scheherazade, a work inspired by Tales of the Arabian Nights.

* Schubert's Trout Quintet20080330

Recorded before the Norfolk and Norwich Music Club, Stephen Johnson explores, with the help of the Gould Piano Trio and friends, the structure and background of one of Schubert's best-loved chamber pieces, the Trout Quintet.

* Schubert's Trout Quintet20080330

Recorded before the Norfolk and Norwich Music Club, Stephen Johnson explores, with the help of the Gould Piano Trio and friends, the structure and background of one of Schubert's best-loved chamber pieces, the Trout Quintet.

* Scriabin's World *20080406

William Mival explores the mystic world and rich harmonies of the eccentric Russian composer Alexander Scriabin.

The music includes excerpts from Scriabin's piano sonatas and preludes as well as Prometheus, his large work for choir and orchestra.

* Scriabin's World *20080406

William Mival explores the mystic world and rich harmonies of the eccentric Russian composer Alexander Scriabin.

The music includes excerpts from Scriabin's piano sonatas and preludes as well as Prometheus, his large work for choir and orchestra.

* Spohr's Nonet20080316

Stephen Johnson takes a closer look at two nonets.

Paul Allen is in Sheffield's Crucible Studio to explore Louis Spohr's popular Nonet with Ensemble 360, and Stephen delves into Bohuslav Martinu's 1959 Nonet, one of many works the composer wrote in the final year of his life.

* Spohr's Nonet20080316

Stephen Johnson takes a closer look at two nonets.

Paul Allen is in Sheffield's Crucible Studio to explore Louis Spohr's popular Nonet with Ensemble 360, and Stephen delves into Bohuslav Martinu's 1959 Nonet, one of many works the composer wrote in the final year of his life.

Graham Fitkin's Tidal20100912

Charles Hazlewood is joined by the BBC Concert Orchestra and the composer Graham Fitkin to explore Fitkin's new BBC commission "Tidal".

Featuring an intriguing look into Fitkin's early work, musical influences and his current compositional techniques with excerpts from the new work and the World Premiere performance.

The programme also features an inside look at a BBC Concert Orchestra education project which ran alongside this Discovering Music.

Charles Hazlewood explores Graham Fitkin's new work Tidal with the composer.

Graham Fitkin's Tidal20100912

Charles Hazlewood is joined by the BBC Concert Orchestra and the composer Graham Fitkin to explore Fitkin's new BBC commission "Tidal".

Featuring an intriguing look into Fitkin's early work, musical influences and his current compositional techniques with excerpts from the new work and the World Premiere performance.

The programme also features an inside look at a BBC Concert Orchestra education project which ran alongside this Discovering Music.

Charles Hazlewood explores Graham Fitkin's new work Tidal with the composer.

16th Century Polyphony

16th Century Polyphony20100926

Catherine Bott explores some of the joys of English ployphony with Harry Christophers, Sally Dunkley and The Sixteen in an exploration of music by Byrd, Tallis and Sheppard.

The programme was recorded at the National Centre for Early Music in York as part of the 2010 York Early Music Festival and unpicks some of the working and ideas behind three contrasting masterpieces from 16th century English chuch music.

William Byrd's "Infelix Ego" is a meditation on Psalm 50 written by the Italian friar Girolamo Savonarola shortly before his execution for heresy.

Thomas Tallis's short but intensely expressive "Miserere Nostri" is an intricate web of musical games and devices around the words "have mercy on us lord, have mercy on us".

Finally John Sheppard's "Media Vita" is a setting of plainsong and text based around the Nunc Dimittis, the traditional song for evening prayer, composed by Sheppard on an uniquely grand scale.

Harry Christophers, the director of The Sixteen, and Sally Dunkley who sings with the group and prepeares many of The Sixteen's editions, discuss and illustrate with Catherine Bott some of musical thinking behind these pieces.

Catherine Bott joins The Sixteen for an exploration of English polyphony.

16th Century Polyphony20100926

Catherine Bott explores some of the joys of English ployphony with Harry Christophers, Sally Dunkley and The Sixteen in an exploration of music by Byrd, Tallis and Sheppard.

The programme was recorded at the National Centre for Early Music in York as part of the 2010 York Early Music Festival and unpicks some of the working and ideas behind three contrasting masterpieces from 16th century English chuch music.

William Byrd's "Infelix Ego" is a meditation on Psalm 50 written by the Italian friar Girolamo Savonarola shortly before his execution for heresy.

Thomas Tallis's short but intensely expressive "Miserere Nostri" is an intricate web of musical games and devices around the words "have mercy on us lord, have mercy on us".

Finally John Sheppard's "Media Vita" is a setting of plainsong and text based around the Nunc Dimittis, the traditional song for evening prayer, composed by Sheppard on an uniquely grand scale.

Harry Christophers, the director of The Sixteen, and Sally Dunkley who sings with the group and prepeares many of The Sixteen's editions, discuss and illustrate with Catherine Bott some of musical thinking behind these pieces.

Catherine Bott joins The Sixteen for an exploration of English polyphony.

Catherine Bott explores some of the joys of English ployphony with Harry Christophers, Sally Dunkley and The Sixteen in an exploration of music by Byrd, Tallis and Sheppard.

The programme was recorded at the National Centre for Early Music in York as part of the 2010 York Early Music Festival and unpicks some of the working and ideas behind three contrasting masterpieces from 16th century English chuch music. William Byrd's "Infelix Ego" is a meditation on Psalm 50 written by the Italian friar Girolamo Savonarola shortly before his execution for heresy.

Thomas Tallis's short but intensely expressive "Miserere Nostri" is an intricate web of musical games and devices around the words "have mercy on us lord, have mercy on us".

Finally John Sheppard's "Media Vita" is a setting of plainsong and text based around the Nunc Dimittis, the traditional song for evening prayer, composed by Sheppard on an uniquely grand scale.

Harry Christophers, the director of The Sixteen, and Sally Dunkley who sings with the group and prepeares many of The Sixteen's editions, discuss and illustrate with Catherine Bott some of musical thinking behind these pieces.

Catherine Bott joins The Sixteen for an exploration of English polyphony.

1964 - The Rise of Minimalism

1964 - The Rise of Minimalism20101024

In 1964, the American composer Terry Riley put on a concert of his music at the San Francisco Tape Music Centre, a concert which saw the premiere of a work which is now seen as one of the first pieces of musical Minimalism: In C. Through In C and a host of other works, Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Concert Orchestra explore the rise of this phenomenon, its popularity today and its roots in both American and European music of the past.

Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Concert Orchestra explore the rise of minimalism.

1964 - The Rise Of Minimalism20101024

In 1964, the American composer Terry Riley put on a concert of his music at the San Francisco Tape Music Centre, a concert which saw the premiere of a work which is now seen as one of the first pieces of musical Minimalism: In C.

Through In C and a host of other works, Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Concert Orchestra explore the rise of this phenomenon, its popularity today and its roots in both American and European music of the past.

Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Concert Orchestra explore the rise of minimalism.

1964 - The Rise Of Minimalism20101024

In 1964, the American composer Terry Riley put on a concert of his music at the San Francisco Tape Music Centre, a concert which saw the premiere of a work which is now seen as one of the first pieces of musical Minimalism: In C.

Through In C and a host of other works, Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Concert Orchestra explore the rise of this phenomenon, its popularity today and its roots in both American and European music of the past.

Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Concert Orchestra explore the rise of minimalism.

A Guide To The Orchestra20060325

In 1947, Benjamin Britten composed his celebrated Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra - in which he 'took the whole orchestra to pieces and then put it back together again' in order to give the listener a better understanding of how it works.

Charles Hazlewood offers the same material as a starting point, and probes the subject a little deeper.

A Soldier's Tale20051105

Samuel West and the ensemble Excellent Device join Charles Hazlewood to explore aspects of Stravinsky's dramatic masterpiece, ahead of a complete performance in the Sunday Gala.

Composed in the years after the First World War, the Soldier's Tale is a masterpiece of brevity and economy, telling the Faustian story of the soldier returning from war to sell his violin - his soul - to the devil.

In this workshop, Charles and his small company perform extracts from the complete work.

A Soldier's Tale20051105

Samuel West and the ensemble Excellent Device join Charles Hazlewood to explore aspects of Stravinsky's dramatic masterpiece, ahead of a complete performance in the Sunday Gala.

Composed in the years after the First World War, the Soldier's Tale is a masterpiece of brevity and economy, telling the Faustian story of the soldier returning from war to sell his violin - his soul - to the devil.

In this workshop, Charles and his small company perform extracts from the complete work.

Aldeburgh Festival - Britten's Nocturne20050625

This exploration of the music and imagery of Benjamin Britten's evocative cycle of night poems for tenor, seven solo instruments and strings was recorded earlier this month in Orford PARISh Church.

Premiered at the LEEDS Festival in 1958, the work was first heard in Orford during the 1959 Festival.

During the workshop Charles Hazlewood, his chamber orchestra and tenor Mark Tucker tease out the detail of the work and also give a complete performance.

Mark Tucker (tenor)

Excellent Device

Charles Hazlewood (conductor).

Aldeburgh Festival - Britten's Nocturne20050625

This exploration of the music and imagery of Benjamin Britten's evocative cycle of night poems for tenor, seven solo instruments and strings was recorded earlier this month in Orford PARISh Church.

Premiered at the LEEDS Festival in 1958, the work was first heard in Orford during the 1959 Festival.

During the workshop Charles Hazlewood, his chamber orchestra and tenor Mark Tucker tease out the detail of the work and also give a complete performance.

Mark Tucker (tenor)

Excellent Device

Charles Hazlewood (conductor).

Ancient Music - Strauss and Respighi20090222
Ancient Music - Strauss And Respighi *20090222

Charles Hazlewood is joined by the BBC Concert Orchestra to explore why certain composers have drawn on the past in their music.

He considers movements from a rarely-performed ballet suite by Richard Strauss, his Divertimento, which re-works harpsichord pieces by Francois Couperin.

That's followed by Ottorino Respighi's celebrated suite, The Birds, based on renaissance and baroque harpsichord and lute pieces.

The programme also includes the third of Christopher Gayford's Codas - his brief look at some of the psychological aspects of listening to music.

Charles Hazlewood explores pieces by Strauss and Respighi inspired by music from the past.

Ancient Music - Strauss And Respighi *20090222

Charles Hazlewood is joined by the BBC Concert Orchestra to explore why certain composers have drawn on the past in their music.

He considers movements from a rarely-performed ballet suite by Richard Strauss, his Divertimento, which re-works harpsichord pieces by Francois Couperin.

That's followed by Ottorino Respighi's celebrated suite, The Birds, based on renaissance and baroque harpsichord and lute pieces.

The programme also includes the third of Christopher Gayford's Codas - his brief look at some of the psychological aspects of listening to music.

Charles Hazlewood explores pieces by Strauss and Respighi inspired by music from the past.

And All That Jazz - 3 Last20040424

Charles Hazlewood concludes his exploration of the impact made by jazz and dance music in European music of the 1920s and 30s, with a profile of the ENGLISH composer Constant Lambert.

In today's audience workshop, Charles is joined by pianist David Owen Norris and the BBC Concert Orchestra, for an exploration of two of Lambert's youthful piano works, the Elegiac Blues and the extraordinarily precocious Piano Concerto (No.

1), which he composed as an eighteen year old student.

The programme also includes Lambert's arrangement of his friend William Walton's overture Portsmouth Point.

And All That Jazz - 120040410

Charles Hazlewood begins a three part exploration of the impact made by jazz and dance music in European music during the 1920s and '30s.

Today he is joined by soprano Tara Harrison, tenor Alan Oke and the BBC Concert Orchestra for an audience workshop on the little known but highly personal music Kurt Weill composed for Georg Kaiser's 1933 anti-Third Reich play with music Der Silbersee (The Silver Lake).

And All That Jazz - 120040410

Charles Hazlewood begins a three part exploration of the impact made by jazz and dance music in European music during the 1920s and '30s.

Today he is joined by soprano Tara Harrison, tenor Alan Oke and the BBC Concert Orchestra for an audience workshop on the little known but highly personal music Kurt Weill composed for Georg Kaiser's 1933 anti-Third Reich play with music Der Silbersee (The Silver Lake).

And All That Jazz - 120050806

Charles Hazlewood begins a three part exploration of the impact made by jazz and dance music in European music during the 1920s and 30s.

He is joined by soprano Tara Harrison, tenor Alan Oke and the BBC Concert Orchestra for an audience workshop on the little known but highly personal music Kurt Weill composed for Georg Kaiser's 1933 anti-Third Reich play with music Der Silbersee, (The Silver Lake).

And All That Jazz - 120050806

Charles Hazlewood begins a three part exploration of the impact made by jazz and dance music in European music during the 1920s and 30s.

He is joined by soprano Tara Harrison, tenor Alan Oke and the BBC Concert Orchestra for an audience workshop on the little known but highly personal music Kurt Weill composed for Georg Kaiser's 1933 anti-Third Reich play with music Der Silbersee, (The Silver Lake).

And All That Jazz - 220040417

Charles Hazlewood continues his exploration of the impact made by jazz and dance music in European music during the 1920s and '30s.

In today's audience workshop, the focus is on two of the most characteristic examples from FRANCE, Darius Milhaud's ballet La Creaton du Monde and Jacques Ibert's Divertissement, in which he is joined by members of the BBC Concert Orchestra.

And All That Jazz - 220040417

Charles Hazlewood continues his exploration of the impact made by jazz and dance music in European music during the 1920s and '30s.

In today's audience workshop, the focus is on two of the most characteristic examples from FRANCE, Darius Milhaud's ballet La Creaton du Monde and Jacques Ibert's Divertissement, in which he is joined by members of the BBC Concert Orchestra.

And All That Jazz - 220050813

Charles Hazlewood continues his exploration of the impact made by jazz and dance music in European music during the 1920s and 30s.

In today's audience workshop, the focus is on two of the most characteristic examples from France, Darius Milhaud's ballet La Creation du Monde and Jacques Ibert's Divertissement, in which he is joined by members of the BBC Concert Orchestra.

And All That Jazz - 220050813

Charles Hazlewood continues his exploration of the impact made by jazz and dance music in European music during the 1920s and 30s.

In today's audience workshop, the focus is on two of the most characteristic examples from France, Darius Milhaud's ballet La Creation du Monde and Jacques Ibert's Divertissement, in which he is joined by members of the BBC Concert Orchestra.

And All That Jazz - 320050820

Charles Hazlewood concludes his exploration of the impact made by jazz and dance music in European music of the 1920s and 30s, with a profile of the English composer Constant Lambert, born in 1905.

In the audience workshop, Charles is joined by pianist David Owen Norris and the BBC Concert Orchestra, for an exploration of two of Lambert's youthful piano works, the Elegiac Blues and the extraordinarily precocious Piano Concerto No 1, which he composed as an 18-year-old student.

The programme also includes Lambert's arrangement of his friend William Walton's overture, Portsmouth Point.

And All That Jazz - 320050820

Charles Hazlewood concludes his exploration of the impact made by jazz and dance music in European music of the 1920s and 30s, with a profile of the English composer Constant Lambert, born in 1905.

In the audience workshop, Charles is joined by pianist David Owen Norris and the BBC Concert Orchestra, for an exploration of two of Lambert's youthful piano works, the Elegiac Blues and the extraordinarily precocious Piano Concerto No 1, which he composed as an 18-year-old student.

The programme also includes Lambert's arrangement of his friend William Walton's overture, Portsmouth Point.

And All That Jazz - 3 Last20040424

Charles Hazlewood concludes his exploration of the impact made by jazz and dance music in European music of the 1920s and 30s, with a profile of the ENGLISH composer Constant Lambert.

In today's audience workshop, Charles is joined by pianist David Owen Norris and the BBC Concert Orchestra, for an exploration of two of Lambert's youthful piano works, the Elegiac Blues and the extraordinarily precocious Piano Concerto (No.

1), which he composed as an eighteen year old student.

The programme also includes Lambert's arrangement of his friend William Walton's overture Portsmouth Point.

Anton Bruckner - Motets20060422

Stephen Johnson explores the motets of Anton Bruckner.

His masses and motets occupy as important a place in his career as the symphonies he composed later in life.

Featuring the BBC Singers, conducted by Bob Chilcott.

Locus iste

Ave Maria (1861)

Vexilla regis

Os justi

Christus factus est (1884).

Anton Bruckner - Motets20060422

Stephen Johnson explores the motets of Anton Bruckner.

His masses and motets occupy as important a place in his career as the symphonies he composed later in life.

Featuring the BBC Singers, conducted by Bob Chilcott.

Locus iste

Ave Maria (1861)

Vexilla regis

Os justi

Christus factus est (1884).

Appalachian Spring20040221

The theme of Aaron Copland's 1944 ballet Appalachian Spring is the pioneer spirit of a young couple about to set out on married life in early nineteenth century Pennsylvania.

The spring celebration is set in their brand new farmhouse.

Copland's music is often described as being among his most American sounding works, not least for the inclusion of the Shaker hymn 'Simple gifts' at its climax.

In this audience workshop Charles Hazlewood and members of his chamber orchestra, Excellent Device, search for the connections between the theme and the character of the music.

Appalachian Spring20040221

The theme of Aaron Copland's 1944 ballet Appalachian Spring is the pioneer spirit of a young couple about to set out on married life in early nineteenth century Pennsylvania.

The spring celebration is set in their brand new farmhouse.

Copland's music is often described as being among his most American sounding works, not least for the inclusion of the Shaker hymn 'Simple gifts' at its climax.

In this audience workshop Charles Hazlewood and members of his chamber orchestra, Excellent Device, search for the connections between the theme and the character of the music.

Arnold: Symphony No 5

Arnold: Symphony No 520091004

Charles Hazlewood delves into the world of Malcolm Arnold's Fifth Symphony.

He discovers that in spite of Arnold's posthumous reputation as a composer of light and superficial music, this a surprisingly dark and complex piece - a work full of irony, conflict and above all, anguish.

Charles also looks back at Arnold's views on social music making, presenting archive interviews with the composer.

Charles Hazlewood delves into the world of Malcolm Arnold's Fifthy Symphony.

Arnold: Symphony No 520091004

Charles Hazlewood delves into the world of Malcolm Arnold's Fifth Symphony.

He discovers that in spite of Arnold's posthumous reputation as a composer of light and superficial music, this a surprisingly dark and complex piece - a work full of irony, conflict and above all, anguish.

Charles also looks back at Arnold's views on social music making, presenting archive interviews with the composer.

