Business Matters [world Service]

Global business news, with live guests and contributions from Asia and the USA.

Episodes

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20170530

British Airways chief executive Alex Cruz says he will not resign as the airline fights to save its reputation after the mass cancellations and delays caused by an IT failure.
We hear from passengers still struggling to get to their destinations as well as Mr Cruz himself.

Also on the programme,the fight to clear the so called Chennai Six.We speak to the family of one of the six British anti-piracy contractors held by Indian authorities in the contentious dispute.

The BBC's Edwin Lane looks at calls for the Japanese government to tackle the problem of excessive working hours in the country.

And, what's the weirdest question you've ever been asked in a job interview? We hear some of your interview horror stories, and ask Peter Reilly of the UK Institute of Employment Studies, what's fair game in a job interview.

The BBC's Fergus Nicoll is joined throughout the programme from Singapore by Simon Littlewood president of ACG Global and from Raleigh, North Carolina, by entrepreneur August Turak. They're also joined from Kolkata by the BBC's Rahul Tandon.

Picture: Reuters.

20170531

Foreign ministers from the Organization of American States meet in Washington DC on Wednesday to try and find a solution to the political and economic crisis in Venezuela.
Professor Ricardo Hausmann of Harvard University assesses the situation.

Also on the programme, India's latest GDP figures are out on Wednesday, Jyoti Malhotra, consulting editor at the Indian Express tells what to look out for.

Drug overdoses are now the number one cause of injury-related deaths in the United States, according to the Atlanta-based Centres for Disease Control. Most are caused by prescription opioids, and one knock-on effect is that morgues are becoming overwhelmed. Adam Allington on the Marketplace programme in the US reports.

And the BBC's Gavin Fischer reports on the threat to South Africa's small scale diamond miners, the Zama Zamas.

The BBC's Fergus Nicoll is joined throughout the programme from Dehli by Jyoti Malhotra and from Washington DC by Adam Allington. They're also joined from Singapore by the BBC's Juiliana Liu.

Picture credit:EPA

20170601

US President Donald Trump is poised to pull the country out of the Paris climate accord, US media has reported quoting senior officials.
The 2015 accord for the first time united most of the world in a single agreement to mitigate climate change.
We hear the views of Dr Irwin Stelzer of the Hudson Institute in Washington DC and Professor Bjorn Lomborg of Copenhagen Business School and author of 'The Sceptical Environmentalist'.

Also on the programme,the BBC's Anna Holligan reports on the Dutch tech company, trying to make our need for batteries a thing of the past with their new light sensitive technology.

And, are ties now just so last year in the workplace? Beyzade Beyzade, employment barrister at the London Law Practice assesses the tie's place in the modern office.

The BBC's Roger Hearing will be joined throughout the programme from New York by Matt Cooper of Skillshare international and from Hong Kong by Andrew Peaple, deputy Asia finance editor at the Wall Street Journal. They'll also be joined from Taiwan by the BBC's Cindy Sui.

Picture: Daniel Leal-Olivas, AFP/Getty Images.

20170606

Qatar is isolated as its neighbours impose an air and sea blockade but what are the wider business implications? We hear from Dr Theodore Karasik, an analyst of regional geopolitics based in Washington DC.

In France, Emmanuel Macron is hoping to follow his success in winning the presidency last month with another victory in upcoming parliamentary elections. The BBC's Hugh Schofield reports from Paris.

The UK general election is just two days off and over the past few weeks we've been hearing from senior representative of the major parties. Today it's the turn of the Scottish National Party's Stuart Hosie to be grilled by Susannah Streeter.

We cast the net a little wider to draw in some of the business headlines from elsewhere in the world and cross to Jakarta to hear from the BBC's Rebecca Henschke who tells us about a drive to count the country's islands definitively and register their names with the UN.

Disposable incomes for many Indians are up which in turn has resulted in an 11% jump on eating out in restaurants. That's helped tempt both global and regional Indian brands, as Rahul Tandon reports from Kolkata.

And with us throughout the programme are Dave Shaw of Scripps News who's in Washington DC and in Hong Kong, Catherine Yeung, Investment Director at Fidelity International.

