Bred Of Heaven

show more detailshow less detail

Episodes

EpisodeFirst
Broadcast
Comments
0120110808

"You have to pay to get in.

The current cost, if you're in a car, is £5.30.

Pressing a note into a fleshy female palm, I deploy the lone word of conversational Welsh in my locker.

'Diolch'.

Thanks.

Then I push my right foot down and accelerate into the land of my fathers.

I'm not really sure where I'm going."

Author and journalist Jasper Rees rises to the challenge of embracing his 'inner Welshness'.

His grandparents on his father's side were Welsh.

So it's partly in recollection of times spent at their house on a hill in Carmarthen that he opts for full 'immersion'.

This means learning the language and putting to paper to some of his grandparents vivid stories about Wales.

It also means travelling around, setting himself various tasks - singing in choirs, sheep-shearing, coracling, coal-mining.

Some tasks are accomplished with deftness, some not, in his wry travelogue, which is abridged for radio in five parts by Katrin Williams.

1.

It can cost £5.30 to enter this country, which fires the author's memories

about a Welsh grandmother on a Gothic porch.

Plus a bit on landscapes and

languages and adventures with a coracle...

Reader Ben Miles.

Author Jasper Rees travels around Wales in order to find his 'inner Welshness'.

0120110808

"You have to pay to get in.

The current cost, if you're in a car, is £5.30.

Pressing a note into a fleshy female palm, I deploy the lone word of conversational Welsh in my locker.

'Diolch'.

Thanks.

Then I push my right foot down and accelerate into the land of my fathers.

I'm not really sure where I'm going."

Author and journalist Jasper Rees rises to the challenge of embracing his 'inner Welshness'.

His grandparents on his father's side were Welsh.

So it's partly in recollection of times spent at their house on a hill in Carmarthen that he opts for full 'immersion'.

This means learning the language and putting to paper to some of his grandparents vivid stories about Wales.

It also means travelling around, setting himself various tasks - singing in choirs, sheep-shearing, coracling, coal-mining.

Some tasks are accomplished with deftness, some not, in his wry travelogue, which is abridged for radio in five parts by Katrin Williams.

1.

It can cost £5.30 to enter this country, which fires the author's memories

about a Welsh grandmother on a Gothic porch.

Plus a bit on landscapes and

languages and adventures with a coracle...

Reader Ben Miles.

Author Jasper Rees travels around Wales in order to find his 'inner Welshness'.

0220110809

"You have to pay to get in.

The current cost, if you're in a car, is £5.30.

Pressing a note into a fleshy female palm, I deploy the lone word of conversational Welsh in my locker.

'Diolch'.

Thanks.

Then I push my right foot down and accelerate into the land of my fathers.

I'm not really sure where I'm going."

Author and journalist Jasper Rees rises to the challenge of embracing his 'inner Welshness'.

His grandparents on his father's side were Welsh.

So it's partly in recollection of times spent at their house on a hill in Camarthen that he opts for full 'immersion'.

This means learning the language and putting to paper to some of his grandparents vivid stories about Wales.

It also means travelling around, setting himself various tasks - singing in choirs, sheep-shearing, coracling, coal-mining.

Some tasks are accomplished with deftness, some not, in his wry travelogue, which is abridged for radio by Katrin Williams.

2.

The author continues his embrace of all things Welsh with

a trip to Caldey Island where his uncle, now known as Teilo,

practices as a monk.

Life starts at half past three in the

morning and it's often a revelatory time of the day...

Reader Ben Miles.

The author takes a trip to Caldey Island, where his uncle practices as a monk.

0220110809

"You have to pay to get in.

The current cost, if you're in a car, is £5.30.

Pressing a note into a fleshy female palm, I deploy the lone word of conversational Welsh in my locker.

'Diolch'.

Thanks.

Then I push my right foot down and accelerate into the land of my fathers.

I'm not really sure where I'm going."

Author and journalist Jasper Rees rises to the challenge of embracing his 'inner Welshness'.

His grandparents on his father's side were Welsh.

So it's partly in recollection of times spent at their house on a hill in Camarthen that he opts for full 'immersion'.

This means learning the language and putting to paper to some of his grandparents vivid stories about Wales.

It also means travelling around, setting himself various tasks - singing in choirs, sheep-shearing, coracling, coal-mining.

Some tasks are accomplished with deftness, some not, in his wry travelogue, which is abridged for radio by Katrin Williams.

2.

The author continues his embrace of all things Welsh with

a trip to Caldey Island where his uncle, now known as Teilo,

practices as a monk.

Life starts at half past three in the

morning and it's often a revelatory time of the day...

Reader Ben Miles.

The author takes a trip to Caldey Island, where his uncle practices as a monk.

0320110810

"You have to pay to get in.

The current cost, if you're in a car, is £5.30.

Pressing a note into a fleshy female palm, I deploy the lone word of conversational Welsh in my locker.

'Diolch'.

Thanks.

Then I push my right foot down and accelerate into the land of my fathers.

I'm not reallly sure where I'm going."

Author and journalist Jasper Rees rises to the challenge of embracing his 'inner Welshness'.

His grandparents on his father's side were Welsh.

So it's partly in recollection of times spent at their house on a hill in Camarthen that he opts for full 'immersion'.

This means learning the language and putting to paper to some of his grandparents vivid stories about Wales.

It also means travelling around, setting himself various tasks - singing in choirs, sheep-shearing, coracling, coal-mining.

Some tasks are accomplished with deftness, some not, in his wry travelogue, which is abridged for radio in five parts by Katrin Williams.

3.

Embracing Welshness means you have to go underground, to greet

blackened faces lit by lamps, and all talk is about tunnelling and a

very big drill...