Charles Hazlewood delves into the world of Malcolm Arnold's Fifthy Symphony.

Arvo Part At 7020051001

Stephen Johnson leads a workshop on Part's distinctive approach to the writing of sacred choral music.

He is joined by the distinguished choral conductor Paul Hillier and by Estonia's leading professional choir, which has made performing the music of their most famous national composer something of a speciality.

Magnificat

Which was the Son of...

Kanon 3 (Kanon Pokajanen)

Nunc Dimittis

Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir

Paul Hillier (musical director).

Arvo Part At 7020051001

Stephen Johnson leads a workshop on Part's distinctive approach to the writing of sacred choral music.

He is joined by the distinguished choral conductor Paul Hillier and by Estonia's leading professional choir, which has made performing the music of their most famous national composer something of a speciality.

Magnificat

Which was the Son of...

Kanon 3 (Kanon Pokajanen)

Nunc Dimittis

Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir

Paul Hillier (musical director).

Bach Magnificat20110730

Sara Mohr-Pietsch and Richard Egarr examine the music and background to Bach's celebrated setting of the Magnificat with the members of the Academy of Ancient Music.

Bach's Magnificat is a setting of Mary's joyous response to the Annunciation - "My Soul Doth Magnify The Lord".

The words have been set by countless composers, but one of the best loved settings is by JS Bach which exists in two versions.

Sara Mohr-Pietsch, in conversation with the AAM's Music Director, Richard Egarr, examines the better known version, in D major, and looks at the way in which Bach adheres to the traditions of the 18th Century Baroque in his compositional approach, in particular how Bach uses his music to "paint" key ideas suggested by the words, thereby heightening the overall expressive power of the work.

The programme was recorded in the BBC Philharmonic Studios at Media City UK as part of the "Philharmonic Presents...." festival in May.

Sara Mohr-Pietsch and Richard Egarr examine the music and background to Bach's Magnificat.

Bach Magnificat20110730

Sara Mohr-Pietsch and Richard Egarr examine the music and background to Bach's celebrated setting of the Magnificat with the members of the Academy of Ancient Music.

Bach's Magnificat is a setting of Mary's joyous response to the Annunciation - "My Soul Doth Magnify The Lord".

The words have been set by countless composers, but one of the best loved settings is by JS Bach which exists in two versions.

Sara Mohr-Pietsch, in conversation with the AAM's Music Director, Richard Egarr, examines the better known version, in D major, and looks at the way in which Bach adheres to the traditions of the 18th Century Baroque in his compositional approach, in particular how Bach uses his music to "paint" key ideas suggested by the words, thereby heightening the overall expressive power of the work.

The programme was recorded in the BBC Philharmonic Studios at Media City UK as part of the "Philharmonic Presents...." festival in May.

Sara Mohr-Pietsch and Richard Egarr examine the music and background to Bach's Magnificat.

Sara Mohr-Pietsch and Richard Egarr examine the music and background to Bach's celebrated setting of the Magnificat with the members of the Academy of Ancient Music.

Bach's Magnificat is a setting of Mary's joyous response to the Annunciation - "My Soul Doth Magnify The Lord". The words have been set by countless composers, but one of the best loved settings is by JS Bach which exists in two versions. Sara Mohr-Pietsch, in conversation with the AAM's Music Director, Richard Egarr, examines the better known version, in D major, and looks at the way in which Bach adheres to the traditions of the 18th Century Baroque in his compositional approach, in particular how Bach uses his music to "paint" key ideas suggested by the words, thereby heightening the overall expressive power of the work.

The programme was recorded in the BBC Philharmonic Studios at Media City UK as part of the "Philharmonic Presents....." festival in May.

Sara Mohr-Pietsch and Richard Egarr examine the music and background to Bach's Magnificat.

Bach: Orchestral Suite No 420120411

Stephen Johnson explores how Leipzig's thriving coffee society found its perfect counterpart in the music of JS Bach, and the orchestral suites which he performed amongst the clinking cups and impassioned conversations. And Bach being Bach, he found ingenious ways of encapsulating this unpromising performing environment in his music.

Stephen Johnson on how Leipzig's coffee society found its counterpart in Bach's music.

Bach: Orchestral Suite No 420120411

Stephen Johnson explores how Leipzig's thriving coffee society found its perfect counterpart in the music of JS Bach, and the orchestral suites which he performed amongst the clinking cups and impassioned conversations. And Bach being Bach, he found ingenious ways of encapsulating this unpromising performing environment in his music.

Stephen Johnson on how Leipzig's coffee society found its counterpart in Bach's music.

Stephen Johnson explores how Leipzig's thriving coffee society found its perfect counterpart in the music of JS Bach, and the orchestral suites which he performed amongst the clinking cups and impassioned conversations. And Bach being Bach, he found ingenious ways of encapsulating this unpromising performing environment in his music.

Stephen Johnson on how Leipzig's coffee society found its counterpart in Bach's music.

Bach: St Mark Passion20130329

Stephen Johnson examines the sources of JS Bach's setting of the St. Mark Passion. Although his obituary tells us Bach wrote five Passions, only two of them, St. Matthew and St. John, have survived complete. It's thought the first performance of the St. Mark Passion took place on March 23rd in 1731, but subsequently the score of the music disappeared. Tantalisingly, all that remained was the text. However, after some keen detective work on Bach's music, there was enough evidence to make a reconstruction a possibility.

Bach: St Mark Passion20130329

Stephen Johnson examines the sources of JS Bach's setting of the St. Mark Passion. Although his obituary tells us Bach wrote five Passions, only two of them, St. Matthew and St. John, have survived complete. It's thought the first performance of the St. Mark Passion took place on March 23rd in 1731, but subsequently the score of the music disappeared. Tantalisingly, all that remained was the text. However, after some keen detective work on Bach's music, there was enough evidence to make a reconstruction a possibility.

Bach's B Minor Mass20130401

Stephen Johnson looks at how Bach, a devout Lutheran, set about producing a Latin mass in the Catholic tradition at the end of his life, and unpacks some of the many musical clues to its meaning.

Bach's B Minor Mass20130401

Stephen Johnson looks at how Bach, a devout Lutheran, set about producing a Latin mass in the Catholic tradition at the end of his life, and unpacks some of the many musical clues to its meaning.

Bach's Partita No 4 In D

Bach's Partita No 4 in D20100711

Stephen Johnson and pianist Leon McCawley examine JS Bach's Partita No 4. The Sarabande and Gigue are A /AS Level Set Works for Edexcel in 2011. JS Bach composed six keyboard Partitas, or suites of dances, that have become a landmark of the pianist's repertory, even though the music was probably originally conceived for the harpsichord. The Fourth Partita, in D major, is arguably the most cohesive in the collection, and it also demonstrates Bach's unfailing imagination and skill with its rich variety of styles and moods. Stephen Johnson, alongside the pianist Leon McCawley examine the background and the workings of this keyboard masterpiece, in a programme that was recorded before an audience at the 2009 Manchester Piano Festival.

As well as the Partita, they also consider Bach on the piano, and examine a transcription by one of Bach's greatest 20th Century advocates, Ferruccio Busoni: his piano adaptation of Bach's Chaconne for solo violin.

Stephen Johnson and pianist Leon McCawley examine Bach's Partita No 4.

Bach's Partita No 4 In D20100711

Stephen Johnson and pianist Leon McCawley examine JS Bach's Partita No 4.

The Sarabande and Gigue are A /AS Level Set Works for Edexcel in 2011.

JS Bach composed six keyboard Partitas, or suites of dances, that have become a landmark of the pianist's repertory, even though the music was probably originally conceived for the harpsichord.

The Fourth Partita, in D major, is arguably the most cohesive in the collection, and it also demonstrates Bach's unfailing imagination and skill with its rich variety of styles and moods.

Stephen Johnson, alongside the pianist Leon McCawley examine the background and the workings of this keyboard masterpiece, in a programme that was recorded before an audience at the 2009 Manchester Piano Festival.

As well as the Partita, they also consider Bach on the piano, and examine a transcription by one of Bach's greatest 20th Century advocates, Ferruccio Busoni: his piano adaptation of Bach's Chaconne for solo violin.

Stephen Johnson and pianist Leon McCawley examine Bach's Partita No 4.

Bach's Partita No 4 In D20100711

Stephen Johnson and pianist Leon McCawley examine JS Bach's Partita No 4.

The Sarabande and Gigue are A /AS Level Set Works for Edexcel in 2011.

JS Bach composed six keyboard Partitas, or suites of dances, that have become a landmark of the pianist's repertory, even though the music was probably originally conceived for the harpsichord.

The Fourth Partita, in D major, is arguably the most cohesive in the collection, and it also demonstrates Bach's unfailing imagination and skill with its rich variety of styles and moods.

Stephen Johnson, alongside the pianist Leon McCawley examine the background and the workings of this keyboard masterpiece, in a programme that was recorded before an audience at the 2009 Manchester Piano Festival.

As well as the Partita, they also consider Bach on the piano, and examine a transcription by one of Bach's greatest 20th Century advocates, Ferruccio Busoni: his piano adaptation of Bach's Chaconne for solo violin.

Stephen Johnson and pianist Leon McCawley examine Bach's Partita No 4.

Bach's Partita No 4 in D20090726
Bach's Partita No 4 In D *20090726

Stephen Johnson and pianist Leon McCawley examine Bach's Partita No 4.

Bach composed six partitas, or suites of dances, that have become a landmark of the pianist's repertoire, even though the music was probably originally conceived for the harpsichord.

The fourth is arguably the most cohesive in the collection, demonstrating Bach's unfailing imagination and skill with its rich variety of styles and moods.

Stephen and Leon examine the background and the workings of the piece in a programme that was recorded before an audience at the 2009 Manchester Piano Festival.

They also examine a piano transcription by one of Bach's greatest 20th-century advocates, Ferruccio Busoni, a keyboard adaptation of Bach's Chaconne for solo violin.

The Sarabande and Gigue from the Fourth Partita are A/AS Level set works for Edexcel from 2011.

Bach's Partita No 4 In D *20090726

Stephen Johnson and pianist Leon McCawley examine Bach's Partita No 4.

Bach composed six partitas, or suites of dances, that have become a landmark of the pianist's repertoire, even though the music was probably originally conceived for the harpsichord.

The fourth is arguably the most cohesive in the collection, demonstrating Bach's unfailing imagination and skill with its rich variety of styles and moods.

Stephen and Leon examine the background and the workings of the piece in a programme that was recorded before an audience at the 2009 Manchester Piano Festival.

They also examine a piano transcription by one of Bach's greatest 20th-century advocates, Ferruccio Busoni, a keyboard adaptation of Bach's Chaconne for solo violin.

The Sarabande and Gigue from the Fourth Partita are A/AS Level set works for Edexcel from 2011.

Barber Piano Concerto20070610

Stephen Johnson is joined by pianist Andrew Zolinsky and the BBC SO conducted by David Robertson for a look at some of the many contrasting ideas that influenced Samuel Barber's composition of his virtuosic Piano Concerto.

Barber Piano Concerto20070610

Stephen Johnson is joined by pianist Andrew Zolinsky and the BBC SO conducted by David Robertson for a look at some of the many contrasting ideas that influenced Samuel Barber's composition of his virtuosic Piano Concerto.

Barber: Violin Concerto And Essay No 1 For Orchestra

Barber: Violin Concerto And Essay No 1 For Orchestra20100307

Stephen Johnson explores one of Samuel Barber's most tranquil and astonishing wartime orchestral works - his Violin Concerto, which he began in Switzerland in the summer of 1939.

Barber continued writing the finale of the concerto in Paris before he quickly returned to his homeland of Pennsylvania as World War II erupted in Europe.

The Violin Concerto was actually a commission from an American entrepreneur - Samuel Fels, who wanted a virtuosic showpiece for his adopted son to play.

Barber's late Romantic style, though, wasn't exactly what Fels was looking for, so there had to be a number of changes made before the young prodigy Iso Briselli agreed to perform it.

To begin the programme, Stephen Johnson also looks at another work written around the same time as the Violin Concerto - his Essay No.1 for Orchestra.

This was a commission by the great Italian conductor Arturo Toscanini in 1938.

Toscanini, despite living in the USA for many years, rarely commissioned new works from American composers, but he had been so struck by the simple beauty" of the slow movement of Samuel Barber's String Quartet, that he suggested Barber provide him with a version for full string orchestra.

The First Essay, which has similar melancholic undertones to the resultant, now famous "Adagio for strings", was first performed at that same concert.

Gavin Maloney conducts the Ulster Orchestra in extracts and complete performances of both works, which were recorded in the Ulster Hall, Belfast in September 2009.

The violin soloist is Chloe Hanslip.

Stephen Johnson explores the nuances in Barber's Violin Concerto and First Essay."

Barber: Violin Concerto And Essay No 1 For Orchestra20100307

Stephen Johnson explores one of Samuel Barber's most tranquil and astonishing wartime orchestral works - his Violin Concerto, which he began in Switzerland in the summer of 1939.

Barber continued writing the finale of the concerto in Paris before he quickly returned to his homeland of Pennsylvania as World War II erupted in Europe.

The Violin Concerto was actually a commission from an American entrepreneur - Samuel Fels, who wanted a virtuosic showpiece for his adopted son to play.

Barber's late Romantic style, though, wasn't exactly what Fels was looking for, so there had to be a number of changes made before the young prodigy Iso Briselli agreed to perform it.

To begin the programme, Stephen Johnson also looks at another work written around the same time as the Violin Concerto - his Essay No.1 for Orchestra.

This was a commission by the great Italian conductor Arturo Toscanini in 1938.

Toscanini, despite living in the USA for many years, rarely commissioned new works from American composers, but he had been so struck by the simple beauty" of the slow movement of Samuel Barber's String Quartet, that he suggested Barber provide him with a version for full string orchestra.

The First Essay, which has similar melancholic undertones to the resultant, now famous "Adagio for strings", was first performed at that same concert.

Gavin Maloney conducts the Ulster Orchestra in extracts and complete performances of both works, which were recorded in the Ulster Hall, Belfast in September 2009.

The violin soloist is Chloe Hanslip.

Stephen Johnson explores the nuances in Barber's Violin Concerto and First Essay."

Barber: Violin Concerto and Essay No 1 for Orchestra20100307

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Bartok's Dance Suite20041009

In this audience workshop from GLASGOW, Charles Hazlewood reveals how Bartok drew on folk traditions ranging from his native Hungary to Romania and North Africa in shaping the musical material of this colourful orchestral masterpiece.

The extracts and a complete performance of the Dance Suite are performed by the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra.

Bartok's Dance Suite20041009

In this audience workshop from GLASGOW, Charles Hazlewood reveals how Bartok drew on folk traditions ranging from his native Hungary to Romania and North Africa in shaping the musical material of this colourful orchestral masterpiece.

The extracts and a complete performance of the Dance Suite are performed by the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra.

Bartok's Music For Strings Percussion And Celeste20071007

Stephen Johnson joins members of the Northern Sinfonia and conductor Thomas Zehetmair for a workshop on one of Bartok's most popular, atmospheric and original works.

Bartok's Music For Strings Percussion And Celeste20071007

Stephen Johnson joins members of the Northern Sinfonia and conductor Thomas Zehetmair for a workshop on one of Bartok's most popular, atmospheric and original works.

Beethoven Cello Sonatas20090118
Beethoven Cello Sonatas *20090118

In a programme recorded at the 2008 Lake District Summer Music Festival in St Martin's College, Ambleside, Stephen Johnson is joined by cellist Colin Carr and pianist Thomas Sauer to explore the first and last of Beethoven's five sonatas for cellos and piano: Op 5 No 1 in F and Op 102 No 2 in D.

The two sonatas fall into the extreme ends of the three periods that Beethoven's music is usually divided into, and Stephen shows how Beethoven develops the relationship between the instruments through them.

An exploration of Beethoven's first and last sonatas for cello and piano.

Beethoven Cello Sonatas *20090118

In a programme recorded at the 2008 Lake District Summer Music Festival in St Martin's College, Ambleside, Stephen Johnson is joined by cellist Colin Carr and pianist Thomas Sauer to explore the first and last of Beethoven's five sonatas for cellos and piano: Op 5 No 1 in F and Op 102 No 2 in D.

The two sonatas fall into the extreme ends of the three periods that Beethoven's music is usually divided into, and Stephen shows how Beethoven develops the relationship between the instruments through them.

An exploration of Beethoven's first and last sonatas for cello and piano.

Beethoven String Quartet - "serioso", Op 9520041218

Stephen Johnson joins the members of the Endellion Quartet before an audience at the Djanogly Concert Hall in Nottingham for an exploration of the ideas behind Beethoven's "Serious" Quartet.

Strange title - is it really more serious than any of the others?

Beethoven String Quartet - "serioso", Op 9520041218

Stephen Johnson joins the members of the Endellion Quartet before an audience at the Djanogly Concert Hall in Nottingham for an exploration of the ideas behind Beethoven's "Serious" Quartet.

Strange title - is it really more serious than any of the others?

Beethoven Symphony No 820131126

Stephen Johnson explores Beethoven's most playful symphony, the Eighth.

The musical jokes and light-hearted character of Beethoven's Eighth Symphony provide an irresistible contrast with the heroic and tempestuous symphonic works that precede and follow it. Beethoven famously called it his "little symphony", but it's never been clear what prompted him to say that. Stephen Johnson peels back the layers, to reveal a work that's bursting with ideas and just as radical in its own way as anything else Beethoven created.

Beethoven Symphony No 820131126

The musical jokes and light-hearted character of Beethoven's Eighth Symphony provide an irresistible contrast with the heroic and tempestuous symphonic works that precede and follow it. Beethoven famously called it his "little symphony", but it's never been clear what prompted him to say that. Stephen Johnson peels back the layers, to reveal a work that's bursting with ideas and just as radical in its own way as anything else Beethoven created.

Stephen Johnson explores Beethoven's most playful symphony, the Eighth.

Beethoven: Piano Concerto No 320121120

Stephen Johnson explores Beethoven's Piano Concerto No 3.

Beethoven: Piano Concerto No 320121120

Stephen Johnson explores Beethoven's Piano Concerto No 3.

Stephen Johnson explores Beethoven's Piano Concerto No 3.

Beethoven: Piano Concerto No 420130116

Stephen Johnson explores Beethoven's Piano Concerto no. 4.

Beethoven: Piano Concerto No 420130116

Stephen Johnson explores Beethoven's Piano Concerto no. 4.

