Bridging The Gap

Episodes

SeriesEpisodeTitleFirst
Broadcast
RepeatedComments
20100127 (BBC7)
20160302 (BBC7)
20160303 (BBC7)

A sound portrait of the Tyne Bridge, recorded by Chris Watson.

A vivid sound portrait of the Tyne Bridge which draws on the voices and sounds of the river, the bridge, local people and wildlife to explore the history, construction and role of this iconic bridge.

It straddles the river between Newcastle and Gateshead, bridging the gap between past and present, north and south.

The earliest bridge across the Tyne, Pons Aelius, was built by the Romans near the location of the present Tyne Bridge. After it fell into disrepair a stone bridge was built in 1270, but this was destroyed by the great flood of 1717. The idea for the present Tyne Bridge dates back to 1883, but it wasn't until 1825 that work began. The design is based on the Sydney Harbour Bridge, and while work on the Sydney bridge began first, the Tyne Bridge was finished and opened first by King George V on 10th October 1928.

The establishment of the Tyne Bridge was essential to the development of the city of Newcastle. The river was the reason that the Romans first settled in the area in 120AD, and centuries later the river was a significant factor in Newcastle's huge shipbuilding and coal industries.

The Tyne is a major artery through the city, the Tyne Bridge a vital span; a thoroughfare of business and trade, a link between Gateshead and Newcastle, between north and south. As a giant arch, the bridge is an engineering triumph and hugely symbolic. It spans place and time, and as a port-way it's symbolic of the changes which have taken place in the north east. Today, the wildlife has moved into the gaps vacated by the industrial past; the river is home to otters and salmon and the bridge is a nesting site for kittiwakes, a species of ocean-travelling gull. The birds which nest here and on the Baltic on the Gateshead riverbank make it the furthest inland breeding site of kittiwakes in the world.

With recordings by wildlife sound recordist Chris Watson, the sounds of the waves, the wind and the wildlife are combined with the voices of the river in this powerful and vivid portrait of a magnificent bridge.

20060807
20060807

Simon Fanshawe visits the On The Streets project in Gorton, Manchester.

An ambitious community project run by Pat Stewart and Rob Burley.

Their aim is to develop in the young teenagers a sense of their community, and show them there is more to life than spiralling from ASBO to serious crime.

20100127
20100127

A vivid sound portrait of the Tyne Bridge which draws on the voices and sounds of the river, the bridge, local people and wildlife to explore the history, construction and role of this iconic bridge.

It straddles the river between Newcastle and Gateshead, bridging the gap between past and present, north and south.

The earliest bridge across the Tyne, Pons Aelius, was built by the Romans near the location of the present Tyne Bridge.

After it fell into disrepair a stone bridge was built in 1270, but this was destroyed by the great flood of 1717.

The idea for the present Tyne Bridge dates back to 1883, but it wasn't until 1825 that work began.

The design is based on the Sydney Harbour Bridge, and while work on the Sydney bridge began first, the Tyne Bridge was finished and opened first by King George V on 10th October 1928.

The establishment of the Tyne Bridge was essential to the development of the city of Newcastle.

The river was the reason that the Romans first settled in the area in 120AD, and centuries later the river was a significant factor in Newcastle's huge shipbuilding and coal industries.

The Tyne is a major artery through the city, the Tyne Bridge a vital span; a thoroughfare of business and trade, a link between Gateshead and Newcastle, between north and south.

As a giant arch, the bridge is an engineering triumph and hugely symbolic.

It spans place and time, and as a port-way it's symbolic of the changes which have taken place in the north east.

Today, the wildlife has moved into the gaps vacated by the industrial past; the river is home to otters and salmon and the bridge is a nesting site for kittiwakes, a species of ocean-travelling gull.

The birds which nest here and on the Baltic on the Gateshead riverbank make it the furthest inland breeding site of kittiwakes in the world.

With recordings by wildlife sound recordist Chris Watson, the sounds of the waves, the wind and the wildlife are combined with the voices of the river in this powerful and vivid portrait of a magnificent bridge.

A sound portrait of the Tyne Bridge, recorded by Chris Watson.

The earliest bridge across the Tyne, Pons Aelius, was built by the Romans near the location of the present Tyne Bridge. After it fell into disrepair a stone bridge was built in 1270, but this was destroyed by the great flood of 1717. The idea for the present Tyne Bridge dates back to 1883, but it wasn't until 1825 that work began. The design is based on the Sydney Harbour Bridge, and while work on the Sydney bridge began first, the Tyne Bridge was finished and opened first by King George V on 10th October 1928.

The establishment of the Tyne Bridge was essential to the development of the city of Newcastle. The river was the reason that the Romans first settled in the area in 120AD, and centuries later the river was a significant factor in Newcastle's huge shipbuilding and coal industries.

The Tyne is a major artery through the city, the Tyne Bridge a vital span; a thoroughfare of business and trade, a link between Gateshead and Newcastle, between north and south. As a giant arch, the bridge is an engineering triumph and hugely symbolic. It spans place and time, and as a port-way it's symbolic of the changes which have taken place in the north east. Today, the wildlife has moved into the gaps vacated by the industrial past; the river is home to otters and salmon and the bridge is a nesting site for kittiwakes, a species of ocean-travelling gull. The birds which nest here and on the Baltic on the Gateshead riverbank make it the furthest inland breeding site of kittiwakes in the world.

199A01The Risk Factor19990228

`The Risk Factor'.

In the first of three programmes, Simon Calder attempts to walk from Colombia into Panama, through the Darien Gap.

This stretch of jungle separating North and South America is a laboratory of insects and disease.

Also, the Colombian guerrillas have recently made it their base.

How risky is the undertaking?

199A02Walking On Water19990307

`Walking on Water'.

Simon Calder continues his attempt to cross the Darien Gap from Colombia into Panama.

The Colombian security situation is so bad that he is forced to take a circuitous route through the San Blas islands, where he comes across an unexpected Scottish connection.

199A03Walk On The Wild Side19990314

`Walk on the Wild Side'.

Simon Calder completes his attempt to walk across the Darien Gap between Colombia and Panama.

After some disturbing encounters with wildlife and some alarming pains in the legs, he is only too pleased to reach the highway to Panama City.