Changing Places

Andrew Sachs discovers how communities driven by a strong concern for the environment are setting about transforming the place where they live.

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Episodes

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20050408

Seeing the Wood for the Trees

Timber is a vital resource to any economy but forests and woodlands are viewed by the public as being much more important than just for the wood products they deliver.

Dylan Winter explores the sustainability of British forestry and how forestry practices maintain a sustainable product that supports local economies as well as boosting biodiversity and providing environmental and social benefits.

20050415

The Wildwood

In the Borders of Scotland a vision is being realised involving time travel for trees.

The Wildwood Group of the Borders Forest Trust is taking a formerly farmed valley back to its wildwood roots of several thousand years ago when it would have been densely forested.

Dylan Winter finds out what it takes to realise such a vision and what it means for the local people, environment and wildlife.

20051111

Food for Fuel

Dylan Winter explores the growing development in this country of turning food crops into useful sources of renewable energy production.

With plans for bioethanol from excess apples to be turned into green electricity and a surplus of wheat being used to fuel cars, he finds out whether these forms of green fuel and energy production can play a significant part in helping to reduce the need for traditional fuels, without having an impact on the countryside.

Bumble Bees20060217

The Springwatch series revealed how the bumble bee seems to be giving up hibernation in favour of surviving all winter long.

Dylan Winter looks at the implications.

Eating Biodiversity20060203

Dylan Winter explores how food production chains can be changed to help conserve biodiversity and provide outlets for local produce helping to support rural communities.

Forest Schools20051028

originated in Scandinavia in the 1950s and have slowly spread to other countries, with the first one taking place in Britain 10 years ago.

Staged in woodlands, the methods of teaching encourage children to develop independence and self-esteem as well as an appreciation and understanding of their natural environment.

Dylan Winter investigates.

From Soil And Sock To Loch20051118

Dylan Winter travels to Scotland to find out how conservation organisations, environmental agencies and local people are tackling the problem of pollution in freshwater lochs in Perthshire.

Two culprits, phosphates and phosphorus, are getting into the water from agricultural and domestic household sources.They are to blame for the unattractive green rafts of algal blooms that cover the surface of the water during the summer, causing problems for people and wildlife alike.

Giving Value20051104

Dylan Winter visits East London to find out why important places are missing out on being protected from the developers.

With the help of environmentalist Chris Baines, he explores how we can give value to such sites in both town and country, and raise awareness of their importance.

Sustainable Housing20060224

Dylan Winter explores whether it is possible to build affordable homes that can help reduce negative impact on the environment.

Energy use and water consumption in the average home is very high.

In the UK, homes account for about 30% of carbon emissions and 56% of water use.

Many individuals and organisations are finding ways to make houses more sustainable through choosing better building materials and environmental designs, and by homeowners thinking more carefully about energy, water and waste.

Wave Power20060210

With the ongoing development of alternative sources of renewable energy, Dylan Winter explores the power of the tide and plans for barrages on British estuaries and rivers.

When The Sea Comes In20050422

Global warming and a rise in sea level is a reality.

So what are coastal communities doing about it? Dylan Winter goes down on the farm in Essex.

Wild And Wet In Wigan20050506

Dylan Winter goes to the industrial North to see two urban wetlands.

The Wigan wetland is just six years old and is already threatened by a road.

The Doncaster wetland has survived for nearly 40 years.

But is this the end of the road for wildlife in the heart of Wigan?

Wilderness Park20050429

Britain has very little true wilderness left and much of the small amount that exists is in private ownership on Scottish Highland estates.

One enterprising landowner, Paul Lister, has decided to turn his traditional estate over to nature and the environment with a vision to reintroduce wolves, lynx and other former native species to his land.

Dylan Winter explores whether it is possible to realise his dreams and create Europe's first wilderness game reserve.

Wind And Wildlife20050513

Dylan Winter challenges renewable energy enthusiasts with a cautionary tale about the impacts of wind and wave farms on British wildlife.

Zero Waste20060127

Dylan Winter looks into moving towards a 'Zero Waste' society.

01Hydropower20051014

Dylan Winter explores the role of small-scale hydropower schemes as a source of renewable energy in helping with emissions reductions targets.