Picture description: A Saudi woman and a boy walking past the Qatar Airways branch in the Saudi capital Riyadh, after it had suspended all flights to Saudi Arabia following a severing of relations between major gulf states and gas-rich Qatar.
Photo credit: Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images

20170607

President Trump has sided with Saudi Arabia in the escalating crisis over Qatar, but the Qatari ruling family has expressed shock at the diplomatic rift with several of its neighbours. Our Diplomatic Correspondent James Robbins has been speaking to the Qatari Foreign Minister, Sheikh Muhammad bin Abd-al-Rahman al-Thani.

A charity called the International Rescue Committee says millions of children in East Africa and in Yemen are at risk of dying from cholera and other preventable waterborne diseases. We hear from Ciaran Donnelly, the IRC's Vice-President of International Progammes.

With election day on Thursday, voters in the UK have another 24 hours of campaigning to decide who to back. We've been giving equal airtime on this programme to representatives of all the main national parties and it's the turn of Conservative MEP Daniel Hannan who's been interviewed by the BBC's Rob Young.

Thursday's general election falls just 11 days before formal negotiations are due to begin over Britain's departure from the European Union; the raison d'etre of the UK Independence Party. Does that mean that the party's essential purpose no longer exists and it's now a spent force? Susannah Streeter quizzes UKIP MEP Roger Helmer.

We cast the net a little wider to draw in some of the business headlines from elsewhere in the world and cross to Taiwan to hear from the BBC's Cindy Sui.

And joining us throughout the programme are Mitchell Hartman of Marketplace in Portland, Oregon and in Hong Kong, Anjani Trivedi of the Wall Street Journal's Heard on the Street column.

Picture description: Qatari Foreign Minister Mohammed bin Abdulrahman al-Thani gives a press conference in Doha on May 25, 2017.
Photo credit: KARIM JAAFAR/AFP/Getty Images

20170608

The former FBI director, James Comey, is set to testify to Congress that President Trump asked for his loyalty a few months before firing him. The opening statement of Mr Comey's evidence to the Senate Intelligence Committee has been published online. His appearance on Thursday has been eagerly anticipated - given the investigation into alleged collusion between the Trump election campaign and Russia. We have analysis on America's reaction to the revelations.
In Sri Lanka, expensive infrastructure projects are lying unused, even as the country is weighed down by Chinese loans it took to build them. The economy is struggling with a debt crisis and so the Sri Lankan government is now being forced to hand control of some of the projects to China. This is being fiercely opposed by people in some parts of the country. The BBC's Yogita Limaye reports from Sri Lanka.
Brazil's economy has just emerged from the longest recession in its history, but its politics seems about to lurch back into chaos Michel Temer, the man leading the country since the impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff is himself now on trial before the Supreme Electoral Tribunal which could remove him from office as well. Our South American Business Reporter, Daniel Gallas investigates.
And throughout, our two guests on opposite sides of the Pacific - Peter Morici, professor of international business at the university of Maryland- who's in Washington, and journalist Puja Mehra in Delhi.

(Photo: President Trump and James Comey. Credit: Reuters.)

20170610

It looks as if Theresa May's administration will be propped up with support from the Democratic Unionists, a small party from Northern Ireland. It's unlikely to be a formal coalition, but a looser agreement of support. The overall results tell us a lot about the divided nature of Britain -- young versus old, rich versus poor, remain versus leave, city versus country. How will the minority government try to bridge those divides, both in how it governs Britain and in its Brexit negotiations? We ask Daniel Hannan, a Conservative member of the European Parliament.

In a week and a half, representatives of the UK and EU will sit down to begin discussing Brexit. The divorce terms, the financial settlement and the future relationship all have to be thrashed out. German businesses are certainly worried the election result will complicate Brexit talks, as Arthur Fischer, chief executive of the Berlin Stock Exchange, explains.

We also discuss three more of the biggest stories from the week - Apple launched a voice-activated home device, which seemed to underwhelm tech analysts. Gulf states imposed an air and sea blockade on Qatar over its alleged funding of extremism. And the UK general election result surprised politicians across Europe. Nina Trentmann from the Wall Street Journal in London and Caleb Melby from Bloomberg in New York give us their thoughts.

The guest throughout the show is Professor Danny Samson from the Department of Management and Marketing at the University of Melbourne in Australia.

