Britain In A Box

Paul Jackson explores the stories behind the making of programmes which have become part of TV history.

Television chronicles the huge changes in tastes and attitudes of post-war Britain but why do some programmes hit the nerve of British society at a particular time? Paul Jackson takes us behind the scenes to investigate the cock-ups and coincidences, inspirations and intrigues that went into making the programmes that have become icons of television history.

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0101The Street20030510

Paul Jackson explores the stories behind the making of programmes which have become part of TV history.

Television chronicles the huge changes in tastes and attitudes of post-war Britain but why do some programmes hit the nerve of British society at a particular time? Paul Jackson takes us behind the scenes to investigate the cock-ups and coincidences, inspirations and intrigues that went into making the programmes that have become icons of television history.Coronation Street defined a new gritty realism in British life, a recognition that ordinary lives had their own validity, democracy, Greek tragedy and kitchen sink drama all rolled into one.

And yet, when it was created in 1960 it was almost shelved by Granada who saw it as incomprehensibly northern.

0101The Street20030510

Paul Jackson explores the stories behind the making of programmes which have become part of TV history.

Television chronicles the huge changes in tastes and attitudes of post-war Britain but why do some programmes hit the nerve of British society at a particular time? Paul Jackson takes us behind the scenes to investigate the cock-ups and coincidences, inspirations and intrigues that went into making the programmes that have become icons of television history.Coronation Street defined a new gritty realism in British life, a recognition that ordinary lives had their own validity, democracy, Greek tragedy and kitchen sink drama all rolled into one.

And yet, when it was created in 1960 it was almost shelved by Granada who saw it as incomprehensibly northern.

0102For Those Watching In Black And White20030517

In 1969 a programme was broadcast to make the most of the recently launched colour television service.

By the time its final final was screened in 1987, Pot Black had not only saved and re-energised snooker, it had also changed for ever the relationship between television and sport.

0102For Those Watching In Black And White20030517

In 1969 a programme was broadcast to make the most of the recently launched colour television service.

By the time its final final was screened in 1987, Pot Black had not only saved and re-energised snooker, it had also changed for ever the relationship between television and sport.

0103Yoghurt Pots And Sticky-backed Plastic20030524

The programme that was to become a national institution and change the way broadcasters talked to children, started life out as a single weekly edition which consisted mainly of a former army officer playing with railway layouts and a former Miss Great Britain showing dolls.

No pets, no badges and no ship, just the ever familiar theme tune and the original name: Blue Peter.

0103Yoghurt Pots And Sticky-backed Plastic20030524

The programme that was to become a national institution and change the way broadcasters talked to children, started life out as a single weekly edition which consisted mainly of a former army officer playing with railway layouts and a former Miss Great Britain showing dolls.

No pets, no badges and no ship, just the ever familiar theme tune and the original name: Blue Peter.

0104 LASTIt's Only A Game20030531

The final programme of the current series, in which Paul Jackson goes behind the scenes to investigate the inspirations and intrigues that went into making the programmes that have become icons of television history.

Who would have thought that locking a group of strangers in the Big Brother house with no contact with the outside world and recording their every move with a battery of cameras would become the broadcasting phenomenon of the new millennium, and change for ever our relationship with that box in the corner?

0104 LASTIt's Only A Game20030531

The final programme of the current series, in which Paul Jackson goes behind the scenes to investigate the inspirations and intrigues that went into making the programmes that have become icons of television history.

Who would have thought that locking a group of strangers in the Big Brother house with no contact with the outside world and recording their every move with a battery of cameras would become the broadcasting phenomenon of the new millennium, and change for ever our relationship with that box in the corner?

0201Blags And Jags20040703

So much more than just a shoot 'em up and chase 'em out police series, The Sweeney not only attracted a weekly audience of 13 million and won the eventual approval of both the police and villains, it also changed forever the way television drama was written and produced.

Out went long theatrical speeches filmed in large studios and in came sharp, witty dialogue filmed almost entirely on location.

0201Blags And Jags20040703

So much more than just a shoot 'em up and chase 'em out police series, The Sweeney not only attracted a weekly audience of 13 million and won the eventual approval of both the police and villains, it also changed forever the way television drama was written and produced.

Out went long theatrical speeches filmed in large studios and in came sharp, witty dialogue filmed almost entirely on location.

0202Art For Art's Sake2004071020080402

In 1957, anxiety about the success of commercial TV and a need to fight for viewers while remaining distinctive led the BBC to launch a regular arts programme and a children's presenter was chosen to run it.

By the time monitor came to an end just over seven years later, it had created the concept of arts programming as we now know it and re-invented much of the basic grammar of television as it went along.

0202Art For Art's Sake2004071020080402

In 1957, anxiety about the success of commercial TV and a need to fight for viewers while remaining distinctive led the BBC to launch a regular arts programme and a children's presenter was chosen to run it.

