Bringing Up Britain

Mariella Frostrup hosts a debate about parenting with families, experts and policy-makers.

At the heart of each debate is a story of a family whose experiences raise relevant issues.

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0101*2008040220080405

Mariella Frostrup hosts a debate about parenting with families, experts and policy-makers.

At the heart of each debate is a story of a family whose experiences raise relevant issues.As bad parenting is blamed for the ills of society, how are we raising the next generation?

0101*2008040220080405

Mariella Frostrup hosts a debate about parenting with families, experts and policy-makers.

At the heart of each debate is a story of a family whose experiences raise relevant issues.As bad parenting is blamed for the ills of society, how are we raising the next generation?

01022008040920080412

When a teenager's behaviour is out of control is it acceptable to tell him to leave home?

01022008040920080412

When a teenager's behaviour is out of control is it acceptable to tell him to leave home?

01032008041620080419

They explore how to achieve the balance between benign neglect and over-stimulation of children.

01032008041620080419

They explore how to achieve the balance between benign neglect and over-stimulation of children.

0104 LAST2008042320080426

A single parent explains why she feels penalised for doing the best for her child.

0104 LAST2008042320080426

A single parent explains why she feels penalised for doing the best for her child.

02012009040820090411

Mariella Frostrup hosts a debate about parenting with families, experts and policy-makers.

Mariella and her guests discuss whether shouting at children inflicts long-term damage or is an inevitable part of busy family life.

As the focus on children's behaviour and parents' management of it increases, are there effective alternatives to yelling at children to get them to do what you want?

The panellists are psychotherapist Sue Gerhardt, Professor Stephen Scott of the National Association of Parenting Practitioners and journalist and writer Jennie Bristow.

Does shouting at children inflict damage or is it an inevitable part of busy family life?

02012009040820090411

Mariella Frostrup hosts a debate about parenting with families, experts and policy-makers.

Mariella and her guests discuss whether shouting at children inflicts long-term damage or is an inevitable part of busy family life.

As the focus on children's behaviour and parents' management of it increases, are there effective alternatives to yelling at children to get them to do what you want?

The panellists are psychotherapist Sue Gerhardt, Professor Stephen Scott of the National Association of Parenting Practitioners and journalist and writer Jennie Bristow.

Does shouting at children inflict damage or is it an inevitable part of busy family life?

02022009041520090418

Mariella Frostrup hosts a debate about parenting with families, experts and policy-makers.

Mariella and her guests ask what parents can do to help children with mental health problems and what constitutes a 'normal' level of unhappiness in childhood and adolescence.

She hears from a mother who fears her unhappy 11-year-old-son will go off the rails in adolescence and a mother and daughter on the drawbacks and benefits of having a mental health diagnosis.

With guests the family therapist Jan Parker, Richard Reeves of the thinktank Demos and Roger Catchpole of YoungMinds.

What can parents do to help children with mental health problems?

02022009041520090418

Mariella Frostrup hosts a debate about parenting with families, experts and policy-makers.

Mariella and her guests ask what parents can do to help children with mental health problems and what constitutes a 'normal' level of unhappiness in childhood and adolescence.

She hears from a mother who fears her unhappy 11-year-old-son will go off the rails in adolescence and a mother and daughter on the drawbacks and benefits of having a mental health diagnosis.

With guests the family therapist Jan Parker, Richard Reeves of the thinktank Demos and Roger Catchpole of YoungMinds.

What can parents do to help children with mental health problems?

02032009042220090425

Mariella Frostrup hosts a debate about parenting with families, experts and policy-makers.

Exploring step-parenting and 'blended families' from the point of view of parents, children and society.

By the age of 16, one in eight children has been through parental separation and is living with a 'new' parent.

For some children such changes can be problematic, while others thrive in stepfamilies.

How can parents help their children to adapt and what do we know about the impact of blended families on children?

Featuring the story of Darren, who has two teenage children, as does his partner.

However, the children do not get on and Darren is worried that the situation is putting strain on all involved.

With guests Christine Tufnell of Care for the Family, Penny Mansfield from the relationship charity One Plus One, Nick Woodall from the Centre for Separated Families, and Elly Farmer, a clinical psychologist who also speaks for the Centre for Social Justice on family issues.

Exploring step-parenting and 'blended families'.

02032009042220090425

Mariella Frostrup hosts a debate about parenting with families, experts and policy-makers.

Exploring step-parenting and 'blended families' from the point of view of parents, children and society.

By the age of 16, one in eight children has been through parental separation and is living with a 'new' parent.

For some children such changes can be problematic, while others thrive in stepfamilies.

How can parents help their children to adapt and what do we know about the impact of blended families on children?

Featuring the story of Darren, who has two teenage children, as does his partner.

However, the children do not get on and Darren is worried that the situation is putting strain on all involved.

With guests Christine Tufnell of Care for the Family, Penny Mansfield from the relationship charity One Plus One, Nick Woodall from the Centre for Separated Families, and Elly Farmer, a clinical psychologist who also speaks for the Centre for Social Justice on family issues.

Exploring step-parenting and 'blended families'.

0204 LAST2009042920090502

Mariella Frostrup hosts a debate about parenting with families, experts and policy-makers.

Dealing with children who don't fit in easily can be challenging for parents and teachers, but if we seek to modify behaviour and attitude too much, do we risk homogenising children?

Featuring a mother who feels that her inattentive and quirky son is a problem at home and school.

She worries that she is failing him by trying to mould him to be more like her other children, but also feels strongly that he needs to fit in to get on in life.