(Photo: Theresa May. Credit: Getty Images.)

20170613

Under pressure UK Prime Minister Theresa May tells her Conservative MPs she will fix the mess created by last week's shock British election, where the party lost its majority in Parliament.
Mrs May told MPs she'd serve them as leader as long as they wanted, but how long might that be? Our political correspondent Rob Watson brings us the latest.

Also on the programme, we hear about the so called "Sin Tax" in Saudi Arabia, that's causing some companies to hoard cigarettes and fizzy drinks. Journalist Essam al Ghalib in Jeddah explains more.

One of the World's most famous photo agencies, Magnum, is toying with the idea of outside investment for the first time. The company's chief executive David Kogan tells us why.

And the Puerto Rican dance hit making Latin music mainstream. We hear about the runaway success of Despacito.

The BBC's Roger Hearing is joined throughout the programme from Beijing by Duncan Clark, expert on the Internet and entrepreneurship in China, and from New York by Jason Abbruzzese, business reporter at the US website Mashable. They'll also be joined from Taiwan by the BBC's Cindy Sui.

Picture: Getty Images.

20170614

The announcement by Travis Kalanick came as the former US Attorney-General, Eric Holder, published the findings of his investigation into corporate ethics at Uber - a company that's been dogged by allegations about harassment and discrimination. So what do Uber's backers make of these developments? Freada Kapur Klein, a California-based venture capitalist and philanthropist, gives her view.

Police in rural Thailand recently raided a house and discovered 474 iPhones and 347,000 unused SIM cards, among other computer hardware. All this kit was dedicated to boosting the online profiles of web users in China by showering their pages with likes and positive comments. But why? Sasiwan Mokhasen, who broke the story for the Khaosod English news website in Bangkok, tells us.

Also on the programme, the Hong Kong government will introduce a bill to stop the ivory trade there by 2021. Hong Kong is one of the top transit centres for ivory on its way to China - a country that, along with the US, has already banned the trade. We hear why it matters from Park Manager Erik Mararv of Garamba National Park is in the north-eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo.

The BBC's Fergus Nicoll is joined by Kimberly Adams of US radio station Marketplace from Washington DC and David Kuo of the Motley Fool website in Singapore.

Picture: Getty Images

20170615

The US Federal Reserve has increased interest rates for the second time this year, Michelle Fleury assesses the economic impact it will have. Cindy Sui reports from Taiwan on the country's weakening relations with the Chinese mainland.

20% of all children in wealthy countries lives in poverty, that's according to a new report by Unicef. Laurence Chandy - Director of Data, Research and Policy at the charity - explains more.

Alison van Diggelen, host of freshdialogues.com, reports from the 'Visionary Awards' - the so-called 'Oscars of Silicon Valley' - on why there are still not enough women in the tech sector. Plus, Consulting Editor at the Indian Express Jyoti Malhotra, joins us from Delhi.

Also in the programme, the BBC's Dave Lee reports from E3, the 'Electronic Entertainment Expo' 2017.

(Picture: Dollar notes, Credit: Getty Images)

20170616

As the UK Prime Minister orders a public inquiry into the fatal fire in London - which killed at least 17 people - the Mayor of London has faced an angry crowd demanding answers to why such a preventable catastrophe happened. In the wake of similar fires worldwide, we speak to Sean Smith, Professor of Construction Innovation at Edinburgh Napier University. An expert in building regulations, he tells us how such needless deaths can be prevented.
Senior figures from the US administration are hosting a gathering of Central American leaders in Miami to work out new ways of working together - at a time when budget cuts are going to have an impact on what can and can't be done. The BBC's Luis Fajardo is covering the conference for us.
In the Kenyan capital, Nairobi, representatives from more than a hundred countries meet at a conference to discuss how farmers could maximise data sharing to improve their businesses. We hear what they've had to say. Meanwhile a maize shortage is making it hard for shoppers to buy flour in the shops. Farmers have run out - government silos are empty - and imports can't keep up with demand. Ferdinand Omondi travelled to Eldoret to find out what's been going wrong.
Next week mobile phone roaming charges are being scrapped for people who live and travel within the 28 - for now - member states of the European Union. They'll be able to call, text and use the web on a mobile device for the price they pay at home. Joe Miller has been getting reaction on the border between Poland and Germany.
And....as Elon Musk and his Falcon rocket programme aims to made the dream of commercial space travel a reality with SpaceX; we hear from a rival in New Zealand. Peter Beck is founder of a company called Rocket Lab, testing his own small-scale, low-cost Electron rocket to take satellites into space. He's been talking to us about his dream to aim for the stars.
Throughout the hour we hear analysis and debate from both sides of the globe with Kara Alaimo - Assistant Professor at Hofstra University and Author of "Pitch, Tweet, or Engage on the Street" in New York and Tony Nash - chief economist at Complete Intelligence - from Singapore.