By the time monitor came to an end just over seven years later, it had created the concept of arts programming as we now know it and re-invented much of the basic grammar of television as it went along.

0203A Still Tongue Makes For A Quiet Life2004071720080319

Although it only ran for 17 episodes, Patrick McGoohan's The Prisoner so entranced its audience that it has grown from a 1960s curiosity to a worldwide cult.

0203A Still Tongue Makes For A Quiet Life2004071720080319

Although it only ran for 17 episodes, Patrick McGoohan's The Prisoner so entranced its audience that it has grown from a 1960s curiosity to a worldwide cult.

0204 LASTAnd It's Goodnight From Him20040724

A technical breakdown at the Bafta's meant that Ronnie Corbett and Ronnie Barker were required to entertain the waiting audience for twenty minutes, completely unrehearsed.

The Two Ronnies' flawless performance prompted one BBC executive to turn to another and say, "How about a show with them then?"

The rest is history...well almost.

0204 LASTAnd It's Goodnight From Him20040724

A technical breakdown at the Bafta's meant that Ronnie Corbett and Ronnie Barker were required to entertain the waiting audience for twenty minutes, completely unrehearsed.

The Two Ronnies' flawless performance prompted one BBC executive to turn to another and say, "How about a show with them then?"

The rest is history...well almost.

0301Welcome Aboard2007021720080305

Fifty years ago, the BBC broke the 'toddlers' truce' and stayed on air for the first time between 6-7pm.

Traditionally this was when the screen went blank, to allow parents to put their youngsters to bed.

The cause of this revolution? A programme that was revolutionary in its own right.

Aimed at an emerging species - the teenager - The Six-Five special steamed up the track each Saturday evening, bringing with it the acts who would become the foundation of British rock and roll, and putting the audience in front of the camera for the first time.

0301Welcome Aboard2007021720080305

Fifty years ago, the BBC broke the 'toddlers' truce' and stayed on air for the first time between 6-7pm.

Traditionally this was when the screen went blank, to allow parents to put their youngsters to bed.

The cause of this revolution? A programme that was revolutionary in its own right.

Aimed at an emerging species - the teenager - The Six-Five special steamed up the track each Saturday evening, bringing with it the acts who would become the foundation of British rock and roll, and putting the audience in front of the camera for the first time.

0302Shameless2007022420080326

He analyses the success of this off-beat comedy drama which centres around the adventures of an apparently highly dysfunctional family in a council estate in Manchester.

Contributiors include writer and creator Paul Abbott and stars David Threlfall, Maggie O'Neill and Gerard Kearns.

An off-beat drama-comedy, centred around the adventures of an apparently highly dysfunctional family in a council estate in Manchester.

No episode involving the Gallagher family would be complete without its fair share of sex, drugs, violence and pyromania, but the heart of the show is 'family' through and through.

Joined by writer and creator Paul Abbott, stars David Threlfall, Maggie O'neill and Gerard Kearns, as well as the producers, commissioners and directors who made it all happen, Paul Jackson asks whether this is just a programme with an amoral heart, or a 21st century version of the Waltons?

0302Shameless2007022420080326

He analyses the success of this off-beat comedy drama which centres around the adventures of an apparently highly dysfunctional family in a council estate in Manchester.

Contributiors include writer and creator Paul Abbott and stars David Threlfall, Maggie O'Neill and Gerard Kearns.

An off-beat drama-comedy, centred around the adventures of an apparently highly dysfunctional family in a council estate in Manchester.

No episode involving the Gallagher family would be complete without its fair share of sex, drugs, violence and pyromania, but the heart of the show is 'family' through and through.

Joined by writer and creator Paul Abbott, stars David Threlfall, Maggie O'neill and Gerard Kearns, as well as the producers, commissioners and directors who made it all happen, Paul Jackson asks whether this is just a programme with an amoral heart, or a 21st century version of the Waltons?

0303 LASTKittens Or Bananas2007030320080227

What is perhaps ITV's finest ever sitcom actually started life as a single play, written by an auditor for the East Midlands electricity board, and had as its lead an actor who had never done TV comedy before.

Writer and creator Eric Chappell, television executive Sir Paul Fox and actor Paul Jones, help trace the origins of Rising Damp back to the banana box - a play that took its name from a comment made in a debate on the entitlement of non-British born residents to call themselves 'British'.

Rising Damp began as a single play called The Banana Box, written by an auditor for the East Midlands Electricity Board, and had as its lead an actor who had never done TV comedy before.

Contributors include writer and creator Eric Chappell, TV executive Sir Paul Fox and actor Paul Jones

0303 LASTKittens Or Bananas2007030320080227

What is perhaps ITV's finest ever sitcom actually started life as a single play, written by an auditor for the East Midlands electricity board, and had as its lead an actor who had never done TV comedy before.