Reader Ben Miles

Author Jasper Rees travels around Wales in order to find his inner 'Welshness'.

0320110810

"You have to pay to get in.

The current cost, if you're in a car, is £5.30.

Pressing a note into a fleshy female palm, I deploy the lone word of conversational Welsh in my locker.

'Diolch'.

Thanks.

Then I push my right foot down and accelerate into the land of my fathers.

I'm not reallly sure where I'm going."

Author and journalist Jasper Rees rises to the challenge of embracing his 'inner Welshness'.

His grandparents on his father's side were Welsh.

So it's partly in recollection of times spent at their house on a hill in Camarthen that he opts for full 'immersion'.

This means learning the language and putting to paper to some of his grandparents vivid stories about Wales.

It also means travelling around, setting himself various tasks - singing in choirs, sheep-shearing, coracling, coal-mining.

Some tasks are accomplished with deftness, some not, in his wry travelogue, which is abridged for radio in five parts by Katrin Williams.

3.

Embracing Welshness means you have to go underground, to greet

blackened faces lit by lamps, and all talk is about tunnelling and a

very big drill...

Reader Ben Miles

Author Jasper Rees travels around Wales in order to find his inner 'Welshness'.

0420110811

"You have to pay to get in.

The current cost, if you're in a car, is £5.30.

Pressing a note into a fleshy female palm, I deploy the lone word of conversational Welsh in my locker.

'Diolch'.

Thanks.

Then I push my right foot down and accelerate into the land of my fathers.

I'm not reallly sure where I'm going."

Author and journalist Jasper Rees rises to the challenge of embracing his 'inner Welshness'.

His grandparents on his father's side were Welsh.

So it's partly in recollection of times spent at their house on a hill in Camarthen that he opts for full 'immersion'.

This means learning the language and putting to paper to some of his grandparents vivid stories about Wales.

It also means travelling around, setting himself various tasks - singing in choirs, sheep-shearing, coracling, coal-mining.

Some tasks are accomplished with deftness, some not, in his wry travelogue, which is abridged for radio by Katrin Williams:

4.

Walking parts of Offa's Dyke is another way of getting to know Wales.

So

the author and a friend set out across sapping moorland and climb many a

steep hill, including Hergest Ridge and Lords Hereford's Knob.

Compelling

tales are attached to these landmarks...

Reader Ben Miles.

The author and a friend set out across sapping moorland and up steep hills.

0420110811

"You have to pay to get in.

The current cost, if you're in a car, is £5.30.

Pressing a note into a fleshy female palm, I deploy the lone word of conversational Welsh in my locker.

'Diolch'.

Thanks.

Then I push my right foot down and accelerate into the land of my fathers.

I'm not reallly sure where I'm going."

Author and journalist Jasper Rees rises to the challenge of embracing his 'inner Welshness'.

His grandparents on his father's side were Welsh.

So it's partly in recollection of times spent at their house on a hill in Camarthen that he opts for full 'immersion'.

This means learning the language and putting to paper to some of his grandparents vivid stories about Wales.

It also means travelling around, setting himself various tasks - singing in choirs, sheep-shearing, coracling, coal-mining.

Some tasks are accomplished with deftness, some not, in his wry travelogue, which is abridged for radio by Katrin Williams:

4.

Walking parts of Offa's Dyke is another way of getting to know Wales.

So

the author and a friend set out across sapping moorland and climb many a

steep hill, including Hergest Ridge and Lords Hereford's Knob.

Compelling

tales are attached to these landmarks...

Reader Ben Miles.

The author and a friend set out across sapping moorland and up steep hills.

05 LAST20110812

"You have to pay to get in.

The current cost, if you're in a car, is £5.30.

Pressing a note into a fleshy female palm, I deploy the lone word of conversational Welsh in my locker.

'Diolch'.

Thanks.

Then I push my right foot down and accelerate into the land of my fathers.

I'm not really sure where I'm going."

Author and journalist Jasper Rees rises to the challenge of embracing his 'inner Welshness'.

His grandparents on his father's side were Welsh.

So it's partly in recollection of times spent at their house on a hill in Camarthen that he opts for full 'immersion'.

This means learning the language and putting to paper to some of his grandparents vivid stories about Wales.

It also means travelling around, setting himself various tasks - singing in choirs, sheep-shearing, coracling, coal-mining.

Some tasks are accomplished with deftness, others not, in his wry travelogue, which is abridged in five parts by Katrin Williams:

5.

Embracing all things Welsh means you start dreaming

about the country, which has something to do with

the author's grandfather Bert and an atmospheric

house at Carmarthen...

Reader Ben Miles.

Embracing all things Welsh means you start dreaming about the country.

05 LAST20110812

"You have to pay to get in.

The current cost, if you're in a car, is £5.30.

Pressing a note into a fleshy female palm, I deploy the lone word of conversational Welsh in my locker.

'Diolch'.

Thanks.

Then I push my right foot down and accelerate into the land of my fathers.

I'm not really sure where I'm going."

Author and journalist Jasper Rees rises to the challenge of embracing his 'inner Welshness'.

His grandparents on his father's side were Welsh.

So it's partly in recollection of times spent at their house on a hill in Camarthen that he opts for full 'immersion'.

This means learning the language and putting to paper to some of his grandparents vivid stories about Wales.

It also means travelling around, setting himself various tasks - singing in choirs, sheep-shearing, coracling, coal-mining.

Some tasks are accomplished with deftness, others not, in his wry travelogue, which is abridged in five parts by Katrin Williams:

5.

Embracing all things Welsh means you start dreaming

about the country, which has something to do with

the author's grandfather Bert and an atmospheric

house at Carmarthen...

Reader Ben Miles.

Embracing all things Welsh means you start dreaming about the country.