Boston Calling [world Service]

Episodes

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20180310 ()

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2012092220120923 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

2012100620121007 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

2012102020121021 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2012110320121104 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2012111020121111 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2012120820121209 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2012121520121216 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2012122920121230 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013020220130203 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013020920130210 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013022320130224 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013030920130310 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013031620130317 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013041320130415 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013042720130428 (WS)
20130429 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013051120130513 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013051820130519 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

20130525
2013060120130603 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013060820130610 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013070620130708 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

20130713

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013072720130729 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013080320130805 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013081720130819 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013113020131201 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013120720131208 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013121420131215 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013122120131222 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

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2014010420140105 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

2014011120140112 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

2014011820140119 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

2014020120140202 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

2014020820140209 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

2014021520140216 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

2014022220140223 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

2014032220140323 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

2014032920140330 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

2014040520140406 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

2014041220140413 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

2014050320140504 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

2014051720140518 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

2014061420140615 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

2014062820140629 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

2014070520140706 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

2014071920140720 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

2014081620140817 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

2014090620140907 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

2014091320140914 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2014092020140921 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2014101820141019 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2014110120141102 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

20170610
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How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Until recently, Russian President Vladimir Putin was deeply suspicious of the world wide web. What changed his mind?

Also: the curious parallels between love and quantum physics; the Native American tribe that invented lacrosse gets nation status in the sport’s World Cup; fans of 'The Bachelorette' react when the reality TV show features a Sikh convert; two immigrant entrepreneurs create virtual reunions; and the Colombian rock star Juanes just wants to make his world better.

(Image: Russian President Vladimir Putin uses binoculars as he visits an air show outside Moscow on July 18, 2017. Credit: Alexey Nikolsky/Getty Images)

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20171021
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How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

20180526

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

20180623

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2018062320180624 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

"I hate it when my leather seats aren't heated"20121020

Haitians star in an ad campaign exposing the irony of the hashtag #FirstWorldProblems.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Haitians have become the spokespeople for a new ad campaign which exposes the irony of the popular hashtag #FirstWorldProblems. Also in the programme we learn what President Kennedy didn’t know during the Cuban Missile Crisis; music from the film Argo; and a reporter's vivid memories of the mercurial King Sihanouk of Cambodia.

(Image: Haitian woman sits in rubble, Credit: AFP/Getty)

"I hate it when my leather seats aren't heated"20121021

Haitians star in an ad campaign exposing the irony of the hashtag #FirstWorldProblems.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Haitians have become the spokespeople for a new ad campaign which exposes the irony of the popular hashtag #FirstWorldProblems. Also in the programme we learn what President Kennedy didn’t know during the Cuban Missile Crisis; music from the film Argo; and a reporter's vivid memories of the mercurial King Sihanouk of Cambodia.

(Image: Haitian woman sits in rubble, Credit: AFP/Getty)

"signed, Sealed, And Delivered"20171016

One Boston family's wish to get a letter to their grandmother in Puerto Rico

Two journalists set off on a quest to hand deliver a letter to a grandmother in Puerto Rico from her family on the mainland of the United States.

Also: we learn why Che Guevara is being honoured on a postage stamp in Ireland; we admire the art of Martin Ramirez which has been featured on postage stamps in the US; plus we read one of the most timeless job application letters in history, sent by a copywriter, Robert Pirosh, to studio directors in Hollywood, in 1934.

(Image: Janet Franceschini Colon (left), Jennifer Santos Franceschini (middle), Jenelyn Santos (right) and Jennifer's two daughters are pictured. Credit: PRI’s The World)

\u2018Caught up in the Policy\u20192017062420170625 (WS)

Why Iraqi immigrants in the US are getting sent back to Iraq

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

“People are absolutely losing it. Some they go to their work. Some they pluck them right out of bed from their families."

Why Iraqis in the US are getting sent back to Iraq; what it means for one immigrant to get to stay; the fight for paid leave for victims of domestic violence in Canada; a Ukrainian physicist who always tries to keep politics and science separate fails yet again; and the two comedians who started ArmComedy, their country’s first satirical news programme, explain what Armenians find funny.

(Photo: An Iraqi owned restaurant in Detroit. Credit: Shirin Jaafari)

\u2018Caught up in the Policy\u20192017062420170626 (WS)

Why Iraqi immigrants in the US are getting sent back to Iraq

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

“People are absolutely losing it. Some they go to their work. Some they pluck them right out of bed from their families."

Why Iraqis in the US are getting sent back to Iraq; what it means for one immigrant to get to stay; the fight for paid leave for victims of domestic violence in Canada; a Ukrainian physicist who always tries to keep politics and science separate fails yet again; and the two comedians who started ArmComedy, their country’s first satirical news programme, explain what Armenians find funny.

(Photo: An Iraqi owned restaurant in Detroit. Credit: Shirin Jaafari)

\u2018Caught up in the Policy\u201920170624

Why Iraqi immigrants in the US are getting sent back to Iraq

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

“People are absolutely losing it. Some they go to their work. Some they pluck them right out of bed from their families."

Why Iraqis in the US are getting sent back to Iraq; what it means for one immigrant to get to stay; the fight for paid leave for victims of domestic violence in Canada; a Ukrainian physicist who always tries to keep politics and science separate fails yet again; and the two comedians who started ArmComedy, their country’s first satirical news programme, explain what Armenians find funny.

(Photo: An Iraqi owned restaurant in Detroit. Credit: Shirin Jaafari)

\u2018You Could Make This Place Beautiful\u201920170107

Hate crimes against Muslims are on the rise. One woman is fighting back. Literally.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

When Rana Abdelhamid was 15, a man tried to rip off her hijab. Now she teaches self-defence classes for Muslim women like her.

Also, we remember Tyrus Wong, the Chinese immigrant who shaped the look of Bambi, we meet ‘Wheelchair Man’ the first Afghan-American superhero; we learn about the Mexican revolutionary who inspired Princess Leia’s iconic hairstyle; we taste the most famous bread in Paris; and we hear a poem that defined a year.

(Image: Muslim women participate in a self-defence class on December 16, 2016 in New York City. The class was organized by the Women's Initiative for Self-Empowerment (WISE). Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

\u201cAs Seen on TV\u201d2015022120150222 (WS)

Odin Biron, an American actor and one of Russia\u2019s most popular TV stars, reveals a secret

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We meet one of the hottest young stars on Russian television— an American actor who recently revealed that he is gay. Plus, we visit the Canadian village of Goodwood, a tiny town proud of its unsavoury reputation on TV. And, we hear about the Iranian film director Jafar Panahi, who is defying a ban on making films.

Also, Boston Calling listeners consider whether there is such thing as ‘a good death’. The story behind a Muslim-American cop show that nearly came to be. And how an unlikely position at RadioShack gave the writer Deepak Singh an unexpected view of America.

(Photo: Odin Biron, the star of the Russian sitcom Interns. Credit: Maria Mitrofanova)

\u201cAs Seen on TV\u201d20150221

Odin Biron, an American actor and one of Russia\u2019s most popular TV stars, reveals a secret

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We meet one of the hottest young stars on Russian television— an American actor who recently revealed that he is gay. Plus, we visit the Canadian village of Goodwood, a tiny town proud of its unsavoury reputation on TV. And, we hear about the Iranian film director Jafar Panahi, who is defying a ban on making films.

Also, Boston Calling listeners consider whether there is such thing as ‘a good death’. The story behind a Muslim-American cop show that nearly came to be. And how an unlikely position at RadioShack gave the writer Deepak Singh an unexpected view of America.

(Photo: Odin Biron, the star of the Russian sitcom Interns. Credit: Maria Mitrofanova)

01/04/2017 Gmt2017040120170402 (WS)
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How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

01/10/2016 Gmt2016100120161002 (WS)
20161003 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

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03/12/2016 Gmt20161203

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

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08/10/2016 Gmt2016100820161009 (WS)
20161010 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

10/03/201820180311 ()

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

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How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

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22/10/2016 Gmt2016102220161023 (WS)
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How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

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A Cancer in the Ranks2013060820130610 (WS)

Sexual assault is becoming \u201ca cancer\u201d in the US military and victims are not just women

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

On Boston Calling, one former US service member speaks out about the sexual abuse he suffered while in the military. Plus, the history of “Little America” in Afghanistan’s Helmand Province. And, why it isn't always desirable to be a “burger” in Pakistan.

(Image: US military leaders testify at a senate hearing on sexual assaults in the military. Credit: Getty Images)

A Cancer in the Ranks20130608

Sexual assault is becoming \u201ca cancer\u201d in the US military and victims are not just women

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

On Boston Calling, one former US service member speaks out about the sexual abuse he suffered while in the military. Plus, the history of “Little America” in Afghanistan’s Helmand Province. And, why it isn't always desirable to be a “burger” in Pakistan.

(Image: US military leaders testify at a senate hearing on sexual assaults in the military. Credit: Getty Images)

A Church on Every Corner2014021520140216 (WS)

The Nigerian pastor who has come to America to 'plant churches like Starbucks'

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

One of Africa's most influential Christian movements is now preaching the gospel in the US. We find out about its ambitious expansion plans. Plus, the former child-star Shirley Temple passed away this week. After retiring as an actress she had a brief career as a diplomat. A long-time Czech diplomat recalls her time as US ambassador to Prague. After that, we sample a kind of pastry - loved by Czechs - that has found its way to New York City by way of Texas.

We meet Kayla Williams and Brian McGough. They were army sergeants deployed to Iraq when they met and fell in love. Their lives were forever changed when Brian narrowly survived an explosion. And, after the city of Glendale, Southern California, erected a statue recently it found itself embroiled in a dispute between Japan and Korea that dates back to the World War Two. Finally, we put to rest some myths about the classic Italian dish, spaghetti alla carbonara.

A Church on Every Corner20140215

The Nigerian pastor who has come to America to 'plant churches like Starbucks'

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

One of Africa's most influential Christian movements is now preaching the gospel in the US. We find out about its ambitious expansion plans. Plus, the former child-star Shirley Temple passed away this week. After retiring as an actress she had a brief career as a diplomat. A long-time Czech diplomat recalls her time as US ambassador to Prague. After that, we sample a kind of pastry - loved by Czechs - that has found its way to New York City by way of Texas.

We meet Kayla Williams and Brian McGough. They were army sergeants deployed to Iraq when they met and fell in love. Their lives were forever changed when Brian narrowly survived an explosion. And, after the city of Glendale, Southern California, erected a statue recently it found itself embroiled in a dispute between Japan and Korea that dates back to the World War Two. Finally, we put to rest some myths about the classic Italian dish, spaghetti alla carbonara.

A Crime to Hate2017070120170702 (WS)

\u201cWe won\u2019t call something anti-Semitism until we really know it\u2019s anti-Semitism."

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Five months after Jewish graves were vandalised in St. Louis, questions remain.

Also: a resolution condemning racism causes chaos at the Southern Baptist Convention; why refugees from Myanmar draw inspiration from the action movie, Rambo; the story of a murder that got manipulated to serve more than one political agenda; why a hate crime survivor tried to save the life of his attacker; plus Renee Goust has something to say to people who thinks she’s a “feminazi” and it comes in the form of a song.

(Image: Karen Aroesty is the regional director of the Anti-Defamation League. Credit: Daniel A. Gross)

A Crime to Hate2017070120170703 (WS)

\u201cWe won\u2019t call something anti-Semitism until we really know it\u2019s anti-Semitism."

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Five months after Jewish graves were vandalised in St. Louis, questions remain.

Also: a resolution condemning racism causes chaos at the Southern Baptist Convention; why refugees from Myanmar draw inspiration from the action movie, Rambo; the story of a murder that got manipulated to serve more than one political agenda; why a hate crime survivor tried to save the life of his attacker; plus Renee Goust has something to say to people who thinks she’s a “feminazi” and it comes in the form of a song.

(Image: Karen Aroesty is the regional director of the Anti-Defamation League. Credit: Daniel A. Gross)

A Crime to Hate20170701

\u201cWe won\u2019t call something anti-Semitism until we really know it\u2019s anti-Semitism."

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Five months after Jewish graves were vandalised in St. Louis, questions remain.

Also: a resolution condemning racism causes chaos at the Southern Baptist Convention; why refugees from Myanmar draw inspiration from the action movie, Rambo; the story of a murder that got manipulated to serve more than one political agenda; why a hate crime survivor tried to save the life of his attacker; plus Renee Goust has something to say to people who thinks she’s a “feminazi” and it comes in the form of a song.

(Image: Karen Aroesty is the regional director of the Anti-Defamation League. Credit: Daniel A. Gross)

A Crime To Hate20170703

“We won’t call something anti-Semitism until we really know it’s anti-Semitism."

Five months after Jewish graves were vandalised in St. Louis, questions remain.

Also: a resolution condemning racism causes chaos at the Southern Baptist Convention; why refugees from Myanmar draw inspiration from the action movie, Rambo; the story of a murder that got manipulated to serve more than one political agenda; why a hate crime survivor tried to save the life of his attacker; plus Renee Goust has something to say to people who thinks she’s a “feminazi? and it comes in the form of a song.

(Image: Karen Aroesty is the regional director of the Anti-Defamation League. Credit: Daniel A. Gross)

A Look Ahead2015010320150104 (WS)

The personal archive of Colombian literary giant Gabriel Garc\u00eda M\u00e1rquez goes to Texas.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We hear about Gabriel García Márquez’s personal archive, which has been acquired by the University of Texas. Plus, we learn about a new virtual reality tool that brings news stories to life, and a project that crowdsources local solutions in the fight against climate change.

Also, we consider the future of the American space programme, the US Navy prepares its Laser Weapon System for battle, and how the greenhouse expertise of the Dutch made one US grower an orchid powerhouse.

Photo: Gabriel García Márquez working on One Hundred Years of Solitude. (Credit: Guillermo Angulo/Harry Ransom Centre)

A Look Ahead20150103

The personal archive of Colombian literary giant Gabriel Garc\u00eda M\u00e1rquez goes to Texas.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We hear about Gabriel García Márquez’s personal archive, which has been acquired by the University of Texas. Plus, we learn about a new virtual reality tool that brings news stories to life, and a project that crowdsources local solutions in the fight against climate change.

Also, we consider the future of the American space programme, the US Navy prepares its Laser Weapon System for battle, and how the greenhouse expertise of the Dutch made one US grower an orchid powerhouse.

Photo: Gabriel García Márquez working on One Hundred Years of Solitude. (Credit: Guillermo Angulo/Harry Ransom Centre)

A Melting Pot Menu2014112920141130 (WS)

Forget the turkey - it is a tamale Thanksgiving in Texas

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We hear why one family in Texas has ditched the Thanksgiving turkey in favour of Thanksgiving tamales. And, we visit an Armenian bakery in Boston to learn how to eat Lahmacun.

