Comprehensively Eton

Jolyon Jenkins on the state-school boys who won scholarships to Eton.

Bradley, Oscar, Joe & Rishad are bright all-rounders who went from their local comprehensive to the world's most famous school.

Eton is probably the most famous school in the world.

With fees of almost £30 thousand a year, it educates some of Britain's most wealthy and privileged boys.

It also offers scholarships and bursaries to a small but growing number of bright and motivated boys who've been educated in the state sector.

But what does the scholarship scheme this mean for the boys? How are they regarded by the fee-payers? What kind of boy does Eton want as a scholar? Do the scholarship-boys fit in at Eton, or is there a class divide? Do they stand out because their accents are different or once anonymised in the tail-coat are they woven into Eton's ancient fabric?

Bradley is from Blackpool, his parents are full-time foster carers who found out about the Eton scholarship when they read about it in 'The Sun'.

Bradley started at Eton last September in what is known as 'F Block' (the equivalent is year 9 in the state sector).

Oscar Hardy is from Seaford on the south coast, a former young-mayor of Seaford and A*grade student; his comprehensive was closing its sixth form so he took a punt on an Eton scholarship - and succeeded.

Jolyon hears from them, and Rishad and Joe, who all won scholarships - and significant bursaries - to attend Eton College.

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Jolyon Jenkins on the state-school boys who won scholarships to Eton.

Bradley, Oscar, Joe & Rishad are bright all-rounders who went from their local comprehensive to the world's most famous school.

Eton is probably the most famous school in the world.

With fees of almost £30 thousand a year, it educates some of Britain's most wealthy and privileged boys.

It also offers scholarships and bursaries to a small but growing number of bright and motivated boys who've been educated in the state sector.

But what does the scholarship scheme this mean for the boys? How are they regarded by the fee-payers? What kind of boy does Eton want as a scholar? Do the scholarship-boys fit in at Eton, or is there a class divide? Do they stand out because their accents are different or once anonymised in the tail-coat are they woven into Eton's ancient fabric?

Bradley is from Blackpool, his parents are full-time foster carers who found out about the Eton scholarship when they read about it in 'The Sun'.

Bradley started at Eton last September in what is known as 'F Block' (the equivalent is year 9 in the state sector).

Oscar Hardy is from Seaford on the south coast, a former young-mayor of Seaford and A*grade student; his comprehensive was closing its sixth form so he took a punt on an Eton scholarship - and succeeded.

Jolyon hears from them, and Rishad and Joe, who all won scholarships - and significant bursaries - to attend Eton College.