Writer and creator Eric Chappell, television executive Sir Paul Fox and actor Paul Jones, help trace the origins of Rising Damp back to the banana box - a play that took its name from a comment made in a debate on the entitlement of non-British born residents to call themselves 'British'.

Rising Damp began as a single play called The Banana Box, written by an auditor for the East Midlands Electricity Board, and had as its lead an actor who had never done TV comedy before.

Contributors include writer and creator Eric Chappell, TV executive Sir Paul Fox and actor Paul Jones

0401World In Action2011020520120103

A second chance to hear Paul Jackson with stories about classic TV hits. Tonight, the show that led the way for current affairs on ITV, World in Action. Coming up later this week, the laddish antics of Men Behaving Badly and the dulcet tones of whispering Bob Harris in The Old Grey Whistle Test.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.

Paul Jackson's series on classic TV programmes focuses on World in Action.

Paul Jackson assesses the impact and legacy of the current affairs programme that launched the television career of John Pilger and helped free the Birmingham 6.

'World In Action' first appeared on our screens in 1963 and finally bowed out in 1998, by which time it had become a watch-word for tough journalism, graphic visuals and public impact.

Paul is joined by journalists who worked on the programme, politicians who provided part of the focus of its attention and television executives who had to keep it in line whilst defending its journalism - including John Pilger, Chris Mullin, Lord Douglas Hurd, Sir Jeremy Isaacs, Dorothy Byrne, Steve Anderson and Ray Fitzwalter.

0401World In Action2011020520120103

A second chance to hear Paul Jackson with stories about classic TV hits. Tonight, the show that led the way for current affairs on ITV, World in Action. Coming up later this week, the laddish antics of Men Behaving Badly and the dulcet tones of whispering Bob Harris in The Old Grey Whistle Test.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.

Paul Jackson's series on classic TV programmes focuses on World in Action.

Paul Jackson assesses the impact and legacy of the current affairs programme that launched the television career of John Pilger and helped free the Birmingham 6.

'World In Action' first appeared on our screens in 1963 and finally bowed out in 1998, by which time it had become a watch-word for tough journalism, graphic visuals and public impact.

Paul is joined by journalists who worked on the programme, politicians who provided part of the focus of its attention and television executives who had to keep it in line whilst defending its journalism - including John Pilger, Chris Mullin, Lord Douglas Hurd, Sir Jeremy Isaacs, Dorothy Byrne, Steve Anderson and Ray Fitzwalter.

0402The Old Grey Whistle Test2011021220120104

Another chance to catch the programme in which Paul Jackson shines a light on TV classics that helped define their time. Today, he turns an ear to The Old Grey Whistle Test, the music show devoted to the rock album, which began life just over 40 years ago and survived for a further sixteen.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.

Paul Jackson's series on classic TV shows focuses on The Old Grey Whistle Test.

0402The Old Grey Whistle Test2011021220120104

Another chance to catch the programme in which Paul Jackson shines a light on TV classics that helped define their time. Today, he turns an ear to The Old Grey Whistle Test, the music show devoted to the rock album, which began life just over 40 years ago and survived for a further sixteen.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.

Paul Jackson's series on classic TV shows focuses on The Old Grey Whistle Test.

0403Men Behaving Badly2011021920120105
20150811 (R4)

Another chance to catch the programme in which Paul Jackson shines a light on TV classics that helped define their time. Tonight, the 1990s sitcom whose title spelled out exactly what the audience saw: Men Behaving Badly, featuring contributions from producer Beryl Vertue, writer Simon Nye and stars Martin Clunes and Leslie Ash.

Producer: Ed Morrish.

Paul Jackson on the classic TV comedy that became indelibly associated with 'lad culture'.

This week, a sitcom that started life on ITV, lost its star after the first series and was cancelled when the ratings dipped for the second - but which crossed over to the other side to become one of the BBC's most successful sitcoms of the 1990s.

'Men Behaving Badly' made its cast and writer famous, became indelibly associated with "lad culture", and finally bowed out with a much-complained about Christmas special.

The show features interviews with stars Martin Clunes, Leslie Ash and Harry Enfield, writer Simon Nye, and producer Beryl Vertue, as well as comedy writer/executive Paul Mayhew-Archer, and Simon Donald, the co-creator of Viz.

0403Men Behaving Badly2011021920120105
20150811 (R4)

Another chance to catch the programme in which Paul Jackson shines a light on TV classics that helped define their time. Tonight, the 1990s sitcom whose title spelled out exactly what the audience saw: Men Behaving Badly, featuring contributions from producer Beryl Vertue, writer Simon Nye and stars Martin Clunes and Leslie Ash.