Beethoven: String Quartet in A minor, Op 13220110605

Stephen Johnson is the guest of the Sowerby Music in Yorkshire for an exploration of one of the pinnacles of the repertory, Beethoven's String Quartet in A minor, Opus 132.

This is one of the so called "late" quartets of Beethoven, written after he had recovered from a debilitating illness. Beethoven used the quartet medium to grapple with some of his deepest feelings and sensibilities and the work is striking for the profundity of its expression and its novel and imaginative use of form. At the heart of the work lies one of the composers' most heart felt slow movements - an expression of an artist's thanks to God after recovering from illness.

Stephen is joined by members of the Wihan Quartet who perform illustrations and a complete performance of the work, and he explores the piece by way of a series of queries and questions from the members of Sowerby Music.

Stephen Johnson explores Beethoven's String Quartet in A minor, Op 132.

Beethoven: String Quartet In A Minor, Op 13220110605

Stephen Johnson is the guest of the Sowerby Music in Yorkshire for an exploration of one of the pinnacles of the repertory, Beethoven's String Quartet in A minor, Opus 132.

This is one of the so called "late" quartets of Beethoven, written after he had recovered from a debilitating illness.

Beethoven used the quartet medium to grapple with some of his deepest feelings and sensibilities and the work is striking for the profundity of its expression and its novel and imaginative use of form.

At the heart of the work lies one of the composers' most heart felt slow movements - an expression of an artist's thanks to God after recovering from illness.

Stephen is joined by members of the Wihan Quartet who perform illustrations and a complete performance of the work, and he explores the piece by way of a series of queries and questions from the members of Sowerby Music.

Stephen Johnson explores Beethoven's String Quartet in A minor, Op 132.

Beethoven: String Quartet In A Minor, Op 13220110605

Stephen Johnson is the guest of the Sowerby Music in Yorkshire for an exploration of one of the pinnacles of the repertory, Beethoven's String Quartet in A minor, Opus 132.

This is one of the so called "late" quartets of Beethoven, written after he had recovered from a debilitating illness.

Beethoven used the quartet medium to grapple with some of his deepest feelings and sensibilities and the work is striking for the profundity of its expression and its novel and imaginative use of form.

At the heart of the work lies one of the composers' most heart felt slow movements - an expression of an artist's thanks to God after recovering from illness.

Stephen is joined by members of the Wihan Quartet who perform illustrations and a complete performance of the work, and he explores the piece by way of a series of queries and questions from the members of Sowerby Music.

Stephen Johnson explores Beethoven's String Quartet in A minor, Op 132.

Beethoven: Symphony No 3 (eroica)

Beethoven: Symphony No 3 (Eroica)20100221
Beethoven: Symphony No 3 (eroica)20100221

Stephen Johnson presents a programme exploring Beethoven's Third Symphony in E flat major, the Eroica.

It is well known that Beethoven intended to dedicate the symphony to Napoleon, but when Napoleon had himself crowned Emperor in 1804, Beethoven angrily scratched out this dedication and the symphony was then titled the 'Heroic' symphony.

Stephen Johnson considers this theme of 'heroism' in the work, illustrated with examples and a complete performance of the symphony by the BBC National Orchestra of Wales conducted by Christophe Mangou.

Stephen Johnson explores Beethoven's Third Symphony in E flat, the Eroica.

Beethoven: Symphony No 3 (eroica)20100221

Stephen Johnson presents a programme exploring Beethoven's Third Symphony in E flat major, the Eroica.

It is well known that Beethoven intended to dedicate the symphony to Napoleon, but when Napoleon had himself crowned Emperor in 1804, Beethoven angrily scratched out this dedication and the symphony was then titled the 'Heroic' symphony.

Stephen Johnson considers this theme of 'heroism' in the work, illustrated with examples and a complete performance of the symphony by the BBC National Orchestra of Wales conducted by Christophe Mangou.

Stephen Johnson explores Beethoven's Third Symphony in E flat, the Eroica.

Beethoven: Symphony No 520130109

Its the most famous piece of classical music ever written, an instant representation of drama, tension, even classical music itself. Whether you hear that iconic opening idea as Fate knocking at the door, or just a simple representation of a yellowhammer's song, it runs all the way through Beethoven's most popular work, his Symphony no.5. Presented by Stephen Johnson

Beethoven: Symphony No 520130109

Its the most famous piece of classical music ever written, an instant representation of drama, tension, even classical music itself. Whether you hear that iconic opening idea as Fate knocking at the door, or just a simple representation of a yellowhammer's song, it runs all the way through Beethoven's most popular work, his Symphony no.5. Presented by Stephen Johnson.

Its the most famous piece of classical music ever written, an instant representation of drama, tension, even classical music itself. Whether you hear that iconic opening idea as Fate knocking at the door, or just a simple representation of a yellowhammer's song, it runs all the way through Beethoven's most popular work, his Symphony no.5. Presented by Stephen Johnson.

Beethoven's 6th Symphony20070624

Charles Hazlewood conducts the BBC Concert Orchestra in an in-depth exploration of Beethoven's Pastoral Symphony.

Beethoven's 6th Symphony20070624

Charles Hazlewood conducts the BBC Concert Orchestra in an in-depth exploration of Beethoven's Pastoral Symphony.

Beethoven's 7th Symphony20070701

With the help of his period orchestra Harmonieband, Charles Hazlewood delves into a Beethovenian paean to rhythm, his 7th Symphony.

Beethoven's 7th Symphony20070701

With the help of his period orchestra Harmonieband, Charles Hazlewood delves into a Beethovenian paean to rhythm, his 7th Symphony.

Beethoven's Emperor Concerto20111213

Stephen Johnson explores the history and musical mechanics of Beethoven's Piano Concerto no.5 'Emperor'.

The title might have been added by others, but Beethoven's masterpiece has always been obscured by the debate surrounding its supposed imperialist intentions: a heroic concerto, written with a Napoleonic spirit.

Not only does this fly in the face of the composer's own sympathies, but it's also disguised the genius of Beethoven's writing.

Stephen Johnson shifts the focus back to the music, and uncovers the radical innovations under the surface of Beethoven's craft.

Stephen Johnson on the history and musical mechanics of Beethoven's Piano Concerto No 5.

Beethoven's Emperor Concerto20111213

Stephen Johnson explores the history and musical mechanics of Beethoven's Piano Concerto no.5 'Emperor'.

The title might have been added by others, but Beethoven's masterpiece has always been obscured by the debate surrounding its supposed imperialist intentions: a heroic concerto, written with a Napoleonic spirit.

Not only does this fly in the face of the composer's own sympathies, but it's also disguised the genius of Beethoven's writing.

Stephen Johnson shifts the focus back to the music, and uncovers the radical innovations under the surface of Beethoven's craft.

Stephen Johnson on the history and musical mechanics of Beethoven's Piano Concerto No 5.

Stephen Johnson explores the history and musical mechanics of Beethoven's Piano Concerto no.5 'Emperor'.

The title might have been added by others, but Beethoven's masterpiece has always been obscured by the debate surrounding its supposed imperialist intentions: a heroic concerto, written with a Napoleonic spirit. Not only does this fly in the face of the composer's own sympathies, but it's also disguised the genius of Beethoven's writing. Stephen Johnson shifts the focus back to the music, and uncovers the radical innovations under the surface of Beethoven's craft.

Stephen Johnson on the history and musical mechanics of Beethoven's Piano Concerto No 5.

Beethoven's Fifth Symphony20090215
Beethoven's Fifth Symphony *20090215

Stephen Johnson and the BBC Symphony Orchestra under Grant Llewellyn deconstruct Beethoven's Fifth Symphony in a programme that also features examples from the sketches.

The Fifth is probably one of the best known works in the classical repertoire, but how much do we understand Beethoven's intentions by it? And how did the composer arrive at the work we know today?

The programme also includes one of four weekly 'Codas' from conductor and music pyschologist Christopher Gayford, exploring our psychological responses to music.

Stephen Johnson and the BBCSO with Grant Llewellyn explore Beethoven's Fifth Symphony.

Beethoven's Fifth Symphony *20090215

Stephen Johnson and the BBC Symphony Orchestra under Grant Llewellyn deconstruct Beethoven's Fifth Symphony in a programme that also features examples from the sketches.

The Fifth is probably one of the best known works in the classical repertoire, but how much do we understand Beethoven's intentions by it? And how did the composer arrive at the work we know today?

The programme also includes one of four weekly 'Codas' from conductor and music pyschologist Christopher Gayford, exploring our psychological responses to music.

Stephen Johnson and the BBCSO with Grant Llewellyn explore Beethoven's Fifth Symphony.

Beethoven's Hammerklavier Sonata20120320

Stephen Johnson scales the extraordinary heights of Beethoven's giant among piano sonatas, the Hammerklavier. Completed in 1818, Opus 106 is the most imposing of all Beethoven's 32 sonatas for piano. The sheer scale of Beethoven's intellectual power coupled with the sonata's fearsome technical demands and length make this one of the most inspiring and challenging works in the solo piano repertoire.

Stephen Johnson explores Beethoven's piano sonata, the Hammerklavier, Op 106.

Beethoven's Hammerklavier Sonata20120320

Stephen Johnson scales the extraordinary heights of Beethoven's giant among piano sonatas, the Hammerklavier. Completed in 1818, Opus 106 is the most imposing of all Beethoven's 32 sonatas for piano. The sheer scale of Beethoven's intellectual power coupled with the sonata's fearsome technical demands and length make this one of the most inspiring and challenging works in the solo piano repertoire.

Stephen Johnson explores Beethoven's piano sonata, the Hammerklavier, Op 106.

Stephen Johnson scales the extraordinary heights of Beethoven's giant among piano sonatas, the Hammerklavier. Completed in 1818, Opus 106 is the most imposing of all Beethoven's 32 sonatas for piano. The sheer scale of Beethoven's intellectual power coupled with the sonata's fearsome technical demands and length make this one of the most inspiring and challenging works in the solo piano repertoire.

Stephen Johnson explores Beethoven's piano sonata, the Hammerklavier, Op 106.

Beethoven's Piano And Cello Sonata In C Major, Op 102 No 120050212

, is the focus of today's workshop session, recorded last year at the Royal Northern College of Music during the MANCHESTER International Cello Festival.

Stephen Johnson is joined by cellist Frans Helmerson and pianist Peter Frankl in this exploration of one of the most compact and original of Beethoven's late works.

Beethoven's Piano And Cello Sonata In C Major, Op 102 No 120050212

, is the focus of today's workshop session, recorded last year at the Royal Northern College of Music during the MANCHESTER International Cello Festival.

Stephen Johnson is joined by cellist Frans Helmerson and pianist Peter Frankl in this exploration of one of the most compact and original of Beethoven's late works.

Beethoven's Piano Concerto No 320071118

Beethoven's Third Piano Concerto clearly owes a debt to the masterly C minor Concerto of Mozart.

Standing on the shoulders of a musical giant, what might Beethoven achieve? Charles Hazlewood explores with pianist Andrew Zolinksy and the BBC Symphony Orchestra.

Beethoven's Piano Concerto No 3

Beethoven's Third Piano Concerto clearly owes a debt to the masterly C minor Concerto of Mozart. Standing on the shoulders of a musical giant, what might Beethoven achieve? Charles Hazlewood explores with pianist Andrew Zolinksy and the BBC Symphony Orchestra.

Beethoven's Piano Concerto No 4 In G20050618

In the last of three Beethoven workshops, Charles Hazlewood and his period instrument orchestra Harmonieband are joined by the Dutch pianist Ronald Brautigam to explore the character of this great piano concerto, revealing the extent to which Beethoven was extending the boundaries of the classical concerto form into new and unexpected directions.

Beethoven's Piano Concerto No 4 In G20050618

In the last of three Beethoven workshops, Charles Hazlewood and his period instrument orchestra Harmonieband are joined by the Dutch pianist Ronald Brautigam to explore the character of this great piano concerto, revealing the extent to which Beethoven was extending the boundaries of the classical concerto form into new and unexpected directions.

Beethoven's Razumovsky Quartet, Op 59 No 320130604

Stephen Johnson explores his favourite Beethoven quartet, the Quartet in C, from Beethoven's Opus 59 series. They were commissioned in 1806 by Count Razumovsky, who was the Russian Ambassador to Vienna and a keen amateur violinist. The quartets clearly reveal Beethoven's intellectual strengths to be at their height, yet their conception and length mystified contemporaries when they were first heard. Given the admiration they would receive subsequently, Beethoven showed remarkable prescience when he said, "..they are not for you but for a later age!".

Beethoven's Razumovsky Quartet, Op 59 No 320130604

Stephen Johnson explores his favourite Beethoven quartet, the Quartet in C, from Beethoven's Opus 59 series. They were commissioned in 1806 by Count Razumovsky, who was the Russian Ambassador to Vienna and a keen amateur violinist. The quartets clearly reveal Beethoven's intellectual strengths to be at their height, yet their conception and length mystified contemporaries when they were first heard. Given the admiration they would receive subsequently, Beethoven showed remarkable prescience when he said, "..they are not for you but for a later age!".

Beethoven's Symphony No 420040925

It's often been said that the symphonies of Beethoven that really matter are the odd numbered ones, and that the even numbered ones, particularly numbers 2 and 4 are lighter and somehow less challenging.

In this studio edition, Stephen Johnson searches for those qualities of darkness and light, and those innovative touches of orchestration that make Beethoven's Fourth every bit as absorbing to listen to and study as the mighty Eroica and the revolutionary Fifth.

The BBC Philharmonic is conducted by Gianandrea Noseda and Jason Lai

Beethoven's Symphony No 420040925

It's often been said that the symphonies of Beethoven that really matter are the odd numbered ones, and that the even numbered ones, particularly numbers 2 and 4 are lighter and somehow less challenging.

In this studio edition, Stephen Johnson searches for those qualities of darkness and light, and those innovative touches of orchestration that make Beethoven's Fourth every bit as absorbing to listen to and study as the mighty Eroica and the revolutionary Fifth.

The BBC Philharmonic is conducted by Gianandrea Noseda and Jason Lai

Beethoven's Symphony No 720130220

Stephen Johnson explores Beethoven's Symphony No 7.

Beethoven's Symphony No 720130220

Stephen Johnson explores Beethoven's Symphony No 7.

Beethoven's Symphony No 920130627

Stephen Johnson explores themes of triumph and doubt in Beethoven's Symphony No 9.

Stephen Johnson explores themes of triumph and doubt in Beethoven's Symphony No 9, reflecting the turbulent times in which he lived.

Beethoven's Symphony No 920130627

Stephen Johnson explores themes of triumph and doubt in Beethoven's Symphony No 9.

Stephen Johnson explores themes of triumph and doubt in Beethoven's Symphony No 9, reflecting the turbulent times in which he lived.

Beethoven's Trio in E flat, Op 3820120229

Beethoven's Piano Trio in E flat opus 38, is one of the few instances of an arrangement of an original work by Beethoven himself. It's based on Beethoven's earlier Septet, and is a mark of gratitude by the composer to the Viennese physician Johann Adam Schmidt. Beethoven had been consulting Schmidt since about 1801 with various complaints, principally his increasing deafness. Due to its dedicatee, the Trio was intended to be performed in the domestic circle of the Schmidt household. The original virtuosic writing within the string parts in the Septet, therefore were allotted by Beethoven to the piano part in the Trio.

Stephen Johnson explores the inner workings of Beethoven's Trio in E flat, Op 38.

Beethoven's Trio In E Flat, Op 3820120229

Beethoven's Piano Trio in E flat opus 38, is one of the few instances of an arrangement of an original work by Beethoven himself. It's based on Beethoven's earlier Septet, and is a mark of gratitude by the composer to the Viennese physician Johann Adam Schmidt. Beethoven had been consulting Schmidt since about 1801 with various complaints, principally his increasing deafness. Due to its dedicatee, the Trio was intended to be performed in the domestic circle of the Schmidt household. The original virtuosic writing within the string parts in the Septet, therefore were allotted by Beethoven to the piano part in the Trio.

Stephen Johnson explores the inner workings of Beethoven's Trio in E flat, Op 38.

Beethoven's Trio In E Flat, Op 3820120229

Beethoven's Piano Trio in E flat opus 38, is one of the few instances of an arrangement of an original work by Beethoven himself. It's based on Beethoven's earlier Septet, and is a mark of gratitude by the composer to the Viennese physician Johann Adam Schmidt. Beethoven had been consulting Schmidt since about 1801 with various complaints, principally his increasing deafness. Due to its dedicatee, the Trio was intended to be performed in the domestic circle of the Schmidt household. The original virtuosic writing within the string parts in the Septet, therefore were allotted by Beethoven to the piano part in the Trio.

Stephen Johnson explores the inner workings of Beethoven's Trio in E flat, Op 38.

Beethoven's Triple Concerto20120503

Beethoven composed his Triple Concerto, opus 56, during an intensely creative period when he was also working on his opera Fidelio, the Waldstein piano sonata, and the Eroica symphony. Yet, Beethoven made the point to his publishers that here in the Triple Concerto was something new. It was composed for Beethoven's young piano pupil Archduke Rudolph to perform, with the violinist Seidler and the celebrated virtuoso cellist Anton Kraft, for whom Haydn had composed a cello concerto two decades earlier. Although the cello takes slightly more prominence in the Triple Concerto, it was a novelty at the time to combine a piano trio with orchestra, and also give the orchestra equal importance. Stephen Johnson takes a look at this work which broke new ground, yet despite its freshness, after its Viennese premiere in 1808, was never performed again in Beethoven's lifetime.

Stephen Johnson explores Beethoven's ground-breaking Triple Concerto, Op 56.

Beethoven's Triple Concerto20120503

Beethoven composed his Triple Concerto, opus 56, during an intensely creative period when he was also working on his opera Fidelio, the Waldstein piano sonata, and the Eroica symphony. Yet, Beethoven made the point to his publishers that here in the Triple Concerto was something new. It was composed for Beethoven's young piano pupil Archduke Rudolph to perform, with the violinist Seidler and the celebrated virtuoso cellist Anton Kraft, for whom Haydn had composed a cello concerto two decades earlier. Although the cello takes slightly more prominence in the Triple Concerto, it was a novelty at the time to combine a piano trio with orchestra, and also give the orchestra equal importance. Stephen Johnson takes a look at this work which broke new ground, yet despite its freshness, after its Viennese premiere in 1808, was never performed again in Beethoven's lifetime.

Stephen Johnson explores Beethoven's ground-breaking Triple Concerto, Op 56.