Picture Credit: DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images

Resident of a nearby council estate watches smoke billowing from Grenfell Tower on June 14, 2017 in west London. The massive fire ripped through the 27-storey apartment block in west London in the early hours of Wednesday, trapping residents inside as 200 firefighters battled the blaze.

20170617

President Trump has said he's cancelling his predecessor Barack Obama's agreement with the Cuban government, two years after relations between the countries were restored. At a ceremony in Miami, Mr Trump described the deal as completely one-sided. Will Grant in the Cuban capital, Havana. reports on how the Obama reforms had changed the way Cuba does business.

Plus, Business Matters discusses retail giant Amazon's announcement that it is to purchase Organic food company Whole Foods. We hear from British families of the so - called 'Chennai 6', who are trying to get their family members released from prison in India.

Catherine Tillotson is the managing partner of Scorpio Partnership, a wealth management company for rich people discusses why rich people find it harder than you might think, to give their money away.

Roby Young is joined for comment throughout the programme by Olivia Rosen-Man, a journalist and audio producer, from Sydney in Australia.

( PICTURE: MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

20170707

As leaders of the world’s twenty largest economies arrive in the northern German city of Hamburg, thousands of protestors took to the streets. Several police officers were injured as violence erupted. We get the latest from BBC correspondent Jenny Hill. As the EU and Japan announce their free trade deal, we speak to Shihoko Goto of the Northeast Asia Program at the Wilson Center in Washington. And the BBC’s Timothy McDonald reports from the Philippines, where new technology is disrupting the craft of guitar making. Roger Hearing is joined throughout the programme by entrepreneur and author August Turake in North Carolina and investment director Catherine Yeung in Hong Kong. (Photo credit Alexander Koerner/Getty Images)

20170708

Just as the protestors on Hamburg's streets have varied demands, so too do the leaders of the G20. The US, for example, wants more trade tariffs (especially on steel imports) - a policy that not all members agree with. We get the latest on the summit from our correspondent in Hamburg, Amir Paivar. London-based PR firm Bell Pottinger apologises after its social media campaigns caused offence in South Africa. Nikita Ramkissoon from the Save South Africa campaign tells us her objections to it. Plus, we meet the astronomer turned entrepreneur Dr Kim Nilson, whose company Pivigo matches data scientists with firms who need them. Susannah Streeter is joined throughout the programme by Peter Ryan, senior business correspondent for ABC in Sydney. (Picture credit Alexander Koerner/Getty Images)

20170711

The fighting is over in Mosul - but how can Iraq rebuild its second city? And how long will it take? We hear from Matthew Schweitzer of the Education for Peace in Iraq Center. The BBC’s Tamasin Ford reports from Abidjan in Ivory Coast about the informal economy of parkers - groups of men who make a living out of helping people park their cars. Mother Teresa was known throughout the world for her work helping the poor. Is it right for the Missionaries of Charity to copyright the garment that made them famous, and that might make them money? We ask veteran Catholic journalist, John Allen. Roger Hearing is joined throughout the programme by writer and researcher Parag Khanna from the Centre on Asia and Globalisation in Singapore, and Diana Furchtgott-Roth, Director of the Economics21 Manhattan Institute in Washington.
(Photo credit: FADEL SENNA/AFP/Getty Images)

20170712

The US President’s son, Donald Trump Jr., has published email conversations between him and a Russian lawyer, in which she offered to hand over material damaging to the Democrat candidate, Hillary Clinton. Professor Jared Yates Sexton, who has written extensively on the case, joins us to discuss this latest development. The BBC's Matthew Kenyon reports from Wimbledon on how marketing has transformed tennis and other sports. The BBC’s Cindy Sui is in Taipei where restrictions have been tightened on retired civil servants visiting mainland China. Roger Hearing is joined throughout the programme by Shameen Prashantham, Associate Professor at the China Europe International Business School in Shanghai and Katie Long from the US public radio programme, Marketplace.
(Photo credit: Win McNamee/Getty Images)