While successful hydropower schemes can be constrained by water supply and topography, enthusiastic supporters are busy improving former leat systems on rivers and restoring water mills in different parts of the country.

Dylan finds out how economically viable hydropower can be and how much environmental impact this form of energy production has.

02More Than Concrete Cows20051021

If all you associate with Milton Keynes are shopping malls and concrete cows, then think again.

Some inspirational management of the city's green spaces has produced woods full of bluebells and primroses, meadows loud with grasshoppers and more species of butterfly within the city boundary than there are in the surrounding countryside.

0101New Beginnings19981002

The three locations on his itinerary are the Colne Valley, outside Huddersfield; Newburgh, just north of Aberdeen; and Crianlarich, in the heart of Scotland.

0102Unspoiling The Unspoilt19981009

The Cumbrian family who have spent the last 25 years restoring their polluted valley; a community outside LEEDS which has cleared its rat-infested river; and Quaking Houses, Durham's forgotten village.

0103Community Gardens19981016

The Calthorpe Project, an oasis in the heart of LONDON's King's Cross; the enterprising owners of a 1960s block of flats in Hitchin, Hertfordshire; and wild flowers in LIVERPOOL.

0104The Food Growers19981023

The residents in SALFORD, MANCHESTER, who dug up the concrete at the base of their flats to build an oasis; the entrepreneurs of Springfield Community Garden in Bradford; and a visit to the Uplands allotments in Handsworth, BIRMINGHAM.

0105 LASTNew Communities19981030

The new-style crofters in Scotland's West Highlands; a former journalist who became a charcoal urner in Cumbria; and the founders of a `living village' in the heart of Shropshire.

0201Rescuing The Land19990212

In the first of five programmes, Howard Stableford discovers how redundant industrial sites are being reclaimed for the benefit of the local community at the Glass Park in Kirk Sandal, Doncaster, and in Lomeshaye, near Nelson, Lancashire.

0202From Grey To Green19990219

`From Grey to Green'.

In the second of five programmes, Howard Stableford meets the communities who inspired the creation of Benwell Nature Park, Newcastle; Liquorice Park, Lincoln; and the Rosebank, LEEDS.

0203Like A Phoenix19990226

`Like a PHOENIX'.

Howard Stableford meets the residents who turned round the prospects of downcast estates of the Wrens Nest in Dudley, and Higginshaw Village in Oldham.

0204Power From The Community19990305

Howard Stableford travels to Newcastleton in the Scottish Borders to hear about Britain's first wood-fired power station, and to Wandsworth, LONDON, to visit Britain's first solar-powered pub.

0205Working With The Land19990312

Howard Stableford discovers how natural resources are being used creatively at Earth Balance, Northumberland and in Sandford, DEVON.

0301Through Artists19991112

`Through Artists' Eyes'.

In the first of five programmes, Howard Stableford discovers how at Eye in rural Suffolk and in the urban fringe of Dewsbury, West YORKshire, the arts are focusing local communities on the environment and encouraging them to work together.

030219991119

In the second of five programmes, Howard Stableford discovers how Caring for Life in LEEDS and KIND in LIVERPOOL are using environmental projects to bring hope to hundreds of young people.

0303Rebuilding Waterways19991126

`Rebuilding Waterways'.

In the third of five programmes, Howard Stableford visits Bugsworth Basin in Derbyshire, once Britain's largest port on the narrow canal system.

It has just been reopened after 30 years of restoration by dedicated volunteers.

In Sussex, on the Wey and Arun Canal, the plan to open up LONDON's lost route to the sea still continues after a quarter of a century.

0304Village Identity19991203

`Village Identity'.

Howard Stableford discovers how - despite landfill sites, sewage works, industrial estates and intensive agriculture - communities in the commuter villages of Cleeve Prior in Worcestershire and Small Dole in West Sussex are fighting against the odds to protect the identity of their villages.

0305In My Back Yard19991210

`In My Back Yard'.

Howard Stableford meets the communities in Skegness and SALFORD who believe the only way to tackle global environmental issues is to dare to campaign for improvements in their own back yard.

0401Sowing The Seeds Of Success20000906

`Sowing the Seeds of Success'.