Beethoven composed his Triple Concerto, opus 56, during an intensely creative period when he was also working on his opera Fidelio, the Waldstein piano sonata, and the Eroica symphony. Yet, Beethoven made the point to his publishers that here in the Triple Concerto was something new. It was composed for Beethoven's young piano pupil Archduke Rudolph to perform, with the violinist Seidler and the celebrated virtuoso cellist Anton Kraft, for whom Haydn had composed a cello concerto two decades earlier. Although the cello takes slightly more prominence in the Triple Concerto, it was a novelty at the time to combine a piano trio with orchestra, and also give the orchestra equal importance. Stephen Johnson takes a look at this work which broke new ground, yet despite its freshness, after its Viennese premiere in 1808, was never performed again in Beethoven's lifetime.

Beethoven composed his Triple Concerto, opus 56, during an intensely creative period when he was also working on his opera Fidelio, the Waldstein piano sonata, and the Eroica symphony. Yet, Beethoven made the point to his publishers that here in the Triple Concerto was something new. It was composed for Beethoven's young piano pupil Archduke Rudolph to perform, with the violinist Seidler and the celebrated virtuoso cellist Anton Kraft, for whom Haydn had composed a cello concerto two decades earlier. Although the cello takes slightly more prominence in the Triple Concerto, it was a novelty at the time to combine a piano trio with orchestra, and also give the orchestra equal importance. Stephen Johnson takes a look at this work which broke new ground, yet despite its freshness, after its Viennese premiere in 1808, was never performed again in Beethoven's lifetime.

Stephen Johnson explores Beethoven's ground-breaking Triple Concerto, Op 56.

Berg Chamber Concerto20090503
Berg Chamber Concerto *20090503

Stephen Johnson joins the members of the Manchester Camerata and their conductor Douglas Boyd for an exploration of Alban Berg's Chamber Concerto, featuring pianist Martin Roscoe and violinist Jack Liebeck as soloists.

The Concerto was written as a homage to Berg's teacher Arnold Schoenberg on his fiftieth birthday, and it alludes to a close circle of friends and Viennese intellectuals from the mid-1920s, namely Berg, Schoenberg and Berg's friend and fellow Schoenberg pupil Anton Webern.

With a wealth of codes and extra-musical references, Berg crafted a compact and technically accomplished work, which is considered one of the great examples of German Expressionism.

The programme includes a complete performance of the piece.

Berg Chamber Concerto *20090503

Stephen Johnson joins the members of the Manchester Camerata and their conductor Douglas Boyd for an exploration of Alban Berg's Chamber Concerto, featuring pianist Martin Roscoe and violinist Jack Liebeck as soloists.

The Concerto was written as a homage to Berg's teacher Arnold Schoenberg on his fiftieth birthday, and it alludes to a close circle of friends and Viennese intellectuals from the mid-1920s, namely Berg, Schoenberg and Berg's friend and fellow Schoenberg pupil Anton Webern.

With a wealth of codes and extra-musical references, Berg crafted a compact and technically accomplished work, which is considered one of the great examples of German Expressionism.

The programme includes a complete performance of the piece.

Berio's Sequenzas

Berio's Sequenzas20100725

Over a span of 44 years, the Italian composer Luciano Berio wrote fourteen pieces entitled Sequenza - a series of solo instrumental works which are dizzyingly virtuosic and experimental.

Yet, unlike similarly experimental works, the Sequenzas remain at the forefront of contemporary solo instrumental repertoire.

In a programme recorded at the 2010 Aldeburgh festival, Stephen Johnson is joined by Trombonist Byron Fulcher, Viola player Paul Silverthorne and Clarinettist Mark van de Wiel to explore three of these varied compositions.

Stephen Johnson explores three of Luciano Berio's virtuosic and experimental Sequenzas.

Berio's Sequenzas20100725

Over a span of 44 years, the Italian composer Luciano Berio wrote fourteen pieces entitled Sequenza - a series of solo instrumental works which are dizzyingly virtuosic and experimental.

Yet, unlike similarly experimental works, the Sequenzas remain at the forefront of contemporary solo instrumental repertoire.

In a programme recorded at the 2010 Aldeburgh festival, Stephen Johnson is joined by Trombonist Byron Fulcher, Viola player Paul Silverthorne and Clarinettist Mark van de Wiel to explore three of these varied compositions.

Stephen Johnson explores three of Luciano Berio's virtuosic and experimental Sequenzas.

Over a span of 44 years, the Italian composer Luciano Berio wrote fourteen pieces entitled Sequenza - a series of solo instrumental works which are dizzyingly virtuosic and experimental. Yet, unlike similarly experimental works, the Sequenzas remain at the forefront of contemporary solo instrumental repertoire. In a programme recorded at the 2010 Aldeburgh festival, Stephen Johnson is joined by Trombonist Byron Fulcher, Viola player Paul Silverthorne and Clarinettist Mark van de Wiel to explore three of these varied compositions.

Stephen Johnson explores three of Luciano Berio's virtuosic and experimental Sequenzas.

Berlioz - Symphonie Fantastique20060603

Stephen Johnson considers the different components that make up Berlioz's Symphonie Fantastique, helped along by the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Yan Pascal Tortelier.

Berlioz - Symphonie Fantastique20060603

Stephen Johnson considers the different components that make up Berlioz's Symphonie Fantastique, helped along by the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Yan Pascal Tortelier.

Berlioz: Les Nuits D'ete

Berlioz: Les Nuits D'ete20100418

Catherine Bott is joined by the biographer and musicologist David Cairns to explore the nuances in Berlioz's song-cycle Les nuits d'ete".

The settings of these six poems by Theophile Gautier was originally conceived to be performed with piano, but Berlioz completed the orchestral versions in 1856.

It has now become one of his most enduring and often performed works.

As David Cairns explains, Berlioz is so often thought to be just a composer on a grand scale, but in this song-cycle he really shows a softer side, capable of writing beautifully-crafted miniatures as well as for huge orchestral forces.

The whole song-cycle is performed by soprano Elizabth Watts with the Ulster Orchestra conducted by Takuo Yuasa.

Catherine Bott and David Cairns explore the nuances in Berlioz's Les nuits d'ete."

Berlioz: Les Nuits D'ete20100418

Catherine Bott is joined by the biographer and musicologist David Cairns to explore the nuances in Berlioz's song-cycle Les nuits d'ete".

The settings of these six poems by Theophile Gautier was originally conceived to be performed with piano, but Berlioz completed the orchestral versions in 1856.

It has now become one of his most enduring and often performed works.

As David Cairns explains, Berlioz is so often thought to be just a composer on a grand scale, but in this song-cycle he really shows a softer side, capable of writing beautifully-crafted miniatures as well as for huge orchestral forces.

The whole song-cycle is performed by soprano Elizabth Watts with the Ulster Orchestra conducted by Takuo Yuasa.

Catherine Bott and David Cairns explore the nuances in Berlioz's Les nuits d'ete."

Berlioz's L'enfance du Christ20110508

Charles Hazlewood examines the background and music to Hector Berlioz's "sacred trilogy" - L'enfance du Christ - The Childhood of Christ which contains some of the composer's most immediate and intimate music.

Berlioz wrote it in the 1850s after penning a short musical sketch in a friend's Vistors' Book, in which he'd set out to parody the sounds of the 17th century. Liking the sketch, Berlioz worked on it further, expanding it into a three part oratorio recounting the childhood of Christ, with a text by Berlioz himself. In proved to be one of the composer's most successful and popular pieces during his lifetime.

Charles Hazlewood joins the members of the BBC Concert Orchestra and the BBC Singers with soloists, Jeremy Ovenden as the Narrator; Catherine Hopper as Marie; Stephan Loges as Joseph and Brindley Sherratt as the Father, in an examination of Berlioz's music, the background and ideas to the piece. Charles also conducts complete performances of the second and third parts: "The Flight into Egypt" and "The Arrival at Sais".

The programme was recorded before an audience at the Queen Elizabeth Hall in London.

Charles Hazlewood examines the background and music to Berlioz's L'enfance du Christ.

Berlioz's L'enfance Du Christ20110508

Charles Hazlewood examines the background and music to Hector Berlioz's "sacred trilogy" - L'enfance du Christ - The Childhood of Christ which contains some of the composer's most immediate and intimate music.

Berlioz wrote it in the 1850s after penning a short musical sketch in a friend's Vistors' Book, in which he'd set out to parody the sounds of the 17th century.

Liking the sketch, Berlioz worked on it further, expanding it into a three part oratorio recounting the childhood of Christ, with a text by Berlioz himself.

In proved to be one of the composer's most successful and popular pieces during his lifetime.

Charles Hazlewood joins the members of the BBC Concert Orchestra and the BBC Singers with soloists, Jeremy Ovenden as the Narrator; Catherine Hopper as Marie; Stephan Loges as Joseph and Brindley Sherratt as the Father, in an examination of Berlioz's music, the background and ideas to the piece.

Charles also conducts complete performances of the second and third parts: "The Flight into Egypt" and "The Arrival at Sais".

The programme was recorded before an audience at the Queen Elizabeth Hall in London.

Charles Hazlewood examines the background and music to Berlioz's L'enfance du Christ.

Berlioz's L'enfance Du Christ20110508

Charles Hazlewood examines the background and music to Hector Berlioz's "sacred trilogy" - L'enfance du Christ - The Childhood of Christ which contains some of the composer's most immediate and intimate music.

Berlioz wrote it in the 1850s after penning a short musical sketch in a friend's Vistors' Book, in which he'd set out to parody the sounds of the 17th century.

Liking the sketch, Berlioz worked on it further, expanding it into a three part oratorio recounting the childhood of Christ, with a text by Berlioz himself.

In proved to be one of the composer's most successful and popular pieces during his lifetime.

Charles Hazlewood joins the members of the BBC Concert Orchestra and the BBC Singers with soloists, Jeremy Ovenden as the Narrator; Catherine Hopper as Marie; Stephan Loges as Joseph and Brindley Sherratt as the Father, in an examination of Berlioz's music, the background and ideas to the piece.

Charles also conducts complete performances of the second and third parts: "The Flight into Egypt" and "The Arrival at Sais".

The programme was recorded before an audience at the Queen Elizabeth Hall in London.

Charles Hazlewood examines the background and music to Berlioz's L'enfance du Christ.

Bernstein - Fancy Free20060826

In 1943, Leonard Bernstein was approached by Jerome Robbins, an up-and-coming choreographer, who had an idea for a ballet featuring three sailors on shore leave for 24 hours in wartime Manhattan.

The result was Fancy Free, the ballet that launched Bernstein's composing career.

Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Concert Orchestra delve into the world of this youthful American masterpiece.

Bernstein - Fancy Free20060826

In 1943, Leonard Bernstein was approached by Jerome Robbins, an up-and-coming choreographer, who had an idea for a ballet featuring three sailors on shore leave for 24 hours in wartime Manhattan.

The result was Fancy Free, the ballet that launched Bernstein's composing career.

Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Concert Orchestra delve into the world of this youthful American masterpiece.

Bernstein Chichester Psalms20061118

Charles Hazlewood explores Leonard Bernstein's 1964 commission by the cathedrals of Chichester and Salisbury, for a piece set from the Book of Psalms.

Chichester Psalms is the work in which Bernstein rediscovered tonality after a brief foray into serialism.

Countertenor William Towers, BBC National Orchestra of Wales and Chamber Choir of the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama assist Hazlewood in his exploration of this serene masterpiece.

Bernstein Chichester Psalms20061118

Charles Hazlewood explores Leonard Bernstein's 1964 commission by the cathedrals of Chichester and Salisbury, for a piece set from the Book of Psalms.

Chichester Psalms is the work in which Bernstein rediscovered tonality after a brief foray into serialism.

Countertenor William Towers, BBC National Orchestra of Wales and Chamber Choir of the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama assist Hazlewood in his exploration of this serene masterpiece.

Bernstein Season - Serenade After Plato's Symposium (1954)20050528

Leonard Bernstein's five movement concerto for violin, strings and percussion is one of his most personal compositions.

It was inspired by Plato's Symposium, a discourse on love in all its aspects, and was presented in the form of a series of statements by celebrated guests at a banquet.

In this workshop session Charles Hazlewood explores the relationship between Bernstein's music and the source of his inspiration.

Antje Weithaas (violin)

BBC Concert Orchestra

Charles Hazlewood (conductor).

Bernstein Season - Serenade After Plato's Symposium (1954)20050528

Leonard Bernstein's five movement concerto for violin, strings and percussion is one of his most personal compositions.

It was inspired by Plato's Symposium, a discourse on love in all its aspects, and was presented in the form of a series of statements by celebrated guests at a banquet.

In this workshop session Charles Hazlewood explores the relationship between Bernstein's music and the source of his inspiration.

Antje Weithaas (violin)

BBC Concert Orchestra

Charles Hazlewood (conductor).

Bizet's Symphony in C20130515

Bizet's "Symphony in C" has a fascinating history. Written when Bizet was studying at the Paris Conservatoire, probably as a student assignment, it seems he made no effort to have the work published during his lifetime. Rediscovered in the 1930s, it was premiered 80 years after it had been written and since then has remained a popular addition to the symphonic repertoire. Stephen Johnson unpicks this youthful work, which reveals the influence of Bizet's teacher, Charles Gounod and the techniques and colourful orchestration that Bizet would employ in his later compositions.

Bizet's Symphony In C20130515

Bizet's "Symphony in C" has a fascinating history. Written when Bizet was studying at the Paris Conservatoire, probably as a student assignment, it seems he made no effort to have the work published during his lifetime. Rediscovered in the 1930s, it was premiered 80 years after it had been written and since then has remained a popular addition to the symphonic repertoire. Stephen Johnson unpicks this youthful work, which reveals the influence of Bizet's teacher, Charles Gounod and the techniques and colourful orchestration that Bizet would employ in his later compositions.

Borodin - Symphony No 220080914

Stephen Johnson is joined by conductor Andre de Ridder and the BBC Philharmonic to explore some of the many musical ideas that inspired Alexander Borodin's Second Symphony, a work composed by a professional Russian chemist who put pen to paper whenever he felt he had time to spare.

Borodin - Symphony No 220080914

Stephen Johnson is joined by conductor Andre de Ridder and the BBC Philharmonic to explore some of the many musical ideas that inspired Alexander Borodin's Second Symphony, a work composed by a professional Russian chemist who put pen to paper whenever he felt he had time to spare.

Brahms And Berg Piano Sonatas20130924

Stephen Johnson looks at two startling "Opus Ones", featured in the second half of tonight's concert, from composers who despite their youth were already masters of their art. Stephen compares the first published works of Brahms and Berg, and examines how each re-imagined the classical idea of a 'piano sonata'.

Brahms and Berg Piano Sonatas20130924

Stephen Johnson looks at two startling "Opus Ones", featured in the second half of tonight's concert, from composers who despite their youth were already masters of their art. Stephen compares the first published works of Brahms and Berg, and examines how each re-imagined the classical idea of a 'piano sonata'.

Brahms String Quartet In B Flat, Op 67
Brahms String Quartet In B Flat, Op 67

Brahms String Quartet in B Flat, Op 6720091108
Brahms String Quartet In B Flat, Op 6720091108

In a programme coming from the University of Cumbria in Ambleside as part of the Lake Disctrict Summer Music Festival 2009, Stephen Johnson explores Brahms's third and final string quartet in B flat, Op 67, written in 1876 soon after he completed his First Symphony.

Brahms's previous quartets, Op 51 Nos 1 and 2, suggest a more classical model and have more of his symphonic drama, but a striking element of the writing in Op 67 is its more conversational or dialogue style.

Stephen is joined by the Kuss Quartet, who illustrate with excerpts and give a complete performance of the quartet.

Stephen Johnson explores Brahms's String Quartet No 3 in B flat, Op 67.

Brahms String Quartet In B Flat, Op 67 *20091108

In a programme coming from the University of Cumbria in Ambleside as part of the Lake Disctrict Summer Music Festival 2009, Stephen Johnson explores Brahms's third and final string quartet in B flat, Op 67, written in 1876 soon after he completed his First Symphony.

Brahms's previous quartets, Op 51 Nos 1 and 2, suggest a more classical model and have more of his symphonic drama, but a striking element of the writing in Op 67 is its more conversational or dialogue style.

Stephen is joined by the Kuss Quartet, who illustrate with excerpts and give a complete performance of the quartet.

Stephen Johnson explores Brahms's String Quartet No 3 in B flat, Op 67.

Brahms Symphony No 32007091620081026

Stephen Johnson explores the workings of Brahms's 'free but happy' Third Symphony with the BBC Symphony Orchestra conducted by Douglas Boyd.

Brahms Symphony No 32007091620081026

Stephen Johnson explores the workings of Brahms's 'free but happy' Third Symphony with the BBC Symphony Orchestra conducted by Douglas Boyd.

Brahms: Symphony No 120080803

Following BBC Philharmonic chief conductor Gianandrea Noseda's recent peformance of a complete cycle of the Brahms symphonies, Stephen Johnson takes the opportunity to explore the workings of Brahms' watershed First Symphony from the conductor's perspective.

Brahms: Symphony No 1 *20080803

Following BBC Philharmonic chief conductor Gianandrea Noseda's recent peformance of a complete cycle of the Brahms symphonies, Stephen Johnson takes the opportunity to explore the workings of Brahms' watershed First Symphony from the conductor's perspective.

Brahms: Symphony No 220090517
Brahms: Symphony No 220090517

Stephen Johnson explores Brahms' Second Symphony, with excerpts and a complete performance from the BBC National Orchestra of Wales, conducted by Theodore Kuchar.

While Brahms's First Symphony took nearly 20 years to complete, his second - in D - was written in only one summer holiday in Portschach, an alpine area by the Wothersee that also inspired Mahler and Berg.

Stephen Johnson explores Brahms' Second Symphony, with a performance by the BBCNOW.

Brahms: Symphony No 2 *20090517

Stephen Johnson explores Brahms' Second Symphony, with excerpts and a complete performance from the BBC National Orchestra of Wales, conducted by Theodore Kuchar.

While Brahms's First Symphony took nearly 20 years to complete, his second - in D - was written in only one summer holiday in Portschach, an alpine area by the Wothersee that also inspired Mahler and Berg.

Stephen Johnson explores Brahms' Second Symphony, with a performance by the BBCNOW.

Brahms: Symphony No 420110612

Stephen Johnson explores Brahms's Fourth Symphony, written in the 2 years following the Third Symphony.

It was Brahms's final work in this genre and is remarkable original; Stephen explores some of the characteristics of the work's opening understated lilting melody, and considers the similarites with one of Brahms's Four Serious Songs, written the year before he died.