20170713

We also hear about the potential danger of one of the world’s largest icebergs breaking away from Antarctica. We speak to international trade and shipping expert Professor Michael Tamvakis.Web companies have been protesting against plans in the US to rewrite the rules governing the internet. California based tech consultant Ben Parr explains the current regulations.Rob Young is joined throughout the programme by two guests on opposite sides of the world; Ralph Silva from the Silva Research Network in Toronto and Tripti Lahiri, the bureau chief for Quartz in Hong Kong. (Photo by Igo Estrela/Getty Images)

20170714

Before Donald Trump came to power, he pledged to create 25 million jobs. To do this, he said he would make the US economy grow by 3% every year - a policy dubbed MAGA-nomics. We speak to economist Terry Savage. Should employers research potential candidates on social media? New proposals say 'legal grounds' should be needed, and we hear from employment lawyer Gillian Howard. And the BBC's Vivienne Nunis meets Afrobeat musician turned politician Bobi Wine in Kampala. Rob Young is joined throughout the programme by activist and financial reform advocate Alexis Goldstein in Washington and Mark Ridley, a consultant at Transform Performance International in the UK.
(Image: President Trump in front of crowds. Photo credit: Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

20170715

JP Morgan Chase has reported a 13% rise in second quarter profits to $7bn, but the bank's boss Jamie Dimon expressed his frustration over what he sees as the country's political inability to invest in infrastructure and overhaul the tax code. Emily Glazer from the Wall Street Journal analyses Mr Dimon's outburst.
How would you manage without the internet? Three weeks ago a ship's anchor severed the fibre-optic cable off the Somali capital Mogadishu and since then the country has been a data desert. Ahmad Farah, a Somali travel agent based in Nairobi, explains how his business has been affected.
Australia is a nation that prides itself on its cricket, but the sport is in crisis. The authorities are trying to change the finance structure of the game. Steve Georgakis, senior sports lecturer at the University of Sydney, tells us why many of the players are unhappy.
(PHOTO CREDIT: AFP/GETTY IMAGES)

20170718

Kenyans will elect their new president, parliament and local politicians on 8 August. But they're nervous - over 1,000 people were killed after violence broke out following the last elections in 2007. The BBC's Vivienne Nunis reports from Nairobi. Plus, Netflix's quarterly earnings boost its share price by 9% - we hear from tech analyst Jay Somaney. And BBC correspondent Phil Mercer on why the state of South Australia is placing a new tax levy on its banks. Roger Hearing is joined throughout the programme by investment director Catherine Yeung in Singapore and Alexander Kaufman, Huffington Post Business and Environment reporter, in New York.
(Photo credit SIMON MAINA/AFP/Getty Images)

20170719

President Trump will allow Obamacare to collapse after a losing another vote on Monday, when two senators said they could not back a bill to repeal the health policy. We hear from Professor Jay Wolfson from the Morsani College of Medicine. The BBC's Joe Miller reports from Breman on how Brexit might affect the UK's historic trade links with the German city. Plus we speak to author and retired Admiral William McRaven who says 'Making Your Bed' is the key to success in life.

(Photo credit: Alex Wong / Ghetty images)

20170720

The total weight of plastics ever produced is equivalent to one billion elephants. Scientists in the United States have calculated humanity has manufactured 8.3 billion tonnes of plastics since the 1950's. Experts warn new solutions are needed urgently. We speak to lead author Professor Roland Geyer who hopes his study will lead to a radical rethink of how we make, use, and dispose of plastics. US and Chinese officials have cancelled a press conference in which a $347 billion trade deficit was to be discussed. Plus, Coca Cola are being sued for misleading the Public on the health risks of the drink.

(Photo credit: Tracey Williams)

20170721

Police in the US and Europe have closed the biggest criminal marketplaces on the internet. EBay profits are down and how biotech experts are attempting to tackle mosquito-borne diseases by releasing twenty million mosquitoes. Also in the programme we discuss transparency in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Our guests today are media entrepreneur, Diane Brady and Simon Littlewood of Asia Now Consulting.