In the first of five programmes Howard Stableford travels to Knowsley in LIVERPOOL, where the opening today of the National Wildflower Centre is seen as a major stepping stone in the campaign for `landlife' which aims to use wildflowers in urban landscapes to bring about environmental and economic regeneration.

040220000913

'Worms, Waste and Ingenuity.' In the second of five programmes Howard Stableford finds innovative recycling methods among a wealth of original ideas being put into operation by the Green Business Network in Sowerby Bridge, West YORKshire.

He also travels to DEVON where an imaginative recycling scheme has led to the creation of a self-financing community business.

0403Serving Others20000920

Howard Stableford tells the story of a place where those with learning difficulties can work alongside the able-bodied - the result of the dreams of two men in different parts of the country.

0404Panning For Rust20000927

Howard Stableford meets two ex-mining communities in the North East which are now battling pollution from closed mines.

But the University of Newcastle's special expertise in the biotechnology of wetlands is providing remarkable solutions.

0405New Kids On The Block20001004

Howard Stableford reports on the crime-cutting activities of far-sighted parents in South Shields and MANCHESTER, who are encouraging wayward youngsters to play board games, doing litter picks and planting trees.

040620001011

Howard Stableford meets the remarkable families who are intent on making the crofting lifestyle viable for the 21st century.

0501Happy Returns2001030820010311

Howard Stableford visits the Recycling Works Consortium in Plymouth, which has extended the scope of its already impressive and surprisingly profitable recycling business.

0502Catch The Wind2001031520010318

Howard Stableford assesses the arguments for and against a proposed wind farm in South Wales: community-owned, it could bring cheap electricity and new life to former mining communities; or it could be seen as an eyesore, generating more noise than profit.

0503Building A Way Out2001032220010325

Howard Stableford meets the mother of a heroin addict who is tackling the BRISTOL drugs scene by employing ex-users in a community construction business, opening shops and changing the face of her estate.

He takes a former addict, for whom the obstacles to work have proven insurmountable, to BRISTOL to meet her.

0504Home - But Not Alone2001032920010401

Howard Stableford visits Hockerton, Nottinghamshire, where, two years ago, five families built earth homes in order to live sustainable lives in a community environment.

Their successes include lower bills, low-cost transport and their own boating lake.

0505Empowering The Valley2001040520010408

Howard Stableford finds out how communities in the Dyfi Valley, in the heart of Wales, are trying to adopt a sustainable way of life without losing their traditions.

The newly formed Dyfi Eco Valley Partnership is planning a future for the area in which agriculture, business and energy needs are returned to the control of those who live there.

0506When The Nightingale Sings Again In Moira2001041220010415

On the eve of the opening of the National Forest Millennium Discovery Centre in Leicestershire, Howard Stableford meets the locals who are transforming thousands of acres of waste ground into magnificent woods, providing leisure facilities and job opportunities.

0507Sherwood Outlaws Co22001041920010422

Howard Stableford visits the site of a former pit, which was bought by the local mining community when it closed.

It is now the Sherwood Energy Village, offering housing, commercial, education and leisure facilities, all powered by renewable energy in a CO2-free zone.

0601Survivors Of The Shipwreck2001083120010903

Sandra Sykes with the series about communities that are acting to improve their quality of life.

She visits Barrow-in-Furness, where Community Action Furness has been creating jobs to replace those lost in shipbuilding.

0602The Past And Future Farm2001090720010910

Sandra Sykes with the series about communities that are acting to improve their quality of life.

She visits Lark Rise Farm in Cambridgeshire, which has been transformed by farmer and conservationist Robin Page.

Would his methods work elsewhere?

0603Wye's Choice2001091420010917

She visits Wye in Kent to find out how a community business that began as a recycling company is now revitalising the local economy and community life.

Could such ideas work on a national scale?

0604The Adventure Valley2001092120010924

She visits the villages of Bedlinog and Trelewis in South Wales.

0605The Arts Factory2001092820011001

She looks at a project in the Rhondda Valley.

0606A New Balance2001100520011008

Sandra Sykes meets a woman who set up a nature club for her children, from which the Kippen Environment Centre developed.

0607A River Alive2001101220011015

Series about proactive communities.

`A River Alive'.

Jessica Holm hears how landowners, farmers and anglers have worked together to make remarkable improvements in the River Tamar.

06082001101920011022

Series about communities acting to improve their quality of life.

