The Curious Life Of Lord Uxbridge's Leg

Just before sunset on the last day of the Battle of Waterloo, a cannonball whisked through the air at 700 mph and partially severed the leg of Lord Uxbridge, Wellington's second in command.

"By God" cried the Lord, "I've lost my leg!" "By God, sir," Wellington replied, "So you have!" Amputated without anaesthetic, the shattered limb went on to assume a curious life of its own.

The surgeon, Mon Hyacinthe PARIS, retained the mound of flesh and bone, buried it in his back garden in Belgium, and made it into a shrine.

Visitors poured in to see the place where the leg - that symbol of British pluck - was buried.

For the next 50 years, the PARIS family built up "La Musee de la jambe" - and even dug up the bones and put them in a case for all to see, leading to a diplomatic incident between Britain and Belgium.

Neil Mullarkey hops in the footstep of Lord Uxbridge's leg.

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Just before sunset on the last day of the Battle of Waterloo, a cannonball whisked through the air at 700 mph and partially severed the leg of Lord Uxbridge, Wellington's second in command.

"By God" cried the Lord, "I've lost my leg!" "By God, sir," Wellington replied, "So you have!" Amputated without anaesthetic, the shattered limb went on to assume a curious life of its own.

The surgeon, Mon Hyacinthe PARIS, retained the mound of flesh and bone, buried it in his back garden in Belgium, and made it into a shrine.

Visitors poured in to see the place where the leg - that symbol of British pluck - was buried.

For the next 50 years, the PARIS family built up "La Musee de la jambe" - and even dug up the bones and put them in a case for all to see, leading to a diplomatic incident between Britain and Belgium.

Neil Mullarkey hops in the footstep of Lord Uxbridge's leg.