Commonwealth Questions

Episodes

EpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
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01Dr Sue Onslow20140310

The first of five Essays from writers around the Commonwealth which start on Commonwealth Day, 10th March, and scrutinise the destiny of this unique international body.

Dr Sue Onslow of the School of Advanced Studies, University of London looks at the history of the Commonwealth and its web of committees and forums. She asks whether they have made a difference in world politics in the past and whether the organisation has a future.

02Fakir Aijazuddin20140311

A series of five essays from writers around the Commonwealth which start on Commonwealth Day, 10th March, and tackle the past, present and future of this unique international organisation.

Fakir Aijazuddin, author and historian from Lahore, comments on Pakistan's chequered relationship with the Commonwealth. He reflects on his own dealings with what he describes as a typically British invention, the 'gentleman's club'.

03Noah Richler20140312

A series of five essays from writers around the Commonwealth which start on Commonwealth Day, 10th March, and tackle the past, present and future of this unique international organisation.

Noah Richler broadcaster at CBC, writes from a Canadian perspective. The Queen still appears on the bank notes of Canada as she is the head of state. The role is largely ceremonial, so why the need for ties like the Commonwealth in such an advanced country?

04Farah Ghuznavi20140313

A series of five essays from writers around the Commonwealth which start on Commonwealth Day 10th March and tackle the past, present and future of this unique international organisation.

Farah Ghuznavi from Bangladesh is the British Council's Writer in Residence for the Commonwealth for 2014. She saw the Commonwealth as an irrelevance in her early life. Here she explains what changed her mind.

05 LASTTolu Ogunlesi20140314

A series of five essays from writers around the Commonwealth which start on Commonwealth Day 10th March and tackle the past, present and future of this unique international organisation.

Tolu Ogunlesi, poet and author from Nigeria looks at whether young people in Lagos can relate to the Commonwealth.