0701The London Wetlands Centre20020201

Communities acting to improve their quality of life.

`The LONDON Wetlands Centre'.

Sir Peter Scott has realised his dream of bringing nature into the heart of LONDON.

0702Rheged20020208

Series about communities acting to improve their quality of life.

`Rheged'.

Julian Hector visits a remarkable service station created by locals for locals, just off the M6.

0703River Swale Regeneration Project20020215

Community action series.

`River Swale Regeneration Project'.

Chris Baines travels along the River Swale, meeting people who are trying to stop it from flooding.

0704The Green Light Trust20020222

Series about community projects.

`The Green Light Trust'.

Jessica Holms finds out about a tree-planting scheme in Suffolk that has its roots in the rainforests of Papua New Guinea.

070520020301

Series about communities acting to improve their quality of life.

Jessica Holm looks at a scheme to sustain the local fishing industry in Orkney by boosting lobster numbers.

0706Bankside Open Spaces20020308

Series about communities acting to improve their quality of life.

`Bankside Open Spaces'.

Chris Baines visits Southwark to meet local people who work to maintain their parks.

0707The Gaia Energy Centre20020315

Community action series.

`The Gaia Energy Centre'.

Paul Evans visits the Gaia Energy Centre, which began as the visitors' centre of Britain's first commercial wind farm.

0708A Tale Of Two Boat Lifts20020322

Series about communities acting to improve their quality of life.

`A Tale of Two Boat Lifts'.

Jessica Holm on the history of two projects due to be completed this spring.

080120020524

Series about communities acting to improve their quality of life.

Chris Baines visits SHEFFIELD to find out how the Regen School is helping people to run regeneration projects.

080220020531

Series about communities acting to improve their quality of life.

Jessica Holm visits a Wiltshire village to find out how the locals got together to run their own village shop.

0803Belfast Bog Meadows20020607

Series about communities acting to improve their quality of life.

`Belfast Bog Meadows' Chris Baines visits a wetland preservation project in the heart of Belfast.

0804Broughshane20020614

Series about communities acting to improve their quality of life.

`Broughshane'.

Chris Baines visits the `garden village of Ulster' to see how the locals are shaping their future.

080520020621

Series about communities acting to improve their quality of life.

Jessica Holm visits Eldonian Village in LIVERPOOL.

0806Uist Art20020628

Series about communities acting to improve their quality of life.

`Uist Art'.

Jessica Holm visits the Outer Hebrides to find how a new arts centre is changing islanders' lives.

080720020705

Chris Baines meets pioneering conservationist Miriam Rothschild, whose passion for wild flowers has helped to preserve them all over the British countryside.

0901Wild Redesdale - A Rural Renaissance20021011

Steve Chalke visits Northumberland, an area trying to promote economic growth in the aftermath of the foot and mouth epidemic.

0902Joined Up Living20021018

Series about communities acting to improve their quality of life.

2: `Joined up Living'.

Steve Chalke visits Europe's largest zero-energy development in Beddington, South LONDON.

0903Wooden Heart20021025

Series about communities acting to improve their quality of life.

3: `Wooden Heart'.

Steve Chalke meets a man trying to revive the hardwood industry of his native Scotland.

0904Working In Hope Street20021101

Steve Chalke visits the Women's Technology and Education Centre in BLACKPOOL.

0905Hillfarmers Making Furniture20021108

Steve Chalke visits the valleys of Montgomeryshire, where traditional hill farmers are working together to plant woodlands and use the thinnings to make furniture.

0906Venice School Meals20021115

Series about communities acting to improve their quality of life.

Steve Chalke visits Venice, where farmers are supplying the city's schools with locally grown organic food.

0907Bromley-by-bow Health Centre20021122

Series about communities acting to improve their quality of life.

Steve Chalke visits Bromley-by-Bow health centre, the first to be owned by its patients.

1001Boats Of Hope20030321

In the first of a new series, Steve Chalke discovers how in an area blighted by the demise of the shipping industry, a group of long term unemployed people in Govan, GLASGOW are providing hope for themselves and the community.

By building and then sailing traditional Norse-Gaelic square sail boats, they are retraining for the job market and rediscovering purpose as well as reconnecting with their rich cultural heritage.