Producer: Ed Morrish.

Paul Jackson on the classic TV comedy that became indelibly associated with 'lad culture'.

This week, a sitcom that started life on ITV, lost its star after the first series and was cancelled when the ratings dipped for the second - but which crossed over to the other side to become one of the BBC's most successful sitcoms of the 1990s.

'Men Behaving Badly' made its cast and writer famous, became indelibly associated with "lad culture", and finally bowed out with a much-complained about Christmas special.

The show features interviews with stars Martin Clunes, Leslie Ash and Harry Enfield, writer Simon Nye, and producer Beryl Vertue, as well as comedy writer/executive Paul Mayhew-Archer, and Simon Donald, the co-creator of Viz.

0404Driving School20110226

Another chance to catch Paul Jackson with the last in his most recent series that goes behind the scenes of TV classics and the eras that produced them.

Today Paul concludes with the hit show, Driving School, which only ran for six editions, but left an indelible mark on British documentary television and made a national and international star of cleaner Maureen Rees.

Producer: Sarah Taylor.

0404Driving School20110226

Another chance to catch Paul Jackson with the last in his most recent series that goes behind the scenes of TV classics and the eras that produced them.

Today Paul concludes with the hit show, Driving School, which only ran for six editions, but left an indelible mark on British documentary television and made a national and international star of cleaner Maureen Rees.

Producer: Sarah Taylor.

0404 LASTDriving School2011022620120106

Another chance to catch Paul Jackson with the last in his most recent series that goes behind the scenes of TV classics and the eras that produced them.

Today Paul concludes with the hit show, Driving School, which only ran for six editions, but left an indelible mark on British documentary television and made a national and international star of cleaner Maureen Rees.

Producer: Sarah Taylor.

Paul Jackson on the docusoap that arguably spawned Britain's first reality TV celebrity.

In the last programme of the present series, Paul Jackson tells the story behind another TV classic, Driving School.

Broadcast in 1997, the so-called docusoap Driving School was a hit with BBC viewers, commanding audiences of up to 12 million.

In the course of its six-week run, it made a star of Cardiff cleaner, Maureen who had failed her test six times and - in her - spawned, arguably, Britain's first "reality television" celebrity.

Launching a new genre of TV wasn't though in the mind of the programme commissioner who in fact was looking for a relatively cheap programme to fill a gap in the evening schedule for which drama was considered too expensive.

Yet without realising it, with Driving School Alan Yentob had commissioned a TV hit and in its own way the first in a new style of TV programming - the 'docusoap'.

Week after week viewers watched to see if Maureen and her fellow learners would ever pass their driving test as their daily travails were edited into a gripping reality drama.

Paul Jackson dissects how this hit series was made with the producers and directors behind it and what it tells us of the era that spawned it.

0404 LASTDriving School2011022620120106

Another chance to catch Paul Jackson with the last in his most recent series that goes behind the scenes of TV classics and the eras that produced them.

Today Paul concludes with the hit show, Driving School, which only ran for six editions, but left an indelible mark on British documentary television and made a national and international star of cleaner Maureen Rees.

Producer: Sarah Taylor.

Paul Jackson on the docusoap that arguably spawned Britain's first reality TV celebrity.

In the last programme of the present series, Paul Jackson tells the story behind another TV classic, Driving School.

Broadcast in 1997, the so-called docusoap Driving School was a hit with BBC viewers, commanding audiences of up to 12 million.

In the course of its six-week run, it made a star of Cardiff cleaner, Maureen who had failed her test six times and - in her - spawned, arguably, Britain's first "reality television" celebrity.

Launching a new genre of TV wasn't though in the mind of the programme commissioner who in fact was looking for a relatively cheap programme to fill a gap in the evening schedule for which drama was considered too expensive.

Yet without realising it, with Driving School Alan Yentob had commissioned a TV hit and in its own way the first in a new style of TV programming - the 'docusoap'.

Week after week viewers watched to see if Maureen and her fellow learners would ever pass their driving test as their daily travails were edited into a gripping reality drama.

Paul Jackson dissects how this hit series was made with the producers and directors behind it and what it tells us of the era that spawned it.

0501Pop Idol2012063020121003

Paul Jackson returns with a new series of the show that not only celebrates classic television programmes, but also uses them as a window on a particular period in our cultural and social history.

Over the next three days he'll be exploring the innovation of 'Vision On' and assessing the legacy of 'Grandstand', but he kicks off with a programme that re-wrote the rules for talent shows, saved a network and conquered the world.

1. Pop Idol - began life as an idea captured on a scrap of paper... went on to make global superstars of some of its participants... and now generates over one and a half billion dollars a season in advertising income in the US alone. With the help of those who sold and who bought the original UK shows, those who fronted it and those who appeared on it, Paul Jackson traces its step-by-step development.