Mariella's guests are writer and journalist Fiona Millar, youth worker Shaun Bailey, Dr Jackie Ravet of Aberdeen University and law lecturer Daniel Monk.

Does seeking to modify children's behaviour and attitude risk homogenising them?

0204 LAST2009042920090502

Mariella Frostrup hosts a debate about parenting with families, experts and policy-makers.

Dealing with children who don't fit in easily can be challenging for parents and teachers, but if we seek to modify behaviour and attitude too much, do we risk homogenising children?

Featuring a mother who feels that her inattentive and quirky son is a problem at home and school.

She worries that she is failing him by trying to mould him to be more like her other children, but also feels strongly that he needs to fit in to get on in life.

Mariella's guests are writer and journalist Fiona Millar, youth worker Shaun Bailey, Dr Jackie Ravet of Aberdeen University and law lecturer Daniel Monk.

Does seeking to modify children's behaviour and attitude risk homogenising them?

03012010092220100925

As the parenting wars escalate and politicians and childcare gurus lock horns over how best to raise our children, Mariella Frostrup and her guests explore the theory of twenty-first century parenting - and the rather messier practice.

This third series of Radio 4's parenting programme begins with a discussion of attachment, the bond between parent and child and the dilemmas at the heart of the care system. As they debate the needs of our most vulnerable children, Mariella and her guests share their research, their personal experience and some very different views on how best to bring up our next generation.

Joining Mariella are Professor Michael Lamb of the University of Cambridge, the writer Kate Figes, Chair of the Careleavers Association Will McMahon, the journalist Camilla Cavendish and John Simmonds of the British Association for Adoption and Fostering. We also hear from John Timpson of After Adoption, Professor Sir Michael Rutter, Nushra Mansuri of the British Association of Social Workers and a mother and daughter brought together through adoption.

Producer: Julia Johnson.

Mariella Frostrup and guests discuss the needs of our most vulnerable children.

This third series of Radio 4's parenting programme begins with a discussion of attachment, the bond between parent and child and the dilemmas at the heart of the care system.

As they debate the needs of our most vulnerable children, Mariella and her guests share their research, their personal experience and some very different views on how best to bring up our next generation.

Joining Mariella are Professor Michael Lamb of the University of Cambridge, the writer Kate Figes, Chair of the Careleavers Association Will McMahon, the journalist Camilla Cavendish and John Simmonds of the British Association for Adoption and Fostering.

We also hear from John Timpson of After Adoption, Professor Sir Michael Rutter, Nushra Mansuri of the British Association of Social Workers and a mother and daughter brought together through adoption.

03012010092220100925

As the parenting wars escalate and politicians and childcare gurus lock horns over how best to raise our children, Mariella Frostrup and her guests explore the theory of twenty-first century parenting - and the rather messier practice.

This third series of Radio 4's parenting programme begins with a discussion of attachment, the bond between parent and child and the dilemmas at the heart of the care system. As they debate the needs of our most vulnerable children, Mariella and her guests share their research, their personal experience and some very different views on how best to bring up our next generation.

Joining Mariella are Professor Michael Lamb of the University of Cambridge, the writer Kate Figes, Chair of the Careleavers Association Will McMahon, the journalist Camilla Cavendish and John Simmonds of the British Association for Adoption and Fostering. We also hear from John Timpson of After Adoption, Professor Sir Michael Rutter, Nushra Mansuri of the British Association of Social Workers and a mother and daughter brought together through adoption.

Producer: Julia Johnson.

Mariella Frostrup and guests discuss the needs of our most vulnerable children.

This third series of Radio 4's parenting programme begins with a discussion of attachment, the bond between parent and child and the dilemmas at the heart of the care system.

As they debate the needs of our most vulnerable children, Mariella and her guests share their research, their personal experience and some very different views on how best to bring up our next generation.

Joining Mariella are Professor Michael Lamb of the University of Cambridge, the writer Kate Figes, Chair of the Careleavers Association Will McMahon, the journalist Camilla Cavendish and John Simmonds of the British Association for Adoption and Fostering.

We also hear from John Timpson of After Adoption, Professor Sir Michael Rutter, Nushra Mansuri of the British Association of Social Workers and a mother and daughter brought together through adoption.

03022010092920101002

As the parenting wars escalate and politicians and childcare gurus lock horns over how best to raise our children, Mariella Frostrup and her guests debate the dilemmas of modern parenting.

In this edition they compare the experience of only children and siblings, ask how family size is changing and debate whether we're having too many children or too few.

As they explore the theory of twenty-first century parenting - and the rather messier practice - Mariella and her guests share advice and some very different views on how best to bring up our next generation.

Mariella Frostrup and her guests ask whether we're having too many children or too few.

03022010092920101002

As the parenting wars escalate and politicians and childcare gurus lock horns over how best to raise our children, Mariella Frostrup and her guests debate the dilemmas of modern parenting.

In this edition they compare the experience of only children and siblings, ask how family size is changing and debate whether we're having too many children or too few.

As they explore the theory of twenty-first century parenting - and the rather messier practice - Mariella and her guests share advice and some very different views on how best to bring up our next generation.

Mariella Frostrup and her guests ask whether we're having too many children or too few.

03032010100620101009

Mariella and her guests share their thoughts this week on the best way of breaking bad news to children.

If you have to tell your kids that you're separating how honest should you be with them? Do we tell our children too much, even treat them as "best friends" at times to the detriment of their emotional well-being? When it comes to bad news in the media - should we let them see everything or should we censor what they hear and see?

Producer: Sarah Taylor.

Mariella Frostrup and her guests debate the best way of breaking bad news to children.

03032010100620101009

Mariella and her guests share their thoughts this week on the best way of breaking bad news to children.