Now the Gal Gael Trust is inspiring another community hundreds of miles south in DEVONport, Plymouth, to develop their own regeneration scheme.

1002Arts For Our Sake20030328

Steve Chalke visits a once failing school in County Durham which now boasts Specialist Status in the Performing Arts, working with the local community.

".

1003Talking Rubbish20030404

Take thousands of tonnes of cardboard and wood from steelworks in SHEFFIELD.

Add wool sludge from the textile industry.

Mix together with vast quantities of the city's garden waste.

Place in a giant warehouse.

When composted sell the lot.

This week Steve Chalke meets Graham Wiles of the Green Business network, who loves talking rubbish, and who has just launched this new scheme which is reducing landfill, recycling waste and reclaiming the talents of the longterm unemployed.

1004Getting Fresh20030411

Steve Chalke visits pioneering schools in Nottinghamshire and Gloucestershire, that are getting fresh locally produced food onto their lunch menus.

1006From Farm To Fork20030425

In the light of work being done to secure a better way of life for farmers, we hear from the Chairman of the Sustainable Development Commission, Jonathon Porritt as to how providing locally produced food to hospitals and schools could provide a vital lifeline.

Steve Chalke finds out how small steps are being made by a farmer in Powys and how the latest research at Cardiff University not only highlights the benefits but shows how the UK can learn from the success of many European countries.

1007It's A Goal20030502

macclesfield Town Football Club may be the smallest club in the Nationwide league, but they have big ideas about their role in the local community.

Instead of opening the stadium gates once a fortnight, they have just received planning permission for a £6 million multi-use facility, to be owned by the community and used by them 365 days of the year.

Steve Chalke hears of their plans to make their ground a hub for sport, health, education, culture, and business.

1101Help On The Doorstep20030822

Homeless young people in Grimsby are literally building their own futures thanks to a local charity Doorstep, which has joined forces with the building industry to form a Community Construction Training Company.

Steve Chalke meets the trainees who have not only learnt skills, but are now tenants in the houses they themselves have built, and hears from the founder Monica Chatterton MBE about how Doorstep has helped over twenty two thousand youngsters during the last twelve years.

1102Save The Family20030829

Keeping the family together is the vital ingredient which makes Save The Family unique.

Thousands of homeless families fleeing such traumas as domestic violence or drug addiction and its consequences have found refuge and a new start at their base, Plas Bellin Hall in North Wales.

Steve Chalke finds out how residents, who had been previously trapped in a web of tragedy, point to the fact that this is the first place where they have received respect and understanding.

1103From Justice To Gentleness20030905

The Old Courthouse in Lambeth is now home to the Jamyang Buddhist Community.

1104New Life Over Loch Ness20030912

In a hanging valley overlooking Loch Ness, the villagers of Abriachan are redefining life in a small Highland community.

They combine the lifestyle of commuting with communal work on the land.

Even their children are involved from an early age, instilling an ownership, which makes many of them want to return to the area after graduating, instead of being seduced by the cities.

Originally all they wanted was access, but in the event they actually bought twelve hundred acres of the forest surrounding their homes.

It was the first time a community group in Scotland had ever been sold land by the Forestry Commission.

Five years on they have removed a hundred thousand exotic trees and replaced them with a hundred thousand native trees.

They have created delights for the walkers to stumble upon such as the recreation of a Bronze Age hut, a hide overlooking a wildlife haven and interpretation boards voiced up by children.

All these are enjoyed not only by the local community but are free to anyone who passes by.

There is also a fabulous tree house which not only hosts frequent birthday parties but is now becoming an important centre for educational trips.

There is also the sale of the timber for various uses and the potential for drying wood chips for fuel.

Altogether, they have put £35,000 back in to the local economy and nearly £1/2 million into that of the Inverness area.

Now they are looking at affordable housing for their young people's return, having realised the danger that the attractive environment they have created may become little more than an outsized playground for the middle classes or a convenient haven for the retired rich.

/ "For the creel fishermen of Loch Torridon on the far North West coast of Scotland, the removal of the three mile limit in 1985 was the beginning of their worst nightmare.

The invasion of their fishing grounds by trawling fleets threatened the depletion of stocks, damage to equipment and the environment and the eventual closure of their fishery, a fate that has befallen many other fisheries around the world.

