Deep Blue

Blues singer Michael Roach traces the roots of his music.

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The plantations of the Mississippi delta spawned a new, raw music of which Charley Patton was the leading exponent

The word 'blue' has been associated with melancholia or depression since the Elizabethan era, but it took the savagery of America's Deep South to turn it into an art form.

From cotton plantations like Dockery's near Clarksdale in the Mississippi Delta, back breaking labour was anaesthetised with the Deep South equivalent of wine, women and song - moonshine, ladies of easy virtue and the new, raw music of people like Charley Patton.

Washington DC traditional blues singer Michael Roach searches for the roots of his music starting in the "hill country" above the Delta where the Fyfe music of Otha Turner has been carried in a direct line from the West coast of Africa.

012003030420040213

The plantations of the Mississippi delta spawned a new, raw music of which Charley Patton was the leading exponent

The word 'blue' has been associated with melancholia or depression since the Elizabethan era, but it took the savagery of America's Deep South to turn it into an art form.

From cotton plantations like Dockery's near Clarksdale in the Mississippi Delta, back breaking labour was anaesthetised with the Deep South equivalent of wine, women and song - moonshine, ladies of easy virtue and the new, raw music of people like Charley Patton.

Washington DC traditional blues singer Michael Roach searches for the roots of his music starting in the "hill country" above the Delta where the Fyfe music of Otha Turner has been carried in a direct line from the West coast of Africa.

022003031120040220

Blues singer Michael Roach continues the series in which he traces the roots of his music with a look at the birth of Chicago blues.

When Muddy Waters quit his job and his woman in Stoval plantation near Memphis, he followed the route taken by millions of other African Americans escaping the deprivation of the Southern cotton fields for the industrial opportunities of Chicago, Kansas City and St Louis.

He figured that what they would need most would be the music to which they drank, danced and sang.

traditional blues singer Michael Roach continues his journey in search of the roots of his music.

When Muddy Waters quit his job and his woman in "Stoval" plantation near Memphis, he followed the route taken by millions of other African Americans escaping the deprivation of the Southern cotton fields for the industrial opportunities of Chicago, Kansas City and St.

Louis.

He figured that what they would need most would be the music they drunk, danced and sang to.

022003031120040220

Blues singer Michael Roach continues the series in which he traces the roots of his music with a look at the birth of Chicago blues.

When Muddy Waters quit his job and his woman in Stoval plantation near Memphis, he followed the route taken by millions of other African Americans escaping the deprivation of the Southern cotton fields for the industrial opportunities of Chicago, Kansas City and St Louis.

He figured that what they would need most would be the music to which they drank, danced and sang.

traditional blues singer Michael Roach continues his journey in search of the roots of his music.

When Muddy Waters quit his job and his woman in "Stoval" plantation near Memphis, he followed the route taken by millions of other African Americans escaping the deprivation of the Southern cotton fields for the industrial opportunities of Chicago, Kansas City and St.

Louis.

He figured that what they would need most would be the music they drunk, danced and sang to.

03 LAST2003031820040227

The 1960s Folk Revival brought a wholly African American music to a new audience.

The thirst of white artists and record producers for the "new" music brought about the birth of rock 'n' roll, but was this at the expense of its roots? Washington DC blues singer Michael Roach concludes this search for the heart and soul of his music in the home of contemporary blues, Chicago where he speaks with today's movers and shakers.

03 LAST2003031820040227

The 1960s Folk Revival brought a wholly African American music to a new audience.

The thirst of white artists and record producers for the "new" music brought about the birth of rock 'n' roll, but was this at the expense of its roots? Washington DC blues singer Michael Roach concludes this search for the heart and soul of his music in the home of contemporary blues, Chicago where he speaks with today's movers and shakers.