Also, how American craft brewers are inspiring beer makers around the world. Why Portuguese fish stew is such a hit in Massachusetts. The beauty of lop-sided cake for Norwegian chef Sweet Paul. And, why French bread is essential for a classic Vietnamese sandwich.

(Photo: A plate of Beatriz Jaimes’ pork and chicken tamales. Credit: Veronica Zaragovia)

A Melting Pot Menu20141129

Forget the turkey - it is a tamale Thanksgiving in Texas

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We hear why one family in Texas has ditched the Thanksgiving turkey in favour of Thanksgiving tamales. And, we visit an Armenian bakery in Boston to learn how to eat Lahmacun.

Also, how American craft brewers are inspiring beer makers around the world. Why Portuguese fish stew is such a hit in Massachusetts. The beauty of lop-sided cake for Norwegian chef Sweet Paul. And, why French bread is essential for a classic Vietnamese sandwich.

(Photo: A plate of Beatriz Jaimes’ pork and chicken tamales. Credit: Veronica Zaragovia)

A Question Of Time2016081320160814 (WS)
20160815 (WS)

Some refugees, stuck in camps in Greece, are considering returning home

Conditions are so bad in refugee camps in Greece, some refugees are considering returning to the war torn countries they came from.

Also on the programme, residents of a disappearing island speak up; a former Pentagon official describes one moment that changed how she thinks about drones; a slam poet from Sudan shares her poetry; and a Silicon Valley entrepreneur thinks manufactured diamonds might replace real ones. Plus, some new emojis right some wrongs when it comes to gender equality.

Picture: A boy sits on a bus as he waits to be transferred to a refugee reception centre in Greece, Credit: Yannis Kolesidis/AFP/Getty Images

A Question of Time2016081320160814 (WS)

Some refugees, stuck in camps in Greece, are considering returning home

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Conditions are so bad in refugee camps in Greece, some refugees are considering returning to the war torn countries they came from.

Also on the programme, residents of a disappearing island speak up; a former Pentagon official describes one moment that changed how she thinks about drones; a slam poet from Sudan shares her poetry; and a Silicon Valley entrepreneur thinks manufactured diamonds might replace real ones. Plus, some new emojis right some wrongs when it comes to gender equality.

Picture: A boy sits on a bus as he waits to be transferred to a refugee reception centre in Greece, Credit: Yannis Kolesidis/AFP/Getty Images

A Question of Time20160813

Some refugees, stuck in camps in Greece, are considering returning home

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Conditions are so bad in refugee camps in Greece, some refugees are considering returning to the war torn countries they came from.

Also on the programme, residents of a disappearing island speak up; a former Pentagon official describes one moment that changed how she thinks about drones; a slam poet from Sudan shares her poetry; and a Silicon Valley entrepreneur thinks manufactured diamonds might replace real ones. Plus, some new emojis right some wrongs when it comes to gender equality.

Picture: A boy sits on a bus as he waits to be transferred to a refugee reception centre in Greece, Credit: Yannis Kolesidis/AFP/Getty Images

A Rebel\u2019s Ride2014040520140406 (WS)

Why the Toyota Hilux truck is coveted by every insurgent group from Syria to Afghanistan

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Why the Toyota Hilux pick-up is the truck that insurgent groups from Afghanistan to Syria want to drive. Also, the California town where Cesar Chavez launched the farm workers’ rights movement in the 1960s gets a starring role in a new film about him. Another California community that wants to be known for its large Arab immigrant population meets resistance from some locals. An American journalist explains how Stalin’s daughter wound up giving him parenting advice. Why one freight train - popular with Central American immigrants heading to the US - has earned the nickname The Beast. And, email sign-off preferences - how should you say goodbye?

A Rebel\u2019s Ride20140405

Why the Toyota Hilux truck is coveted by every insurgent group from Syria to Afghanistan

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Why the Toyota Hilux pick-up is the truck that insurgent groups from Afghanistan to Syria want to drive. Also, the California town where Cesar Chavez launched the farm workers’ rights movement in the 1960s gets a starring role in a new film about him. Another California community that wants to be known for its large Arab immigrant population meets resistance from some locals. An American journalist explains how Stalin’s daughter wound up giving him parenting advice. Why one freight train - popular with Central American immigrants heading to the US - has earned the nickname The Beast. And, email sign-off preferences - how should you say goodbye?

A Tale of Two Homes2014110820141109 (WS)

A band of war refugees from Sierra Leone become Ebola refugees in Rhode Island

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

One of Sierra Leone’s most popular musical outfits is made up of former refugees from the country’s civil war. And now they are in exile again - this time, they are Ebola refugees in the US. We pay a visit to Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars.

Also, the musings of an Indian-American writer who feels trapped between two countries. Why children from South Korea don't keep the fan on overnight. And, the memoir of an accidental war reporter in Yemen. Plus, the Star Trek actor George Takei talks about growing up in World War Two America. And, we find out how New York chef Ivan Orkin became a king of Japanese ramen.

(Photo: Reuben Koroma of Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars practices the bass guitar at his temporary home in the city of Providence, Rhode Island. Credit: Marco Werman)

A Tale of Two Homes20141108

A band of war refugees from Sierra Leone become Ebola refugees in Rhode Island

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

One of Sierra Leone’s most popular musical outfits is made up of former refugees from the country’s civil war. And now they are in exile again - this time, they are Ebola refugees in the US. We pay a visit to Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars.

Also, the musings of an Indian-American writer who feels trapped between two countries. Why children from South Korea don't keep the fan on overnight. And, the memoir of an accidental war reporter in Yemen. Plus, the Star Trek actor George Takei talks about growing up in World War Two America. And, we find out how New York chef Ivan Orkin became a king of Japanese ramen.

(Photo: Reuben Koroma of Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars practices the bass guitar at his temporary home in the city of Providence, Rhode Island. Credit: Marco Werman)

A Tale Of Two Homes2014110820141109 (WS)

One of Sierra Leone’s most popular musical outfits is made up of former refugees from the country’s civil war. And now they are in exile again - this time, they are Ebola refugees in the US. We pay a visit to Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars.

Also, the musings of an Indian-American writer who feels trapped between two countries. Why children from South Korea don't keep the fan on overnight. And, the memoir of an accidental war reporter in Yemen. Plus, the Star Trek actor George Takei talks about growing up in World War Two America. And, we find out how New York chef Ivan Orkin became a king of Japanese ramen.

(Photo: Reuben Koroma of Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars practices the bass guitar at his temporary home in the city of Providence, Rhode Island. Credit: Marco Werman)

A band of war refugees from Sierra Leone become Ebola refugees in Rhode Island

A US marine\u2019s Iraq war diary2013032320130324 (WS)

Tim McLaughlin's writings about the 2003 invasion of Iraq anchor a New York exhibit.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

A US Marine's Iraq war diary goes on display in New York City; why there are more international journalists covering the Bradley Manning whistle-blower trial than Americans; Muscovites give American action film star Steven Seagal a big Russian welcome and marrying by proxy.

(Image: An armed US Marine with night vision goggles, in silhouette on night patrol in Iraq. Credit: Getty Images)

A US marine\u2019s Iraq war diary20130323

Tim McLaughlin's writings about the 2003 invasion of Iraq anchor a New York exhibit.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

A US Marine's Iraq war diary goes on display in New York City; why there are more international journalists covering the Bradley Manning whistle-blower trial than Americans; Muscovites give American action film star Steven Seagal a big Russian welcome and marrying by proxy.

(Image: An armed US Marine with night vision goggles, in silhouette on night patrol in Iraq. Credit: Getty Images)

A Us Marine’s Iraq War Diary2013032320130324 (WS)

Tim McLaughlin's writings about the 2003 invasion of Iraq anchor a New York exhibit.

A US Marine's Iraq war diary goes on display in New York City; why there are more international journalists covering the Bradley Manning whistle-blower trial than Americans; Muscovites give American action film star Steven Seagal a big Russian welcome and marrying by proxy.

(Image: An armed US Marine with night vision goggles, in silhouette on night patrol in Iraq. Credit: Getty Images)

A Us Retailer Fights Off A Canadian Pirate2013062220130624 (WS)

A small shop in Canada is reselling goods from popular US store in, Trader Joe's

A European take on revelations of a secret US government surveillance programme and, looking back to a time when 'listening in' was less sophisticated, we hear from Cold War-era eavesdroppers.

Also on the programme: a beloved US retailer takes on a Canadian pirate. And the hunt for a video game that’s trash to some but treasure to others.

(Image: A sign says "We are an unauthorised (pirate) reseller of Trader Joe's fantastically great products", Credit: Mike Hallatt)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

A US Retailer Fights off a Canadian Pirate2013062220130624 (WS)

A small shop in Canada is reselling goods from popular US store in, Trader Joe's

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

A European take on revelations of a secret US government surveillance programme and, looking back to a time when 'listening in' was less sophisticated, we hear from Cold War-era eavesdroppers.

Also on the programme: a beloved US retailer takes on a Canadian pirate. And the hunt for a video game that’s trash to some but treasure to others.

(Image: A sign says "We are an unauthorised (pirate) reseller of Trader Joe's fantastically great products", Credit: Mike Hallatt)

A US Retailer Fights off a Canadian Pirate20130622

A small shop in Canada is reselling goods from popular US store in, Trader Joe's

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

A European take on revelations of a secret US government surveillance programme and, looking back to a time when 'listening in' was less sophisticated, we hear from Cold War-era eavesdroppers.

Also on the programme: a beloved US retailer takes on a Canadian pirate. And the hunt for a video game that’s trash to some but treasure to others.

(Image: A sign says "We are an unauthorised (pirate) reseller of Trader Joe's fantastically great products", Credit: Mike Hallatt)

A Year of Living Dangerously2014011120140112 (WS)

Glenn Greenwald talks about his life since accepting secret files from Edward Snowden

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Journalist Glenn Greenwald describes what life has been like for him since he accepted secret documents about US government spying from Edward Snowden. We also hear about a Spanish developer with big plans for rebuilding the bankrupt US city of Detroit. Japan gives the US military permission to relocate a controversial base in Okinawa. US veterans weigh in on the latest surge of violence in Iraq. And New York’s famed Apollo Theater attracts amateur performers to its weekly talent night from all corners of the globe.

(Photo: Guardian journalist Glenn Greenwald, who interviewed former CIA employee Edward Snowden. Credit: Associated Press)

A Year of Living Dangerously20140111

Glenn Greenwald talks about his life since accepting secret files from Edward Snowden

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Journalist Glenn Greenwald describes what life has been like for him since he accepted secret documents about US government spying from Edward Snowden. We also hear about a Spanish developer with big plans for rebuilding the bankrupt US city of Detroit. Japan gives the US military permission to relocate a controversial base in Okinawa. US veterans weigh in on the latest surge of violence in Iraq. And New York’s famed Apollo Theater attracts amateur performers to its weekly talent night from all corners of the globe.

(Photo: Guardian journalist Glenn Greenwald, who interviewed former CIA employee Edward Snowden. Credit: Associated Press)

€caught Up In The Policy’20170626

Iraqi immigrants in the US are getting sent back to Iraq.

“People are absolutely losing it. Some they go to their work. Some they pluck them right out of bed from their families."

Why Iraqis in the US are getting sent back to Iraq; what it means for one immigrant to get to stay; the fight for paid leave for victims of domestic violence in Canada; a Ukrainian physicist who always tries to keep politics and science separate fails yet again; and the two comedians who started ArmComedy, their country’s first satirical news programme, explain what Armenians find funny.

(Photo: An Iraqi owned restaurant in Detroit. Credit: Shirin Jaafari)

Activism in the Digital Age2015032120150322 (WS)

Technology as a force for social change at the South by Southwest interactive conference

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

At the South by Southwest interactive conference in Austin, Texas, we find out how new media is being used to drive social change. We hear about the role that protest plays in creating communities. We meet a Harvard student pressurising her university to give up its fossil fuel investments. And, Vivian Graubard, technology adviser to the White House, speaks about her passion for the issue of immigration. A young blogger in the US pushes for change in Egypt. And an investor in start-up businesses hopes to harness the creativity of entrepreneurs to counter the social media strategy of Islamic extremists.

(Image: A cartoon of a young protester holding a mobile phone. Credit: Rick Pinchera)

Activism in the Digital Age20150321

Technology as a force for social change at the South by Southwest interactive conference

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

At the South by Southwest interactive conference in Austin, Texas, we find out how new media is being used to drive social change. We hear about the role that protest plays in creating communities. We meet a Harvard student pressurising her university to give up its fossil fuel investments. And, Vivian Graubard, technology adviser to the White House, speaks about her passion for the issue of immigration. A young blogger in the US pushes for change in Egypt. And an investor in start-up businesses hopes to harness the creativity of entrepreneurs to counter the social media strategy of Islamic extremists.

(Image: A cartoon of a young protester holding a mobile phone. Credit: Rick Pinchera)

Aleppo's Ancient Souk20121014

Aleppo\u2019s ancient souk, a Norwegian statesman's rock ballad and brave New York foodies.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

This week, we tour Aleppo’s ancient souk.

Also, Norwegian statesman Jan Egeland gets his own rock ballad.

Plus, some Bostonians try to lift Indian kids out of poverty.

And we have the story of some New Yorkers who will tuck into any type of food - even duck embryo.

(Image: Shops are shuttered in the souk in the old city of Aleppo. Credit: MIGUEL MEDINA/AFP/GettyImages)

Aleppo's Ancient Souk20121014

This week, we tour Aleppo’s ancient souk.

Also, Norwegian statesman Jan Egeland gets his own rock ballad.

Plus, some Bostonians try to lift Indian kids out of poverty.

And we have the story of some New Yorkers who will tuck into any type of food - even duck embryo.

(Image: Shops are shuttered in the souk in the old city of Aleppo. Credit: MIGUEL MEDINA/AFP/GettyImages)

Aleppo’s ancient souk, a Norwegian statesman's rock ballad and brave New York foodies.

All Dressed Up2017123020171231 (WS)

We meet the women who make our clothes.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

About 80 percent of garment industry workers are women. For the past few months, Jasmine Garsd has travelled the globe to meet these workers, in person.

We start in Roanoke Rapids in North Carolina, a formerly bustling cotton mill town, that’s gone quiet. Next, we go to Los Angeles, were we learn how a sweatshop raid in 1995 changed the garment industry in the US forever. Lastly, we got to Bangladesh, where a large portion of our clothing now gets made.

Want to find out how fair your fashion is? Here’s the website mentioned in the programme: https://interactive.pri.org/2017/fair-fashion-quiz/

(Image: Mother and daughter, Rongmala Begum (standing) and Mayna Begum, both work in clothing factories in Bangladesh. Credit: Ismael Ferdous/PRI)

All Dressed Up20171230

We meet the women who make our clothes.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

About 80 percent of garment industry workers are women. For the past few months, Jasmine Garsd has travelled the globe to meet these workers, in person.