The programme includes illustrative extracts, and a complete performance of the work performed by the BBC Symphony Orchestra and its Chief Conductor Jirí Belohlávek.

Stephen Johnson explores Brahms's Symphony No 4, with excerpts and a complete performance.

Brahms: Symphony No 420110612

Stephen Johnson explores Brahms's Fourth Symphony, written in the 2 years following the Third Symphony.

It was Brahms's final work in this genre and is remarkable original; Stephen explores some of the characteristics of the work's opening understated lilting melody, and considers the similarites with one of Brahms's Four Serious Songs, written the year before he died.

The programme includes illustrative extracts, and a complete performance of the work performed by the BBC Symphony Orchestra and its Chief Conductor Jirí Belohlávek.

Stephen Johnson explores Brahms's Symphony No 4, with excerpts and a complete performance.

Stephen Johnson explores Brahms's Fourth Symphony, written in the 2 years following the Third Symphony. It was Brahms's final work in this genre and is remarkable original; Stephen explores some of the characteristics of the work's opening understated lilting melody, and considers the similarites with one of Brahms's Four Serious Songs, written the year before he died. The programme includes illustrative extracts, and a complete performance of the work performed by the BBC Symphony Orchestra and its Chief Conductor Jirí Belohlávek.

Stephen Johnson explores Brahms's Symphony No 4, with excerpts and a complete performance.

Brahms: Variations On A Theme Of Haydn (the St Anthony Choral)2005082720061202

Stephen Johnson joins the BBC Symphony Orchestra and conductor Grant Llewellyn for a look at Brahms' pioneering set of orchestral variations.

Just as Mozart and Beethoven before him had used variation form to demonstrate their skills as performers, so Brahms used the form to show off his skills as a composer.

Brahms: Variations On A Theme Of Haydn (the St Anthony Choral)2005082720061202

Stephen Johnson joins the BBC Symphony Orchestra and conductor Grant Llewellyn for a look at Brahms' pioneering set of orchestral variations.

Just as Mozart and Beethoven before him had used variation form to demonstrate their skills as performers, so Brahms used the form to show off his skills as a composer.

Brahms's First Symphony20120928

Stephen Johnson explores Brahms's Symphony no.1, which took the composer a long time to compose. Brahms had a number of disappointments as an orchestral composer, in particular the reception of his First Piano Concerto. This made him very wary as a symphonist, and he didn't complete his First Symphony until the age of forty-three, despite having begun the work some twenty years earlier. By the time Brahms did feel ready to launch himself onto this purely orchestral scene, it was to a public already used to programmatic works from Wagner and Berlioz. Brahms strove to create his own unique sound, but the critics pounced upon the symphony, in particular the last movement for its Beethovenian echoes.

Brahms's First Symphony20120928

Stephen Johnson explores Brahms's Symphony no.1, which took the composer a long time to compose. Brahms had a number of disappointments as an orchestral composer, in particular the reception of his First Piano Concerto. This made him very wary as a symphonist, and he didn't complete his First Symphony until the age of forty-three, despite having begun the work some twenty years earlier. By the time Brahms did feel ready to launch himself onto this purely orchestral scene, it was to a public already used to programmatic works from Wagner and Berlioz. Brahms strove to create his own unique sound, but the critics pounced upon the symphony, in particular the last movement for its Beethovenian echoes.

Brahms's German Requiem20120216

Brahms' German Requiem is often presumed to be a nationalistic, Teutonic celebration. Yet this couldn't have been further from the truth. "I confess, I should have gladly left out 'German' and substituted 'Human'", the composer once wrote.

Stephen Johnson explores the work's influences - from Bach's cantatas to the tragic death of Brahms' mentor, Robert Schumann - and looks at the universal appeal of this very 'humane' requiem.

Stephen Johnson explores the influences behind Brahms's German Requiem.

Brahms's German Requiem20120216

Brahms' German Requiem is often presumed to be a nationalistic, Teutonic celebration. Yet this couldn't have been further from the truth. "I confess, I should have gladly left out 'German' and substituted 'Human'", the composer once wrote.

Stephen Johnson explores the work's influences - from Bach's cantatas to the tragic death of Brahms' mentor, Robert Schumann - and looks at the universal appeal of this very 'humane' requiem.

Stephen Johnson explores the influences behind Brahms's German Requiem.

Brahms' German Requiem is often presumed to be a nationalistic, Teutonic celebration. Yet this couldn't have been further from the truth. "I confess, I should have gladly left out 'German' and substituted 'Human'", the composer once wrote.

Stephen Johnson explores the work's influences - from Bach's cantatas to the tragic death of Brahms' mentor, Robert Schumann - and looks at the universal appeal of this very 'humane' requiem.

Stephen Johnson explores the influences behind Brahms's German Requiem.

Brahms's Violin Concerto20100829

Stephen Johnson explores the Violin Concerto by Brahms, one of the most challenging works in the repertoire.

Brahms was clearly inspired by his great friend and violin virtuoso Joseph Joachim, and Brahms sought his advice while he composed this concerto.

Stephen Johnson is joined by the violinist Matthew Trusler, with the BBC Symphony Orchestra conducted by Grant Llewellyn, who illustrate with musical extracts, and the programme concludes with a complete performance of the work.

Stephen Johnson explores Brahms's challenging Violin Concerto.

Brahms's Violin Concerto20100829

Stephen Johnson explores the Violin Concerto by Brahms, one of the most challenging works in the repertoire.

Brahms was clearly inspired by his great friend and violin virtuoso Joseph Joachim, and Brahms sought his advice while he composed this concerto.

Stephen Johnson is joined by the violinist Matthew Trusler, with the BBC Symphony Orchestra conducted by Grant Llewellyn, who illustrate with musical extracts, and the programme concludes with a complete performance of the work.

Stephen Johnson explores Brahms's challenging Violin Concerto.

Stephen Johnson explores the Violin Concerto by Brahms, one of the most challenging works in the repertoire. Brahms was clearly inspired by his great friend and violin virtuoso Joseph Joachim, and Brahms sought his advice while he composed this concerto. Stephen Johnson is joined by the violinist Matthew Trusler, with the BBC Symphony Orchestra conducted by Grant Llewellyn, who illustrate with musical extracts, and the programme concludes with a complete performance of the work.

Stephen Johnson explores Brahms's challenging Violin Concerto.

Brandenburg Concertos - 120110227

In the first of two programmes, Sara Mohr-Pietsch joins Richard Egarr and the Academy of Ancient Music to unpick some of the musical ideas in Bach's Brandenburg Concertos.

Today, Richard and Sara in conversation, focus on concertos numbers 1, 3 and 6, with examples performed by members of the Academy of Ancient Music, and look at how Bach sought to encompass many musical worlds in the celebrated collection of baroque masterpieces.

Sara and Richard refer to the set as Bach's "calling card" - a demonstration of what Bach could achieve as a composer in the modern concerto form.

The works are generally regarded to be some of the greatest instrumental music of the 18th century.

The man he was trying to impress was Christian Ludwig, the Margrave of Brandenburg.

Richard Egarr draws attention to many of the symbolic references in these three concertos, and how these chime in with many of the ideas and occupations of Bach's age.

In the First Concerto we have music inspired by the great outdoors and the hunt.

In the Third Concerto Bach seems to make use of numbers and numerology as allegories of religion and faith.

The Sixth Concerto, in which Bach masterfully combines the old with the new; can be interpreted as an allegory of love.

The programmes were recorded before an audience in the Turner Sims Concert Hall of Southampton University, and feature complete performances as well the workshop.

Sara Mohr-Pietsch and Richard Egarr explore Bach's Brandenburg Concertos Nos 1, 3 and 6.

Brandenburg Concertos - 120110227

In the first of two programmes, Sara Mohr-Pietsch joins Richard Egarr and the Academy of Ancient Music to unpick some of the musical ideas in Bach's Brandenburg Concertos.

Today, Richard and Sara in conversation, focus on concertos numbers 1, 3 and 6, with examples performed by members of the Academy of Ancient Music, and look at how Bach sought to encompass many musical worlds in the celebrated collection of baroque masterpieces.

Sara and Richard refer to the set as Bach's "calling card" - a demonstration of what Bach could achieve as a composer in the modern concerto form.

The works are generally regarded to be some of the greatest instrumental music of the 18th century.

The man he was trying to impress was Christian Ludwig, the Margrave of Brandenburg.

Richard Egarr draws attention to many of the symbolic references in these three concertos, and how these chime in with many of the ideas and occupations of Bach's age.

In the First Concerto we have music inspired by the great outdoors and the hunt.

In the Third Concerto Bach seems to make use of numbers and numerology as allegories of religion and faith.

The Sixth Concerto, in which Bach masterfully combines the old with the new; can be interpreted as an allegory of love.

The programmes were recorded before an audience in the Turner Sims Concert Hall of Southampton University, and feature complete performances as well the workshop.

Sara Mohr-Pietsch and Richard Egarr explore Bach's Brandenburg Concertos Nos 1, 3 and 6.

Brandenburg Concertos - 2 Last20110306

In the second of two programmes, Sara Mohr-Pietsch joins Richard Egarr and the Academy of Ancient Music to unpick some of the musical ideas in Bach's Brandenburg Concertos.

Today, Richard and Sara in conversation, focus on concertos numbers 2, 3 and 5, with examples performed by members of the Academy of Ancient Music, and look at how through the whole set Bach is exploring and developing the musical possibilities of the concerto form.

These concertos feature a remarkable array of instruments, no two concertos are alike, and to good effect.

Bach's ear for subtle balance and contrast creates a model of instrumental writing of the baroque age.

The programmes were recorded before an audience, in the Turner Sims Concert Hall of Southampton University, and feature complete performances as well as the workshop.

Sara Mohr-Pietsch and Richard Egarr explore Bach's Brandenburg Concertos Nos 2, 3 and 5.

Brandenburg Concertos - 2 Last20110306

In the second of two programmes, Sara Mohr-Pietsch joins Richard Egarr and the Academy of Ancient Music to unpick some of the musical ideas in Bach's Brandenburg Concertos.

Today, Richard and Sara in conversation, focus on concertos numbers 2, 3 and 5, with examples performed by members of the Academy of Ancient Music, and look at how through the whole set Bach is exploring and developing the musical possibilities of the concerto form.

These concertos feature a remarkable array of instruments, no two concertos are alike, and to good effect.

Bach's ear for subtle balance and contrast creates a model of instrumental writing of the baroque age.

The programmes were recorded before an audience, in the Turner Sims Concert Hall of Southampton University, and feature complete performances as well as the workshop.

Sara Mohr-Pietsch and Richard Egarr explore Bach's Brandenburg Concertos Nos 2, 3 and 5.

Brett Dean20110410

Sara Mohr-Pietsch explores the music of Australian born composer Brett Dean in the company of the man himself, and with soprano Claire Booth and members of BCMG.

Brett Dean has quickly established himself as one Australia's foremost musicians and composers.

His most recent opera, "Bliss", with a libretto by Amanda Holden inspired by a story by Australian writer Peter Carey, will be broadcast on Radio 3 next weekend.

As a prelude to that Sara Mohr-Pietsch joins the composer before an invited audience, and with the soprano Claire Booth and members of Birmingham Contemporary Music Group (BCMG) for an exploration of the composers work.

The programme focuses on two pieces: "Recollections" for ensemble, and "Wolf-Leider" inspired by the life and songs of the great 19th Century romantic Hugo Wolf.

The programme was recorded at last year's Cheltenham Festival where Brett Dean was a featured composer.

Sara Mohr-Pietsch explores the music of Brett Dean in the company of the composer.

Brett Dean20110410

Sara Mohr-Pietsch explores the music of Australian born composer Brett Dean in the company of the man himself, and with soprano Claire Booth and members of BCMG.

Brett Dean has quickly established himself as one Australia's foremost musicians and composers.

His most recent opera, "Bliss", with a libretto by Amanda Holden inspired by a story by Australian writer Peter Carey, will be broadcast on Radio 3 next weekend.

As a prelude to that Sara Mohr-Pietsch joins the composer before an invited audience, and with the soprano Claire Booth and members of Birmingham Contemporary Music Group (BCMG) for an exploration of the composers work.

The programme focuses on two pieces: "Recollections" for ensemble, and "Wolf-Leider" inspired by the life and songs of the great 19th Century romantic Hugo Wolf.

The programme was recorded at last year's Cheltenham Festival where Brett Dean was a featured composer.

Sara Mohr-Pietsch explores the music of Brett Dean in the company of the composer.

Sara Mohr-Pietsch explores the music of Australian born composer Brett Dean in the company of the man himself, and with soprano Claire Booth and members of BCMG.

Brett Dean has quickly established himself as one Australia's foremost musicians and composers. His most recent opera, "Bliss", with a libretto by Amanda Holden inspired by a story by Australian writer Peter Carey, will be broadcast on Radio 3 next weekend.

As a prelude to that Sara Mohr-Pietsch joins the composer before an invited audience, and with the soprano Claire Booth and members of Birmingham Contemporary Music Group (BCMG) for an exploration of the composers work. The programme focuses on two pieces: "Recollections" for ensemble, and "Wolf-Leider" inspired by the life and songs of the great 19th Century romantic Hugo Wolf.

The programme was recorded at last year's Cheltenham Festival where Brett Dean was a featured composer.

Sara Mohr-Pietsch explores the music of Brett Dean in the company of the composer.

Britten - Sea Interludes And Passacaglia20070422

Charles Hazlewood conducts the BBC Concert Orchestra in an exploration of the Four Sea Interludes and Passacaglia that Benjamin Britten extracted from his opera Peter Grimes

Britten - Les Illuminations20060506

Tenor Daniel Norman joins Charles Hazlewood and the strings of the BBC Philharmonic to explore the music meaning of Britten's youthful settings of Rimbaud's poetry.

Britten - Les Illuminations20060506

Tenor Daniel Norman joins Charles Hazlewood and the strings of the BBC Philharmonic to explore the music meaning of Britten's youthful settings of Rimbaud's poetry.

Britten - Sea Interludes And Passacaglia20070422

Charles Hazlewood conducts the BBC Concert Orchestra in an exploration of the Four Sea Interludes and Passacaglia that Benjamin Britten extracted from his opera Peter Grimes

Britten Cello Symphony

Britten Cello Symphony20091018

Stephen Johnson visits Glasgow for an exploration of Benjamin Britten's Cello Symphony, and presents a complete performance of the work by the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Takuo Yuasa with soloist Tim Hugh.

Written in 1963 for the great Russian cellist Mstislav Rostropovich, who gave the premiere a year later, with the Moscow Philharmonic conducted by the composer, the piece is full of very dark colours.

It uses the bass sonorities of the orchestral texture, like low strings, bassoons, tuba and bass drum, allowing the cello's tenor register to sing out of the mire.

It has a four-movement symphonic structure, with the last two linked by a solo cello cadenza, which, Stephen argues, makes the piece more of a symphony than a cello concerto, as the composer suggests in the work's title.

Stephen Johnson joins the BBC SSO to explore the intricacies in Britten's Cello Symphony.

Britten Cello Symphony20091018

Stephen Johnson visits Glasgow for an exploration of Benjamin Britten's Cello Symphony, and presents a complete performance of the work by the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Takuo Yuasa with soloist Tim Hugh.

Written in 1963 for the great Russian cellist Mstislav Rostropovich, who gave the premiere a year later, with the Moscow Philharmonic conducted by the composer, the piece is full of very dark colours.

It uses the bass sonorities of the orchestral texture, like low strings, bassoons, tuba and bass drum, allowing the cello's tenor register to sing out of the mire.

It has a four-movement symphonic structure, with the last two linked by a solo cello cadenza, which, Stephen argues, makes the piece more of a symphony than a cello concerto, as the composer suggests in the work's title.

Stephen Johnson joins the BBC SSO to explore the intricacies in Britten's Cello Symphony.

Britten: Saint Nicolas20111219

Stephen Johnson reveals the inner workings of Britten's first major work for children's chorus, his cantata Saint Nicolas.

Premiered at the first ever Aldeburgh Festival, the work drew on the skills of both amateur and professional performers.

Stephen Johnson explores how their spirit permeated the work, typifying Britten's personal passion to make his music accessible and meaningful to everyone.

Stephen Johnson explores Britten's work for children's chorus, his cantata Saint Nicolas.

Britten: Saint Nicolas20111219

Stephen Johnson reveals the inner workings of Britten's first major work for children's chorus, his cantata Saint Nicolas.

Premiered at the first ever Aldeburgh Festival, the work drew on the skills of both amateur and professional performers.

Stephen Johnson explores how their spirit permeated the work, typifying Britten's personal passion to make his music accessible and meaningful to everyone.

Stephen Johnson explores Britten's work for children's chorus, his cantata Saint Nicolas.

Stephen Johnson reveals the inner workings of Britten's first major work for children's chorus, his cantata Saint Nicolas.

Premiered at the first ever Aldeburgh Festival, the work drew on the skills of both amateur and professional performers. Stephen Johnson explores how their spirit permeated the work, typifying Britten's personal passion to make his music accessible and meaningful to everyone.

Stephen Johnson explores Britten's work for children's chorus, his cantata Saint Nicolas.

Britten's Sinfonia Da Requiem20040131

The Sinfonia da Requiem (1940) by Benjamin Britten was the outcome of a commission from the Japanese Government, but was rejected by them on account of its CHRISTIAN subject matter.

The music is both highly dramatic and personal, being a tribute to the memory of the composer's parents.

In this audience workshop session, Charles Hazlewood explores the sources of Britten's inspiration, both personal and musical, and conducts the BBC Symphony Orchestra in a complete performance of what is one of the most personal and controversial British symphonies of the last century.

Britten's Sinfonia Da Requiem20040131

The Sinfonia da Requiem (1940) by Benjamin Britten was the outcome of a commission from the Japanese Government, but was rejected by them on account of its CHRISTIAN subject matter.

The music is both highly dramatic and personal, being a tribute to the memory of the composer's parents.

In this audience workshop session, Charles Hazlewood explores the sources of Britten's inspiration, both personal and musical, and conducts the BBC Symphony Orchestra in a complete performance of what is one of the most personal and controversial British symphonies of the last century.

Britten's Sinfonia da Requiem20130418

Written in 1940, the "Sinfonia da Requiem" was commissioned by the government of Japan, who asked Britten to create a work celebrating the 2600th anniversary of the ruling dynasty. For his part, looking ahead in some ways to the Requiem he would write some years later, Britten, who was a dedicated pacifist, produced a kind of musical plea for peace, which uses part of the Catholic liturgy as movement headings. The overall tone of the score and its links with Christianity resulted in the Japanese commissioners feeling that the composer had rather misunderstood their wishes. Instead, the piece was first performed in America, with a personal dedication to the memory of Britten's parents.

