Classic Storylines

Episodes

TitleComments
Genome: [r4 Bd=19940915]

The Moonstone. Gabriel Betteredge in Wilkie Collins 's novel The Moonstone is one of the first in a long and continuing line of victims of the compelling powers of the detective story. Author PD James investigates. Producer Sally Marmion

Genome: [r4 Bd=19940915]

Unknown: Wilkie Collins

Unknown: Pd James

Producer: Sally Marmion

Genome: [r4 Bd=19940922]

Frankenstein. In 1831, Mary Shelley could not have imagined the colossal effects of her monster upon the public imagination. Frankenstein became an instant theatrical success in Victorian melodrama, a political metaphor for the rising-up of the masses, and found its ultimate realisation through

Hollywood. Peggy Reynolds explores why Mary Shelley 's creation lives on. Producer Sally Marmion

Genome: [r4 Bd=19940922]

Unknown: Mary Shelley

Producer: Sally Marmion

Genome: [r4 Bd=19940929]

4: The Time Machine. H G Wells sent his time traveller into the future almost a hundred years ago and began a series of novels which exhilarated readers with the imaginative possibilities of science. Peter Kemp examines Wells's future. Producer Sally Marmion

Genome: [r4 Bd=19940929]

Unknown: G Wells

Unknown: Peter Kemp

Producer: Sally Marmion

Genome: [r4 Bd=19950129]

1: Jane Eyre. Peggy Reynolds explores how Charlotte Bronte's classic novel has continued to capture the imagination. Producer Sally Marmion Rpt

Genome: [r4 Bd=19950129]

Unknown: Jane Eyre.

Unknown: Peggy Reynolds

Producer: Sally Marmion Rpt

Genome: [r4 Bd=19950205]

2: The Moonstone. Author P D James examines why Wilkie Collins 's novel continues to influence crime writers.

Producer Sally Marmion Rpt

Genome: [r4 Bd=19950205]

Unknown: P D James

Unknown: Wilkie Collins

Producer: Sally Marmion

Genome: [r4 Bd=19950212]

3: Frankenstein. Peggy Reynolds explores why Mary Shelley 's 1831 creation lives on. Producer Sally Marmion Rpt

Genome: [r4 Bd=19950212]

Unknown: Peggy Reynolds

Unknown: Mary Shelley

Producer: Sally Marmion Rpt

Genome: [r4 Bd=19950219]

The Time Machine. In the last of the series, Peter Kemp examines how H G Wells 's novel remains exciting and influential despite its pessimistic vision. Producer Sally Marmion Rpt

Genome: [r4 Bd=19950219]

Unknown: Peter Kemp

Unknown: H G Wells

Producer: Sally Marmion Rpt

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970128]

The first of four programmes reconsidering stories which have had a profound influence on popular culture.

1: Robinson Crusoe. Peggy Reynolds re-visits the original desert island. Producer Sally Marmion

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970128]

The first of four programmes reconsidering stories which have had a profound influence on popular culture.

1: Robinson Crusoe. Peggy Reynolds re-visits the original desert island. Producer Sally Marmion

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970128]

Unknown: Peggy Reynolds

Producer: Sally Marmion

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970128]

Unknown: Peggy Reynolds

Producer: Sally Marmion

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970204]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970204]

The second of four programmes reconsidering stories which have had a profound influence on popular culture. 2: Oliver Twist. Charles Dickens 's story of an orphan who has to re-invent himself as he moves between the dingy underworld squalor and gentility of the middle classes of Victorian England reverberates still in popular culture. The David Lean film, made in 1948, remains, for social historian Roy Porter , the definitive version of the book. The actual resolution of who Oliver is and how he is re-united with his family is often overlooked in favour of the more memorable images - Bill Sykes clubbing Nacy to death or the young boy saying "Please Sir, I want some more". Peggy Reynolds talks to Roy Porter , Steven Connor (Professor of English Literature at Birkbeck College) and Lionel Bart , whose musical Oliver! provides so many people with memories of the story. Producer Sally Marmion Repeat

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970204]

The second of four programmes reconsidering stories which have had a profound influence on popular culture. 2: Oliver Twist. Charles Dickens 's story of an orphan who has to re-invent himself as he moves between the dingy underworld squalor and gentility of the middle classes of Victorian England reverberates still in popular culture. The David Lean film, made in 1948, remains, for social historian Roy Porter , the definitive version of the book. The actual resolution of who Oliver is and how he is re-united with his family is often overlooked in favour of the more memorable images - Bill Sykes clubbing Nacy to death or the young boy saying "Please Sir, I want some more". Peggy Reynolds talks to Roy Porter , Steven Connor (Professor of English Literature at Birkbeck College) and Lionel Bart , whose musical Oliver! provides so many people with memories of the story. Producer Sally Marmion Repeat

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970204]

Unknown: Oliver Twist.

Unknown: Charles Dickens

Unknown: David Lean

Unknown: Roy Porter

Unknown: Bill Sykes

Talks: Peggy Reynolds

Unknown: Steven Connor

Unknown: Lionel Bart

Producer: Sally Marmion

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970204]

Unknown: Oliver Twist.

Unknown: Charles Dickens

Unknown: David Lean

Unknown: Roy Porter

Unknown: Bill Sykes

Talks: Peggy Reynolds

Unknown: Steven Connor

Unknown: Lionel Bart

Producer: Sally Marmion

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970204]

Unknown: Oliver Twist.

Unknown: Charles Dickens

Unknown: David Lean

Unknown: Roy Porter

Unknown: Bill Sykes

Talks: Peggy Reynolds

Unknown: Steven Connor

Unknown: Lionel Bart

Producer: Sally Marmion

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970211]

Four programmes reconsidering stories that have had a profound influence on popular culture.

3: The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. Peggy Reynolds investigates the original of a tale which has so often been retold.

Producer Sally Marmion Repeat

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970211]

Four programmes reconsidering stories that have had a profound influence on popular culture.

3: The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. Peggy Reynolds investigates the original of a tale which has so often been retold.

Producer Sally Marmion Repeat

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970211]

Four programmes reconsidering stories that have had a profound influence on popular culture.

3: The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. Peggy Reynolds investigates the original of a tale which has so often been retold.

Producer Sally Marmion Repeat

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970211]

Unknown: Mr Hyde.

Unknown: Peggy Reynolds

Producer: Sally Marmion

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970211]

Unknown: Mr Hyde.

Unknown: Peggy Reynolds

Producer: Sally Marmion

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970211]

Unknown: Mr Hyde.

Unknown: Peggy Reynolds

Producer: Sally Marmion

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970218]
Genome: [r4 Bd=19970218]

The last of four programmes reconsidering stories that have had a profound influence on popular culture. The Turn of the Screw. Peggy Reynolds talks to modern writers about their interpretations of Henry James 's psychological thriller. Producer Sally Marmion Repeat

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970218]

The last of four programmes reconsidering stories that have had a profound influence on popular culture. The Turn of the Screw. Peggy Reynolds talks to modern writers about their interpretations of Henry James 's psychological thriller. Producer Sally Marmion Repeat

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970218]

Talks: Peggy Reynolds

Unknown: Henry James

Producer: Sally Marmion

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970218]

Talks: Peggy Reynolds

Unknown: Henry James

Producer: Sally Marmion

Genome: [r4 Bd=19970218]

Talks: Peggy Reynolds

Unknown: Henry James

Producer: Sally Marmion