The Business Of Race

Episodes

EpisodeFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
012005121220060219

A few years ago, no one had heard of diversity training, but now it's big business, with diversity trainers springing up everywhere, helping us understand our differences and guiding different ethnic groups towards peaceful co-existence.

Public sector bodies do it because the law obliges them to promote good race relations.

The private sector does it because it wants to be able to sell its products to all ethnic groups.

But does it work? Munira Mirza sets out to investigate whether we can be made more sensitive to each other, or whether, by emphasising difference, diversity training might unwittingly be divisive.

012005121220060219

A few years ago, no one had heard of diversity training, but now it's big business, with diversity trainers springing up everywhere, helping us understand our differences and guiding different ethnic groups towards peaceful co-existence.

Public sector bodies do it because the law obliges them to promote good race relations.

The private sector does it because it wants to be able to sell its products to all ethnic groups.

But does it work? Munira Mirza sets out to investigate whether we can be made more sensitive to each other, or whether, by emphasising difference, diversity training might unwittingly be divisive.

02 LAST2005121920060226

According to Trevor Phillips, head of the Commission for Racial Equality, parts of Britain are sleep-walking to segregation, with different races choosing to live parallel but separate lives.

But do the different races in Britain stare at each other with mutual hostility and incomprehension?

Munira Mirza investigates the evidence, and reveals new research, commissioned by the Radio 4, which shows the extent to which black students in Britain may be held back by their own perceptions of what white people think of them.

02 LAST2005121920060226

According to Trevor Phillips, head of the Commission for Racial Equality, parts of Britain are sleep-walking to segregation, with different races choosing to live parallel but separate lives.

But do the different races in Britain stare at each other with mutual hostility and incomprehension?

Munira Mirza investigates the evidence, and reveals new research, commissioned by the Radio 4, which shows the extent to which black students in Britain may be held back by their own perceptions of what white people think of them.