(Photo credit: Getty Images)

20170722

North Korea's economy accelerated at its fastest pace in 17 years last year. Jean Lee of the Woodrow Wilson Center assesses the figures. And amid reports that US citizens are to be banned from travelling to North Korea, we find out more from Matt Kulesza of Young Pioneer Tours, which arranges visits to the country. Also the BBC's Manuela Saragosa reports from Sicily, where EU agricultural subsidies may be helping to keep the mafia alive. Plus U2 will play a huge homecoming concert in Dublin. Our guest today is Sean Turnell, senior economics advisor to the government of Myanmar.

(Photo credit: MANAN VATSYAYANA/AFP/Getty Images)

20170725

Google parent company Alphabet has announced a cut of more than a quarter in its profits after taking into account a record $2.7 billion fine from the EU. We hear from BBC North America technology reporter, Dave Lee, in San Francisco. With the Kenyan presidential election just two weeks away, the BBC’s Will Bain asks who’s paying for what could be one of the most expensive elections per head in the world. We have the latest from the investigation into allegations of Russia's involvement in the 2016 US election, as Jared Kushner, Donald Trump's son in law, gives evidence. Roger Hearing is joined throughout the programme by Alison Van Diggelen, host of Fresh Dialogues in California and journalist Madhavan Narayanan in Delhi.

(Photo credit: JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)

20170726

The US House of Representatives has voted to impose fresh sanctions on Russia, despite President Donald Trump objecting to the legislation.
Daniel Fried, former sanctions coordinator at the US State Department looks at the latest step.

Is infrastructure spending really the secret to boosting economic growth? We look at the cost and benefits of planned projects around the globe.

And, the "world's most useless airport" is finally about to get its first scheduled flight.

The BBC's Roger Hearing will be joined throughout the programme from Singapore by Asit Biswas, distinguished visiting Professor at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, and from Los Angeles by Andy Uhler from the Marketplace programme at American public radio. They'll also be joined from Taiwan by the BBC's Cindy Sui and by Chris Heathcote author of the Global Infrastructure Outlook report and the travel journalist Simon Calder.

Picture: US President Donald Trump and Russia's President Vladimir Putin shake hands during a meeting on the sidelines of the G20 Summit in Hamburg this month. Credit:Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images.

20170727

The US has expanded its sanctions regime against Venezuela to thirteen key officials, amidst continued political tensions in the country. We hear from Carlos Camacho, Venezuela correspondent for the Latin American Herald Tribune.

US President Donald Trump has said that transgender people cannot serve in 'any capacity' in the military. We hear from one of the first members of the infantry to come out as transgender. Plus, there are increasing fears that the opioid prescription drug crisis could be adversely affecting the US economy. Hudson Senior Fellow Irwin Stelzer assesses the impact it is having.

Also in the programme, a report from Australia where shoppers throw out an estimated 20% of the groceries that they buy. Now the government has promised to halve that amount.

As Britain announces a ban on diesel and petrol cars by 2040, we discuss the repercussions for the car industry as a whole. From Delhi, we are joined by Jyoti Malhotra, Consulting Editor at the Indian Express and from Washington, by Alexis Goldstein, activist and financial reform advocate.

(Picture: Venezuelan flag being held up, Credit: Getty Images)

20170728

The US Senate has overwhelmingly endorsed new sanctions against Russia. It's prompted Vladimir Putin to complain that relations between Russia and the US are being damaged by domestic American politics. What will President Trump do when the bill reaches his desk? We hear from Edward Lucas, who writes about Russia for The Economist magazine and Dr Frank Schauff of the Association of European Businesses, a group representing foreign investors in the country.

It’s been a summer of severe flooding in parts of southern China. Paul Sayers of the Environment Change Institute at Oxford University joins us to discuss the impact on the affected areas. Meanwhile, the warm temperatures and long days of summer in northern Sweden present some unique business opportunities, as the BBC’s Elizabeth Hotson has been discovering.

Plus, as US comic Jerry Seinfeld is named the highest paid comedian by the US business magazine Forbes – thanks in part to his exclusive deal with Netflix - we explore the power of new media on the career of an entertainer.