Britten's Sinfonia Da Requiem20130418

Written in 1940, the "Sinfonia da Requiem" was commissioned by the government of Japan, who asked Britten to create a work celebrating the 2600th anniversary of the ruling dynasty. For his part, looking ahead in some ways to the Requiem he would write some years later, Britten, who was a dedicated pacifist, produced a kind of musical plea for peace, which uses part of the Catholic liturgy as movement headings. The overall tone of the score and its links with Christianity resulted in the Japanese commissioners feeling that the composer had rather misunderstood their wishes. Instead, the piece was first performed in America, with a personal dedication to the memory of Britten's parents.

Britten's Spring Symphony20130125

It's the work which polarises opinion more than anything else he wrote. For some, Benjamin Britten's 'Spring Symphony' is a deeply touching and human reflection on the emergence from winter, the epitome of Britten's talents as an anthologiser of literary sources, the works of Spenser, Clare, Peele and Auden. But does it cross a line into the realms of naivety, and can its architectural design stand up to the weight of its building blocks? Stephen Johnson takes the work apart to find out.

Britten's Spring Symphony20130125

It's the work which polarises opinion more than anything else he wrote. For some, Benjamin Britten's 'Spring Symphony' is a deeply touching and human reflection on the emergence from winter, the epitome of Britten's talents as an anthologiser of literary sources, the works of Spenser, Clare, Peele and Auden. But does it cross a line into the realms of naivety, and can its architectural design stand up to the weight of its building blocks? Stephen Johnson takes the work apart to find out.

Britten's Variations On A Theme Of Frank Bridge20070923

Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Concert Orchestra examine Britten's Variations on a Theme of Frank Bridge alongside Bridge's own Three Idylls.

Britten's Variations On A Theme Of Frank Bridge20070923

Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Concert Orchestra examine Britten's Variations on a Theme of Frank Bridge alongside Bridge's own Three Idylls.

Bruch - Violin Concerto No 120060429

Stephen Johnson joins the BBC Symphony Orchestra conducted by Edward Gardner and Radio 3 New Generation Artist Alina Ibragimova in front of an invited audience for an exploration into the workings of one of Max Bruch's most inspired compositions.

Bruch - Violin Concerto No 120060429

Stephen Johnson joins the BBC Symphony Orchestra conducted by Edward Gardner and Radio 3 New Generation Artist Alina Ibragimova in front of an invited audience for an exploration into the workings of one of Max Bruch's most inspired compositions.

Bruckner: Symphony No 220130314

Stephen Johnson explores Bruckner's Symphony no. 2 in C minor.

Bruckner: Symphony No 220130314

Stephen Johnson explores Bruckner's Symphony no. 2 in C minor.

Bruckner: Symphony No 920121116

Stephen Johnson explores Bruckner's Symphony No 9.

Bruckner: Symphony No 920121116

Stephen Johnson explores Bruckner's Symphony No 9.

Bruckner's Sixth Symphony20110206

Stephen Johnson examines the workings of Bruckner's enigmatic 6th Symphony with the help of the BBC Philharmonic, conducted by Petri Sakari.

In Stephen Johnson's opinion, Bruckner's 6th Symphony is one of the composer's most original pieces and contains some of his most beautiful and arresting music. It appeared partly as a response to the devastating reviews that Bruckner received following the disastrous first performance of his 3rd Symphony.

Stephen takes Bruckner's symphony apart and compares it with music from the earlier symphony in order to illustrate the novelty and possible meaning of this "Cinderella" work in the composers' symphonic output. The BBC Philharmonic then give a complete performance of the 6th Symphony, recorded in the Royal Concert Hall in Nottingham with conductor Petri Sakari - who has won much acclaim for his interpretation of Bruckner.

In Stephen Johnson's opinion, Bruckner's 6th Symphony is one of the composer's most original pieces and contains some of his most beautiful and arresting music.

It appeared partly as a response to the devastating reviews that Bruckner received following the disastrous first performance of his 3rd Symphony.

Stephen takes Bruckner's symphony apart and compares it with music from the earlier symphony in order to illustrate the novelty and possible meaning of this "Cinderella" work in the composers' symphonic output.

The BBC Philharmonic then give a complete performance of the 6th Symphony, recorded in the Royal Concert Hall in Nottingham with conductor Petri Sakari - who has won much acclaim for his interpretation of Bruckner.

Stephen Johnson examines the workings of Bruckner's enigmatic Sixth Symphony.

Bruckner's Sixth Symphony20110206

Stephen Johnson examines the workings of Bruckner's enigmatic 6th Symphony with the help of the BBC Philharmonic, conducted by Petri Sakari.

In Stephen Johnson's opinion, Bruckner's 6th Symphony is one of the composer's most original pieces and contains some of his most beautiful and arresting music.

It appeared partly as a response to the devastating reviews that Bruckner received following the disastrous first performance of his 3rd Symphony.

Stephen takes Bruckner's symphony apart and compares it with music from the earlier symphony in order to illustrate the novelty and possible meaning of this "Cinderella" work in the composers' symphonic output.

The BBC Philharmonic then give a complete performance of the 6th Symphony, recorded in the Royal Concert Hall in Nottingham with conductor Petri Sakari - who has won much acclaim for his interpretation of Bruckner.

Stephen Johnson examines the workings of Bruckner's enigmatic Sixth Symphony.

Stephen Johnson examines the workings of Bruckner's enigmatic 6th Symphony with the help of the BBC Philharmonic, conducted by Petri Sakari.

In Stephen Johnson's opinion, Bruckner's 6th Symphony is one of the composer's most original pieces and contains some of his most beautiful and arresting music. It appeared partly as a response to the devastating reviews that Bruckner received following the disastrous first performance of his 3rd Symphony.

Stephen takes Bruckner's symphony apart and compares it with music from the earlier symphony in order to illustrate the novelty and possible meaning of this "Cinderella" work in the composers' symphonic output. The BBC Philharmonic then give a complete performance of the 6th Symphony, recorded in the Royal Concert Hall in Nottingham with conductor Petri Sakari - who has won much acclaim for his interpretation of Bruckner.

Stephen Johnson examines the workings of Bruckner's enigmatic 6th Symphony with the help of the BBC Philharmonic, conducted by Petri Sakari.

In Stephen Johnson's opinion, Bruckner's 6th Symphony is one of the composer's most original pieces and contains some of his most beautiful and arresting music. It appeared partly as a response to the devastating reviews that Bruckner received following the disastrous first performance of his 3rd Symphony.

Stephen takes Bruckner's symphony apart and compares it with music from the earlier symphony in order to illustrate the novelty and possible meaning of this "Cinderella" work in the composers' symphonic output. The BBC Philharmonic then give a complete performance of the 6th Symphony, recorded in the Royal Concert Hall in Nottingham with conductor Petri Sakari - who has won much acclaim for his interpretation of Bruckner.

Stephen Johnson examines the workings of Bruckner's enigmatic Sixth Symphony.

Bruckner's Symphony No 420111012

Bruckner was an abundance of contradictions: full of naivety but fascinated by politics, a writer with conviction but plagued by self-doubt, an eternal student with a passion for teaching, a lover of improvisation fascinated by the strictest musical forms.

Stephen Johnson explores how all of this fed into his 4th Symphony, and uncovers why the composer might have decided to break from his usual habit and give it a published nickname: 'Romantic'.

Bruckner's Symphony No 420111012

Bruckner was an abundance of contradictions: full of naivety but fascinated by politics, a writer with conviction but plagued by self-doubt, an eternal student with a passion for teaching, a lover of improvisation fascinated by the strictest musical forms.

Stephen Johnson explores how all of this fed into his 4th Symphony, and uncovers why the composer might have decided to break from his usual habit and give it a published nickname: 'Romantic'.

Bruckner was an abundance of contradictions: full of naivety but fascinated by politics, a writer with conviction but plagued by self-doubt, an eternal student with a passion for teaching, a lover of improvisation fascinated by the strictest musical forms. Stephen Johnson explores how all of this fed into his 4th Symphony, and uncovers why the composer might have decided to break from his usual habit and give it a published nickname: 'Romantic'.

Stephen Johnson explores Bruckner's Symphony No 4.

Charles Ives20090125
Charles Ives *20090125

American conductor David Robertson joins the BBCSO for an exploration of the music of one of his nation's most innovative composers, Charles Ives.

He considers the imaginative way Ives evokes a sense of place - in particular his homeland around Boston - and what some of the wider implications of this might be.

He focuses on three Ives masterpieces: Central Park in the Dark, The Unanswered Question and Three Places in New England.

There is also a feature about a complementary project created by amateur musicians in London based on some of Ives's musical ideas.

Conductor David Robertson explores ideas of place in the music of Charles Ives.

Chinese Myths20040306

Stephen Johnson presents a special programme exploring aspects of Chinese music and discusses the themes and ideas behind Chen Yi's Chinese Myths Cantata, which fuses Eastern and Western musical traditions.

You can hear a performance of the complete cantata in Thursday's Performance on 3.

Chinese Myths20040306

Stephen Johnson presents a special programme exploring aspects of Chinese music and discusses the themes and ideas behind Chen Yi's Chinese Myths Cantata, which fuses Eastern and Western musical traditions.

You can hear a performance of the complete cantata in Thursday's Performance on 3.

Chopin Preludes

Chopin Preludes20100321

Stephen Johnson with pianists Llyr Williams and Benjamin Frith, examine the history and musical ideas behind Chopin's cycle of Preludes.

Chopin composed his celebrated set of Preludes Opus 28, while staying in Majorca with his lover, the novelist George Sand.

One of his inspirations for the set was the keyboard music of JS Bach, especially Bach's celebrated cycle of Preludes and Fugues - the 48".

In this programme Stephen Johnson examines the ideas behind Chopin's Preludes.

Unlike Bach's prices, these are not a prelude to anything in particular, so what did Chopin mean by the title? Did the composer intend the cycle for performance or are they didactic pieces, intended to explore different aspects of pianisim? Should the cycle be regarded as one whole or treated as an anthology? Stephen is assisted in his exploration by the pianist Lyr Williams, who also performs the Preludes.

The programme was recorded before an audience at the Turner Sims Concert Hall in Southampton.

In addition to the Opus 28 Preludes, Stephen Johnson also examines the three other pieces for piano which Chopin called Prelude.

With the pianist Benjamin Frith, he takes apart the Prelude in C sharp minor Op45.

A work that is sometimes called the 25th Prelude.Through meticulous examination of the piece, Stephen offers an insight into Chopin's compositional world, examining his romantic style; his harmonic and melodic invention; and his imaginative exploitation of musical form.

Stephen Johnson, with pianists Llyr Williams and Benjamin Frith, on Chopin's Preludes."

Chopin Preludes20100321

Stephen Johnson with pianists Llyr Williams and Benjamin Frith, examine the history and musical ideas behind Chopin's cycle of Preludes.

Chopin composed his celebrated set of Preludes Opus 28, while staying in Majorca with his lover, the novelist George Sand.

One of his inspirations for the set was the keyboard music of JS Bach, especially Bach's celebrated cycle of Preludes and Fugues - the 48".

In this programme Stephen Johnson examines the ideas behind Chopin's Preludes.

Unlike Bach's prices, these are not a prelude to anything in particular, so what did Chopin mean by the title? Did the composer intend the cycle for performance or are they didactic pieces, intended to explore different aspects of pianisim? Should the cycle be regarded as one whole or treated as an anthology? Stephen is assisted in his exploration by the pianist Lyr Williams, who also performs the Preludes.

The programme was recorded before an audience at the Turner Sims Concert Hall in Southampton.

In addition to the Opus 28 Preludes, Stephen Johnson also examines the three other pieces for piano which Chopin called Prelude.

With the pianist Benjamin Frith, he takes apart the Prelude in C sharp minor Op45.

A work that is sometimes called the 25th Prelude.Through meticulous examination of the piece, Stephen offers an insight into Chopin's compositional world, examining his romantic style; his harmonic and melodic invention; and his imaginative exploitation of musical form.

Stephen Johnson, with pianists Llyr Williams and Benjamin Frith, on Chopin's Preludes."

Chopin's Mazurkas

Chopin's Mazurkas20101017

Chopin's Mazurkas20101017

As part of the 2010 Birmingham International Piano Academy, Stephen Johnson is joined by pianist Ashley Wass at the Birmingham Conservatoire to explore the intricacies and folk-music elements in Chopin's Mazurkas and Polonaises.

It's widely thought that Chopin's first ever composition was a Polonaise (which he wrote at the age of seven) and his last, fittingly, was a Mazurka.

His 58 Mazurkas and 25 Polonaises, based on traditional Polish folk-dances, signalled new ideas of musical nationalism which influenced and inspired other composers to support their national music.

Stephen Johnson on the intricacies and folk elements in Chopin's mazurkas and polonaises.

Chopin's Mazurkas20101017

As part of the 2010 Birmingham International Piano Academy, Stephen Johnson is joined by pianist Ashley Wass at the Birmingham Conservatoire to explore the intricacies and folk-music elements in Chopin's Mazurkas and Polonaises.

It's widely thought that Chopin's first ever composition was a Polonaise (which he wrote at the age of seven) and his last, fittingly, was a Mazurka.

His 58 Mazurkas and 25 Polonaises, based on traditional Polish folk-dances, signalled new ideas of musical nationalism which influenced and inspired other composers to support their national music.

Stephen Johnson on the intricacies and folk elements in Chopin's mazurkas and polonaises.

As part of the 2010 Birmingham International Piano Academy, Stephen Johnson is joined by pianist Ashley Wass at the Birmingham Conservatoire to explore the intricacies and folk-music elements in Chopin's Mazurkas and Polonaises. It's widely thought that Chopin's first ever composition was a Polonaise (which he wrote at the age of seven) and his last, fittingly, was a Mazurka. His 58 Mazurkas and 25 Polonaises, based on traditional Polish folk-dances, signalled new ideas of musical nationalism which influenced and inspired other composers to support their national music.

Stephen Johnson on the intricacies and folk elements in Chopin's mazurkas and polonaises.

Chopin's Piano Concerto No 1 In E Minor20070429

Stephen Johnson joins pianist Piers Lane and members of BBC National Orchestra of Wales conducted by Kenneth Woods for an investigation into a distinct genre of concerto.

Chopin's Piano Concerto No 1 In E Minor20070429

Stephen Johnson joins pianist Piers Lane and members of BBC National Orchestra of Wales conducted by Kenneth Woods for an investigation into a distinct genre of concerto.

Chopin's Piano Preludes Opus 2820050305

Stephen Johnson and the Radio 3 New Generation artist Llyr Williams appear before an audience in the Turner Simms Concert Hall in Southampton for an exploration of Chopin's celebrated cycle of Opus 28 Preludes for the piano.

Chopin's Piano Preludes Opus 2820050305

Stephen Johnson and the Radio 3 New Generation artist Llyr Williams appear before an audience in the Turner Simms Concert Hall in Southampton for an exploration of Chopin's celebrated cycle of Opus 28 Preludes for the piano.

Composing For The Silver Screen

Composing for the Silver Screen20100516
Composing For The Silver Screen2006022520100516

Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Concert Orchestra are joined by film composer Debbie Wiseman to uncover what's involved in composing music for movies.

Featured music used includes extracts from Debbie's own score for Wilde.

Plus some iconic film moments where music carries the drama - the opening scene of On the Waterfront, with music by Leonard Bernstein; the Shower scene from Psycho, with music by Bernard Hermann; and the main theme from Harry Potter, by John Williams.

Composing for the Silver Screen

Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Concert Orchestra are joined by special guest film composer Debbie Wiseman to uncover what's involved in composing music for films The music used includes extracts from Debbie's own score for Wilde plus some iconic film moments where music carries the drama: the opening scene of On the Waterfront, with music by Leonard Bernstein, the Shower scene from Psycho, with music by Bernard Hermann and the main theme from Harry Potter by John Williams.

This is a programme designed to complement A level study.

(Repeat).

Charles Hazlewood and Debbie Wiseman with the BBC CO on composing for the cinema.

Composing For The Silver Screen2006022520100516

Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Concert Orchestra are joined by film composer Debbie Wiseman to uncover what's involved in composing music for movies.

Featured music used includes extracts from Debbie's own score for Wilde.

Plus some iconic film moments where music carries the drama - the opening scene of On the Waterfront, with music by Leonard Bernstein; the Shower scene from Psycho, with music by Bernard Hermann; and the main theme from Harry Potter, by John Williams.

Composing for the Silver Screen

Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Concert Orchestra are joined by special guest film composer Debbie Wiseman to uncover what's involved in composing music for films The music used includes extracts from Debbie's own score for Wilde plus some iconic film moments where music carries the drama: the opening scene of On the Waterfront, with music by Leonard Bernstein, the Shower scene from Psycho, with music by Bernard Hermann and the main theme from Harry Potter by John Williams.

This is a programme designed to complement A level study.

(Repeat).

Charles Hazlewood and Debbie Wiseman with the BBC CO on composing for the cinema.

Copland Clarinet Concerto20061014

David Owen Norris explores Aaron Copland's jazz-infused piece with celebrated American clarinettist Richard Stoltzman.

David Lockington conducts the Northern Sinfonia at the Sage Gateshead.

Copland Clarinet Concerto20061014

David Owen Norris explores Aaron Copland's jazz-infused piece with celebrated American clarinettist Richard Stoltzman.

David Lockington conducts the Northern Sinfonia at the Sage Gateshead.

Corelli's Opus 6 Concertos20101226

Stephen Johnson unpicks the ideas and background behind Corelli's ground breaking set of Opus 6 Violin Concertos which includes the celebrated "Christmas Concerto".

He joins the members of the European Union Baroque Orchestra directed from the violin by Enrico Onofri, and violinist Margaret Faultless, for a look at how some of the artistic innovations of late 17th Century Rome, focused the mind of a young violin virtuoso, Arcangelo Corelli, and prompted him to create what became the foundation of the influential and ubiquitous late baroque concerto.

Stephen fosues on three concertos from the Opus 6 set of 12: Numbers 4, 8 and 12, which includes the famous Christmas Concerto.

The programme was recorded as part of the 2010 Lufthansa Festival of Baroque Music.

Stephen Johnson unpicks the ideas behind Corelli's famous set of Opus 6 Concertos.

Corelli's Opus 6 Concertos20101226

Stephen Johnson unpicks the ideas and background behind Corelli's ground breaking set of Opus 6 Violin Concertos which includes the celebrated "Christmas Concerto".