If you have to tell your kids that you're separating how honest should you be with them? Do we tell our children too much, even treat them as "best friends" at times to the detriment of their emotional well-being? When it comes to bad news in the media - should we let them see everything or should we censor what they hear and see?

Producer: Sarah Taylor.

Mariella Frostrup and her guests debate the best way of breaking bad news to children.

0304 LAST2010101320101016

Where has it all gone wrong with children and food? The previous Labour Government spent nearly £2 billion over ten years attempting to tackle childhood obesity levels.

Now more than one in three British children aged 5 to 13 are in the over-weight or obese category.

Yet according to the latest research, parents of over-weight children don't even recognise that their children are too heavy to qualify as healthy.

Mariella and her guests debate the tricky issue of raising healthy children.

Producer: Sarah Taylor.

Mariella Frostrup and her guests ask why children are becoming obese.

0304 LAST2010101320101016

Where has it all gone wrong with children and food? The previous Labour Government spent nearly £2 billion over ten years attempting to tackle childhood obesity levels.

Now more than one in three British children aged 5 to 13 are in the over-weight or obese category.

Yet according to the latest research, parents of over-weight children don't even recognise that their children are too heavy to qualify as healthy.

Mariella and her guests debate the tricky issue of raising healthy children.

Producer: Sarah Taylor.

Mariella Frostrup and her guests ask why children are becoming obese.

0401Feral Kids And Feckless Parents2011121420111217

Mariella Frostrup asks how parents can keep control of their kids.

Programme 1: Feral Kids and Feckless Parents

The August riots in parts of England showed youngsters out of control on the streets, and put huge focus onto parenting skills.

MPs and council leaders warned parents that they should know where their children were at night and keep them indoors and out of trouble.

But parents themselves were saying they were unable to discipline their kids, either because they feared repercussions by the authorities, or because their children were simply physically too strong.

In the first of the new series of "Bringing Up Britain", Mariella Frostrup is joined by a panel of experts to discuss parental discipline right across British society.

How easy is it for us to control our children, especially after they stop being biddable toddlers and begin to assert their own personalities?

Have we given children too many rights and ignored those of parents?

Can you really stop a large teenage child going out, and what restraining measures can you legally use?

And, if your child is going off the rails, how do you break the cycle and get them back into good habits?

Joining Mariella to explore these issues will be:

Charlie Taylor, head teacher and behaviour advisor to the Department of Education;

Sheldon Thomas, who founded "Gangsline" to help youngsters caught up in gangs and their families;

Clem Henricson, social policy analyst and Member of the University of Oxford Centre for Research into Parenting and Children;

Guardian journalist Zoe Williams.

We also find out the results of a survey commissioned by the programme into attitudes to parental discipline.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

0401Feral Kids And Feckless Parents2011121420111217

Mariella Frostrup asks how parents can keep control of their kids.

Programme 1: Feral Kids and Feckless Parents

The August riots in parts of England showed youngsters out of control on the streets, and put huge focus onto parenting skills.

MPs and council leaders warned parents that they should know where their children were at night and keep them indoors and out of trouble.

But parents themselves were saying they were unable to discipline their kids, either because they feared repercussions by the authorities, or because their children were simply physically too strong.

In the first of the new series of "Bringing Up Britain", Mariella Frostrup is joined by a panel of experts to discuss parental discipline right across British society.

How easy is it for us to control our children, especially after they stop being biddable toddlers and begin to assert their own personalities?

Have we given children too many rights and ignored those of parents?

Can you really stop a large teenage child going out, and what restraining measures can you legally use?

And, if your child is going off the rails, how do you break the cycle and get them back into good habits?

Joining Mariella to explore these issues will be:

Charlie Taylor, head teacher and behaviour advisor to the Department of Education;

Sheldon Thomas, who founded "Gangsline" to help youngsters caught up in gangs and their families;

Clem Henricson, social policy analyst and Member of the University of Oxford Centre for Research into Parenting and Children;

Guardian journalist Zoe Williams.

We also find out the results of a survey commissioned by the programme into attitudes to parental discipline.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

0402Birds, Bees And Blushes20111221

Mariella Frostrup and a panel of expert guests debate how parents talk to their children about sex.

In a recent poll only 6% of young people said they got the information they needed from their parents.

If that's the case, why are so many of us failing to have these vital conversations?

Many parents worry about what to say to their children, and when.

And it's not just because it can all be a bit embarrassing.

Mariella and her guests explore how adults' attitudes to children and sexuality colour how they behave as parents.

Are we a society dangerously relaxed about the sexualised clothing, imagery and culture surrounding young people? Or, has the increased awareness of child sexual abuse in recent years made parents deeply uncomfortable with talking and thinking about children and sex at all?

Mariella explores how all of this translates into everyday dilemmas and awkward situations, and pinpoints practical solutions and useful research.

Parents know that children are curious about their bodies and where babies come from, but if your five year old still exposes himself at every family gathering and your teen is online all night with the door closed, what do you do? Perceptions of what is 'normal' differ, but what do we know about how sexual identity develops, and how should that shape these conversations?

Reg Bailey, Chief Executive of The Mothers' Union carried out a recent review into the sexualisation and commercialisation of childhood, Simon Blake is the Chief Executive of Brook, a charity offering sexual health information and services.

They join Viviane Green, adult, child and adolescent psychotherapist and Programe Manager for the MSc in Child and Adolescent Counselling and Psychotherapy, Dept of Psychosocial Studies Birkbeck College and Dr.

Jan Macvarish from the University of Kent to debate the issues.