Those appearing include producers Alan Boyd and Richard Holloway, commissioners Claudia Rosencrantz and David Liddiment, presenters And and Dec, winner Michelle McManus and commentators Mike Smith and Nina Myskow.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.

Over the next three weeks he'll be exploring the innovation of 'Vision On' and assessing the legacy of 'Grandstand', but he kicks off with a programme that re-wrote the rules for talent shows, saved a network and conquered the world.

Those appearing include producers Alan Boyd and Richard Holloway, commissioners Claudia Rosencrantz and David Liddiment, presenters Ant and Dec, winner Michelle McManus and commentators Mike Smith and Nina Myskow.

0501Pop Idol2012063020121003

Paul Jackson returns with a new series of the show that not only celebrates classic television programmes, but also uses them as a window on a particular period in our cultural and social history.

Over the next three days he'll be exploring the innovation of 'Vision On' and assessing the legacy of 'Grandstand', but he kicks off with a programme that re-wrote the rules for talent shows, saved a network and conquered the world.

1. Pop Idol - began life as an idea captured on a scrap of paper... went on to make global superstars of some of its participants... and now generates over one and a half billion dollars a season in advertising income in the US alone. With the help of those who sold and who bought the original UK shows, those who fronted it and those who appeared on it, Paul Jackson traces its step-by-step development.

Those appearing include producers Alan Boyd and Richard Holloway, commissioners Claudia Rosencrantz and David Liddiment, presenters And and Dec, winner Michelle McManus and commentators Mike Smith and Nina Myskow.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.

Over the next three weeks he'll be exploring the innovation of 'Vision On' and assessing the legacy of 'Grandstand', but he kicks off with a programme that re-wrote the rules for talent shows, saved a network and conquered the world.

Those appearing include producers Alan Boyd and Richard Holloway, commissioners Claudia Rosencrantz and David Liddiment, presenters Ant and Dec, winner Michelle McManus and commentators Mike Smith and Nina Myskow.

0502Grandstand2012070720121004

Paul Jackson presents a further edition of the show that not only celebrates classic television programmes, but also uses them as a window on a particular period in our cultural and social history.

Programme 2. Grandstand - the show that for nearly 50 years changed our relationship to sport, brought constant innovation to live TV coverage, and gave us not only David Coleman and Frank Bought but also Des Lynam.

And with the help of the said Lynam, as well as former BBC 1 controllers Sir Paul Fox and Alan Hart, former and current Heads of Sport Jonathan Martin and Barbara Slater, Paul Jackson not only traces the development of Grandstand but also assesses it's legacy and asks whether the BBC is in danger of taking its eye off the sporting ball.

Producers: Oliver Julian & Paul Kobrak.

Programme 2. Grandstand - in a programme recorded before the London Olympics, Paul traces the origins of the show that for nearly 50 years changed our relationship to sport, brought constant innovation to live TV coverage, and gave us not only David Coleman and Frank Bought but also Des Lynam.

0502Grandstand2012070720121004

Paul Jackson presents a further edition of the show that not only celebrates classic television programmes, but also uses them as a window on a particular period in our cultural and social history.

Programme 2. Grandstand - the show that for nearly 50 years changed our relationship to sport, brought constant innovation to live TV coverage, and gave us not only David Coleman and Frank Bought but also Des Lynam.

And with the help of the said Lynam, as well as former BBC 1 controllers Sir Paul Fox and Alan Hart, former and current Heads of Sport Jonathan Martin and Barbara Slater, Paul Jackson not only traces the development of Grandstand but also assesses it's legacy and asks whether the BBC is in danger of taking its eye off the sporting ball.

Producers: Oliver Julian & Paul Kobrak.

Programme 2. Grandstand - in a programme recorded before the London Olympics, Paul traces the origins of the show that for nearly 50 years changed our relationship to sport, brought constant innovation to live TV coverage, and gave us not only David Coleman and Frank Bought but also Des Lynam.

0503 LASTVision On2012071420121005

As Children's TV wave goodbye to BBC1, heading off to their own dedicated channel, Paul Jackson takes a lingering look back at a cult show from the golden era of children's TV. "Vision On" was one of the most successful, funny and anarchic programmes ever to grace the little grey box in the corner; it's 'Gallery' theme music still a trip down memory lane for viewers of a certain age.

Created in 1964 to replace the prosaic "For Deaf Children", Pat Keysall and Tony Hart fronted a programme that aimed squarely at the funny bone. Art, animation, clowning and dangerous stunts - long before "Health and Safety" became a dirty word. "Vision On" was aimed at all children, but worked hard not to exclude the hard of hearing.

Rather than creating a worthy line up, producer Patrick Dowling cultivated the silly, the extraordinary and the dramatic, using new technology to create effects and giving breaks to a wealth of creative talent, acting and technical.