He joins the members of the European Union Baroque Orchestra directed from the violin by Enrico Onofri, and violinist Margaret Faultless, for a look at how some of the artistic innovations of late 17th Century Rome, focused the mind of a young violin virtuoso, Arcangelo Corelli, and prompted him to create what became the foundation of the influential and ubiquitous late baroque concerto.

Stephen fosues on three concertos from the Opus 6 set of 12: Numbers 4, 8 and 12, which includes the famous Christmas Concerto.

The programme was recorded as part of the 2010 Lufthansa Festival of Baroque Music.

Stephen Johnson unpicks the ideas behind Corelli's famous set of Opus 6 Concertos.

Stephen Johnson unpicks the ideas and background behind Corelli's ground breaking set of Opus 6 Violin Concertos which includes the celebrated "Christmas Concerto".

He joins the members of the European Union Baroque Orchestra directed from the violin by Enrico Onofri, and violinist Margaret Faultless, for a look at how some of the artistic innovations of late 17th Century Rome, focused the mind of a young violin virtuoso, Arcangelo Corelli, and prompted him to create what became the foundation of the influential and ubiquitous late baroque concerto.

Stephen fosues on three concertos from the Opus 6 set of 12: Numbers 4, 8 and 12, which includes the famous Christmas Concerto.

The programme was recorded as part of the 2010 Lufthansa Festival of Baroque Music.

Stephen Johnson unpicks the ideas behind Corelli's famous set of Opus 6 Concertos.

Debussy's Images for Orchestra20131010

Stephen Johnson explores the musical paintings created by Debussy in his three orchestral Images, composed between 1908 and 1912. He examines how Debussy adopted a colouristic approach to the orchestra to evoke the most realistic sound pictures possible of locations such as Spain.

Debussy's Images For Orchestra20131010

Stephen Johnson explores the musical paintings created by Debussy in his three orchestral Images, composed between 1908 and 1912. He examines how Debussy adopted a colouristic approach to the orchestra to evoke the most realistic sound pictures possible of locations such as Spain.

Debussy's La mer20110723

Stephen Johnson examines the music and background to Debussy's La Mer with the BBC Symphony Orchestra conducted by Tito Ceccherini and the South Bank Gamelan Ensemble.

Debussy's three movement symphonic masterpiece takes much of its inspiration from the sea, as its title suggests, but it is more than just a piece of music with an extra musical programme. Stephen Johnson takes the work to pieces with the help of the players of the BBC Symphony Orchestra and looks at how Debussy was inspired not only by the Japanese wood block prints for a pictorial depiction of the sea, but by the structures and scales of far eastern music as well, to create what many regard to be the greatest ever symphony by a Frenchman.

This programme has been filmed for a visualisation on the Radio 3 website. Debussy's La Mer is featured in the 2011 Proms on 6th September.

Stephen Johnson examines the music and background to Debussy's La mer with the BBC SO.

Debussy's La Mer20110723

Stephen Johnson examines the music and background to Debussy's La Mer with the BBC Symphony Orchestra conducted by Tito Ceccherini and the South Bank Gamelan Ensemble.

Debussy's three movement symphonic masterpiece takes much of its inspiration from the sea, as its title suggests, but it is more than just a piece of music with an extra musical programme.

Stephen Johnson takes the work to pieces with the help of the players of the BBC Symphony Orchestra and looks at how Debussy was inspired not only by the Japanese wood block prints for a pictorial depiction of the sea, but by the structures and scales of far eastern music as well, to create what many regard to be the greatest ever symphony by a Frenchman.

This programme has been filmed for a visualisation on the Radio 3 website.

Debussy's La Mer is featured in the 2011 Proms on 6th September.

Stephen Johnson examines the music and background to Debussy's La mer with the BBC SO.

Debussy's La Mer20110723

Stephen Johnson examines the music and background to Debussy's La Mer with the BBC Symphony Orchestra conducted by Tito Ceccherini and the South Bank Gamelan Ensemble.

Debussy's three movement symphonic masterpiece takes much of its inspiration from the sea, as its title suggests, but it is more than just a piece of music with an extra musical programme.

Stephen Johnson takes the work to pieces with the help of the players of the BBC Symphony Orchestra and looks at how Debussy was inspired not only by the Japanese wood block prints for a pictorial depiction of the sea, but by the structures and scales of far eastern music as well, to create what many regard to be the greatest ever symphony by a Frenchman.

This programme has been filmed for a visualisation on the Radio 3 website.

Debussy's La Mer is featured in the 2011 Proms on 6th September.

Stephen Johnson examines the music and background to Debussy's La mer with the BBC SO.

Delius And The Orchestra20041127

Frederick Delius was a truly international composer - born in Bradford of German parents, lived for much of his life in rural FRANCE and was greatly inspired painters and landscapes.

His orchestral style is also a unique amalgam of sensuous imagery and intuition.

Today conductor Martyn Brabbins and the BBC Symphony Orchestra examine the way Delius's orchestral music works, focusing on three contrasting pieces, "On hearing the first cuckoo in spring", "The walk to the Paradise Garden" and Dance Rhapsody No 2.

Delius And The Orchestra20041127

Frederick Delius was a truly international composer - born in Bradford of German parents, lived for much of his life in rural FRANCE and was greatly inspired painters and landscapes.

His orchestral style is also a unique amalgam of sensuous imagery and intuition.

Today conductor Martyn Brabbins and the BBC Symphony Orchestra examine the way Delius's orchestral music works, focusing on three contrasting pieces, "On hearing the first cuckoo in spring", "The walk to the Paradise Garden" and Dance Rhapsody No 2.

Discovering Music: Szymanowski's Third Symphony20120222

Setting the second Divan, Song of the Night, by the thirteenth-century mystical poet Rumi, Szymanowski's Symphony no.3 marks a high point in the composer's Impressionistic style. Forging a link between western musical language and oriental beliefs in those worlds which lie beyond our physically and emotionally conditioned lives, Szymanowski realised that this work for tenor solo, chorus and orchestra, had surpassed his previous compositions. Once the work was complete, Szymanowski commented that "not even a musician like myself can have any idea of what it will sound like with an orchestra." The work has been described by composer Sorabji, as music that is permeated with the very essence of the choicest and rarest specimens of Iranian art...like a Persian painting or silk rug.

Stephen Johnson explores the inner world of Szymanowski's Symphony No 3.

Discovering Music: Szymanowski's Third Symphony20120222

Setting the second Divan, Song of the Night, by the thirteenth-century mystical poet Rumi, Szymanowski's Symphony no.3 marks a high point in the composer's Impressionistic style. Forging a link between western musical language and oriental beliefs in those worlds which lie beyond our physically and emotionally conditioned lives, Szymanowski realised that this work for tenor solo, chorus and orchestra, had surpassed his previous compositions. Once the work was complete, Szymanowski commented that "not even a musician like myself can have any idea of what it will sound like with an orchestra." The work has been described by composer Sorabji, as music that is permeated with the very essence of the choicest and rarest specimens of Iranian art...like a Persian painting or silk rug.

Stephen Johnson explores the inner world of Szymanowski's Symphony No 3.

Setting the second Divan, Song of the Night, by the thirteenth-century mystical poet Rumi, Szymanowski's Symphony no.3 marks a high point in the composer's Impressionistic style. Forging a link between western musical language and oriental beliefs in those worlds which lie beyond our physically and emotionally conditioned lives, Szymanowski realised that this work for tenor solo, chorus and orchestra, had surpassed his previous compositions. Once the work was complete, Szymanowski commented that "not even a musician like myself can have any idea of what it will sound like with an orchestra." The work has been described by composer Sorabji, as music that is permeated with the very essence of the choicest and rarest specimens of Iranian art...like a Persian painting or silk rug.

Stephen Johnson explores the inner world of Szymanowski's Symphony No 3.

Dvorak - Symphony No 920070318

Charles Hazlewood conducts the BBC Concert Orchestra in an exploration of Antonin Dvorak's masterpiece his Symphony No 9, to which the composer gave the subtitle From the New World.

Dvorak - Symphony No 920070318

Charles Hazlewood conducts the BBC Concert Orchestra in an exploration of Antonin Dvorak's masterpiece his Symphony No 9, to which the composer gave the subtitle From the New World.

Dvorak Overtures20040207

Dvorak originally conceived his three overtures, In Nature's Realm, Carnival and Othello as a philosophical three movement romantic tone poem depicting Nature, Life and Love.

Stephen Johnson explores some of the links between the three pieces and the BBC Concert Orchestra conducted by Matthew Rowe offer a rare opportunity to hear them performed as a sequence.

Dvorak Overtures20040207

Dvorak originally conceived his three overtures, In Nature's Realm, Carnival and Othello as a philosophical three movement romantic tone poem depicting Nature, Life and Love.

Stephen Johnson explores some of the links between the three pieces and the BBC Concert Orchestra conducted by Matthew Rowe offer a rare opportunity to hear them performed as a sequence.

Dvorak's 7th Symphony20121130

Stephen Johnson explores Dvorak's Seventh symphony, a work that marks a milestone in the composer's symphonic language. Commissioned by the Royal Philharmonic Society in 1884, Dvorak's intention was ambitious from the outset. He wanted to create a work that "must be capable of stirring the world." The creative intensity Dvorak displayed during the symphony's composition extended to its first performance. Completed on March 17th, 1885, a mere five weeks later Dvorak conducted the first performance in London.

Dvorak's 7th Symphony20121130

Stephen Johnson explores Dvorak's Seventh symphony, a work that marks a milestone in the composer's symphonic language. Commissioned by the Royal Philharmonic Society in 1884, Dvorak's intention was ambitious from the outset. He wanted to create a work that "must be capable of stirring the world." The creative intensity Dvorak displayed during the symphony's composition extended to its first performance. Completed on March 17th, 1885, a mere five weeks later Dvorak conducted the first performance in London.

Dvorak's American String Quintet20110327

The Skampa Quartet and viola player Garfield Jackson join Stephen Johnson in dissecting Dvorak's 'American' String Quintet Op 97.

Along with his Symphony No 9 (From the New World) and the American String Quartet Op 96, the String Quintet was a work Dvorak wrote during the 3 years he spent in the USA.

The programme was recorded at last year's Lake District Summer Music Festival in Kendal, and features extracts and complete performance of the String Quintet.

Stephen Johnson explores Dvorak's American String Quintet.

Dvorak's American String Quintet20110327

The Skampa Quartet and viola player Garfield Jackson join Stephen Johnson in dissecting Dvorak's 'American' String Quintet Op 97.

Along with his Symphony No 9 (From the New World) and the American String Quartet Op 96, the String Quintet was a work Dvorak wrote during the 3 years he spent in the USA.

The programme was recorded at last year's Lake District Summer Music Festival in Kendal, and features extracts and complete performance of the String Quintet.

Stephen Johnson explores Dvorak's American String Quintet.

The Skampa Quartet and viola player Garfield Jackson join Stephen Johnson in dissecting Dvorak's 'American' String Quintet Op 97. Along with his Symphony No 9 (From the New World) and the American String Quartet Op 96, the String Quintet was a work Dvorak wrote during the 3 years he spent in the USA. The programme was recorded at last year's Lake District Summer Music Festival in Kendal, and features extracts and complete performance of the String Quintet.

Stephen Johnson explores Dvorak's American String Quintet.

Dvorak's Dumky Trio20120403

was so well-received at its first performance in 1891, with Dvorak himself at the piano, that he took it on a 40-date farewell tour of Bohemia and Moravia, before leaving his homeland for a new life in America. Stephen Johnson explores what a dumka is, and how Dvorak adapted this native folk music for use in his classical compositions.

Stephen Johnson explores Dvorak's Piano Trio No 4 in E minor - the Dumky Trio.

Dvorak's Dumky Trio20120403

was so well-received at its first performance in 1891, with Dvorak himself at the piano, that he took it on a 40-date farewell tour of Bohemia and Moravia, before leaving his homeland for a new life in America. Stephen Johnson explores what a dumka is, and how Dvorak adapted this native folk music for use in his classical compositions.

Stephen Johnson explores Dvorak's Piano Trio No 4 in E minor - the Dumky Trio.

Dvorak's Dumky Trio was so well-received at its first performance in 1891, with Dvorak himself at the piano, that he took it on a 40-date farewell tour of Bohemia and Moravia, before leaving his homeland for a new life in America. Stephen Johnson explores what a dumka is, and how Dvorak adapted this native folk music for use in his classical compositions.

Stephen Johnson explores Dvorak's Piano Trio No 4 in E minor - the Dumky Trio.

Dvorak's Eighth Symphony20130206

Stephen Johnson explores Dvorak's Eighth Symphony.

Dvorak's Eighth Symphony20130206

Stephen Johnson explores Dvorak's Eighth Symphony.

Dvorak's New World Symphony20121023

The Ninth Symphony by Dvorak, was the first completed work after the composer had arrived in New York, taking up his post as Director of the National Conservatory of Music of America. The symphony has definite links to Negro spirituals and plantation songs, and Dvorak encouraged this connection with America, giving it the name "From the New World". Yet at this time, Dvorak greatly missed his homeland, and the music of Czechoslovakia is also very much present within the work. Stephen Johnson explores the Symphony no.9 by Dvorak, within the context of its own musical heritage.

Dvorak's New World Symphony20121023

The Ninth Symphony by Dvorak, was the first completed work after the composer had arrived in New York, taking up his post as Director of the National Conservatory of Music of America. The symphony has definite links to Negro spirituals and plantation songs, and Dvorak encouraged this connection with America, giving it the name "From the New World". Yet at this time, Dvorak greatly missed his homeland, and the music of Czechoslovakia is also very much present within the work. Stephen Johnson explores the Symphony no.9 by Dvorak, within the context of its own musical heritage.

Dvorak's Second Piano Quartet20130405

Stephen Johnson delves into the musical intricacies of Dvorak's second Piano Quartet in Eb.

Dvorak's Second Piano Quartet20130405

Stephen Johnson delves into the musical intricacies of Dvorak's second Piano Quartet in Eb.

Eight Songs For A Mad King20081102

Charles Hazlewood is joined by the composer Peter Maxwell Davies for an in-depth exploration of his iconic music theatre work Eight Songs for a Mad King.

With the ensemble Psappha and baritone Kelvin Thomas.

Considered one of the most celebrated and shocking pieces of British music theatre ever written, the work portrays the tragic madness of King George III.

Eight Songs For A Mad King20081102

Charles Hazlewood is joined by the composer Peter Maxwell Davies for an in-depth exploration of his iconic music theatre work Eight Songs for a Mad King.

With the ensemble Psappha and baritone Kelvin Thomas.

Considered one of the most celebrated and shocking pieces of British music theatre ever written, the work portrays the tragic madness of King George III.

Eighteenth Century Tchaikovsky20081019

Charles Hazlewood is joined by the BBC Philharmonic and cellist Robert Cohen to explore two of Tchaikovsky's 18th century-inspired works - the Rococo Variations and the orchestral suite Mozartiana.

Tchaikovsky's music appears to embody the romantic passions and storms of the his age, but the composer himself often took solace reflecting idealistically on the sensibilities of the 18th century and in particular on his beloved Mozart.

Eighteenth Century Tchaikovsky20081019

Charles Hazlewood is joined by the BBC Philharmonic and cellist Robert Cohen to explore two of Tchaikovsky's 18th century-inspired works - the Rococo Variations and the orchestral suite Mozartiana.

Tchaikovsky's music appears to embody the romantic passions and storms of the his age, but the composer himself often took solace reflecting idealistically on the sensibilities of the 18th century and in particular on his beloved Mozart.

Electronic Music20080217

Alwynne Pritchard takes us on a journey through the rich and colourful landscape of electronic music with composer Jonathan Harvey discussing his Mortuos Plango, Vivos Voco and pioneering works by Varese and Stockhausen.

Electronic Music20080217

Alwynne Pritchard takes us on a journey through the rich and colourful landscape of electronic music with composer Jonathan Harvey discussing his Mortuos Plango, Vivos Voco and pioneering works by Varese and Stockhausen.

Elgar - The South *20090719

Mark Elder and the Halle Orchestra explore Elgar's orchestral works, focusing on In the South, an extrovert concert overture inspired by an Italian holiday.

The programme contains a complete performance of the overture.

Elgar - The South *20090719

Mark Elder and the Halle Orchestra explore Elgar's orchestral works, focusing on In the South, an extrovert concert overture inspired by an Italian holiday.

The programme contains a complete performance of the overture.

Elgar And The Orchestra20041120

Three great British composers of the 20th century died in 1934 - Elgar, Delius and Holst.

Over the next three weeks the orchestral music of each of them is put under the microscope.

Today conductor Mark Elder and the Halle Orchestra explore the unique sound world of Elgar's orchestra focussing on the extrovert concert overture inspired by an Italian holiday, "In the South".

Elgar And The Orchestra20041120

Three great British composers of the 20th century died in 1934 - Elgar, Delius and Holst.

Over the next three weeks the orchestral music of each of them is put under the microscope.

Today conductor Mark Elder and the Halle Orchestra explore the unique sound world of Elgar's orchestra focussing on the extrovert concert overture inspired by an Italian holiday, "In the South".

Elgar And The Orchestra20050917

Three great British composers of the 20th century died in 1934 - Elgar, Delius and Holst.

In this programme, conductor Mark Elder and the Halle Orchestra explore the unique sound world of Elgar's orchestra focussing on the extrovert concert overture inspired by an Italian holiday, 'In the South'.

Elgar And The Orchestra20050917

Three great British composers of the 20th century died in 1934 - Elgar, Delius and Holst.

In this programme, conductor Mark Elder and the Halle Orchestra explore the unique sound world of Elgar's orchestra focussing on the extrovert concert overture inspired by an Italian holiday, 'In the South'.

Elgar Cello Concerto20071202

Stephen Johnson joins the BBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Alexander Briger, and cellist Christian Poltera for a look behind the notes of one of the best loved cello concertos in the repertory.

Elgar Cello Concerto20071202

Stephen Johnson joins the BBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Alexander Briger, and cellist Christian Poltera for a look behind the notes of one of the best loved cello concertos in the repertory.

Elgar: A Very English Composer? *2008012720080921

Charles Hazlewood is joined by the string section of the BBC National Orchestra of Wales to explore what makes Elgar such a quintessentially 'English' composer, focusing on his 1905 Introduction and Allegro, and the 1892 Serenade for Strings.