We start in Roanoke Rapids in North Carolina, a formerly bustling cotton mill town, that’s gone quiet. Next, we go to Los Angeles, were we learn how a sweatshop raid in 1995 changed the garment industry in the US forever. Lastly, we got to Bangladesh, where a large portion of our clothing now gets made.

Want to find out how fair your fashion is? Here’s the website mentioned in the programme: https://interactive.pri.org/2017/fair-fashion-quiz/

(Image: Mother and daughter, Rongmala Begum (standing) and Mayna Begum, both work in clothing factories in Bangladesh. Credit: Ismael Ferdous/PRI)

All Dressed Up20171230

Where do the clothes we wear every day come from?

America\u2019s Domestic Drones2013012620130127 (WS)

How unmanned aerial vehicles used for overseas missions are watching Americans at home

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How unmanned aerial vehicles used for overseas missions are also tracking Americans at home.

Also, immigrant rights campaigners in Texas see an opportunity in President Obama's second term. And help comes to domestic abuse victims in California's South-Asian community.

(Image: A drone, Credit: Getty Images)

America\u2019s Domestic Drones20130126

How unmanned aerial vehicles used for overseas missions are watching Americans at home

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How unmanned aerial vehicles used for overseas missions are also tracking Americans at home.

Also, immigrant rights campaigners in Texas see an opportunity in President Obama's second term. And help comes to domestic abuse victims in California's South-Asian community.

(Image: A drone, Credit: Getty Images)

America\u2019s H1B workers2013031620130317 (WS)

Could a controversial visa program for highly skilled foreigner workers be a bad idea?

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

A controversial US visa program for highly-skilled foreign workers; young refugees and immigrants in Arizona unite under the name "Team Milan"; the reigning Boston Marathon champ wins a different kind of race back home in Kenya and Japanese tsunami victims learn to smile again.

(Image: App Academy in San Francisco, CA, teaches students enough web development to qualify for an entry-level programming job in nine weeks. Credit: App Academy)

America\u2019s H1B workers20130316

Could a controversial visa program for highly skilled foreigner workers be a bad idea?

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

A controversial US visa program for highly-skilled foreign workers; young refugees and immigrants in Arizona unite under the name "Team Milan"; the reigning Boston Marathon champ wins a different kind of race back home in Kenya and Japanese tsunami victims learn to smile again.

(Image: App Academy in San Francisco, CA, teaches students enough web development to qualify for an entry-level programming job in nine weeks. Credit: App Academy)

America’s Domestic Drones2013012620130127 (WS)

How unmanned aerial vehicles used for overseas missions are watching Americans at home

How unmanned aerial vehicles used for overseas missions are also tracking Americans at home.

Also, immigrant rights campaigners in Texas see an opportunity in President Obama's second term. And help comes to domestic abuse victims in California's South-Asian community.

(Image: A drone, Credit: Getty Images)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

American Adventures in North Korea2013120720131208 (WS)

Has a secret Korean war mission landed an elderly US veteran in hot water in North Korea?

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

An 85-year-old US veteran who spent his war years behind enemy lines secretly training a group of Korean partisans is detained by North Korean authorities, at the conclusion of his recent visit to Pyongyang. Was his association with this most hated and feared unit the reason he is being held? Another American who served in a similar unit in North Korea says he is certain he would be arrested if he set foot in the country again.

Also, the story of a pair of American rappers who went to North Korea to shoot a music video. Plus, what US primary schools could learn from their counterparts overseas, and reinventing the bicycle wheel.

American Adventures in North Korea20131207

Has a secret Korean war mission landed an elderly US veteran in hot water in North Korea?

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

An 85-year-old US veteran who spent his war years behind enemy lines secretly training a group of Korean partisans is detained by North Korean authorities, at the conclusion of his recent visit to Pyongyang. Was his association with this most hated and feared unit the reason he is being held? Another American who served in a similar unit in North Korea says he is certain he would be arrested if he set foot in the country again.

Also, the story of a pair of American rappers who went to North Korea to shoot a music video. Plus, what US primary schools could learn from their counterparts overseas, and reinventing the bicycle wheel.

American Dreams2013122120131222 (WS)

We delve into the troubled family history of the alleged Boston Marathon bombers

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We explore the dysfunctional family history of the alleged Boston Marathon bombers, brothers Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. Also, we meet a Spanish teacher in Guatemala who doesn’t need to move to the US to live the so-called “American Dream”. He is living it in Guatemala - thanks to the internet. We hear why some Chinese students are embracing American slang, and why not everyone loves cinnamon. Plus, a case of international espionage set in an American corn field, and a rags-to-riches story set in California wine country.

(Photo: Patimat Suleimanova, aunt of Boston bombing suspects Dzhokhar and Tamerlan Tsarnaev, holds a photo from the family archive 22 April , 2013. Dzhokhar (C, bottom) and Tamerlan (C, top). Credit: Reuters)

American Dreams20131221

We delve into the troubled family history of the alleged Boston Marathon bombers

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We explore the dysfunctional family history of the alleged Boston Marathon bombers, brothers Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. Also, we meet a Spanish teacher in Guatemala who doesn’t need to move to the US to live the so-called “American Dream”. He is living it in Guatemala - thanks to the internet. We hear why some Chinese students are embracing American slang, and why not everyone loves cinnamon. Plus, a case of international espionage set in an American corn field, and a rags-to-riches story set in California wine country.

(Photo: Patimat Suleimanova, aunt of Boston bombing suspects Dzhokhar and Tamerlan Tsarnaev, holds a photo from the family archive 22 April , 2013. Dzhokhar (C, bottom) and Tamerlan (C, top). Credit: Reuters)

American Identities20150523

How to eat pork, drink booze and be a 'good' Muslim

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We meet Tanzila 'Taz' Ahmed and Zahra Noorbakhsh, the creative minds behind a new podcast called #GoodMuslimBadMuslim. And, we get Hollywood’s take on Asian-American leading men. Plus, the identity gap between African-Americans and African immigrants in the US.

Also, California's gardens tell an immigrant story. The celebrated Mexican author Cristina Rivera Garza says languages are not strait-jackets, but tools to start a bilingual conversation. And we bid farewell to the late-night host David Letterman with a sitar player.

(Photo: Zahra Noorbakhsh (left) and Tanzila "Taz" Ahmed host the new podcast #GoodMuslimBadMuslim. Credit: Sabiha Basrai)

American Justice2018042120180422 (WS)

Since 1978, the number of women in US state prisons has grown by more than 800 per cent.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

All over the world, countries are imprisoning women at higher rates than ever before.

On the programme: We visit a new kind of drug treatment program for women in the Midwestern state of Ohio; we hear about why more and more mothers in Mexico are serving time for selling drugs; and we go to court with a Canadian woman named Cheyenne Sharma whose case ends up changing the law. The programme ends with the song ‘The One Who Stands In the Sun’ by Choctaw musician Samantha Crain.

(Image: Lisa Duncan, Ashley Porter, Sheena Kimberly and Stephanie Cleveland, all of whom are in the Tapestry program in Ohio, are pictured from left to right. Credit: PRI’s The World)

American Justice20180421

Since 1978, the number of women in US state prisons has grown by more than 800 per cent.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

All over the world, countries are imprisoning women at higher rates than ever before.

On the programme: We visit a new kind of drug treatment program for women in the Midwestern state of Ohio; we hear about why more and more mothers in Mexico are serving time for selling drugs; and we go to court with a Canadian woman named Cheyenne Sharma whose case ends up changing the law. The programme ends with the song ‘The One Who Stands In the Sun’ by Choctaw musician Samantha Crain.

(Image: Lisa Duncan, Ashley Porter, Sheena Kimberly and Stephanie Cleveland, all of whom are in the Tapestry program in Ohio, are pictured from left to right. Credit: PRI’s The World)

American Justice2018042120180422 (WS)

Since 1978, the number of women in US state prisons has grown by more than 800 per cent.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

All over the world, countries are imprisoning women at higher rates than ever before.

On the programme: We visit a new kind of drug treatment program for women in the Midwestern state of Ohio; we hear about why more and more mothers in Mexico are serving time for selling drugs; and we go to court with a Canadian woman named Cheyenne Sharma whose case ends up changing the law. The programme ends with the song ‘The One Who Stands In the Sun’ by Choctaw musician Samantha Crain.

(Image: Lisa Duncan, Ashley Porter, Sheena Kimberly and Stephanie Cleveland, all of whom are in the Tapestry program in Ohio, are pictured from left to right. Credit: PRI’s The World)

Since 1978, the number of women in US state prisons has grown by more than 800 per cent.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

All over the world, countries are imprisoning women at higher rates than ever before.

On the programme: We visit a new kind of drug treatment program for women in the Midwestern state of Ohio; we hear about why more and more mothers in Mexico are serving time for selling drugs; and we go to court with a Canadian woman named Cheyenne Sharma whose case ends up changing the law. The programme ends with the song ‘The One Who Stands In the Sun’ by Choctaw musician Samantha Crain.

(Image: Lisa Duncan, Ashley Porter, Sheena Kimberly and Stephanie Cleveland, all of whom are in the Tapestry program in Ohio, are pictured from left to right. Credit: PRI’s The World)

Americans and War2013072720130729 (WS)

A Syrian-American doctor returns to Syria to help victims of the sectarian violence

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Dr Aref Rifai, a Syrian-American eye doctor describes his recent visit to Syria to operate on victims of that country’s civil war. Filipinos who fought alongside Americans in the Second World War were granted US citizenship, but some family members are still waiting to be reunited with them in America. The remains of a 16th century Spanish fort recently discovered in the US state of North Carolina serve as a reminder of a neglected period in America’s history. US counter-insurgency tactics used in Afghanistan are enjoying some success combating gang violence in one struggling American city. And, why some want to do away with the US dollar?

(Picture: Dr Aref Rifai, a Syrian-American ophthalmologist, with a patient in Syria, Credit: Aref Rifai.)

Americans and War20130727

A Syrian-American doctor returns to Syria to help victims of the sectarian violence

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Dr Aref Rifai, a Syrian-American eye doctor describes his recent visit to Syria to operate on victims of that country’s civil war. Filipinos who fought alongside Americans in the Second World War were granted US citizenship, but some family members are still waiting to be reunited with them in America. The remains of a 16th century Spanish fort recently discovered in the US state of North Carolina serve as a reminder of a neglected period in America’s history. US counter-insurgency tactics used in Afghanistan are enjoying some success combating gang violence in one struggling American city. And, why some want to do away with the US dollar?

(Picture: Dr Aref Rifai, a Syrian-American ophthalmologist, with a patient in Syria, Credit: Aref Rifai.)

America's Reliance on Drone Warfare2013050420130506 (WS)

US Senators meet a Yemeni man whose village was targeted by a drone

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Yemenis question America's reliance on drone warfare: US Senators meet a Yemeni man whose village was targeted by a drone, and a made-up drone strike in Massachusetts goes viral in Pakistan.

Also, a reluctant fundamentalist jumps from book form to the big screen, and helping Mexican entrepreneurs get a leg up in the US market.

(Image: Air hangar and a drone, Credit: Getty Images)

America's Reliance on Drone Warfare20130504

US Senators meet a Yemeni man whose village was targeted by a drone

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Yemenis question America's reliance on drone warfare: US Senators meet a Yemeni man whose village was targeted by a drone, and a made-up drone strike in Massachusetts goes viral in Pakistan.

Also, a reluctant fundamentalist jumps from book form to the big screen, and helping Mexican entrepreneurs get a leg up in the US market.

(Image: Air hangar and a drone, Credit: Getty Images)

An Act of Faith2016101520161016 (WS)

Two Americans in Lebanon on a mission from God to teach Syrian refugee children

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Two Texan missionaries built a school for refugees in Lebanon. But it’s unclear if they understand the risks.

Also: A Muslim doctor recalls when a patient refused to let him to treat her; ultra-Orthodox Israeli newspaper editors struggle to cover the US presidential race without printing pictures of women; writer Sabaa Tahir explains her vision of afterlife; and we learn about an ancient religion you've probably never heard of. Lastly, a Jewish family in New York sacrifices their first chicken.

(A woman walks past graffiti depicting a cross and reading 'we are here' in a Christian dominated suburb east of the Lebanese capital Beirut. Credit: Patrick Baz/AFP/Getty Images)

An Act of Faith20161015

Two Americans in Lebanon on a mission from God to teach Syrian refugee children

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Two Texan missionaries built a school for refugees in Lebanon. But it’s unclear if they understand the risks.

Also: A Muslim doctor recalls when a patient refused to let him to treat her; ultra-Orthodox Israeli newspaper editors struggle to cover the US presidential race without printing pictures of women; writer Sabaa Tahir explains her vision of afterlife; and we learn about an ancient religion you've probably never heard of. Lastly, a Jewish family in New York sacrifices their first chicken.

(A woman walks past graffiti depicting a cross and reading 'we are here' in a Christian dominated suburb east of the Lebanese capital Beirut. Credit: Patrick Baz/AFP/Getty Images)

An Act Of Faith2016101520161016 (WS)
20161017 (WS)

Two Texan missionaries built a school for refugees in Lebanon. But it’s unclear if they understand the risks.

Also: A Muslim doctor recalls when a patient refused to let him to treat her; ultra-Orthodox Israeli newspaper editors struggle to cover the US presidential race without printing pictures of women; writer Sabaa Tahir explains her vision of afterlife; and we learn about an ancient religion you've probably never heard of. Lastly, a Jewish family in New York sacrifices their first chicken.

(A woman walks past graffiti depicting a cross and reading 'we are here' in a Christian dominated suburb east of the Lebanese capital Beirut. Credit: Patrick Baz/AFP/Getty Images)

Two Americans in Lebanon on a mission from God to teach Syrian refugee children

An American Feast2013113020131201 (WS)

Going foraging in Seattle for locally grown foods

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

'Urban foraging' is the practice of harvesting food that grows naturally in the city where you live. Once a fringe activity, urban foraging is gaining acceptance in some US cities as a measure to protect against increasing food insecurity. We’ll go harvesting with some foragers in Seattle. We’ll also hear how coffee powers America’s soldiers… and why it’s okay to leave one Japanese restaurant in New York City without tipping. We’ll also sample some New Orleans gumbo. It’s the dish that defines the city, or is it the city that defines the dish?

Picture: Melany Vorass Herrera harvests stinging nettles from Seattle’s Golden Gardens Park. It’s technically illegal, but like many other US cities, Seattle is starting to promote careful urban foraging.

An American Feast20131130

Going foraging in Seattle for locally grown foods

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

'Urban foraging' is the practice of harvesting food that grows naturally in the city where you live. Once a fringe activity, urban foraging is gaining acceptance in some US cities as a measure to protect against increasing food insecurity. We’ll go harvesting with some foragers in Seattle. We’ll also hear how coffee powers America’s soldiers… and why it’s okay to leave one Japanese restaurant in New York City without tipping. We’ll also sample some New Orleans gumbo. It’s the dish that defines the city, or is it the city that defines the dish?