David Sproxton, creator of Aardman Animations, fondly recalls creating his very first short film for "Vision On", while Sylvester McCoy who went on to became Dr Who, and is currently filming The Hobbit with Peter Jackson, recalls close encounters of an explosive kind with the fabulous creations of Wilf Lunn, another graduate of the Ken Campbell school of fearlessness.

"Britain In A Box" explores the role of disability programming with past and present BBC children's controllers; Edward Barnes and Joe Godwin, and talks to Susan Daniels from the National Deaf Children's Society about how TV can be accessible to all - something "Vision On" pioneered with style.

Remembered that Gallery theme music yet?

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.

0503 LASTVision On2012071420121005

As Children's TV wave goodbye to BBC1, heading off to their own dedicated channel, Paul Jackson takes a lingering look back at a cult show from the golden era of children's TV. "Vision On" was one of the most successful, funny and anarchic programmes ever to grace the little grey box in the corner; it's 'Gallery' theme music still a trip down memory lane for viewers of a certain age.

Created in 1964 to replace the prosaic "For Deaf Children", Pat Keysall and Tony Hart fronted a programme that aimed squarely at the funny bone. Art, animation, clowning and dangerous stunts - long before "Health and Safety" became a dirty word. "Vision On" was aimed at all children, but worked hard not to exclude the hard of hearing.

Rather than creating a worthy line up, producer Patrick Dowling cultivated the silly, the extraordinary and the dramatic, using new technology to create effects and giving breaks to a wealth of creative talent, acting and technical.

David Sproxton, creator of Aardman Animations, fondly recalls creating his very first short film for "Vision On", while Sylvester McCoy who went on to became Dr Who, and is currently filming The Hobbit with Peter Jackson, recalls close encounters of an explosive kind with the fabulous creations of Wilf Lunn, another graduate of the Ken Campbell school of fearlessness.

"Britain In A Box" explores the role of disability programming with past and present BBC children's controllers; Edward Barnes and Joe Godwin, and talks to Susan Daniels from the National Deaf Children's Society about how TV can be accessible to all - something "Vision On" pioneered with style.

Remembered that Gallery theme music yet?

Producer: Sara Jane Hall.

06012013050420150810 (R4)

Paul Jackson returns with the series that does much more than celebrating innovative television programmes - it uses them as a window on a particular period in our cultural and social history. In the spotlight over the next three weeks will be: Channel 4's longest running sit com, Desmond's - the OTHER Peckham based comedy which featured Norman Beaton as Desmond, the owner of a West Indian Barber shop; then there's the world's longest running medical soap, BBC1's Casualty.

But first off, Paul Jackson assesses the impact and legacy of the popular current affairs programme that launched the television career of Sue Lawley, and spawned the birth of TV consumer journalism, Nationwide.

Paul talks to the programme's first presenter, Michael Barratt and the show's first director, Keith Clement, who recall the early technical mishaps which threatened to take Nationwide off the air. When Michael announced to viewers that we were going to Glasgow, the viewers would see wavy lines and hear technical clunks. The BBC circuit system was not quite up to speed with the technical ambition of the programme - though within six months, and ever increasing audience numbers, the programme found its feet.

Popular across the nation because of its inclusion of the regions, we hear Sue Lawley on why she felt the programme became a success. We also hear her account of THAT interview with Mrs. Thatcher when housewife, Mrs Diana Gould persisted in questioning Mrs Thatcher on the decision to sink the Argentinian war ship, Belgrano when it 'was sailing away' during the Falklands War.

Producer: Sarah Taylor.

06012013050420150810 (R4)

Paul Jackson returns with the series that does much more than celebrating innovative television programmes - it uses them as a window on a particular period in our cultural and social history. In the spotlight over the next three weeks will be: Channel 4's longest running sit com, Desmond's - the OTHER Peckham based comedy which featured Norman Beaton as Desmond, the owner of a West Indian Barber shop; then there's the world's longest running medical soap, BBC1's Casualty.

But first off, Paul Jackson assesses the impact and legacy of the popular current affairs programme that launched the television career of Sue Lawley, and spawned the birth of TV consumer journalism, Nationwide.

Paul talks to the programme's first presenter, Michael Barratt and the show's first director, Keith Clement, who recall the early technical mishaps which threatened to take Nationwide off the air. When Michael announced to viewers that we were going to Glasgow, the viewers would see wavy lines and hear technical clunks. The BBC circuit system was not quite up to speed with the technical ambition of the programme - though within six months, and ever increasing audience numbers, the programme found its feet.

Popular across the nation because of its inclusion of the regions, we hear Sue Lawley on why she felt the programme became a success. We also hear her account of THAT interview with Mrs. Thatcher when housewife, Mrs Diana Gould persisted in questioning Mrs Thatcher on the decision to sink the Argentinian war ship, Belgrano when it 'was sailing away' during the Falklands War.