As a contrast, Charles also examines the music of Holst, another English composer who was writing in the early part of the 20th century, looking at his Saint Paul's Suite for string orchestra.

Could Holst's style possibly be more authentically English than that of Elgar?

Elgar: A Very English Composer? *2008012720080921

Charles Hazlewood is joined by the string section of the BBC National Orchestra of Wales to explore what makes Elgar such a quintessentially 'English' composer, focusing on his 1905 Introduction and Allegro, and the 1892 Serenade for Strings.

As a contrast, Charles also examines the music of Holst, another English composer who was writing in the early part of the 20th century, looking at his Saint Paul's Suite for string orchestra.

Could Holst's style possibly be more authentically English than that of Elgar?

Elgar's Enigma Variations20121205

Stephen Johnson explores Elgar's "Enigma Variations", a series of 13 musical sketches of the composer's friends which concludes with a representation of Elgar himself. The theme of the variations was spotted by his wife, as an exhausted Elgar strummed on the piano to relax after a long day teaching violin. When it was completed, this impromptu session turned into Elgar's most ambitious orchestral work to date, which, after it was first performed in London on 19th June 1899, went on to secure his reputation as a composer of international standing.

Elgar's Enigma Variations20121205

Stephen Johnson explores Elgar's "Enigma Variations", a series of 13 musical sketches of the composer's friends which concludes with a representation of Elgar himself. The theme of the variations was spotted by his wife, as an exhausted Elgar strummed on the piano to relax after a long day teaching violin. When it was completed, this impromptu session turned into Elgar's most ambitious orchestral work to date, which, after it was first performed in London on 19th June 1899, went on to secure his reputation as a composer of international standing.

Stephen Johnson explores Elgar's "Enigma Variations", a series of 13 musical sketches of the composer's friends which concludes with a representation of Elgar himself. The theme of the variations was spotted by his wife, as an exhausted Elgar strummed on the piano to relax after a long day teaching violin. When it was completed, this impromptu session turned into Elgar's most ambitious orchestral work to date, which, after it was first performed in London on 19th June 1899, went on to secure his reputation as a composer of international standing.

Elgar's Second Symphony20120315

Stephen Johnson explores Elgar's Second Symphony, which was inspired by stays in Italy and Tintagel in Cornwall, and a poem by Shelley. When it was first heard in 1911, the shifting moods and complex underlying spirit of the symphony confounded many of the audience, perhaps anticipating the troubled times that were about to overtake Europe.

Stephen Johnson explores Elgar's Second Symphony.

Elgar's Second Symphony20120315

Stephen Johnson explores Elgar's Second Symphony, which was inspired by stays in Italy and Tintagel in Cornwall, and a poem by Shelley. When it was first heard in 1911, the shifting moods and complex underlying spirit of the symphony confounded many of the audience, perhaps anticipating the troubled times that were about to overtake Europe.

Stephen Johnson explores Elgar's Second Symphony.

Stephen Johnson explores Elgar's Second Symphony, which was inspired by stays in Italy and Tintagel in Cornwall, and a poem by Shelley. When it was first heard in 1911, the shifting moods and complex underlying spirit of the symphony confounded many of the audience, perhaps anticipating the troubled times that were about to overtake Europe.

Stephen Johnson explores Elgar's Second Symphony.

Elgar's Symphony No 120120110

Stephen Johnson explores a work which was ten years in the gestation, but worth waiting for - Elgar's Symphony no.1, which was an immediate and phenomenal success at its first performance in 1908.

Stephen Johnson explores Elgar's Symphony No 1, which was ten years in the making.

Elgar's Symphony No 120120110

Stephen Johnson explores a work which was ten years in the gestation, but worth waiting for - Elgar's Symphony no.1, which was an immediate and phenomenal success at its first performance in 1908.

Stephen Johnson explores Elgar's Symphony No 1, which was ten years in the making.

Stephen Johnson explores a work which was ten years in the gestation, but worth waiting for - Elgar's Symphony no.1, which was an immediate and phenomenal success at its first performance in 1908.

Stephen Johnson explores Elgar's Symphony No 1, which was ten years in the making.

Elliott Carter at 10020081214
Elliott Carter At 10020081214

Stephen Johnson travels to New York City to talk to the composer Elliott Carter, who celebrates his 100th birthday in 2008.

Focusing on four of his pieces - Elegy, Triple Duo, String Quartet No 5 and Dialogues - Carter delves into the techniques behind his music, together with stories from his life.

Elliott Carter At 10020081214

Stephen Johnson travels to New York City to talk to the composer Elliott Carter, who celebrates his 100th birthday in 2008.

Focusing on four of his pieces - Elegy, Triple Duo, String Quartet No 5 and Dialogues - Carter delves into the techniques behind his music, together with stories from his life.

ETA Hoffmann20101205

Stephen Johnson and the BBC Concert Orchestra explore the impact of writer ETA Hoffmann on music, not least on Tchaikovsky's ballet The Nutcracker.

The fantastical writings of ETA Hoffmann made an enormous impact on composers in the 19th Century. In this programme Stephen Johnson joins the BBC Concert Orchestra, conducted by Johannes Wildner, before an audience at London's South Bank, for an exploration of Hoffmann's writings and ideas.

Hoffmann began his career as a composer and music always played a large part in his life. In the programme the Concert Orchestra offer an opportunity to hear some of Hoffmann's music alongside a focus on Tchaikovsky's Hoffmann inspired ballet The Nutcracker.

Stephen Johnson examines Tchaikovsky's Nutcracker and the impact of writer ETA Hoffmann.

Eta Hoffmann20101205

Stephen Johnson and the BBC Concert Orchestra explore the impact of writer ETA Hoffmann on music, not least on Tchaikovsky's ballet The Nutcracker.

The fantastical writings of ETA Hoffmann made an enormous impact on composers in the 19th Century.

In this programme Stephen Johnson joins the BBC Concert Orchestra, conducted by Johannes Wildner, before an audience at London's South Bank, for an exploration of Hoffmann's writings and ideas.

Hoffmann began his career as a composer and music always played a large part in his life.

In the programme the Concert Orchestra offer an opportunity to hear some of Hoffmann's music alongside a focus on Tchaikovsky's Hoffmann inspired ballet The Nutcracker.

Stephen Johnson examines Tchaikovsky's Nutcracker and the impact of writer ETA Hoffmann.

Eta Hoffmann20101205

Stephen Johnson and the BBC Concert Orchestra explore the impact of writer ETA Hoffmann on music, not least on Tchaikovsky's ballet The Nutcracker.

The fantastical writings of ETA Hoffmann made an enormous impact on composers in the 19th Century.

In this programme Stephen Johnson joins the BBC Concert Orchestra, conducted by Johannes Wildner, before an audience at London's South Bank, for an exploration of Hoffmann's writings and ideas.

Hoffmann began his career as a composer and music always played a large part in his life.

In the programme the Concert Orchestra offer an opportunity to hear some of Hoffmann's music alongside a focus on Tchaikovsky's Hoffmann inspired ballet The Nutcracker.

Stephen Johnson examines Tchaikovsky's Nutcracker and the impact of writer ETA Hoffmann.

Fairy Tales20040710

The literature of music contains some vivid examples of story telling in music.

Charles is joined by an audience of school students for a workshop, recorded last year in the Ulster Hall Belfast, in which he tells the musical stories behind some familiar and less well known fairy tales, including items from Carl Nielsen's incidental music for Aladdin, Ravel's ballet Mother Goose and Humperdinck's opera Hansel and Gretel.

The music is performed by the Ulster Orchestra and the Choir of Methodist College.

Fairy Tales20040710

The literature of music contains some vivid examples of story telling in music.

Charles is joined by an audience of school students for a workshop, recorded last year in the Ulster Hall Belfast, in which he tells the musical stories behind some familiar and less well known fairy tales, including items from Carl Nielsen's incidental music for Aladdin, Ravel's ballet Mother Goose and Humperdinck's opera Hansel and Gretel.

The music is performed by the Ulster Orchestra and the Choir of Methodist College.

Falla's Nights in the Gardens of Spain20110710

Stephen Johnson joins the pianist Artur Pizarro and the BBCCO conducted by Barry Wordsworth for a look at the music and ideas of Manuel de Falla's Nights in the Gardens of Spain.

Falla finished his musical evocation of Spanish landscapes, scored for piano and orchestra, in 1915. As well as the many native Spanish influences that shaped the music, Falla was also guided by the French Impressionists, Debussy and Ravel, so that his three movement portrait has a telling atmospheric quality. It also demonstrates many of the Spanish influences taken from the Arab world.

Stephen unpicks the work with playing and comment from the Lisbon born pianist Artur Pizarro.

Stephen Johnson considers the music of Manuel de Falla's Nights in the Gardens of Spain.

Falla's Nights In The Gardens Of Spain20110710

Stephen Johnson joins the pianist Artur Pizarro and the BBCCO conducted by Barry Wordsworth for a look at the music and ideas of Manuel de Falla's Nights in the Gardens of Spain.

Falla finished his musical evocation of Spanish landscapes, scored for piano and orchestra, in 1915.

As well as the many native Spanish influences that shaped the music, Falla was also guided by the French Impressionists, Debussy and Ravel, so that his three movement portrait has a telling atmospheric quality.

It also demonstrates many of the Spanish influences taken from the Arab world.

Stephen unpicks the work with playing and comment from the Lisbon born pianist Artur Pizarro.

Stephen Johnson considers the music of Manuel de Falla's Nights in the Gardens of Spain.

Falla's Nights In The Gardens Of Spain20110710

Stephen Johnson joins the pianist Artur Pizarro and the BBCCO conducted by Barry Wordsworth for a look at the music and ideas of Manuel de Falla's Nights in the Gardens of Spain.

Falla finished his musical evocation of Spanish landscapes, scored for piano and orchestra, in 1915.

As well as the many native Spanish influences that shaped the music, Falla was also guided by the French Impressionists, Debussy and Ravel, so that his three movement portrait has a telling atmospheric quality.

It also demonstrates many of the Spanish influences taken from the Arab world.

Stephen unpicks the work with playing and comment from the Lisbon born pianist Artur Pizarro.

Stephen Johnson considers the music of Manuel de Falla's Nights in the Gardens of Spain.

Faure Requiem

Faure Requiem20100117

Gabriel Fauré composed what is arguably his magnum opus - the Requiem in D minor - between 1870 and 1890, but his reasons for composing the piece are uncertain. Faure lost both his parents within two years of each other, which may have been his original impetus, but by the time of his mother's death he had already begun the work, which he later declared was "composed for nothing. for fun, if I may be permitted to say so!"

The first version of the work, which he called "un petit Requiem" included just five movements, but not the "Libera Me". It was first performed at La Madeleine in Paris, with Fauré himself conducting - the occasion being the funeral of the architect, Joseph La Soufaché.

Over the next two years Fauré expanded the piece to the now more familiar seven movements, and altered some of his original orchestrations. In 1899-1900, the score was reworked again for full orchestra, probably by one of his students. It was the definiteive version of the Requiem - played at Fauré's own funeral in 1924 - until John Rutter rediscovered Fauré's original manuscript of the chamber orchestra version in the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris in the early 1980s. It has now become one of the most popular pieces for choirs and choral societies all over the world.

In today's programme, Stephen Johnson explores the nuances and differences in the Requiem, using the recordings by John Eliot Gardiner's Monteverdi Choir and The Sixteen, conducted by Harry Christophers.

Faure Requiem20100117

Gabriel Fauré composed what is arguably his magnum opus - the Requiem in D minor - between 1870 and 1890, but his reasons for composing the piece are uncertain. Faure lost both his parents within two years of each other, which may have been his original impetus, but by the time of his mother's death he had already begun the work, which he later declared was "composed for nothing . for fun, if I may be permitted to say so!"

The first version of the work, which he called "un petit Requiem" included just five movements, but not the "Libera Me". It was first performed at La Madeleine in Paris, with Fauré himself conducting - the occasion being the funeral of the architect, Joseph La Soufaché.

Over the next two years Fauré expanded the piece to the now more familiar seven movements, and altered some of his original orchestrations. In 1899-1900, the score was reworked again for full orchestra, probably by one of his students. It was the definiteive version of the Requiem - played at Fauré's own funeral in 1924 - until John Rutter rediscovered Fauré's original manuscript of the chamber orchestra version in the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris in the early 1980s. It has now become one of the most popular pieces for choirs and choral societies all over the world.

In today's programme, Stephen Johnson explores the nuances and differences in the Requiem, using the recordings by John Eliot Gardiner's Monteverdi Choir and The Sixteen, conducted by Harry Christophers.

Faure Requiem *20100117

Stephen Johnson explores the nuances and different versions of Faure's great Requiem, using the recordings by John Eliot Gardiner's Monteverdi Choir and The Sixteen, conducted by Harry Christophers.

Gabriel Faure composed his Requiem in D minor, arguably his magnum opus, between 1870 and 1890, but his reasons for composing the piece are uncertain.

He lost both his parents within two years of each other, which may have been his original impetus, but by the time of his mother's death he had already begun the work, which he later declared was 'composed for nothing...for fun, if I may be permitted to say so!'

The first version of the work, which he called 'un petit Requiem' included just five movements, but not the Libera Me.

It was first performed at La Madeleine in Paris, with Faure himself conducting - the occasion being the funeral of the architect, Joseph La Soufache.

Over the next two years the composer expanded the piece to the now more familiar seven movements and altered some of his original orchestrations.

In 1899-1900, the score was reworked again for full orchestra, probably by one of his students.

It was the definitive version of the Requiem - played at Faure's own funeral in 1924 - until John Rutter rediscovered the original manuscript of the chamber orchestra version in the Bibliotheque Nationale in Paris in the early 1980s.

It has now become one of the most popular pieces for choirs and choral societies all over the world.

Stephen Johnson explores the nuances and different versions of Faure's Requiem in D minor.

Faure Requiem *20100117

Stephen Johnson explores the nuances and different versions of Faure's great Requiem, using the recordings by John Eliot Gardiner's Monteverdi Choir and The Sixteen, conducted by Harry Christophers.

Gabriel Faure composed his Requiem in D minor, arguably his magnum opus, between 1870 and 1890, but his reasons for composing the piece are uncertain.

He lost both his parents within two years of each other, which may have been his original impetus, but by the time of his mother's death he had already begun the work, which he later declared was 'composed for nothing...for fun, if I may be permitted to say so!'

The first version of the work, which he called 'un petit Requiem' included just five movements, but not the Libera Me.

It was first performed at La Madeleine in Paris, with Faure himself conducting - the occasion being the funeral of the architect, Joseph La Soufache.

Over the next two years the composer expanded the piece to the now more familiar seven movements and altered some of his original orchestrations.

In 1899-1900, the score was reworked again for full orchestra, probably by one of his students.

It was the definitive version of the Requiem - played at Faure's own funeral in 1924 - until John Rutter rediscovered the original manuscript of the chamber orchestra version in the Bibliotheque Nationale in Paris in the early 1980s.

It has now become one of the most popular pieces for choirs and choral societies all over the world.

Stephen Johnson explores the nuances and different versions of Faure's Requiem in D minor.

Faure's Piano Quartet No 120130430

In 1877, Gabriel Fauré finally became engaged to Marianne Viardot, daughter of the famous French mezzo-soprano Pauline Viardot, after wooing her for five years.

Within four months, their engagement had been broken off - to Fauré's considerable distress. Stephen Johnson explores the composer's First Piano Quartet - a work written in the latter stages of Fauré and Viardot's relationship, and examines how Fauré's emotional turmoil manifested itself in its pages.

Faure's Piano Quartet No 120130430

In 1877, Gabriel Fauré finally became engaged to Marianne Viardot, daughter of the famous French mezzo-soprano Pauline Viardot, after wooing her for five years.

Within four months, their engagement had been broken off - to Fauré's considerable distress. Stephen Johnson explores the composer's First Piano Quartet - a work written in the latter stages of Fauré and Viardot's relationship, and examines how Fauré's emotional turmoil manifested itself in its pages.

Figures In The Garden20050205

Charles Hazlewood joins wind players from the National Orchestra of Wales to explore Jonathan Dove's Figures in the Garden, a serenade for Wind Octet inspired by Mozart's The Marriage of Figaro.

Figures In The Garden20050205

Charles Hazlewood joins wind players from the National Orchestra of Wales to explore Jonathan Dove's Figures in the Garden, a serenade for Wind Octet inspired by Mozart's The Marriage of Figaro.

Finzi's In Terra Pax20121219

'In Terra Pax' was one of Finzi's very last compositions before leukaemia claimed him at the age of 55. Stephen Johnson unpacks the origins of this Christmas favourite and explores how, despite the many tragic events that shaped Finzi's world, he left behind a work filled with hope and beauty.

Finzi's In Terra Pax20121219

'In Terra Pax' was one of Finzi's very last compositions before leukaemia claimed him at the age of 55. Stephen Johnson unpacks the origins of this Christmas favourite and explores how, despite the many tragic events that shaped Finzi's world, he left behind a work filled with hope and beauty.

'In Terra Pax' was one of Finzi's very last compositions before leukaemia claimed him at the age of 55. Stephen Johnson unpacks the origins of this Christmas favourite and explores how, despite the many tragic events that shaped Finzi's world, he left behind a work filled with hope and beauty.

Foxtrots

Foxtrots20100110

Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Concert Orchestra explore how the foxtrot of the dance halls of the 1920s and 40s had a creative impact on the imagination of 20th-century composers such as Maurice Ravel, John Adams and Peter Maxwell Davies.

The iconic sounds of the popular foxtrots, which reached mass audiences through the wind-up gramophone, through the dance halls and through radio, have become a useful vehicle with which some composers have chosen to present extra-musical and sometimes ironic references in their 'serious' music.

Charles briefly analyses the substance of the foxtrot and considers how Ravel used the dance in his opera L'enfant et les sortileges to evoke the spirit of his times; of how American composer John Adams uses the distinctive sounds of the dance played on a 78 rpm record, as the basis for short orchestral concert work The Chairman Dances; and of how Peter Maxwell Davies's recollection of the foxtrots of his childhood culminate in observations about political and moral responsibility in his St Thomas Wake for orchestra.

Foxtrots20100110

Charles Hazlewood and the BBC Concert Orchestra explore how the foxtrot of the dance halls of the 1920s and 40s had a creative impact on the imagination of 20th-century composers such as Maurice Ravel, John Adams and Peter Maxwell Davies.

The iconic sounds of the popular foxtrots, which reached mass audiences through the wind-up gramophone, through the dance halls and through radio, have become a useful vehicle with which some composers have chosen to present extra-mus