Fergus Nicoll is joined by two CEOs on the programme. Guarav Dhillon founded the data integration company SnapLogic in California and Professor Jasper Kim of Ewha University in Seoul, founded the Asia-Pacific Global Research Group.

(Picture: Russian President Vladimir Putin arrives for the first day of the G20 summit in Hamburg this month. Photo credit: Morris MacMatzen/Getty Images)

20170729

North Korea’s latest ballistic missile launch was in the direction of Japan. The Japanese Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe, says the world needs to increase pressure on Pyongyang to end its missile testing programme. We'll discuss North Korea's latest intercontinental missile test, which experts say puts US cities in range.

As the United States Food and Drug Administration announces that it wants to limit the amount of nicotine in cigarettes, we asked Professor Stanton Glantz from the University of California San Francisco for his assessment.

Plus, an underground mail train in London is coming back on track as part of the London Postal Museum. The BBC’s Richard Collings went on board.

Rob Young is joined on the programme by Colin Peacock, who’s a journalist at Radio New Zealand.

(Photo: A man looks at images of missile launches and military exercises in a public square in Pyongyang. Photo credit: ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)

20170801

Venezuelans elected a new assembly on Sunday to draft a new constitution but there are many doubts about it as anti-government protests continue. Under the sanctions, US firms and individuals are banned from doing business with Mr Maduro. We're live in Caracas.

President Trump dismisses White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci after 10 days in the office. He felt his comments to a reporter were 'inappropriate' for a person in his position. We speak to Politico journalist Daniel Lippman.

Plus two of the biggest TV networks in the US are combining: Discovery Communications, owner of Discovery Channel and Animal Planet, has bought Scripps Networks for $14.6bn.

And....money in your sneakers. Our reporter puts on her best pair and finds out why sports shoes are now a billion dollar market.

(Photo: JUAN BARRETO/AFP/Getty Images)

20170802

Apple is back on the march again as sales are up once more, with shares up 7% in after hours trading. Our regular commentator Roger Bootle assess the Donald Trump Presidency to date - has he performed as well as his twitter account claims?

In downtown Sao Paulo, authorities have struggled with illegal drug dealing, in an area called Cracolandia or “crackland? The BBC’s Daniel Gallas has been checking out efforts to revitalise the district. Plus we talk about hugging in the workplace. Is it ever OK to hug a colleague?

Roger Hearing is joined throughout the programme by Kimberly Adams from our US sister programme Marketplace, and David Kuo of the Motley Fool in Singapore.

(Photo: Apple logo in Sydney. Credit: Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images)

20170803

The company that provided the technology for Venezuela's voting system says the turnout in Sunday's controversial election was inflated by at least one million votes. We speak to Marc Weisbrot at the Center for Economic and Policy Research in Washington DC.

The world of crypto-currencies is a mystery to many of us but the range is growing in part because Bitcoin itself split into two this week. We hear from Oliver Von Landsberg Sadie who runs BitcoinBro which advises very wealthy people on how to invest in this alternative reality.

In the far north of Alaska local people are divided over their future relationship with oil. President Obama banned oil drilling in the Arctic Ocean and President Trump wants to get it started. Claire Marshall reports from Alaska's northern coastline.

Last week we featured a report from Sydney about the city's food waste. In today's programme we hear from John Owens of Forgottenharvest.org - last year it shifted 22,500 of unwanted fresh food to people who couldn't have afforded to buy it.

Indonesia's president, Joko Widodo, has ordered the police to find those reasonable for an acid attack against the country's top anti-corruption investigator. We cross to Jakarta to speak to the BBC's Rebecca Henschke

Perfume is the theme of a new multi-sensory exhibition in London and the BBC's Mike Johnson went along for a sniff.

And joining us throughout the programme are Professor Peter Morici of the University of Maryland in Washington DC and Sushma Ramachandran, former Business Editor of The Hindu; she's with us from Delhi.

Picture description: A man casts his vote to elect a Constituent Assembly in Caracas on July 30, 2017.
Picture credit: RONALDO SCHEMIDT/AFP/Getty Images

20170804

Iran's newly re-elected president, Hassan Rouhani, warns the US that Iran will not accept "malicious attempts to