Creeling, a sustainable way of catching prawns and other shell fish has been the traditional way of life of the villagers of Shieldaig for centuries, and at least two of their number were not willing to see it just disappear.

Taking their case to the then Scottish Office, they fought for 15 years for the establishment of a trawler free zone, and very unusually for these cases, they won.

With protection guaranteed for the next five years, they were determined to ensure that their careful management was given independent recognition.

To this end they have just been awarded The Marine Stewardship Council Certificate for well-managed and environmentally sustainable fisheries.

Only seven fisheries world-wide have been granted this award and they are the first in Europe.

But their achievement isn't just on paper.

Twelve creel boats now fish the Loch, their two man crews joining forces to form the Shieldaig Export Company, a co-operative which sells the local catch live to the Spanish market.

All in all over sixty per cent of the village's workforce have found employment, in an industry where the future looks more assured.

".

1105Fishing For The Future20030919

For the creel fishermen of Loch Torridon on the far North West coast of Scotland, the removal of the three mile limit in 1985 was the beginning of their worst nightmare.

The invasion of their fishing grounds by trawling fleets threatened the depletion of stocks, damage to equipment and the environment and the eventual closure of their fishery, a fate that has befallen many other fisheries around the world.

Creeling, a sustainable way of catching prawns and other shell fish has been the traditional way of life of the villagers of Shieldaig for centuries, and at least two of their number were not willing to see it just disappear.

Taking their case to the then Scottish Office, they fought for 15 years for the establishment of a trawler free zone, and very unusually for these cases, they won.

With protection guaranteed for the next five years, they were determined to ensure that their careful management was given independent recognition.

To this end they have just been awarded The Marine Stewardship Council Certificate for well-managed and environmentally sustainable fisheries.

Only seven fisheries world-wide have been granted this award and they are the first in Europe.

But their achievement isn't just on paper.

Twelve creel boats now fish the Loch, their two man crews joining forces to form the Shieldaig Export Company, a co-operative which sells the local catch live to the Spanish market.

All in all over sixty per cent of the village's workforce have found employment, in an industry where the future looks more assured.

1106Whitehaven - A Phoenix From The Ashes20030926

The medieval town of Whitehaven, once a vibrant port with a rich Georgian heritage, became in the 1990s so desolate that many suggested closing it down and throwing away the key! The mines had closed, the port lost ninety nine per cent of its trade in ten years and the failing structure of the harbour could no longer support the fishing industry.

Just at the time when there seemed little left, a small band of optimists formed the Whitehaven Development Company.

Their philosophy of improving the infrastructure of both the harbour and the town in order to win back businesses and tourism, earned the support of a number of agencies and drew down funding to the value of £56 million, money which is now seeing Whitehaven rise like a legendary PHOENIX from the ashes.

There was even a fire! The PARISh Church was burnt to the ground, leaving Jim Baker the new vicar staring at the charred historic tower, which now stood alone.

Yet, out of these ashes a chain of events led to another strand in the regeneration of Whitehaven.

That tower became a community centre with a vibrant café that attracted the unwelcome attention of scores of young people.

Concerned for their needs Jim Baker and Kerry Maxwell, a member of the congregation, decided to set up another cafe in the nearby historic Market Hall, where the youngsters could train as chefs and waitresses whilst gaining qualifications.

The Whitehaven Community Trust was born.

1201Fair Deal20040109
1202The Family Service20040116

Changing Places reveals more stories of ordinary individuals who have brought remarkable changes to their localities for the benefit of their whole communities.

2/6.

The Family Service With affordable childcare high on the national agenda, St Chad's Community Project has developed a scheme that has now been in successful operation for more than a decade.

Dealing with youngsters from 1 to 14 years old, as well as providing family support, it has become the region's highest employer, with many of the staff drawn from the local area.

The project's existence has empowered local people to start addressing local problems and it's believed that it has also lowered truancy and crime figures.

/ With affordable childcare high on the national agenda, St Chad's Community Project has developed a scheme that has now been in successful operation for more than a decade.

1203A Mountain For The People20040123

3/6.

A Mountain For The People Residents from three villages in North Wales have clubbed together and are trying to buy a mountain to develop rural employment opportunities for the community.