Picture: Melany Vorass Herrera harvests stinging nettles from Seattle’s Golden Gardens Park. It’s technically illegal, but like many other US cities, Seattle is starting to promote careful urban foraging.

An Artist\u2019s Touch20150516

A war photographer documents life and death on the American home front

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We hear from David Guttenfelder, an American war photographer raising awareness about the alarming suicide rate among former US soldiers. Plus, we look at the Vietnam War’s aftermath through the eyes of a communist spy. And we meet Sonita Alizadeh, a young Afghan rapper who escaped teen marriage by singing about it.

Also, independent perfumers make a big splash in the fragrance world. Ai Weiwei’s Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads exhibition comes to Wyoming. And an Iranian-American musician pays tribute to Rabia Basri, the first female Sufi mystic.

(Photo: Marine Corps boots sit on a small shelf in Brandon Ladner’s old bedroom. Ladner was a US Marine who shot and killed himself last year. Credit: David Guttenfelder)

An Iraqi-American Family\u2019s Sanctions Nightmare2013010520130106 (WS)

Jailed for sending money to Iraq; join the Army, become an American; and Mexico\u2019s drug war

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

On today's show: the Iraqi-American businessman jailed for violating US sanctions by sending money to his relatives in Iraq in the 1990s.

Plus, we hear about the Koreans flooding a Pentagon programme offering a fast-track to US citizenship for those who join the military and “outlandish” stories from Mexico’s drug war.

Photo: Getty Images

An Iraqi-American Family\u2019s Sanctions Nightmare20130105

Jailed for sending money to Iraq; join the Army, become an American; and Mexico\u2019s drug war

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

On today's show: the Iraqi-American businessman jailed for violating US sanctions by sending money to his relatives in Iraq in the 1990s.

Plus, we hear about the Koreans flooding a Pentagon programme offering a fast-track to US citizenship for those who join the military and “outlandish” stories from Mexico’s drug war.

Photo: Getty Images

An Iraqi-american Family’s Sanctions Nightmare2013010520130106 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Are You Afraid of The Dark?2017072220170723 (WS)

A solar eclipse rallied Americans around science. Could it again?

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

In 1878, scientists all over the US witnessed a total eclipse of the sun. After that, American science was never quite the same.

Also: Sona Hosseini learns that being an astronomist….can be depressing; photographer Joel Sartore goes on a quest to take pictures of endangered animals before they disappear; why the American TV drama Twin Peaks took off in Russia; and we remember director George Romero who changed how we think about zombies.

(Image: A total solar eclipse is seen in Indonesia on March 9, 2016. Credit: Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)

Are You Afraid of The Dark?2017072220170724 (WS)

A solar eclipse rallied Americans around science. Could it again?

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

In 1878, scientists all over the US witnessed a total eclipse of the sun. After that, American science was never quite the same.

Also: Sona Hosseini learns that being an astronomist….can be depressing; photographer Joel Sartore goes on a quest to take pictures of endangered animals before they disappear; why the American TV drama Twin Peaks took off in Russia; and we remember director George Romero who changed how we think about zombies.

(Image: A total solar eclipse is seen in Indonesia on March 9, 2016. Credit: Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)

Are You Afraid of The Dark?20170722

A solar eclipse rallied Americans around science. Could it again?

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

In 1878, scientists all over the US witnessed a total eclipse of the sun. After that, American science was never quite the same.

Also: Sona Hosseini learns that being an astronomist….can be depressing; photographer Joel Sartore goes on a quest to take pictures of endangered animals before they disappear; why the American TV drama Twin Peaks took off in Russia; and we remember director George Romero who changed how we think about zombies.

(Image: A total solar eclipse is seen in Indonesia on March 9, 2016. Credit: Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)

Are You Afraid Of The Dark?20170724

A solar eclipse rallied Americans around science. Could it again?

In 1878, scientists all over the US witnessed a total eclipse of the sun. After that, American science was never quite the same.

Also: Sona Hosseini learns that being an astronomist….can be depressing; photographer Joel Sartore goes on a quest to take pictures of endangered animals before they disappear; why the American TV drama Twin Peaks took off in Russia; and we remember director George Romero who changed how we think about zombies.

(Image: A total solar eclipse is seen in Indonesia on March 9, 2016. Credit: Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images)

Asian Exchange2014112220141123 (WS)

How a start-up selling low-tech products is helping India's poor

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We hear about a start-up in India - founded by two young American women - selling low-tech products that help the poor with every day challenges. And, the legacy of Swami Vivekananda in the United States.

Also, how immigrants in the US state of New Hampshire created an unlikely ethnic food hub for the local South Asian community. The American activist training the women’s national cycling team in Afghanistan. And the Pakistani writer, Bina Shah, challenges perceptions of her homeland in the American television series ‘Homeland’. Plus, breaking a sweat with BollyX—the new fitness trend sweeping America that combines aerobics and Bollywood dance moves.

(Photo: The owner of a small shop on the side of a highway in India's Tamil Nadu. Above his head is a solar lamp produced by the start-up Essmart. Credit: Rhitu Chatterjee)

Asian Exchange20141122

How a start-up selling low-tech products is helping India's poor

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We hear about a start-up in India - founded by two young American women - selling low-tech products that help the poor with every day challenges. And, the legacy of Swami Vivekananda in the United States.

Also, how immigrants in the US state of New Hampshire created an unlikely ethnic food hub for the local South Asian community. The American activist training the women’s national cycling team in Afghanistan. And the Pakistani writer, Bina Shah, challenges perceptions of her homeland in the American television series ‘Homeland’. Plus, breaking a sweat with BollyX—the new fitness trend sweeping America that combines aerobics and Bollywood dance moves.

(Photo: The owner of a small shop on the side of a highway in India's Tamil Nadu. Above his head is a solar lamp produced by the start-up Essmart. Credit: Rhitu Chatterjee)

Assumptions... Assumptions20151114

America has no monopoly on racism, it's just 'more lethal'

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

The journalist Gary Younge tells us how his exposure to racism in the US changed his view on the world. Then we hear why activists for India's Dalits are taking cues from the Black Lives Matter movement. And the essayist Deepak Singh recalls the excruciating moments watching TV with his family in India when a condom ad would come on the screen.

Also: how a Latina with red hair and a Jewish last name challenges ideas about identity. We ask whether Orthodox Jewish women can become rabbis. And we meet a rising star on the Mexican music scene— El Compa Negro.

(Photo: Protesters gather at Union Square in New York City on April 2015. Credit: Getty Images)

Assumptions... Assumptions20151114

The journalist Gary Younge tells us how his exposure to racism in the US changed his view on the world. Then we hear why activists for India's Dalits are taking cues from the Black Lives Matter movement. And the essayist Deepak Singh recalls the excruciating moments watching TV with his family in India when a condom ad would come on the screen.

Also: how a Latina with red hair and a Jewish last name challenges ideas about identity. We ask whether Orthodox Jewish women can become rabbis. And we meet a rising star on the Mexican music scene— El Compa Negro.

(Photo: Protesters gather at Union Square in New York City on April 2015. Credit: Getty Images)

America has no monopoly on racism, it's just 'more lethal'

At The Movies20171125

The voice acting world is facing questions of identity and representation.

Hollywood has been criticised for its practice of whitewashing. Now, the voice acting world faces questions.

Also: Kelvin Han Yee, a Chinese-American actor, broke his parents' heart and wonders if it was worth it; a birdwatcher begs Hollywood to get its bird sounds right; Disney/Pixar’s “Coco,” which was a hit in Mexico, comes to the US; Laela French, a Star Wars buff, explains the origins of Darth Vader’s costume; and in the documentary “Dreamland” the Wabanaki people take back their narrative.

(Image: For years, G.K. Bowes was the official voice of Barbie. Credit: Courtesy of G.K. Bowes)

At the Movies2017112520171126 (WS)

The voice acting world is facing questions of identity and representation.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Hollywood has been criticised for its practice of whitewashing. Now, the voice acting world faces questions.

Also: Kelvin Han Yee, a Chinese-American actor, broke his parents' heart and wonders if it was worth it; a birdwatcher begs Hollywood to get its bird sounds right; Disney/Pixar’s “Coco,” which was a hit in Mexico, comes to the US; Laela French, a Star Wars buff, explains the origins of Darth Vader’s costume; and in the documentary “Dreamland” the Wabanaki people take back their narrative.

(Image: For years, G.K. Bowes was the official voice of Barbie. Credit: Courtesy of G.K. Bowes)

At the Movies20171125

The voice acting world is facing questions of identity and representation.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Hollywood has been criticised for its practice of whitewashing. Now, the voice acting world faces questions.

Also: Kelvin Han Yee, a Chinese-American actor, broke his parents' heart and wonders if it was worth it; a birdwatcher begs Hollywood to get its bird sounds right; Disney/Pixar’s “Coco,” which was a hit in Mexico, comes to the US; Laela French, a Star Wars buff, explains the origins of Darth Vader’s costume; and in the documentary “Dreamland” the Wabanaki people take back their narrative.

(Image: For years, G.K. Bowes was the official voice of Barbie. Credit: Courtesy of G.K. Bowes)

At Your Civil Service2017102120171022 (WS)

How climate change and Donald Trump brought an end to one diplomat's career

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Dave Rank, a high ranking diplomat, resigned over Trump’s climate change policy.

Also: a former sheriff worries that new legislation in California to protect unauthorised immigrants will make it harder for police officers to do their jobs; a member of India’s lowest caste moves to New York and becomes a train conductor; a journalist travels around the world to see how people pay taxes; Harry Truman’s grandson impersonates him in a play; plus we meet some four legged civil servants: bomb sniffing dogs.

(Image: Dave Rank is the former head of the US embassy in Beijing. Credit: Ashley Ahearn/Terrestrial. http://kuow.org/programs/terrestrial )

At Your Civil Service2017102120171023 (WS)

How climate change and Donald Trump brought an end to one diplomat's career

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Dave Rank, a high ranking diplomat, resigned over Trump’s climate change policy.

Also: a former sheriff worries that new legislation in California to protect unauthorised immigrants will make it harder for police officers to do their jobs; a member of India’s lowest caste moves to New York and becomes a train conductor; a journalist travels around the world to see how people pay taxes; Harry Truman’s grandson impersonates him in a play; plus we meet some four legged civil servants: bomb sniffing dogs.

(Image: Dave Rank is the former head of the US embassy in Beijing. Credit: Ashley Ahearn/Terrestrial. http://kuow.org/programs/terrestrial )

At Your Civil Service20171021

How climate change and Donald Trump brought an end to one diplomat's career

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Dave Rank, a high ranking diplomat, resigned over Trump’s climate change policy.

Also: a former sheriff worries that new legislation in California to protect unauthorised immigrants will make it harder for police officers to do their jobs; a member of India’s lowest caste moves to New York and becomes a train conductor; a journalist travels around the world to see how people pay taxes; Harry Truman’s grandson impersonates him in a play; plus we meet some four legged civil servants: bomb sniffing dogs.

(Image: Dave Rank is the former head of the US embassy in Beijing. Credit: Ashley Ahearn/Terrestrial. http://kuow.org/programs/terrestrial )

At Your Civil Service20171023

How climate change and Donald Trump brought an end to one diplomat's career

Dave Rank, a high ranking diplomat, resigned over Trump’s climate change policy.

Also: a former sheriff worries that new legislation in California to protect unauthorised immigrants will make it harder for police officers to do their jobs; a member of India’s lowest caste moves to New York and becomes a train conductor; a journalist travels around the world to see how people pay taxes; Harry Truman’s grandson impersonates him in a play; plus we meet some four legged civil servants: bomb sniffing dogs.

(Image: Dave Rank is the former head of the US embassy in Beijing. Credit: Ashley Ahearn/Terrestrial. http://kuow.org/programs/terrestrial )

Dave Rank, a high ranking diplomat, resigned over Trump’s climate change policy.

Also: a former sheriff worries that new legislation in California to protect unauthorised immigrants will make it harder for police officers to do their jobs; a member of India’s lowest caste moves to New York and becomes a train conductor; a journalist travels around the world to see how people pay taxes; Harry Truman’s grandson impersonates him in a play; plus we meet some four legged civil servants: bomb sniffing dogs.

(Image: Dave Rank is the former head of the US embassy in Beijing. Credit: Ashley Ahearn/Terrestrial)

Best Intentions2014041220140413 (WS)

The story of a ball designed to revolutionise the way the world\u2019s poor light their homes

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

The story of a ball that was supposed to have revolutionised the way people in developing countries light their homes. Also in the show, how the Rwanda genocide led a 27-year-old American to devote his life to preventing future atrocities. An American man who brought presents to the family of the Palestinian who tried to murder his wife. An immigrant from Malaysia remembers going hungry her first night in the US because of a misunderstanding between her and her host family. And, a programme that hopes to solve the shortage of young farmers in America by focusing on urban immigrant teens.

Picture: Eduardo Tamaniz Diego, 6, was excited to receive a “Soccket” last year in his home state of Puebla, Mexico. But he says the ball, which generates power to run an electric light, stopped working, Credit: Jennifer Collins

Best Intentions20140412

The story of a ball designed to revolutionise the way the world\u2019s poor light their homes

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

The story of a ball that was supposed to have revolutionised the way people in developing countries light their homes. Also in the show, how the Rwanda genocide led a 27-year-old American to devote his life to preventing future atrocities. An American man who brought presents to the family of the Palestinian who tried to murder his wife. An immigrant from Malaysia remembers going hungry her first night in the US because of a misunderstanding between her and her host family. And, a programme that hopes to solve the shortage of young farmers in America by focusing on urban immigrant teens.

Picture: Eduardo Tamaniz Diego, 6, was excited to receive a “Soccket” last year in his home state of Puebla, Mexico. But he says the ball, which generates power to run an electric light, stopped working, Credit: Jennifer Collins

Better Together20180113

A love story that began at the outbreak of the Korean War.

For George Lampman and Lee Sook Ei it was love at first sight. Then, the Korean War broke out.

Also: A monastery in Missouri, about to close its doors, is saved by monks from Vietnam; Spanish speaking actors in Miami unionise to fight for better working conditions; doctors in the US get lessons from doctors in Cuba in how to reduce infant mortality; an amateur mathematician from Tennessee discovers the largest known prime number; plus we listen to Bjork and reminisce about unrequited crushes.
(Image: Lee Sook Ei and George Lampman met at the US embassy in Seoul. Credit: Courtesy of the Lampman family)

Better Together2018011320180114 (WS)

A love story that began at the outbreak of the Korean War.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

For George Lampman and Lee Sook Ei it was love at first sight. Then, the Korean War broke out.