The columnist and writer Giles Coren talks about the why he wrote a highly personal magazine article about his baby daughter in which he imagined her future sex life.

And parents who think that schools teach too much too young explain why they feel their parental authority is being undermined

Producer: Erin Riley.

Mariella Frostrup and guests on talking to children about sex.

0402Birds, Bees And Blushes20111221

Mariella Frostrup and a panel of expert guests debate how parents talk to their children about sex.

In a recent poll only 6% of young people said they got the information they needed from their parents.

If that's the case, why are so many of us failing to have these vital conversations?

Many parents worry about what to say to their children, and when.

And it's not just because it can all be a bit embarrassing.

Mariella and her guests explore how adults' attitudes to children and sexuality colour how they behave as parents.

Are we a society dangerously relaxed about the sexualised clothing, imagery and culture surrounding young people? Or, has the increased awareness of child sexual abuse in recent years made parents deeply uncomfortable with talking and thinking about children and sex at all?

Mariella explores how all of this translates into everyday dilemmas and awkward situations, and pinpoints practical solutions and useful research.

Parents know that children are curious about their bodies and where babies come from, but if your five year old still exposes himself at every family gathering and your teen is online all night with the door closed, what do you do? Perceptions of what is 'normal' differ, but what do we know about how sexual identity develops, and how should that shape these conversations?

Reg Bailey, Chief Executive of The Mothers' Union carried out a recent review into the sexualisation and commercialisation of childhood, Simon Blake is the Chief Executive of Brook, a charity offering sexual health information and services.

They join Viviane Green, adult, child and adolescent psychotherapist and Programe Manager for the MSc in Child and Adolescent Counselling and Psychotherapy, Dept of Psychosocial Studies Birkbeck College and Dr.

Jan Macvarish from the University of Kent to debate the issues.

The columnist and writer Giles Coren talks about the why he wrote a highly personal magazine article about his baby daughter in which he imagined her future sex life.

And parents who think that schools teach too much too young explain why they feel their parental authority is being undermined

Producer: Erin Riley.

Mariella Frostrup and guests on talking to children about sex.

0403Consumer Children2011122820111231

Mariella and guests on what we buy our kids and who is choosing.

:

It's the week after Christmas, and children across the UK will have found their stockings bulging with new toys and gadgets.

But how do you decide what you should and shouldn't buy for your children? Quite apart from cost, this question has become increasingly fraught.

Ethicists and child psychologists, environmentalists and politicians, even fellow parents - all have something to say about what you buy your children.

So in this programme, Mariella and guests explore how parents make these decisions.

She asks how much attention parents should pay to what other adults might think. If we buy our children the latest gadget, does it make us feel guilty about our values as parents? And should it?

Consumer society is unlikely to vanish any time soon - so Mariella explores how we are educating the next generation of consumers. How can we empower our youngsters by teaching them about the need for limits, and about how to judge value? Can handling pocket money or learning about planning a family budget help teach them useful skills?

But Mariella also questions whether buying products is the most effective way to show your child affection. Do we decide what to buy in our children's best interests, or are we really buying for our own gratification?

We hear from parents who are faced with pester-power and explore the choices that they make in these straitened times. We also hear about the effects of deprivation on children's happiness.

The panel includes Dr. Agnes Nairn, policy researcher and author of 'Consumer Kids', Fiona Ellis, who works as an advisory member for the Personal Finance Education Group which teaches finance in schools, and Donald Hirsch who works on issues around minimum income standards.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

0403Consumer Children2011122820111231

Mariella and guests on what we buy our kids and who is choosing.

:

It's the week after Christmas, and children across the UK will have found their stockings bulging with new toys and gadgets.

But how do you decide what you should and shouldn't buy for your children? Quite apart from cost, this question has become increasingly fraught.

Ethicists and child psychologists, environmentalists and politicians, even fellow parents - all have something to say about what you buy your children.

So in this programme, Mariella and guests explore how parents make these decisions.

She asks how much attention parents should pay to what other adults might think. If we buy our children the latest gadget, does it make us feel guilty about our values as parents? And should it?

Consumer society is unlikely to vanish any time soon - so Mariella explores how we are educating the next generation of consumers. How can we empower our youngsters by teaching them about the need for limits, and about how to judge value? Can handling pocket money or learning about planning a family budget help teach them useful skills?

But Mariella also questions whether buying products is the most effective way to show your child affection. Do we decide what to buy in our children's best interests, or are we really buying for our own gratification?

We hear from parents who are faced with pester-power and explore the choices that they make in these straitened times. We also hear about the effects of deprivation on children's happiness.

The panel includes Dr. Agnes Nairn, policy researcher and author of 'Consumer Kids', Fiona Ellis, who works as an advisory member for the Personal Finance Education Group which teaches finance in schools, and Donald Hirsch who works on issues around minimum income standards.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

0404 LASTButting Out And Letting Go2012010420120107

Mariella Frostrup and guests on fostering independence in children.

In the early years parents control their children's lives, but a failure to foster independence even in young children is key to debates being had now about whether young people are coping at university and work and with life in general.

Are we raising a generation unable to deal practically and emotionally with adult life after years of parental indulgence and funding? The recession and rising house prices might mean that adult children increasingly come back home or never leave, so - once they're over 18 is your opinion relevant? Should you expect an input about big decisions and is seeking parental approval good for adults? Reseach about the impact of the situation in Italy where 8 out of 10 men between 18 and 30 live with their parents suggests that parents 'bribe' their children by offering home comforts and security in return for compliance.

So are we risking young people less inclined to seek work and control their own lives? And when do you need to start letting them go? How do you help your child become themselves - do we know what's hard-wired and what are the key developmental moments?