Their spur was to prevent a farm which came up for sale being divided up, and the buildings converted into cottages for holiday lettings If they succeed they will become the first Welsh group jointly to buy land for the benefit of local people.

They have to raise £400,000 in the next two years and pool the energies of both ENGLISH and Welsh speaking groups to decide how best to manage a mountain rich in wildlife, landscape features, geology, archaeology and opportunities for business or leisure.

They are finding it's easy to unite in opposition to holiday homes, but more challenging to agree on what sort of development should take place.

/ Residents from three villages in North Wales have clubbed together and are trying to buy a mountain to develop rural employment opportunities for the community.

1204Byker And Newcastle Waste20040130

"BAN waste" grew from the concerns of local residents to the Newcastle City Council's proposal to replace the existing incinerator at Byker with a new plant.

Having stopped that development, they have spent the last three years producing a plan for recycling huge amounts of the city's waste.

Their revolutionary procedure of emulating parliament in using select committees made up of local residents, council officers, and representatives of trade unions, has drawn up a blueprint for how grassroots organisations can work effectively.

Steve Chalke reports.

120520040206

Changing Places reveals more stories of ordinary individuals who have brought remarkable changes to their localities for the benefit of their whole communities.

1206The Wind Farmers20040213

Dismayed by a seventy five per cent drop in their income in the late 1990s, three farmers in the Conwy valley decided to cash in on the most obvious asset of their region, the power of the wind.

Risking all they had they are the first farmers to have conceived, developed and owned their own wind farm.

The first two turbines have been in production since January 2003, and they are currently awaiting planning permission to put up nine more turbines.

Determined to share their success with their local community, this second phase will see them contribute £200,000 a year to the community, though payments to local community councils, the setting up of an energy savings scheme and the chance for local people to invest in a bond scheme.

Nevertheless a local opposition group has been very vocal in its objections and planning permission will not go uncontested.

Web site says it was 20040109 and 20040116.

Sandra Sykes meets three hill farmers in North Wales who want to expand their wind farm.

Dismayed by a seventy five per cent drop in their income in the late 1990s, the three farmers in the Conwy valley decided to cash in on the most obvious asset of their region, the power of the wind.

1301Sherwood Revisited20040402

With mines closing all around them, the miners at Ollerton Colliery decided to meet to discuss what they would do if the same fate befell them.

The meeting had been called for 7.00pm, but out of the blue another meeting was held at 3.00pm by British Coal, declaring the mine was to close.

For Stan Crawford and the other miners, 'What if?' became 'What now?' They were determined that something like this must never happen to them again.

After two years of hard negotiation, they bought the 91-acre colliery site for a deposit of £1.

Their aim: To build the Sherwood Energy village, where families could live, work, learn and play powered by renewable energy - an energy that wouldn't cost the Earth.

1401Farming The City20040416

In 1980 part of a housing estate in SHEFFIELD was demolished and a city farm took its place.

Steve Chalke visits the farm to find them still meeting new challenges a quarter of a century later.

1402Transforming The Earth20040423

In the foothills of the Grampians, a Scottish couple, are growing cabbages the size of footballs, and strawberries as large as plums, on land which had grown virtually nothing for the last fifty years.

Their secret is a technique of combining rock dust waste from the local quarry with municipal compost, transforming infertile earth into rich deep soils.

Steve Chalke finds out how their discovery has won them almost £100,000 of research funding from the Scottish Executive and speaks to scientists about the validity of their claims.

1404The Angels Of East Manchester20040430

Sandra Sykes visits Gorton in East MANCHESTER where a six million pound project is just about to begin which will turn a derelict Franciscan friary and church into the focal point of a regeneration scheme providing employment, training, and enterprise as well as improved community and health facilities.

Known as The Angels the whole scheme has been planned and organised by a small group of local people who after seven years of ambitious yet careful preparation are at last seeing their plans take shape.

Presented and produced by Sandra Sykes.

1405 LASTThe People's Railway20040507

Sandra Sykes visits Wensleydale in North YORKshire where, as if in anticipation of a recent government policy document, the community have been working for the last fourteen years on the restoration and operation of their railway line.

Now Wensleydale Railway plc is unique in holding all five operating licences and controlling part of the national network at a local level.