Also: A monastery in Missouri, about to close its doors, is saved by monks from Vietnam; Spanish speaking actors in Miami unionise to fight for better working conditions; doctors in the US get lessons from doctors in Cuba in how to reduce infant mortality; an amateur mathematician from Tennessee discovers the largest known prime number; plus we listen to Bjork and reminisce about unrequited crushes.
(Image: Lee Sook Ei and George Lampman met at the US embassy in Seoul. Credit: Courtesy of the Lampman family)

Better Together20180113

A love story that began at the outbreak of the Korean War.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

For George Lampman and Lee Sook Ei it was love at first sight. Then, the Korean War broke out.

Also: A monastery in Missouri, about to close its doors, is saved by monks from Vietnam; Spanish speaking actors in Miami unionise to fight for better working conditions; doctors in the US get lessons from doctors in Cuba in how to reduce infant mortality; an amateur mathematician from Tennessee discovers the largest known prime number; plus we listen to Bjork and reminisce about unrequited crushes.
(Image: Lee Sook Ei and George Lampman met at the US embassy in Seoul. Credit: Courtesy of the Lampman family)

Between 'immigrant' And 'citizen'2013112320131124 (WS)

A play about illegal immigrants in the US tries to humanise the immigration reform debate

How a play about the struggles of illegal immigrant youths in the United States is trying to humanise the national debate over immigration reform. We hear from the author of Citizenship: American Identity after Globalization about how the value placed on US citizenship has changed through the years.

Also, how Filipinos in the US who already send a lot of aid back home are trying to do more in the wake of Typhoon Haiyan. An American architect’s ambitious vision for a new public park in Russia’s capital moves ahead. And, what Fidel Castro said when he heard that President John F Kennedy had been shot in Dallas 50 years ago this week.

(Picture: The play Just Like Us follows four young immigrants from Mexico and looks at how their legal status impacts their futures, Credit: Jennifer M Koskinen, all rights reserved by Denver Center Theater Company)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Between 'Immigrant' and 'Citizen'2013112320131124 (WS)

A play about illegal immigrants in the US tries to humanise the immigration reform debate

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How a play about the struggles of illegal immigrant youths in the United States is trying to humanise the national debate over immigration reform. We hear from the author of Citizenship: American Identity after Globalization about how the value placed on US citizenship has changed through the years.

Also, how Filipinos in the US who already send a lot of aid back home are trying to do more in the wake of Typhoon Haiyan. An American architect’s ambitious vision for a new public park in Russia’s capital moves ahead. And, what Fidel Castro said when he heard that President John F Kennedy had been shot in Dallas 50 years ago this week.

(Picture: The play Just Like Us follows four young immigrants from Mexico and looks at how their legal status impacts their futures, Credit: Jennifer M Koskinen, all rights reserved by Denver Center Theater Company)

Between 'Immigrant' and 'Citizen'20131123

A play about illegal immigrants in the US tries to humanise the immigration reform debate

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How a play about the struggles of illegal immigrant youths in the United States is trying to humanise the national debate over immigration reform. We hear from the author of Citizenship: American Identity after Globalization about how the value placed on US citizenship has changed through the years.

Also, how Filipinos in the US who already send a lot of aid back home are trying to do more in the wake of Typhoon Haiyan. An American architect’s ambitious vision for a new public park in Russia’s capital moves ahead. And, what Fidel Castro said when he heard that President John F Kennedy had been shot in Dallas 50 years ago this week.

(Picture: The play Just Like Us follows four young immigrants from Mexico and looks at how their legal status impacts their futures, Credit: Jennifer M Koskinen, all rights reserved by Denver Center Theater Company)

Beyond the Call of Duty2014102520141026 (WS)

How former US soldier Jordan Matson is fighting the Islamic State in Syria

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

President Obama insists there are no American combat troops in Iraq and Syria, and that there are no plans to deploy any. But we meet an American ex-military man who’s gone to fight with the Kurds against Islamic State.

Also, the Royal Air Force’s first openly transgender officer has a message for the Pentagon regarding the US military’s ban on transgender people serving. And, a former American soldier shares her experience of transitioning from male to female during a deployment to Afghanistan. Plus, a visual journalist uses a pencil - not a lens - to capture images of war in Afghanistan. A photographer documents the surreal landscape of the US detention centre at Guantanamo Bay. And a Sikh-American combats stigma and prejudice by making people laugh.

(Photo: Former US soldier Jordan Matson, who joined a Kurdish militia group fighting IS in northern Syria. Courtesy of Jordan Matson)

Beyond the Call of Duty20141025

How former US soldier Jordan Matson is fighting the Islamic State in Syria

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

President Obama insists there are no American combat troops in Iraq and Syria, and that there are no plans to deploy any. But we meet an American ex-military man who’s gone to fight with the Kurds against Islamic State.

Also, the Royal Air Force’s first openly transgender officer has a message for the Pentagon regarding the US military’s ban on transgender people serving. And, a former American soldier shares her experience of transitioning from male to female during a deployment to Afghanistan. Plus, a visual journalist uses a pencil - not a lens - to capture images of war in Afghanistan. A photographer documents the surreal landscape of the US detention centre at Guantanamo Bay. And a Sikh-American combats stigma and prejudice by making people laugh.

(Photo: Former US soldier Jordan Matson, who joined a Kurdish militia group fighting IS in northern Syria. Courtesy of Jordan Matson)

Border Control20150711

A political campaign in Texas takes aim at Islamic law.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We look at a campaign in Texas that takes aim at Islamic religious law. Then, the Mexican-American cartoonist Lalo Alcaraz explains why sensitive viewers should avoid his new TV show, ‘Bordertown’. And, we hear how Salvador Dalí and a soft drink helped a poet laureate find his way in the US.

Also, we’ve got the story of onetime enemies in Bosnia who are now regulars at the same café in Arizona. An American tourist finds out that his passport is in the hands of smugglers in Turkey. And John Wurdeman tells us how a trip to a record store in the state of Virginia led him to a winery in the country of Georgia.

Border Patrol2013092120130923 (WS)

A cat-and-mouse game intensifies with US Border Patrol as illegal crossings rise in Texas

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

The issue of immigration reform in the United States has been pushed to the side as the US Congress weighs other concerns. But immigration reform advocates say the problem of people entering the United States illegally is as big as ever. We hear about the growing number of would-be immigrants who are dying along the US/Mexico border. We also meet a local politician who tried to pass laws to discourage illegal immigration in his community - and lost.

Also, refugees of the 1990s civil war in Bosnia now living in the US offer advice to Syrians who are fleeing the violence in their homeland. And a cartoon sponge who’s become ubiquitous in Egypt.

Picture: A grandson hugs his grandfather after both were apprehended by Border Patrol in Hidalgo, Texas, Credit: Mónica Ortiz Uribe

Border Patrol20130921

A cat-and-mouse game intensifies with US Border Patrol as illegal crossings rise in Texas

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

The issue of immigration reform in the United States has been pushed to the side as the US Congress weighs other concerns. But immigration reform advocates say the problem of people entering the United States illegally is as big as ever. We hear about the growing number of would-be immigrants who are dying along the US/Mexico border. We also meet a local politician who tried to pass laws to discourage illegal immigration in his community - and lost.

Also, refugees of the 1990s civil war in Bosnia now living in the US offer advice to Syrians who are fleeing the violence in their homeland. And a cartoon sponge who’s become ubiquitous in Egypt.

Picture: A grandson hugs his grandfather after both were apprehended by Border Patrol in Hidalgo, Texas, Credit: Mónica Ortiz Uribe

Boston Bombings Aftermath20130427

Boylston Street reopens after the Marathon bombings

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Boston Bombings Aftermath2013042720130428 (WS)

Boylston Street reopens after the Marathon bombings

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Boston Bombings Aftermath2013042720130429 (WS)

Boylston Street reopens after the Marathon bombings

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Boston Calling20170624

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

“People are absolutely losing it. Some they go to their work. Some they pluck them right out of bed from their families."

Why Iraqis in the US are getting sent back to Iraq; what it means for one immigrant to get to stay; the fight for paid leave for victims of domestic violence in Canada; a Ukrainian physicist who always tries to keep politics and science separate fails yet again; and the two comedians who started ArmComedy, their country’s first satirical news programme, explain what Armenians find funny.

(Image: There are an estimated 121,000 Chaldeans in the metro Detroit area. Many of them are small business owners. Credit: Shirin Jaafari)

Boston Calling20170701
Boston Goes to Hollywood20160213

Teaching American actors how to sound authentically African

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We meet the American woman teaching US actors how to improve their African accents, and we hear why #OscarsSoWhite isn't very Latino. We look at the bicultural LA bakery that is breaking one of the unwritten rules of business. And, we speak to the Colombian film-maker behind the first feature shot in the Amazon rainforest in more than 30 years. We find out why American film studios are making more foreign movies specifically for foreign audiences. Plus, we remember Mary Fiumara, an icon of Boston's Little Italy.

(Photo: Actor Will Smith attends the Concussion premiere in New York, 2015. Credit: Mike Coppola/Getty Images)

Boston Goes To Hollywood20160213

We meet the American woman teaching US actors how to improve their African accents, and we hear why #OscarsSoWhite isn't very Latino. We look at the bicultural LA bakery that is breaking one of the unwritten rules of business. And, we speak to the Colombian film-maker behind the first feature shot in the Amazon rainforest in more than 30 years. We find out why American film studios are making more foreign movies specifically for foreign audiences. Plus, we remember Mary Fiumara, an icon of Boston's Little Italy.

(Photo: Actor Will Smith attends the Concussion premiere in New York, 2015. Credit: Mike Coppola/Getty Images)

Teaching American actors how to sound authentically African

Boston Marathon Bombing2013042020130421 (WS)
20130422 (WS)

Views on the Boston Marathon bombings from some of the race's international runners, as well as war correspondents compare the scene in Boston to some of the worst they've witnessed. Also on the programme praising tourniquets and an amputee marathon competitor offers hope to those injured in the attack.

(Image: A Boston police officer and floral tributes, Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

Views on the Boston Marathon bombings from some of the race's international runners, as well (should probably just be "and") war correspondents compare the scene in Boston to some of the worst they've witnessed. Also on the programme, praising tourniquets and an amputee marathon competitor offers hope to those injured in the attack.

Views on from racers, war correspondents and an amputee marathon competitor

Boston Marathon bombings2013042020130421 (WS)

Views from racers, war correspondents and an amputee marathon competitor.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Views on the Boston Marathon bombings from some of the race's international runners and war correspondents compare the scene in Boston to some of the worst they've witnessed. Also on the programme, praising tourniquets and an amputee marathon competitor offers hope to those injured in the attack.

(Image: A Boston police officer and floral tributes, Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

Boston Marathon bombings20130420

Views from racers, war correspondents and an amputee marathon competitor.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Views on the Boston Marathon bombings from some of the race's international runners and war correspondents compare the scene in Boston to some of the worst they've witnessed. Also on the programme, praising tourniquets and an amputee marathon competitor offers hope to those injured in the attack.

(Image: A Boston police officer and floral tributes, Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

Boston Uncommon2014041920140420 (WS)

It’s been a year since the Boston Marathon bombings. As the city gears up for this year’s race, we hear from some of the people who’ll be on the course. One - an experienced runner and trauma surgeon - treated victims in last year’s blast. The second is an Iraqi diplomat who’ll be running to show solidarity with terrorism victims the world over.

Also in this edition, how the adopted hometown of the alleged bombing suspects is coming to terms with the events of last April. And the new generation of robots that are being deployed to protect high-profile sporting events like the Boston Marathon.

Picture: A man observes the Dear Boston exhibit at the Boston Public Library. The exhibit pays homage to the victims of last year’s Boston Marathon bombing, the survivors, and the resilience of Boston and the world of runners who consider this city their home, too.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Boston Uncommon2014041920140420 (WS)

How Boston has changed in the aftermath of last year\u2019s Marathon bombings

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

It’s been a year since the Boston Marathon bombings. As the city gears up for this year’s race, we hear from some of the people who’ll be on the course. One - an experienced runner and trauma surgeon - treated victims in last year’s blast. The second is an Iraqi diplomat who’ll be running to show solidarity with terrorism victims the world over.

Also in this edition, how the adopted hometown of the alleged bombing suspects is coming to terms with the events of last April. And the new generation of robots that are being deployed to protect high-profile sporting events like the Boston Marathon.

Picture: A man observes the Dear Boston exhibit at the Boston Public Library. The exhibit pays homage to the victims of last year’s Boston Marathon bombing, the survivors, and the resilience of Boston and the world of runners who consider this city their home, too.

Boston Uncommon20140419

How Boston has changed in the aftermath of last year\u2019s Marathon bombings

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

It’s been a year since the Boston Marathon bombings. As the city gears up for this year’s race, we hear from some of the people who’ll be on the course. One - an experienced runner and trauma surgeon - treated victims in last year’s blast. The second is an Iraqi diplomat who’ll be running to show solidarity with terrorism victims the world over.

Also in this edition, how the adopted hometown of the alleged bombing suspects is coming to terms with the events of last April. And the new generation of robots that are being deployed to protect high-profile sporting events like the Boston Marathon.

Picture: A man observes the Dear Boston exhibit at the Boston Public Library. The exhibit pays homage to the victims of last year’s Boston Marathon bombing, the survivors, and the resilience of Boston and the world of runners who consider this city their home, too.

Boston's Thorny Questions2013051120130513 (WS)

The duel tasks of honouring victims and compensating survivors of the Boston Marathon

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How best to honour the victims of the Boston Marathon bombings and compensate the survivors. The weeks-long effort to bury one of the Boston bombing suspects finally ends. The American man who dreams of playing Napoleon. And a border fence that unites those it divides.

(Photo: The memorial site in Copley Square to the Boston Marathon bombings is seen on Boylston Street. Credit: Getty Images)

Boston's Thorny Questions20130511

The duel tasks of honouring victims and compensating survivors of the Boston Marathon

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How best to honour the victims of the Boston Marathon bombings and compensate the survivors. The weeks-long effort to bury one of the Boston bombing suspects finally ends. The American man who dreams of playing Napoleon. And a border fence that unites those it divides.

(Photo: The memorial site in Copley Square to the Boston Marathon bombings is seen on Boylston Street. Credit: Getty Images)

Breathcatcher2017080520170806 (WS)

Two teenage journalists get an interview with the US Secretary of Defence

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Two teenage reporters, Teddy Fischer and Jane Gormley, interview the US Secretary of Defence.

Also: an unauthorized immigrant dreams of white picket fences; a Mexican street cart vendor in Los Angeles becomes an overnight celebrity; oil brings wealth and trouble to a small town in North Dakota; Laleh Khadivi’s latest novel is about a surfer-dude turned jihadi; plus we meet a man who listens to trees.