With Dr Terri Apter, author of 'The Myth of Maturity', the journalist Deborah Orr, Dr Helene Guldberg, author of 'Reclaiming Childhood: Freedom and Play in an Age of Fear' and Matt Whyman, who offers advice to young people about how to manage their parents via the advice web-site TheSite.org.

Producer: Erin Riley.

0404 LASTButting Out And Letting Go2012010420120107

Mariella Frostrup and guests on fostering independence in children.

In the early years parents control their children's lives, but a failure to foster independence even in young children is key to debates being had now about whether young people are coping at university and work and with life in general.

Are we raising a generation unable to deal practically and emotionally with adult life after years of parental indulgence and funding? The recession and rising house prices might mean that adult children increasingly come back home or never leave, so - once they're over 18 is your opinion relevant? Should you expect an input about big decisions and is seeking parental approval good for adults? Reseach about the impact of the situation in Italy where 8 out of 10 men between 18 and 30 live with their parents suggests that parents 'bribe' their children by offering home comforts and security in return for compliance.

So are we risking young people less inclined to seek work and control their own lives? And when do you need to start letting them go? How do you help your child become themselves - do we know what's hard-wired and what are the key developmental moments?

With Dr Terri Apter, author of 'The Myth of Maturity', the journalist Deborah Orr, Dr Helene Guldberg, author of 'Reclaiming Childhood: Freedom and Play in an Age of Fear' and Matt Whyman, who offers advice to young people about how to manage their parents via the advice web-site TheSite.org.

Producer: Erin Riley.

05012012091920120922

Mariella Frostrup and guests explore the issues involved in raising 'digital kids'.

Mariella Frostrup returns with a new series of the programme that explores the complex realities of parenting in today's Britain.

In the first programme of the new series, she is joined by a panel of experts and commentators to discuss raising 'digital kids'. Can tablet games really help nurture or educate the under-fives? Should older primary school-age children engage with age-appropriate social networking sites as a form of 'training' - or should they be protected from the online world, however safely controlled, until much later?

And Mariella and her guests will explore how parents can help equip teenage children to negotiate the wilds of the internet, from cyberbullying to 'sexting'.

So, Mariella asks, to what extent has the digital world simply sharpened problems that have always faced parents - and how far has it wrought a radical change in the nature of teenage life, and what parents need to know and do to help their children through it?

With Professor Tanya Byron, Professor Lydia Plowman, Julie Johnson, Helen King (Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre) and Professor Sonia Livingstone.

Producer: Phil Tinline.

05012012091920120922

Mariella Frostrup and guests explore the issues involved in raising 'digital kids'.

Mariella Frostrup returns with a new series of the programme that explores the complex realities of parenting in today's Britain.

In the first programme of the new series, she is joined by a panel of experts and commentators to discuss raising 'digital kids'. Can tablet games really help nurture or educate the under-fives? Should older primary school-age children engage with age-appropriate social networking sites as a form of 'training' - or should they be protected from the online world, however safely controlled, until much later?

And Mariella and her guests will explore how parents can help equip teenage children to negotiate the wilds of the internet, from cyberbullying to 'sexting'.

So, Mariella asks, to what extent has the digital world simply sharpened problems that have always faced parents - and how far has it wrought a radical change in the nature of teenage life, and what parents need to know and do to help their children through it?

With Professor Tanya Byron, Professor Lydia Plowman, Julie Johnson, Helen King (Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre) and Professor Sonia Livingstone.

Producer: Phil Tinline.

050220120926
050220120926
0503 LAST20121003

Mariella Frostrup and guests discuss adoption. Both its immediate challenges and wider issues from passing the selection process, nurturing traumatised children and dealing with biological parents to the question of mixed race adoption and the dilemmas of keeping siblings together when they might be better apart.

But as well as having specific challenges adoption also presents universal issues of authority, communication transparency and care. And with the gevernment looking to speed up the adoption process we examine what this might mean for children in care and the adults who adopt them.

0503 LAST20121003

Mariella Frostrup and guests discuss adoption. Both its immediate challenges and wider issues from passing the selection process, nurturing traumatised children and dealing with biological parents to the question of mixed race adoption and the dilemmas of keeping siblings together when they might be better apart.

But as well as having specific challenges adoption also presents universal issues of authority, communication transparency and care. And with the gevernment looking to speed up the adoption process we examine what this might mean for children in care and the adults who adopt them.

0601Parenting And Pornography2013040320130406

As pornography becomes more available to youngsters through the internet and mobiles, Mariella Frostrup and guests discuss how we can best equip the next generation to deal with it.

Reports show that the numbers of children accessing explicit sexual images are growing. There's increasing concern that youngsters who watch pornography regularly may be tempted to act out scenes of abuse on other children, and that many kids' ideas about relationships and bodies are being affected by the images they are watching.

So what can parents and society do about it? Can we stop children watching pornography altogether? If not, what kinds of conversations should we have with our children about it, and what is the role for schools?

Joining Mariella are psychotherapist John Woods, Claire Perry MP, Leonie Hodge from Family Lives, the Deputy Children's Commissioner for England Sue Berelowitz and Jim Killock from the Open Rights Group.

We also hear the experiences of parents and teenagers and find out what they think about the effects of pornography.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

0601Parenting And Pornography2013040320130406

As pornography becomes more available to youngsters through the internet and mobiles, Mariella Frostrup and guests discuss how we can best equip the next generation to deal with it.

Reports show that the numbers of children accessing explicit sexual images are growing. There's increasing concern that youngsters who watch pornography regularly may be tempted to act out scenes of abuse on other children, and that many kids' ideas about relationships and bodies are being affected by the images they are watching.

