Darwin's Children

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01*20090209

Writers explore some of the diverse fields to which Darwin's theories have been applied.

English professor Jonathan Gottschall describes the application of evolutionary analysis to literary interpretation, from the late bronze age of Homer's Mycenae to Jane Austen's regency.

What can a biological evolutionary analysis of stories and story-telling teach us about the nature of humanity?

Jonathan Gottschall describes the use of evolutionary analysis in literary interpretation.

02* *20090210

Writers explore some of the diverse fields to which Darwin's theories have been applied.

Prof Judith Donath of MIT describes the link from Darwin to online social networks such as Facebook.

Chimps affirm friendships through grooming each other; humans have evolved many different ways over the millennia, from clubs to Christmas cards.

Is adding your name to a list on a public website the 21st century equivalent, and how might that change the shape of society?

Judith Donath describes the link from Darwin to online social networks such as Facebook.

03*20090211

Writers explore some of the diverse fields to which Darwin's theories have been applied.

Prof Douglas Davies charts the birth of anthropology and the idea of an evolution of religion.

Darwin's book On the Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals exposed human culture and even society itself to the brutal randomness of natural selection.

Could the idea of a god be an evolutionary adaptation?

Douglas Davies charts the birth of anthropology and the idea of an evolution of religion.

04*20090212

Writers explore some of the diverse fields to which Darwin's theories have been applied.

Art Historian Diana Donald describes the impact of Darwin on art and aesthetic theory.

According to Darwin, all beauty in nature served a purpose.

His theory of natural selection questioned divine objectivity in aesthetic appreciation, and drew attention from many new schools, such as the impressionists, who regarded themselves as possessing the most highly evolved eyes in nature.

05 LAST*20090213

Writers explore some of the diverse fields to which Darwin's theories have been applied.

Professor James K Galbraith, son of the economist JK Galbraith, describes early efforts to make economics more Darwinian, and why we should revisit those now more than ever.

He argues that for too long economics has been deterministic and unrealistic, and to go forward from the current financial gloom, economists must embrace the evolutionary jungle, accepting that there is no such thing as 'business as usual'.

Professor James K Galbraith describes early efforts to make economics more Darwinian.