Opened primarily as a passenger service for the community, as well as a means of bringing in tourists without their cars, the line is already boosting trade in local shops and providing much needed job opportunities.

1501Our Kids And Orchids20040924

Yvonne Ellis hears how rare and beautiful orchids, many under threat, are being preserved thanks to pupils at Writhlington Comprehensive School in Somerset.

We discover how Simon Pugh Jones has managed to capture the imagination of a group of ordinary school children to be totally enthraled by the orchid world, conservation and social enterprise and whether their efforts are simply a novel idea or whether they are actually playing a significant role in orchid conservation world-wide.

1502Owning An Island20041001

When the people of North Harris in Scotland's Western Isles had the chance to buy their island, all the omens were in their favour.

New land reform legislation, financial support and a real will to improve the environmental and economic future of North Harris all played their part.

But freedom to develop and care for the dramatic landscape also brings responsibilities.

Sandra Sykes meets the crofters, weavers, teachers and others who are meeting the challenge of owning an island.

1503The Cornwall Heathland Project20041008

Yvonne Ellis visits the 30 square miles of CHINA clay extraction to the north of St Austell where a partnership is being forged between the mining industry, the county council and ENGLISH Nature, in the largest heathland restoration initiative of its kind in Europe.

After oil, CHINA clay is the UK's biggest mineral export with a wide range of uses, from fine porcelain to the gloss on this Radio Times.

Yet in spite of its great economic value its waste products have a huge environmental impact on local communities.

If you have similar stories of restoring landscapes then we would like to hear from you.

Please write to write to Changing Places, BRISTOL BS8 2LR.

1504The Hemp Revival20041015

Hemp, with its narcotic properties bred out, is re-emerging as a versatile and profitable crop.

The fibres can be used as an alternative to cotton and as filler for car door panels, whilst the oil from its seeds is used in foods and even as the slip agent in plastic bags making them easier to open! Yvonne Ellis meets the former grain baron near YORK who is now growing hemp and other non-food crops, finding them to be beneficial to wildlife as well as having the potential to rejuvenate the rural economy.

1505 LASTCommunities In Trust20041022

Providing affordable homes for local people is a huge problem for many communities.

Sandra Sykes visits the village of High Bickington in DEVON where the villagers are working closely with county and district councils to achieve a solution which will benefit not just home owners but the local school and village economy too.

If your community has solved the problem of affordable housing then we would like to hear from you.

1601Green Funerals20050121

Dylan Winter gets to grips with one of the biggest environmental pressure groups in the country - the green funeral movement.

Dylan visits a woodland burial site and finds out that there are a surprising number of options for the environmentally-minded funeral planner.

1602Pocket Parks20050128

Dylan Winter visits Northamptonshire, the home of the pocket park.

These small areas of land are managed for wildlife and people by the local community and have transformed neighbourhoods in town and country.

As he discovers, they're as varied as volunteers make them, and demand a high level of dedication and enthusiasm from their community keepers.

1603On Your Bike20050204

In 1977, John Grimshaw and fellow bike activists in BRISTOL started to build a cycle path.

By the end of this year, there will be 10,000 miles of paths forming the National Cycle Network across Britain.

Yvonne Ellis finds out how John and his organisation, Sustrans, achieved this, and how they might encourage us to get out of our cars and onto our bikes.

1604Green Gyms20050211

Dylan Winter meets the people who have given up the treadmill and rowing machine of the gym to cut down trees and rake leaves.

Green Gyms came on the scene eight years ago and have since spread across the UK.

The idea is to get fit and improve the environment, without ever needing to step into Lycra.

Dylan packs his wellies and joins in on a session with the Rochdale group.

1605Bug Roofs20050218

In this week's Changing Places, Yvonne Ellis visits what has been called 'ENGLAND's Little Rainforest' - Canvey Island in Essex.

It may seem like an unlikely haven for wildlife, but this brownfield site on what used to be an oil refinery is jam packed with rare and special insects.

As plans go ahead to build a business park on the site, Yvonne Ellis discovers how this will be a development with a difference.

The insect inhabitants of the island are calling the shots, with plans to protect their habitats by building bee banks, leaving rough grassland, and creating brown roofs on the tops of the buildings.

But as Yvonne discovers, not everyone is happy about the development.