(Image: U.S. Secretary of Defence James Mattis listens to a reporter’s questions at the Pentagon on July 7, 2017 in Arlington, Virginia. Credit: Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images)

Breathcatcher2017080520170807 (WS)

Two teenage journalists get an interview with the US Secretary of Defence

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Two teenage reporters, Teddy Fischer and Jane Gormley, interview the US Secretary of Defence.

Also: an unauthorized immigrant dreams of white picket fences; a Mexican street cart vendor in Los Angeles becomes an overnight celebrity; oil brings wealth and trouble to a small town in North Dakota; Laleh Khadivi’s latest novel is about a surfer-dude turned jihadi; plus we meet a man who listens to trees.

(Image: U.S. Secretary of Defence James Mattis listens to a reporter’s questions at the Pentagon on July 7, 2017 in Arlington, Virginia. Credit: Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images)

Breathcatcher20170805

Two teenage journalists get an interview with the US Secretary of Defence

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Two teenage reporters, Teddy Fischer and Jane Gormley, interview the US Secretary of Defence.

Also: an unauthorized immigrant dreams of white picket fences; a Mexican street cart vendor in Los Angeles becomes an overnight celebrity; oil brings wealth and trouble to a small town in North Dakota; Laleh Khadivi’s latest novel is about a surfer-dude turned jihadi; plus we meet a man who listens to trees.

(Image: U.S. Secretary of Defence James Mattis listens to a reporter’s questions at the Pentagon on July 7, 2017 in Arlington, Virginia. Credit: Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images)

Breathcatcher20170807

Two teenage journalists get an interview with the US Secretary of Defence

Two teenage reporters, Teddy Fischer and Jane Gormley, interview the US Secretary of Defence.

Also: an unauthorized immigrant dreams of white picket fences; a Mexican street cart vendor in Los Angeles becomes an overnight celebrity; oil brings wealth and trouble to a small town in North Dakota; Laleh Khadivi’s latest novel is about a surfer-dude turned jihadi; plus we meet a man who listens to trees.

(Image: U.S. Secretary of Defence James Mattis listens to a reporter’s questions at the Pentagon on July 7, 2017 in Arlington, Virginia. Credit: Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images)

Bridging the Divide20151219

A pastor and an imam 'programmed to hate one another' bridge a religious divide.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

A pastor and an imam 'programmed to hate one another' tell us how they bridged a religious divide and offer advice for Americans divided by faith and fear. Then we meet Bajhat Abdulwahed, a face familiar to many Iraqis but few Philadelphians. And we hear why Muslim women in America are being advised to ‘keep a baseball cap handy in the car’.

Plus, the dual life of a Somali-American teenager. And we ask: will hipsters erase the distinctive street art of Miami's Little Haiti?

(Photo: In decades past, Nigerian Imam Muhammad Ashafa (right) and Pastor James Wuye were leaders of militias that battled one another. Credit: PRI’s The World)

Bridging The Divide20151219

A pastor and an imam 'programmed to hate one another' tell us how they bridged a religious divide and offer advice for Americans divided by faith and fear. Then we meet Bajhat Abdulwahed, a face familiar to many Iraqis but few Philadelphians. And we hear why Muslim women in America are being advised to ‘keep a baseball cap handy in the car’.

Plus, the dual life of a Somali-American teenager. And we ask: will hipsters erase the distinctive street art of Miami's Little Haiti?

(Photo: In decades past, Nigerian Imam Muhammad Ashafa (right) and Pastor James Wuye were leaders of militias that battled one another. Credit: PRI’s The World)

A pastor and an imam 'programmed to hate one another' bridge a religious divide.

Calculated Risk20150801

The US Navy investigates a possible cancer cluster at Guantanamo Bay

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We hear how working at the US military base in Guantanamo Bay could be hazardous to your health. Then, we learn about a recent study that found right-wing extremists pose a greater threat to the American people than Muslim extremists. And, we have a personal tale about what it’s like to grow up a lesbian in Saudi Arabia.

Also, how massive ‘supertunnels’ allow for easier drug trafficking across the US border, why asylum in America remains little more than an elusive dream for most Mexicans, and the story of Gottschee - a European city that no longer exists.

(Photo: Exterior of Camp Delta at Guantanamo Bay. Credit: Reuters)

Call of the Wild2016070920160710 (WS)

Most US national park visitors are white. Some Latinos say they feel unwelcome

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We speak to a Latino activist about why most of the visitors to US national parks are white and how that is not good for the future of the parks. We visit the largest naval base in the world, which is threatened by rising sea levels. Next, we visit the American south-west where some have to travel 20 miles for clean water.

Also, we search for what may be the world's most valuable fish, go undercover to find out where our old electronics end up, and overhear a group of Andean women sing in the back of an Inca temple on Machu Picchu.

(Photo: Tourists watch the The Old Faithful geyser at the Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. Credit: Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images)

Call of the Wild20160709

Most US national park visitors are white. Some Latinos say they feel unwelcome

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We speak to a Latino activist about why most of the visitors to US national parks are white and how that is not good for the future of the parks. We visit the largest naval base in the world, which is threatened by rising sea levels. Next, we visit the American south-west where some have to travel 20 miles for clean water.

Also, we search for what may be the world's most valuable fish, go undercover to find out where our old electronics end up, and overhear a group of Andean women sing in the back of an Inca temple on Machu Picchu.

(Photo: Tourists watch the The Old Faithful geyser at the Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. Credit: Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images)

Call Of The Wild2016070920160710 (WS)
20160711 (WS)

We speak to a Latino activist about why most of the visitors to US national parks are white and how that is not good for the future of the parks. We visit the largest naval base in the world, which is threatened by rising sea levels. Next, we visit the American south-west where some have to travel 20 miles for clean water.

Also, we search for what may be the world's most valuable fish, go undercover to find out where our old electronics end up, and overhear a group of Andean women sing in the back of an Inca temple on Machu Picchu.

(Photo: Tourists watch the The Old Faithful geyser at the Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. Credit: Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images)

Most US national park visitors are white. Some Latinos say they feel unwelcome

Cancer triggers in the developing world20121208

Cancer\u2019s link to infectious diseases, an extraordinary gem, and life without Twinkies.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

This week on Boston Calling, we hear how viruses and bacteria can lead to cancer in the developing world.

Also, an extraordinary blue gem makes its public debut.

We also prepare for life without the Twinkie and hear what happens when the fiscal cliff crisis meets Tolkien's Hobbit.

(Image: A girl in Uganda with Burkitt's lymphoma, caused by a virus. Credit: PRI)

Cancer triggers in the developing world20121209

Cancer\u2019s link to infectious diseases, an extraordinary gem, and life without Twinkies.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

This week on Boston Calling, we hear how viruses and bacteria can lead to cancer in the developing world.

Also, an extraordinary blue gem makes its public debut.

We also prepare for life without the Twinkie and hear what happens when the fiscal cliff crisis meets Tolkien's Hobbit.

(Image: A girl in Uganda with Burkitt's lymphoma, caused by a virus. Credit: PRI)

Change of Plan20151010

Is the US training and equipping of foreign armies and rebels money well spent?

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Over the past decade, the US has poured billions of dollars into training and equipping foreign armies and rebels, from Iraq to Afghanistan to Syria. But this strategy has yet to prove a success, and we ask a former US Army officer why this is the case. Plus, how the Obama administration’s plan to increase the number of migrants the US takes in could be a boon for local businesses. And, the 'home' away from home that is helping young Haitians in Boston cope with the trauma of the 2010 earthquake.

Also, how Bolivia reframed the conversation about coca leaves, and took on the US Drug Enforcement Administration. Remembering the life of civil rights activist Grace Lee Boggs. And, how the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 changed America and seeded today's immigration debate.

(Photo: US Army paratroopers manoeuvre through a hallway as part of squad level training at Camp Taji, Iraq. Credit: US Army)

Change Of Plan20151010

Over the past decade, the US has poured billions of dollars into training and equipping foreign armies and rebels, from Iraq to Afghanistan to Syria. But this strategy has yet to prove a success, and we ask a former US Army officer why this is the case. Plus, how the Obama administration’s plan to increase the number of migrants the US takes in could be a boon for local businesses. And, the 'home' away from home that is helping young Haitians in Boston cope with the trauma of the 2010 earthquake.

Also, how Bolivia reframed the conversation about coca leaves, and took on the US Drug Enforcement Administration. Remembering the life of civil rights activist Grace Lee Boggs. And, how the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 changed America and seeded today's immigration debate.

(Photo: US Army paratroopers manoeuvre through a hallway as part of squad level training at Camp Taji, Iraq. Credit: US Army)

Is the US training and equipping of foreign armies and rebels money well spent?

Chinese Characters2014042620140427 (WS)

Why workers who make American-brand footwear in China have walked off the job

We hear why some Chinese factory workers who make American-brand footwear are demanding more money and better treatment by their bosses. And, how American-style graffiti is allowed to thrive on the concrete walls of Beijing. Plus, what China can learn from America when it comes to building skyscrapers. The Chinese-American re-enactor taking on the British at the Battle of Lexington. We meet an American man who goes hunting for a Chinese name, and learn why more and more Chinese are adopting American-sounding names like 'Tom' and 'Cinderella'.

(Photo: Nike shoes displayed at an outlet in Jakarta. Credit: Adek Berry/AFP/Getty Images)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Chinese Characters2014042620140427 (WS)

Why workers who make American-brand footwear in China have walked off the job

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We hear why some Chinese factory workers who make American-brand footwear are demanding more money and better treatment by their bosses. And, how American-style graffiti is allowed to thrive on the concrete walls of Beijing. Plus, what China can learn from America when it comes to building skyscrapers. The Chinese-American re-enactor taking on the British at the Battle of Lexington. We meet an American man who goes hunting for a Chinese name, and learn why more and more Chinese are adopting American-sounding names like 'Tom' and 'Cinderella'.

(Photo: Nike shoes displayed at an outlet in Jakarta. Credit: Adek Berry/AFP/Getty Images)

Chinese Characters20140426

Why workers who make American-brand footwear in China have walked off the job

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We hear why some Chinese factory workers who make American-brand footwear are demanding more money and better treatment by their bosses. And, how American-style graffiti is allowed to thrive on the concrete walls of Beijing. Plus, what China can learn from America when it comes to building skyscrapers. The Chinese-American re-enactor taking on the British at the Battle of Lexington. We meet an American man who goes hunting for a Chinese name, and learn why more and more Chinese are adopting American-sounding names like 'Tom' and 'Cinderella'.

(Photo: Nike shoes displayed at an outlet in Jakarta. Credit: Adek Berry/AFP/Getty Images)

Classroom Diplomacy2014022220140223 (WS)

American professors reach out to help a Chinese colleague who fears for his job

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

When a professor at a Chinese university feared he would lose his job, professors at an American college reached out and tried to help. Plus, our resident history buff tells us about America's 18th Century technology pirates. We meet the Cuban students who have been given permission to study in the US. Also, we hear from the Muslim-American men who are writing about their love lives. And, we speak to actor Michael Rogers, who is portraying Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe on the New York stage.

Classroom Diplomacy20140222

American professors reach out to help a Chinese colleague who fears for his job

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

When a professor at a Chinese university feared he would lose his job, professors at an American college reached out and tried to help. Plus, our resident history buff tells us about America's 18th Century technology pirates. We meet the Cuban students who have been given permission to study in the US. Also, we hear from the Muslim-American men who are writing about their love lives. And, we speak to actor Michael Rogers, who is portraying Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe on the New York stage.

'Closed Until Further Notice'2013100520131007 (WS)

Both tourists and refugees in the US are feeling the impact of the government shutdown

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Parts of the US government closed down this week when Congress failed to pass a new budget. We find out how the closures are affecting both tourists and refugees in the US. We also hear from a long-time American correspondent in East Asia who returns home to find the air cleaner and the crowds smaller than what she had grown accustomed to. Also, America’s relationship with Brazil takes a turn for the worse. And, how some immigrant actors in the US find that their accents have become assets when pursuing certain roles.

(Photo: The USS Constitution in Boston closed until further notice. Credit: Emily Files)

'Closed Until Further Notice'20131005

Both tourists and refugees in the US are feeling the impact of the government shutdown

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Parts of the US government closed down this week when Congress failed to pass a new budget. We find out how the closures are affecting both tourists and refugees in the US. We also hear from a long-time American correspondent in East Asia who returns home to find the air cleaner and the crowds smaller than what she had grown accustomed to. Also, America’s relationship with Brazil takes a turn for the worse. And, how some immigrant actors in the US find that their accents have become assets when pursuing certain roles.

(Photo: The USS Constitution in Boston closed until further notice. Credit: Emily Files)

'closed Until Further Notice'2013100520131007 (WS)

Both tourists and refugees in the US are feeling the impact of the government shutdown

Parts of the US government closed down this week when Congress failed to pass a new budget. We find out how the closures are affecting both tourists and refugees in the US. We also hear from a long-time American correspondent in East Asia who returns home to find the air cleaner and the crowds smaller than what she had grown accustomed to. Also, America’s relationship with Brazil takes a turn for the worse. And, how some immigrant actors in the US find that their accents have become assets when pursuing certain roles.

(Photo: The USS Constitution in Boston closed until further notice. Credit: Emily Files)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Coast to Coast2017092320170924 (WS)

Among the things climate change is bringing to this small Inuit town: cruise ships

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Marco Werman climbs aboard the largest passenger ship ever to sail through the Northwest Passage.

Also: we speak to residents of the Arctic with mixed feelings about cruise ships sailing past their towns; we meet climate change scientists risking their lives to gather data in the field; we visit a marshland that's worth millions of dollars; we spend the day with teens saving songbirds in Washington, DC; and we learn how American climate change policies have changed this past year.

(Image:The Crystal Serenity docked at the Boston cruise terminal near the end of its 32-day Northwest Passage journey. Credit: PRI’s The World)

Coast to Coast2017092320170925 (WS)

Among the things climate change is bringing to this small Inuit town: cruise ships

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Marco Werman climbs aboard the largest passenger ship ever to sail through the Northwest Passage.

Also: we speak to residents of the Arctic with mixed feelings about cruise ships sailing past their towns; we meet climate change scientists risking their lives to gather data in the field; we visit a marshland that's worth millions of dollars; we spend the day with teens saving songbirds in Washington, DC; and we learn how American climate change policies have changed this past year.

(Image:The Crystal Serenity docked at the Boston cruise terminal near the end of its 32-day Northwest Passage journey. Credit: PRI’s The World)

Coast to Coast20170923

Among the things climate change is bringing to this small Inuit town: cruise ships

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Marco Werman climbs aboard the largest passenger ship ever to sail through the Northwest Passage.

Also: we speak to residents of the Arctic with mixed feelings about cruise ships sailing past their towns; we meet climate change scientists risking their lives to gather data in the field; we visit a marshland that's worth millions of dollars; we spend the day with teens saving songbirds in Washington, DC; and we learn how American climate change policies have changed this past year.