So what can parents and society do about it? Can we stop children watching pornography altogether? If not, what kinds of conversations should we have with our children about it, and what is the role for schools?

Joining Mariella are psychotherapist John Woods, Claire Perry MP, Leonie Hodge from Family Lives, the Deputy Children's Commissioner for England Sue Berelowitz and Jim Killock from the Open Rights Group.

We also hear the experiences of parents and teenagers and find out what they think about the effects of pornography.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

0602Character2013041020130413

Mariella explores the significance of character in the parenting of the next generation.

Character can be broadly defined as the collection of strengths and weaknesses that form and define who we are. But to get an idea of what constitutes "good" character we have to go back to the ancient Greek philosophers like Aristotle, who said that the potential for good character is by nature in humans but whether virtues come to be present or not is not determined by human nature but as a consequence of following the right habits.

Fast forward a couple of millennia and the role of character is again a hot topic. As a generation of children emerge into an adult world of fierce competition, shrinking job markets and over-subscribed and costly higher education, questions are being asked about how prepared they are for this strange new world. And with anxiety at epidemic levels and a huge rise in cases of depression in teenagers; could focus on character and character education be as important as grades in equipping children for an uncertain future.

Joining Mariella Frostrup to discuss this are Baroness Claire Tyler, Lib Dem peer from the Social Mobility All Party Parliamentary Group; Tom Harrison, the Deputy Director of the Jubilee Centre for Character and Values at the University of Birmingham; Tim Gill, a writer and consultant on childhood issues; Sue Atkins, a parenting expert, writer and coach , and Dr Anthony Seldon, Master of Wellington College.

Producer: Alison Hughes.

0602Character2013041020130413

Mariella explores the significance of character in the parenting of the next generation.

Character can be broadly defined as the collection of strengths and weaknesses that form and define who we are. But to get an idea of what constitutes "good" character we have to go back to the ancient Greek philosophers like Aristotle, who said that the potential for good character is by nature in humans but whether virtues come to be present or not is not determined by human nature but as a consequence of following the right habits.

Fast forward a couple of millennia and the role of character is again a hot topic. As a generation of children emerge into an adult world of fierce competition, shrinking job markets and over-subscribed and costly higher education, questions are being asked about how prepared they are for this strange new world. And with anxiety at epidemic levels and a huge rise in cases of depression in teenagers; could focus on character and character education be as important as grades in equipping children for an uncertain future.

Joining Mariella Frostrup to discuss this are Baroness Claire Tyler, Lib Dem peer from the Social Mobility All Party Parliamentary Group; Tom Harrison, the Deputy Director of the Jubilee Centre for Character and Values at the University of Birmingham; Tim Gill, a writer and consultant on childhood issues; Sue Atkins, a parenting expert, writer and coach , and Dr Anthony Seldon, Master of Wellington College.

Producer: Alison Hughes.

0603 LASTBirth Order2013041720130420

Does being the eldest child give you an advantage in life? Does the youngest get away with more? Whether you're the youngest or eldest child, or somewhere in the middle, your position in the family may influence your attitude to school, careers and relationships. In this edition of Bringing Up Britain, Mariella and her guests will be looking at the evidence and experience of how important your place in the family pecking order is, and its potential consequences.

Why are more astronauts first borns?

Can it really be true, as one study revealed that the first born child has an IQ 2.3 points higher than their subsequent siblings and as one longitudinal study has revealed, the younger you are in your family, the shorter you are likely to be.

Mariella is joined around the table by anthropologist, Professor Ruth Mace, clinical psychologist, Linda Blair and family relationship counsellor Suzy Hayman to sift and debate the evidence.

Producer: Sarah Taylor

0603 LASTBirth Order2013041720130420

Does being the eldest child give you an advantage in life? Does the youngest get away with more? Whether you're the youngest or eldest child, or somewhere in the middle, your position in the family may influence your attitude to school, careers and relationships. In this edition of Bringing Up Britain, Mariella and her guests will be looking at the evidence and experience of how important your place in the family pecking order is, and its potential consequences.

Why are more astronauts first borns?

Can it really be true, as one study revealed that the first born child has an IQ 2.3 points higher than their subsequent siblings and as one longitudinal study has revealed, the younger you are in your family, the shorter you are likely to be.

Mariella is joined around the table by anthropologist, Professor Ruth Mace, clinical psychologist, Linda Blair and family relationship counsellor Suzy Hayman to sift and debate the evidence.

Producer: Sarah Taylor

0701Money Matters2014011520140118

Spending or saving - Mariella Frostrup and guests discuss children, parenting and money. How should our kids learn about money and how much should we tell them about our finances?

With Christmas over, many children will have money they were given burning a hole in their pockets. Should we let them spend it on whatever they like or should we impose parental controls? What are the best ways to teach children about the value of money?

Bringing Up Britain takes a look at money matters by investigating how the subjects of money and finance are being taught at home and in school. Mariella and her guests explore which are the most useful lessons for youngsters and how perceptions of money change as children grow.

We also investigate what parents tell youngsters about their own money situations. Whether we're challenged by austerity or seeing the green shoots of recovery, most parents will have found themselves pre-occupied by money matters in recent years. How much of that should we pass on to our children?

Mariella and her guests also discuss how we can talk to youngsters about changing financial circumstances - if a parent loses their job and money becomes tight for instance. Surveys have shown that kids understand more than we think and get worried about money too. How can we help ourselves and our children through the financial minefield?