Producer: Sarah Taylor.

0601Nationwide20130504

Paul Jackson returns with the series that does much more than celebrating innovative television programmes - it uses them as a window on a particular period in our cultural and social history. In the spotlight over the next three weeks will be: Channel 4's longest running sit com, Desmond's - the OTHER Peckham based comedy which featured Norman Beaton as Desmond, the owner of a West Indian Barber shop; then there's the world's longest running medical soap, BBC1's Casualty.

But first off, Paul Jackson assesses the impact and legacy of the popular current affairs programme that launched the television career of Sue Lawley, and spawned the birth of TV consumer journalism, Nationwide.

Paul talks to the programme's first presenter, Michael Barratt and the show's first director, Keith Clement, who recall the early technical mishaps which threatened to take Nationwide off the air. When Michael announced to viewers that we were going to Glasgow, the viewers would see wavy lines and hear technical clunks. The BBC circuit system was not quite up to speed with the technical ambition of the programme - though within six months, and ever increasing audience numbers, the programme found its feet.

Popular across the nation because of its inclusion of the regions, we hear Sue Lawley on why she felt the programme became a success. We also hear her account of THAT interview with Mrs. Thatcher when housewife, Mrs Diana Gould persisted in questioning Mrs Thatcher on the decision to sink the Argentinian war ship, Belgrano when it 'was sailing away' during the Falklands War.

Producer: Sarah Taylor.

0601Nationwide20130504

Paul Jackson returns with the series that does much more than celebrating innovative television programmes - it uses them as a window on a particular period in our cultural and social history. In the spotlight over the next three weeks will be: Channel 4's longest running sit com, Desmond's - the OTHER Peckham based comedy which featured Norman Beaton as Desmond, the owner of a West Indian Barber shop; then there's the world's longest running medical soap, BBC1's Casualty.

But first off, Paul Jackson assesses the impact and legacy of the popular current affairs programme that launched the television career of Sue Lawley, and spawned the birth of TV consumer journalism, Nationwide.

Paul talks to the programme's first presenter, Michael Barratt and the show's first director, Keith Clement, who recall the early technical mishaps which threatened to take Nationwide off the air. When Michael announced to viewers that we were going to Glasgow, the viewers would see wavy lines and hear technical clunks. The BBC circuit system was not quite up to speed with the technical ambition of the programme - though within six months, and ever increasing audience numbers, the programme found its feet.

Popular across the nation because of its inclusion of the regions, we hear Sue Lawley on why she felt the programme became a success. We also hear her account of THAT interview with Mrs. Thatcher when housewife, Mrs Diana Gould persisted in questioning Mrs Thatcher on the decision to sink the Argentinian war ship, Belgrano when it 'was sailing away' during the Falklands War.

Producer: Sarah Taylor.

0602Desmond's20130511

Paul Jackson continues with the series that does much more than celebrating innovative television programmes - it uses them as a window on a particular period in our cultural and social history.

In the spotlight today is Channel 4's longest running sit com, Desmond's - the OTHER Peckham based comedy which featured Norman Beaton as Desmond, the owner of a West Indian Barber shop and Carmen Munroe who played his wife, Shirley. The 71 episode series first aired on Channel 4 in 1989 and finished in 1994 upon the untimely early death of its star character, 'Desmond', played by Norman Beaton.

Paul speaks to the show's creator, Trix Worrell, who got the idea for setting a comedy in a Peckham West Indian Barber's shop whilst he was on a bus travelling through Peckham on the way to meet comedy producer, Humphrey Barclay.

Both of them share their memories of the creation of Desmond's with Paul Jackson, along with the series' first producer, Charlie Hanson and script editor Paulette Randall. Ram John Holder, one of the show's stars, 'Porkpie' tells Paul how accurately the sit com portrayed the West Indian community and how it was a welcome change to be in a black sit com which was both funny and enjoyed by all sections of the audience.

The then commissioner for Channel 4, Farrukh Dhondy, gives his thoughts on the success of Desmond's and contributors question how much further forward British television is today in its commission of comedies featuring members from the UK's diverse communities.

Producer: Sarah Taylor

0602Desmond's20130511

Paul Jackson continues with the series that does much more than celebrating innovative television programmes - it uses them as a window on a particular period in our cultural and social history.

In the spotlight today is Channel 4's longest running sit com, Desmond's - the OTHER Peckham based comedy which featured Norman Beaton as Desmond, the owner of a West Indian Barber shop and Carmen Munroe who played his wife, Shirley. The 71 episode series first aired on Channel 4 in 1989 and finished in 1994 upon the untimely early death of its star character, 'Desmond', played by Norman Beaton.