(Image:The Crystal Serenity docked at the Boston cruise terminal near the end of its 32-day Northwest Passage journey. Credit: PRI’s The World)

Coast To Coast20170925

Among the things climate change is bringing to this small Inuit town: cruise ships

Marco Werman climbs aboard the largest passenger ship ever to sail through the Northwest Passage.

Also: we speak to residents of the Arctic with mixed feelings about cruise ships sailing past their towns; we meet climate change scientists risking their lives to gather data in the field; we visit a marshland that's worth millions of dollars; we spend the day with teens saving songbirds in Washington, DC; and we learn how American climate change policies have changed this past year.

(Image:The Crystal Serenity docked at the Boston cruise terminal near the end of its 32-day Northwest Passage journey. Credit: PRI’s The World)

Collective Action2014092720140928 (WS)

The Russian punk rock collective Pussy Riot comes to Boston

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

The Russian punk performance art activists Pussy Riot comes to Boston. We chat with two of its members about Vladimir Putin, prison, and fugitive US intelligence analyst Edward Snowden. Plus, we learn why the United States and Europe are so far apart on climate policy. And, we meet two young Central American migrants who are facing a new challenge—starting school in the US. Also on this edition, we look at the push to get Muslim holidays on the school calendar in New York City. We hear from the American puppeteers who received a standing ovation in Tehran. And, we have a review the Ig Nobel Cookbook, Volume I.

(Photo: Nadezhda Tolokonnikova (left) and Maria Alyokhina. Courtesy of Pussy Riot)

Collective Action20140927

The Russian punk rock collective Pussy Riot comes to Boston

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

The Russian punk performance art activists Pussy Riot comes to Boston. We chat with two of its members about Vladimir Putin, prison, and fugitive US intelligence analyst Edward Snowden. Plus, we learn why the United States and Europe are so far apart on climate policy. And, we meet two young Central American migrants who are facing a new challenge—starting school in the US. Also on this edition, we look at the push to get Muslim holidays on the school calendar in New York City. We hear from the American puppeteers who received a standing ovation in Tehran. And, we have a review the Ig Nobel Cookbook, Volume I.

(Photo: Nadezhda Tolokonnikova (left) and Maria Alyokhina. Courtesy of Pussy Riot)

Collective Action2014092720140928 (WS)

The Russian punk rock collective Pussy Riot comes to Boston

The Russian punk performance art activists Pussy Riot comes to Boston. We chat with two of its members about Vladimir Putin, prison, and fugitive US intelligence analyst Edward Snowden. Plus, we learn why the United States and Europe are so far apart on climate policy. And, we meet two young Central American migrants who are facing a new challenge—starting school in the US. Also on this edition, we look at the push to get Muslim holidays on the school calendar in New York City. We hear from the American puppeteers who received a standing ovation in Tehran. And, we have a review the Ig Nobel Cookbook, Volume I.

(Photo: Nadezhda Tolokonnikova (left) and Maria Alyokhina. Courtesy of Pussy Riot)

Comfort Zone20150829

Subhi Nahas never felt safe as a gay man in Syria \u2014 and then IS took over his hometown.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Subhi Nahas fled the Syrian city of Idlib when Islamist militants started killing gay men there. Now he’s become one of the first people ever to address the UN Security Council on LGBT persecution. Meanwhile, Pope Francis prepares for a trip to the US– where gay rights activists hope to meet with him.

Then, we travel to Antarctica to hear how culinary creativity keeps up morale in the long winter months. Plus, the search for a cross-cultural dish made from a pinch of India, a spoonful of China, and a dollop of America. And researchers debut a flying robot called ‘Snotbot’ that helps scientists study whales.

(Photo: Subhi Nahas, a refugee from the Syrian city of Idlib. Credit: Furkan Hancioglu)

Comfort Zone20150829

Subhi Nahas never felt safe as a gay man in Syria — and then IS took over his hometown.

Subhi Nahas fled the Syrian city of Idlib when Islamist militants started killing gay men there. Now he’s become one of the first people ever to address the UN Security Council on LGBT persecution. Meanwhile, Pope Francis prepares for a trip to the US– where gay rights activists hope to meet with him.

Then, we travel to Antarctica to hear how culinary creativity keeps up morale in the long winter months. Plus, the search for a cross-cultural dish made from a pinch of India, a spoonful of China, and a dollop of America. And researchers debut a flying robot called ‘Snotbot’ that helps scientists study whales.

(Photo: Subhi Nahas, a refugee from the Syrian city of Idlib. Credit: Furkan Hancioglu)

Coming of Age2016090320160904 (WS)

The conflict in Colombia began before she was born. But it has affected her personally.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

When she was six, her bus was stopped by armed Colombian rebels. Now, she’s learned that the conflict there might finally be over.

Also on the programme, two stories about life-changing summer jobs. Presenter Marco Werman tries breadfruit for the first time, not entirely by choice. Somali-American teens explain why the Black Lives Matter movement speaks to them, too. And Aki Kumar explains why he gave up his dream to be bigger than Bill Gates, for the blues.

Coming of Age20160903

The conflict in Colombia began before she was born. But it has affected her personally.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

When she was six, her bus was stopped by armed Colombian rebels. Now, she’s learned that the conflict there might finally be over.

Also on the programme, two stories about life-changing summer jobs. Presenter Marco Werman tries breadfruit for the first time, not entirely by choice. Somali-American teens explain why the Black Lives Matter movement speaks to them, too. And Aki Kumar explains why he gave up his dream to be bigger than Bill Gates, for the blues.

Coming Of Age2016090320160904 (WS)
20160905 (WS)

When she was six, her bus was stopped by armed Colombian rebels. Now, she’s learned that the conflict there might finally be over.

Also on the programme, two stories about life-changing summer jobs. Presenter Marco Werman tries breadfruit for the first time, not entirely by choice. Somali-American teens explain why the Black Lives Matter movement speaks to them, too. And Aki Kumar explains why he gave up his dream to be bigger than Bill Gates, for the blues.

The conflict in Colombia began before she was born. But it has affected her personally.

Coming to America2015031420150315 (WS)

The murder of an Iraqi migrant in Texas has the Muslim community on edge

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We hear the story of Ahmed al-Jumaili, an Iraqi migrant who was shot dead in the Texas city of Dallas just three weeks after arriving in the United States. And, we examine a US Supreme Court case that considers whether an American citizen has a right to know why her husband has been barred from entering the country. Plus, a story about the Somali-Americans fighting to save their lifeline for sending cash to loved ones back home.

We visit the Louisiana radio station that prefers to broadcast ‘en Franglais’. And ‘The Voice’ of South Africa - Vusi Mahlasela - celebrates 20 years of freedom.

(Photo: Ahmed al-Jumaili and his wife, Zahraa. Courtesy of the Ahmed al-Jumaili Memorial Fund)

Coming to America20150314

The murder of an Iraqi migrant in Texas has the Muslim community on edge

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We hear the story of Ahmed al-Jumaili, an Iraqi migrant who was shot dead in the Texas city of Dallas just three weeks after arriving in the United States. And, we examine a US Supreme Court case that considers whether an American citizen has a right to know why her husband has been barred from entering the country. Plus, a story about the Somali-Americans fighting to save their lifeline for sending cash to loved ones back home.

We visit the Louisiana radio station that prefers to broadcast ‘en Franglais’. And ‘The Voice’ of South Africa - Vusi Mahlasela - celebrates 20 years of freedom.

(Photo: Ahmed al-Jumaili and his wife, Zahraa. Courtesy of the Ahmed al-Jumaili Memorial Fund)

Coming to Terms2014101120141012 (WS)

Ebola comes to the US, but African immigrants remain focused on the crisis back home

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

The first person to be diagnosed with Ebola in the United States has died. Now, at least one African immigrant is finding herself on the defensive. We meet the young Liberian-American, and learn how she is trying to remain focused on the crisis back home.

Also on this edition, another immigrant recalls some early fashion lessons from her teenage class-mates. And, we hear from our listeners about whether the world is actually becoming a more peaceful place. Plus, a trip to Alcatraz Island to tour an unprecedented new exhibit by the Chinese artist Ai Weiwei. We learn how English became the language of science. And, from the Beyonce horse fly to the George Bush beetle, we find out how new species get their familiar names.

(Photo: Congregants at the Friends in Jesus African International Church, Sacramento, California. The church caters to the city's large Liberian-American community. Credit: Joe Rubin)

Coming to Terms20141011

Ebola comes to the US, but African immigrants remain focused on the crisis back home

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

The first person to be diagnosed with Ebola in the United States has died. Now, at least one African immigrant is finding herself on the defensive. We meet the young Liberian-American, and learn how she is trying to remain focused on the crisis back home.

Also on this edition, another immigrant recalls some early fashion lessons from her teenage class-mates. And, we hear from our listeners about whether the world is actually becoming a more peaceful place. Plus, a trip to Alcatraz Island to tour an unprecedented new exhibit by the Chinese artist Ai Weiwei. We learn how English became the language of science. And, from the Beyonce horse fly to the George Bush beetle, we find out how new species get their familiar names.

(Photo: Congregants at the Friends in Jesus African International Church, Sacramento, California. The church caters to the city's large Liberian-American community. Credit: Joe Rubin)

Coming To Terms2014101120141012 (WS)

The first person to be diagnosed with Ebola in the United States has died. Now, at least one African immigrant is finding herself on the defensive. We meet the young Liberian-American, and learn how she is trying to remain focused on the crisis back home.

Also on this edition, another immigrant recalls some early fashion lessons from her teenage class-mates. And, we hear from our listeners about whether the world is actually becoming a more peaceful place. Plus, a trip to Alcatraz Island to tour an unprecedented new exhibit by the Chinese artist Ai Weiwei. We learn how English became the language of science. And, from the Beyonce horse fly to the George Bush beetle, we find out how new species get their familiar names.

(Photo: Congregants at the Friends in Jesus African International Church, Sacramento, California. The church caters to the city's large Liberian-American community. Credit: Joe Rubin)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Compare and Contrast20151031

Iran starts to dismantle its nuclear infrastructure as part of an agreement with the West

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We take a closer look at the Iran nuclear deal, which has just officially gone into effect. Then, we talk with an American photographer who was astonished to find his photo in IS propaganda. And: you may not know it, but if you speak Spanish, you actually speak some Arabic too.

Plus: Italians see something familiar in Donald Trump's presidential campaign. We visit a school in Virginia that teaches Korean dads 'how to hug'. And we get a taste of the small, but mighty, soul music scene in Finland.

Image: Men work inside a uranium conversion facility just outside the Iranian city of Isfahan, March 2005. (Credit: Getty Images)

Compare And Contrast20151031

We take a closer look at the Iran nuclear deal, which has just officially gone into effect. Then, we talk with an American photographer who was astonished to find his photo in IS propaganda. And: you may not know it, but if you speak Spanish, you actually speak some Arabic too.

Plus: Italians see something familiar in Donald Trump's presidential campaign. We visit a school in Virginia that teaches Korean dads 'how to hug'. And we get a taste of the small, but mighty, soul music scene in Finland.

Image: Men work inside a uranium conversion facility just outside the Iranian city of Isfahan, March 2005. (Credit: Getty Images)

Iran starts to dismantle its nuclear infrastructure as part of an agreement with the West

Confronting A Sexual Harasser2013111620131117 (WS)

An American reporter living in Egypt turns her microphone on a man who calls her 'Sugar'

An American reporter living in Egypt says that after being sexually harassed on the streets of Cairo day after day, she’d had enough. Find out what happens when she asks one of her harassers for an interview. Also, Marvel Comics unveils its first Muslim superhero – the Pakistani-American Miss Marvel. A tech support worker in the Philippines who answers help requests from abroad finds something to laugh about in the wake of Typhoon Haiyan. A young, Asian-American woman embraces the cultural tradition of multi-generational living. And, tragedy strikes the members of an Iranian rock band in New York City.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Confronting a Sexual Harasser2013111620131117 (WS)

An American reporter living in Egypt turns her microphone on a man who calls her 'Sugar'

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

An American reporter living in Egypt says that after being sexually harassed on the streets of Cairo day after day, she’d had enough. Find out what happens when she asks one of her harassers for an interview. Also, Marvel Comics unveils its first Muslim superhero – the Pakistani-American Miss Marvel. A tech support worker in the Philippines who answers help requests from abroad finds something to laugh about in the wake of Typhoon Haiyan. A young, Asian-American woman embraces the cultural tradition of multi-generational living. And, tragedy strikes the members of an Iranian rock band in New York City.

Confronting a Sexual Harasser20131116

An American reporter living in Egypt turns her microphone on a man who calls her 'Sugar'

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

An American reporter living in Egypt says that after being sexually harassed on the streets of Cairo day after day, she’d had enough. Find out what happens when she asks one of her harassers for an interview. Also, Marvel Comics unveils its first Muslim superhero – the Pakistani-American Miss Marvel. A tech support worker in the Philippines who answers help requests from abroad finds something to laugh about in the wake of Typhoon Haiyan. A young, Asian-American woman embraces the cultural tradition of multi-generational living. And, tragedy strikes the members of an Iranian rock band in New York City.

Consider The Source2014122020141221 (WS)

The day-to-day life of a US drone operator

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We meet a former US drone operator and learn what it’s like to work in a perpetual state of war. Then, Farea al-Muslimi - a Yemeni activist - describes life on the other end of America’s drone programme.

Also, allegations that a US development agency planned to use hip-hop to start a Cuban revolution. The Oregon school that’s raising the bar for bilingual education. And the risks of remaining a monolingual culture. Plus, how the etymology of food terms reveals the history and travels of the things we eat.

Consider The Source20141220

The day-to-day life of a US drone operator

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We meet a former US drone operator and learn what it’s like to work in a perpetual state of war. Then, Farea al-Muslimi - a Yemeni activist - describes life on the other end of America’s drone programme.

Also, allegations that a US development agency planned to use hip-hop to start a Cuban revolution. The Oregon school that’s raising the bar for bilingual education. And the risks of remaining a monolingual culture. Plus, how the etymology of food terms reveals the history and travels of the things we eat.

Corporate Diplomacy20151017

After battling the so-called Islamic State, Kurds find a new foe in Facebook

A Kurdish activist in Stockholm runs a popular Facebook page devoted to saving the Syrian city of Kobane from Islamic State militants. But the page is under attack from Facebook administrators. We find out why Facebook targets the Kurds, and hear how the social media giant determines what is appropriate to publish.

Also, the Volkswagen scandal as seen from an American dealer's point of view. We look at a new industry popping up in Guatemala that employs ‘searchers’ to connect adopted children with their birth parents. And we meet Christian Ray Flores, the man who supplied the soundtrack for Boris Yeltsin's Rock the Vote.