On the panel are Anna Foster, Head of Services at P-FEG, the Personal Finance Education Group which works in schools, Dr Elizabeth Kilbey, a Consultant Clinical Psychologist who has been working with the Money Advice Service, Dr Rajiv Prabhaka, lecturer in personal finance at the Open University and author of "The Assets Agenda" and Dr. Esther Dermott from Bristol University who is one of the key researchers on the survey "Poverty and Social Exclusion in the UK".

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

0701Money Matters2014011520140118

Spending or saving - Mariella Frostrup and guests discuss children, parenting and money. How should our kids learn about money and how much should we tell them about our finances?

With Christmas over, many children will have money they were given burning a hole in their pockets. Should we let them spend it on whatever they like or should we impose parental controls? What are the best ways to teach children about the value of money?

Bringing Up Britain takes a look at money matters by investigating how the subjects of money and finance are being taught at home and in school. Mariella and her guests explore which are the most useful lessons for youngsters and how perceptions of money change as children grow.

We also investigate what parents tell youngsters about their own money situations. Whether we're challenged by austerity or seeing the green shoots of recovery, most parents will have found themselves pre-occupied by money matters in recent years. How much of that should we pass on to our children?

Mariella and her guests also discuss how we can talk to youngsters about changing financial circumstances - if a parent loses their job and money becomes tight for instance. Surveys have shown that kids understand more than we think and get worried about money too. How can we help ourselves and our children through the financial minefield?

On the panel are Anna Foster, Head of Services at P-FEG, the Personal Finance Education Group which works in schools, Dr Elizabeth Kilbey, a Consultant Clinical Psychologist who has been working with the Money Advice Service, Dr Rajiv Prabhaka, lecturer in personal finance at the Open University and author of "The Assets Agenda" and Dr. Esther Dermott from Bristol University who is one of the key researchers on the survey "Poverty and Social Exclusion in the UK".

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

0702Sibling Rivalry2014012220140125

From Cain and Abel to today, Mariella Frostrup and guests explore sibling rivalry, how parents should deal with it and whether it can be ended.

Recent reports suggest sibling rivalry can have an even more sinister impact - what starts out as simple bickering can become sibling bullying with traumatic and long-lasting effects.

Joining Mariella to discuss the issues are Professor Juliet Mitchell from Jesus College Cambridge, a literature scholar and an expert in the field of psychoanalysis, who's currently working on a book about siblings in Shakespeare.

Professor Dieter Wolke from the Department of Psychology at the University of Warwick , who's been researching sibling relationships for many years. He is shortly to publish work on sibling bullying.

Karen Doherty, co-author of the parent's guide Sibling Rivalry, Seven Simple Solutions,

And Tim Lott, a journalist on the Guardian's Family section and writer whose book "Under the Same Stars" was based on his often fraught relationship with his older brother.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

0702Sibling Rivalry2014012220140125

From Cain and Abel to today, Mariella Frostrup and guests explore sibling rivalry, how parents should deal with it and whether it can be ended.

Recent reports suggest sibling rivalry can have an even more sinister impact - what starts out as simple bickering can become sibling bullying with traumatic and long-lasting effects.

Joining Mariella to discuss the issues are Professor Juliet Mitchell from Jesus College Cambridge, a literature scholar and an expert in the field of psychoanalysis, who's currently working on a book about siblings in Shakespeare.

Professor Dieter Wolke from the Department of Psychology at the University of Warwick , who's been researching sibling relationships for many years. He is shortly to publish work on sibling bullying.

Karen Doherty, co-author of the parent's guide Sibling Rivalry, Seven Simple Solutions,

And Tim Lott, a journalist on the Guardian's Family section and writer whose book "Under the Same Stars" was based on his often fraught relationship with his older brother.

Producer: Emma Kingsley.

0703 LASTIs Work Working For Our Kids?2014012920140201

From April 2015, working parents will be able to share leave after the birth of a child. Mariella Frostrup debates whether this will change attitudes towards stay-at-home dads and mums who choose to go back to work.

Announcing the new policy, Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg has stated that 'women deserve the right to pursue their goals and not feel they have to choose between having a successful career or having a baby.'

Mariella examines whether the idea of shared parental leave is the best way to give working mothers a more fulfilling career, and whether fathers will be prepared to spend more time at home with a new baby.

Few parenting dilemmas spark more debate than how to balance work and play. Mariella and her guests discuss the tricky juggling act and financial costs of childcare and examine current research into the impact of working parents on children.

Joining Mariella to debate the issues are Sarah Jackson, chief executive of Working Families, Laura Perrins, from Mothers At Home Matter, Sally Goddard Blythe, director of the Institute for Neuro-Physiological Psychology, Gideon Burrows, author of Men Can Do It, Dr Denise Hawkes, from the Institute of Education and Anji Hunter from Edelman, where she works to get equal numbers of women and men in British boardrooms.

Producer: Sarah Bowen.

0703 LASTIs Work Working For Our Kids?2014012920140201

From April 2015, working parents will be able to share leave after the birth of a child. Mariella Frostrup debates whether this will change attitudes towards stay-at-home dads and mums who choose to go back to work.

Announcing the new policy, Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg has stated that 'women deserve the right to pursue their goals and not feel they have to choose between having a successful career or having a baby.'

Mariella examines whether the idea of shared parental leave is the best way to give working mothers a more fulfilling career, and whether fathers will be prepared to spend more time at home with a new baby.

Few parenting dilemmas spark more debate than how to balance work and play. Mariella and her guests discuss the tricky juggling act and financial costs of childcare and examine current research into the impact of working parents on children.