Paul speaks to the show's creator, Trix Worrell, who got the idea for setting a comedy in a Peckham West Indian Barber's shop whilst he was on a bus travelling through Peckham on the way to meet comedy producer, Humphrey Barclay.

Both of them share their memories of the creation of Desmond's with Paul Jackson, along with the series' first producer, Charlie Hanson and script editor Paulette Randall. Ram John Holder, one of the show's stars, 'Porkpie' tells Paul how accurately the sit com portrayed the West Indian community and how it was a welcome change to be in a black sit com which was both funny and enjoyed by all sections of the audience.

The then commissioner for Channel 4, Farrukh Dhondy, gives his thoughts on the success of Desmond's and contributors question how much further forward British television is today in its commission of comedies featuring members from the UK's diverse communities.

Producer: Sarah Taylor

0603Casualty2013051820150812 (R4)

Paul Jackson presents a further edition of the show that not only celebrates classic television programmes, but also uses them as a window on a particular period in our cultural and social history.

In the final programme of the current series, he visits the purpose-built studios of the longest running medical drama in the world. Born out of necessity (as a weapon in the weekly battle for audience-share on Saturday nights) "Casualty" has become one of BBC 1's most consistent performers.

Paul discusses the programme's origins with the show's creators (Jeremy Brock and Paul Unwin) and the people who commissioned it and then stood by it during its lean years (Lord Grade and Jonathan Powell). He assesses how much it has changed in its 27 year life with the help of its current (and long-standing) cast (including the returning Patrick Robinson who plays Ash, the ever present Derek Thompson who from the very first episode played Charlie Fairhead, and Pete Salt, the medical consultant on whom Charlie is based) and series Producer Nikki Wilson. And he gauges the future of the programme with the head of BBC 1's scheduling, Dan McGolpin.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.

0603Casualty2013051820150812 (R4)

Paul Jackson presents a further edition of the show that not only celebrates classic television programmes, but also uses them as a window on a particular period in our cultural and social history.

In the final programme of the current series, he visits the purpose-built studios of the longest running medical drama in the world. Born out of necessity (as a weapon in the weekly battle for audience-share on Saturday nights) "Casualty" has become one of BBC 1's most consistent performers.

Paul discusses the programme's origins with the show's creators (Jeremy Brock and Paul Unwin) and the people who commissioned it and then stood by it during its lean years (Lord Grade and Jonathan Powell). He assesses how much it has changed in its 27 year life with the help of its current (and long-standing) cast (including the returning Patrick Robinson who plays Ash, the ever present Derek Thompson who from the very first episode played Charlie Fairhead, and Pete Salt, the medical consultant on whom Charlie is based) and series Producer Nikki Wilson. And he gauges the future of the programme with the head of BBC 1's scheduling, Dan McGolpin.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.

0603 LASTCasualty20130518

Paul Jackson presents a further edition of the show that not only celebrates classic television programmes, but also uses them as a window on a particular period in our cultural and social history.

In the final programme of the current series, he visits the purpose-built studios of the longest running medical drama in the world. Born out of necessity (as a weapon in the weekly battle for audience-share on Saturday nights) "Casualty" has become one of BBC 1's most consistent performers.

Paul discusses the programme's origins with the show's creators (Jeremy Brock & Paul Unwin) and the people who commissioned it and then stood by it during its lean years (Lord Grade and Jonathan Powell). He assesses how much it has changed in its 27 year life with the help of its current (and long-standing) cast (including the returning Patrick Robinson who plays Ash, the ever present Derek Thompson who from the very first episode played Charlie Fairhead, and Pete Salt, the medical consultant on whom Charlie is based) and series Producer Nikki Wilson. And he gauges the future of the programme with the head of BBC 1's scheduling, Dan McGolpin.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.

0603 LASTCasualty20130518

Paul Jackson presents a further edition of the show that not only celebrates classic television programmes, but also uses them as a window on a particular period in our cultural and social history.

In the final programme of the current series, he visits the purpose-built studios of the longest running medical drama in the world. Born out of necessity (as a weapon in the weekly battle for audience-share on Saturday nights) "Casualty" has become one of BBC 1's most consistent performers.

Paul discusses the programme's origins with the show's creators (Jeremy Brock & Paul Unwin) and the people who commissioned it and then stood by it during its lean years (Lord Grade and Jonathan Powell). He assesses how much it has changed in its 27 year life with the help of its current (and long-standing) cast (including the returning Patrick Robinson who plays Ash, the ever present Derek Thompson who from the very first episode played Charlie Fairhead, and Pete Salt, the medical consultant on whom Charlie is based) and series Producer Nikki Wilson. And he gauges the future of the programme with the head of BBC 1's scheduling, Dan McGolpin.

Producer: Paul Kobrak.