Joining Mariella to debate the issues are Sarah Jackson, chief executive of Working Families, Laura Perrins, from Mothers At Home Matter, Sally Goddard Blythe, director of the Institute for Neuro-Physiological Psychology, Gideon Burrows, author of Men Can Do It, Dr Denise Hawkes, from the Institute of Education and Anji Hunter from Edelman, where she works to get equal numbers of women and men in British boardrooms.

Producer: Sarah Bowen.

0801Boosting Your Child's Iq20150902

Mariella Frostrup and guests ask can you make your child smarter?

As summer ends and children trade flip flops for school shoes, Mariella Frostrup starts the new academic year exploring what can affect a child's IQ.

Parents who read to their children, talk at the dinner table and help with homework might have happy offspring, but will they be making them smarter?

In the light of research into the influence of genes, Mariella and her guests debate the role of parenting on intelligence. They explore recent research into the effect of exercise and sleep and ask what difference can breastfeeding, flashcards, violin lessons and superfoods really make.

For the first in a new series of Radio 4's parenting programme, Mariella is joined by Dr Stuart Richie, Postdoctoral Fellow in Cognitive Ageing at the University of Edinburgh, writer and consultant Sue Palmer, Dr Sophie von Stumm, Lecturer in Psychology at Goldsmiths and Director of their Hungry Mind Lab, and Hilary Wilce, writer, advice columnist and coach.

Producer: Sarah Bowen.

0801Boosting Your Child's Iq20150902

Mariella Frostrup and guests ask can you make your child smarter?

As summer ends and children trade flip flops for school shoes, Mariella Frostrup starts the new academic year exploring what can affect a child's IQ.

Parents who read to their children, talk at the dinner table and help with homework might have happy offspring, but will they be making them smarter?

In the light of research into the influence of genes, Mariella and her guests debate the role of parenting on intelligence. They explore recent research into the effect of exercise and sleep and ask what difference can breastfeeding, flashcards, violin lessons and superfoods really make.

For the first in a new series of Radio 4's parenting programme, Mariella is joined by Dr Stuart Richie, Postdoctoral Fellow in Cognitive Ageing at the University of Edinburgh, writer and consultant Sue Palmer, Dr Sophie von Stumm, Lecturer in Psychology at Goldsmiths and Director of their Hungry Mind Lab, and Hilary Wilce, writer, advice columnist and coach.

Producer: Sarah Bowen.

0802Divorce And Separation20150909

Mariella Frostrup and guests look at how to parent through a separation or divorce.

With nearly a third of all children likely to experience their parents separating by the age of 16, Mariella Frostrup explores what a parent can do when they have decided to end their relationship.

What is the best way to break the news to your child? How should you manage sharing the children's time? When is it right to introduce new partners? Or should we just be trying harder to stay together for the kids?

For the second in a new series of Radio 4's parenting programme, Mariella is joined by experts to discuss how best to parent through a divorce or separation.

0802Divorce And Separation20150909

Mariella Frostrup and guests look at how to parent through a separation or divorce.

With nearly a third of all children likely to experience their parents separating by the age of 16, Mariella Frostrup explores what a parent can do when they have decided to end their relationship.

What is the best way to break the news to your child? How should you manage sharing the children's time? When is it right to introduce new partners? Or should we just be trying harder to stay together for the kids?

For the second in a new series of Radio 4's parenting programme, Mariella is joined by experts to discuss how best to parent through a divorce or separation.

0802Divorce And Separation20150916

Mariella Frostrup and guests look at how to parent through a separation or divorce.

With nearly a third of all children likely to experience their parents separating by the age of 16, Mariella Frostrup explores what a parent can do when they have decided to end their relationship.

What is the best way to break the news to your child? How should you manage sharing the children's time? When is it right to introduce new partners? Or should we just be trying harder to stay together for the kids?

For the second in a new series of Radio 4's parenting programme, Mariella is joined by experts to discuss how best to parent through a divorce or separation.

0802Divorce And Separation20150916

Mariella Frostrup and guests look at how to parent through a separation or divorce.

With nearly a third of all children likely to experience their parents separating by the age of 16, Mariella Frostrup explores what a parent can do when they have decided to end their relationship.

What is the best way to break the news to your child? How should you manage sharing the children's time? When is it right to introduce new partners? Or should we just be trying harder to stay together for the kids?

For the second in a new series of Radio 4's parenting programme, Mariella is joined by experts to discuss how best to parent through a divorce or separation.

0803Manners And Discipline20150923

Mariella Frostrup and guests discuss the importance of good manners in young children.

How important are good manners and discipline in young children? Mariella and her guests debate the best methods of tackling bad behaviour when children test boundaries. They discuss whether giving them rewards, banishing them to the naughty step, or "love bombing" works best.

Do children learn from their parents or act up due to the food they eat, too much screen time, their genetics or gender?

Mariella is joined by Oliver James, clinical psychologist, Penny Palmano, best-selling author on good manners, Stephen Scott, Professor of Child Health and Behaviour at Kings College London and Bonamy Oliver, Head of the Nurture Lab at the University of Sussex.

0803Manners And Discipline20150923

Mariella Frostrup and guests discuss the importance of good manners in young children.

How important are good manners and discipline in young children? Mariella and her guests debate the best methods of tackling bad behaviour when children test boundaries. They discuss whether giving them rewards, banishing them to the naughty step, or "love bombing" works best.

Do children learn from their parents or act up due to the food they eat, too much screen time, their genetics or gender?

Mariella is joined by Oliver James, clinical psychologist, Penny Palmano, best-selling author on good manners, Stephen Scott, Professor of Child Health and Behaviour at Kings College London and Bonamy Oliver, Head of the Nurture Lab at the University of Sussex.