(Photo: The ‘Save Kobane’ Facebook page. Facebook routinely takes down its posts. Credit: Christopher Livesay)

Corporate Diplomacy20151017

After battling the so-called Islamic State, Kurds find a new foe in Facebook

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

A Kurdish activist in Stockholm runs a popular Facebook page devoted to saving the Syrian city of Kobane from Islamic State militants. But the page is under attack from Facebook administrators. We find out why Facebook targets the Kurds, and hear how the social media giant determines what is appropriate to publish.

Also, the Volkswagen scandal as seen from an American dealer's point of view. We look at a new industry popping up in Guatemala that employs ‘searchers’ to connect adopted children with their birth parents. And we meet Christian Ray Flores, the man who supplied the soundtrack for Boris Yeltsin's Rock the Vote.

(Photo: The ‘Save Kobane’ Facebook page. Facebook routinely takes down its posts. Credit: Christopher Livesay)

Cream of the Crop20161217

China is building its own replica of an Iowa corn farm

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Grant Kimberley is a corn farmer in Iowa. The Chinese government is building a replica of his farm and his entire Midwestern town.

Plus, what some farm workers have to fear from a Trump presidency; why one hospital is training farm workers to also work as medical interpreters; how the history of Islamic Studies in the US began with a man falling off a donkey; and how one woman reconnected with her birth country through vegetables. Finally, we meet the world's most precious chicken.

(Image: A blue ribbon is displayed next to a display of ears of corn at the Iowa State Fair in Des Moines, Iowa. Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Cream Of The Crop20161217

Grant Kimberley is a corn farmer in Iowa. The Chinese government is building a replica of his farm and his entire Midwestern town.

Plus, what some farm workers have to fear from a Trump presidency; why one hospital is training farm workers to also work as medical interpreters; how the history of Islamic Studies in the US began with a man falling off a donkey; and how one woman reconnected with her birth country through vegetables. Finally, we meet the world's most precious chicken.

(Image: A blue ribbon is displayed next to a display of ears of corn at the Iowa State Fair in Des Moines, Iowa. Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

China is building its own replica of an Iowa corn farm

Crimes And Misdemeanours2018041420180415 (WS)

Is Facebook doing enough to moderate hate speech?

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg promises to dedicate resources towards fighting hate speech. People in Sri Lanka have been asking for that for years.

Also: policy makers in Thailand consider legalizing drugs; unauthorized workers in the US fight for their wages under threat of deportation; the film "Our New President" tells the story of how Russians learned about the 2016 US election using all real news clips yet no true statements; plus Jimmy O. Yang publishes his first book, and his parents don't like it.

(Image: Mark Zuckerberg appears for a hearing on Wednesday April 11, 2018 in Washington, DC. Credit: Saul Loeb/Getty Images)

Is Facebook doing enough to moderate hate speech?

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg promises to dedicate resources towards fighting hate speech. People in Sri Lanka have been asking for that for years.

Also: policy makers in Thailand consider legalizing drugs; unauthorized workers in the US fight for their wages under threat of deportation; the film "Our New President" tells the story of how Russians learned about the 2016 US election using all real news clips yet no true statements; plus Jimmy O. Yang publishes his first book, and his parents don't like it.

(Image: Mark Zuckerberg appears for a hearing on Wednesday April 11, 2018 in Washington, DC. Credit: Saul Loeb/Getty Images)

Is Facebook doing enough to moderate hate speech?

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg promises to dedicate resources towards fighting hate speech. People in Sri Lanka have been asking for that for years.

Also: policy makers in Thailand consider legalizing drugs; unauthorized workers in the US fight for their wages under threat of deportation; the film "Our New President" tells the story of how Russians learned about the 2016 US election using all real news clips yet no true statements; plus Jimmy O. Yang publishes his first book, and his parents don't like it.

(Image: Mark Zuckerberg appears for a hearing on Wednesday April 11, 2018 in Washington, DC. Credit: Saul Loeb/Getty Images)

Crimes and Misdemeanours2018041420180415 (WS)

Is Facebook doing enough to moderate hate speech?

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg promises to dedicate resources towards fighting hate speech. People in Sri Lanka have been asking for that for years.

Also: policy makers in Thailand consider legalizing drugs; unauthorized workers in the US fight for their wages under threat of deportation; the film "Our New President" tells the story of how Russians learned about the 2016 US election using all real news clips yet no true statements; plus Jimmy O. Yang publishes his first book, and his parents don't like it.

(Image: Mark Zuckerberg appears for a hearing on Wednesday April 11, 2018 in Washington, DC. Credit: Saul Loeb/Getty Images)

Crimes and Misdemeanours20180414

Is Facebook doing enough to moderate hate speech?

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg promises to dedicate resources towards fighting hate speech. People in Sri Lanka have been asking for that for years.

Also: policy makers in Thailand consider legalizing drugs; unauthorized workers in the US fight for their wages under threat of deportation; the film "Our New President" tells the story of how Russians learned about the 2016 US election using all real news clips yet no true statements; plus Jimmy O. Yang publishes his first book, and his parents don't like it.

(Image: Mark Zuckerberg appears for a hearing on Wednesday April 11, 2018 in Washington, DC. Credit: Saul Loeb/Getty Images)

Dance Lessons20171209

Ever heard of the clave? It's the foundation of salsa, boogaloo, mambo, and more.

It’s the beat that drives the bugaloo and mambo. Ayana Contreras travels to Cuba to understand the clave.

Plus, we go beneath a motorway flyover in Rio de Janeiro, where US hip-hop from the 1990s gets re-imagined every Saturday night; we meet a 9-year-old boy who is preserving his family’s Cambodian history through dance; South African superstar Johnny Clegg tells us how he helped form an interracial dance troupe during apartheid; and we remember Johnny Hallyday, “the French Elvis Presley”.

(Image: Dancers at the weekly Saturday night charme dance in Madureira, a neighborhood in Rio de Janeiro's North Zone. Credit: Catherine Osborn)

Dance Lessons2017120920171210 (WS)

Ever heard of the clave? It's the foundation of salsa, boogaloo, mambo, and more.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

It’s the beat that drives the bugaloo and mambo. Ayana Contreras travels to Cuba to understand the clave.

Plus, we go beneath a motorway flyover in Rio de Janeiro, where US hip-hop from the 1990s gets re-imagined every Saturday night; we meet a 9-year-old boy who is preserving his family’s Cambodian history through dance; South African superstar Johnny Clegg tells us how he helped form an interracial dance troupe during apartheid; and we remember Johnny Hallyday, “the French Elvis Presley”.

(Image: Dancers at the weekly Saturday night charme dance in Madureira, a neighborhood in Rio de Janeiro's North Zone. Credit: Catherine Osborn)

Dance Lessons20171209

Ever heard of the clave? It's the foundation of salsa, boogaloo, mambo, and more.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

It’s the beat that drives the bugaloo and mambo. Ayana Contreras travels to Cuba to understand the clave.

Plus, we go beneath a motorway flyover in Rio de Janeiro, where US hip-hop from the 1990s gets re-imagined every Saturday night; we meet a 9-year-old boy who is preserving his family’s Cambodian history through dance; South African superstar Johnny Clegg tells us how he helped form an interracial dance troupe during apartheid; and we remember Johnny Hallyday, “the French Elvis Presley”.

(Image: Dancers at the weekly Saturday night charme dance in Madureira, a neighborhood in Rio de Janeiro's North Zone. Credit: Catherine Osborn)

Detroit: Our Problem, Your Problem2013101220131014 (WS)

European banks dig in their heels over the largest municipal bankruptcy in US history

Detroit made history in July when it became the largest US city ever to declare bankruptcy. We hear why some European banks are now digging in their heels over the city’s drive to solvency. Also, we find out about the hardships faced by some migrants who sneak across the US/Mexico border after being picked up by the US border patrol. We meet a Somali-American imam in Minnesota who is determined to counter any extremist views being perpetuated in his community. And, words of warning for Americans who like to help those who are less fortunate - you may be doing more harm than good.

(Photo: The word 'Bankruptcy' is painted on the side of a vacant building on Grand River Avenue in Detroit, by street artists as a statement on the financial affairs of the city. Credit: Reuters)

Detroit: Our Problem, Your Problem2013101220131014 (WS)

European banks dig in their heels over the largest municipal bankruptcy in US history

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Detroit made history in July when it became the largest US city ever to declare bankruptcy. We hear why some European banks are now digging in their heels over the city’s drive to solvency. Also, we find out about the hardships faced by some migrants who sneak across the US/Mexico border after being picked up by the US border patrol. We meet a Somali-American imam in Minnesota who is determined to counter any extremist views being perpetuated in his community. And, words of warning for Americans who like to help those who are less fortunate - you may be doing more harm than good.

(Photo: The word 'Bankruptcy' is painted on the side of a vacant building on Grand River Avenue in Detroit, by street artists as a statement on the financial affairs of the city. Credit: Reuters)

Detroit: Our Problem, Your Problem20131012

European banks dig in their heels over the largest municipal bankruptcy in US history

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Detroit made history in July when it became the largest US city ever to declare bankruptcy. We hear why some European banks are now digging in their heels over the city’s drive to solvency. Also, we find out about the hardships faced by some migrants who sneak across the US/Mexico border after being picked up by the US border patrol. We meet a Somali-American imam in Minnesota who is determined to counter any extremist views being perpetuated in his community. And, words of warning for Americans who like to help those who are less fortunate - you may be doing more harm than good.

(Photo: The word 'Bankruptcy' is painted on the side of a vacant building on Grand River Avenue in Detroit, by street artists as a statement on the financial affairs of the city. Credit: Reuters)

Disunited States of America2016071620160717 (WS)

"I saw my brother in these boys. I saw my son in these boys,\u201d Why one activist spoke out

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

"I saw my brother in these boys. I saw my son in these boys.”

First, we talk to an activist speaking out against violence towards blacks in America. Then, we hear how the story of one police shooting in San Francisco has been turned into a stage play.

Next, we learn why the Bahamas issued a travel advisory to the US. Also, we hear about the perils of "walking while black" in New York City. Plus, a daughter figures out how to talk to her father about race for the first time.

We end the show with “American Tune,’’ a posthumous release by the New Orleans musician Allen Toussaint.

Disunited States of America20160716

"I saw my brother in these boys. I saw my son in these boys,\u201d Why one activist spoke out

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

"I saw my brother in these boys. I saw my son in these boys.”

First, we talk to an activist speaking out against violence towards blacks in America. Then, we hear how the story of one police shooting in San Francisco has been turned into a stage play.

Next, we learn why the Bahamas issued a travel advisory to the US. Also, we hear about the perils of "walking while black" in New York City. Plus, a daughter figures out how to talk to her father about race for the first time.

We end the show with “American Tune,’’ a posthumous release by the New Orleans musician Allen Toussaint.

Disunited States Of America2016071620160717 (WS)
20160718 (WS)

"I saw my brother in these boys. I saw my son in these boys.?

First, we talk to an activist speaking out against violence towards blacks in America. Then, we hear how the story of one police shooting in San Francisco has been turned into a stage play.

Next, we learn why the Bahamas issued a travel advisory to the US. Also, we hear about the perils of "walking while black" in New York City. Plus, a daughter figures out how to talk to her father about race for the first time.

We end the show with “American Tune,’’ a posthumous release by the New Orleans musician Allen Toussaint.

"I saw my brother in these boys. I saw my son in these boys,? Why one activist spoke out

Do the Right Thing2016052120160522 (WS)

A US governor advocates on behalf of Syrian refugees as other politicians turn them away

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We speak with Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy, who is advocating on behalf of Syrian refugees as other American politicians try to turn them away. Then, we sit in on a cooking class that teaches people in Boston how to eat healthier with traditional African dishes. And, the US wants to give peanuts to malnourished kids in Haiti — we find out why that idea is so controversial.

Plus: a US army officer sues President Obama over the legality of the war against Islamic State; Italy’s most prominent transgender politician weighs in on North Carolina’s controversial ‘bathroom bill’; and a Sudanese human rights activist finds inspiration in America's civil rights movement.

Image: A refugee mother and son from the Syrian town of Kobani walk beside their tent in a camp in Sanliurfa, Turkey. October 19, 2014. (Credit: Gokhan Sahin/Getty Images)

Do the Right Thing20160521

A US governor advocates on behalf of Syrian refugees as other politicians turn them away

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We speak with Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy, who is advocating on behalf of Syrian refugees as other American politicians try to turn them away. Then, we sit in on a cooking class that teaches people in Boston how to eat healthier with traditional African dishes. And, the US wants to give peanuts to malnourished kids in Haiti — we find out why that idea is so controversial.

Plus: a US army officer sues President Obama over the legality of the war against Islamic State; Italy’s most prominent transgender politician weighs in on North Carolina’s controversial ‘bathroom bill’; and a Sudanese human rights activist finds inspiration in America's civil rights movement.

Image: A refugee mother and son from the Syrian town of Kobani walk beside their tent in a camp in Sanliurfa, Turkey. October 19, 2014. (Credit: Gokhan Sahin/Getty Images)

Do The Right Thing2016052120160522 (WS)
20160523 (WS)

We speak with Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy, who is advocating on behalf of Syrian refugees as other American politicians try to turn them away. Then, we sit in on a cooking class that teaches people in Boston how to eat healthier with traditional African dishes. And, the US wants to give peanuts to malnourished kids in Haiti — we find out why that idea is so controversial.

Plus: a US army officer sues President Obama over the legality of the war against Islamic State; Italy’s most prominent transgender politician weighs in on North Carolina’s controversial ‘bathroom bill’; and a Sudanese human rights activist finds inspiration in America's civil rights movement.

Image: A refugee mother and son from the Syrian town of Kobani walk beside their tent in a camp in Sanliurfa, Turkey. October 19, 2014. (Credit: Gokhan Sahin/Getty Images)

A US governor advocates on behalf of Syrian refugees as other politicians turn them away

Electronic Frontiers2014121320141214 (WS)

How cyber-security prodigy Chris Doman beats hackers at their own game

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We meet Chris Doman, one of the world’s top civilian cyber defenders, and learn how he beats hackers at their own game. And we hear from Arnas Fedaravičius, the Lithuanian actor who played the fugitive intelligence analyst Edward Snowden on Russian TV. Plus, the legacy of the real Edward Snowden.

Also, video game designer Navid Khonsari tells us the inspiration behind his yet to be released game about Iran’s 1979 Islamic Revolution. We remember Ralph Baer, the serial inventor who became the ‘father of video games’. And we find out how a Buddhist shrine transformed a once-rough street corner in northern California.

(Image: A rendering of The Cyber Warrior. Credit: Rick Pinchera)

Electronic Frontiers20141213

How cyber-security prodigy Chris Doman beats hackers at their own game

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We meet Chris Doman, one of the world’s top civilian cyber defenders, and learn how he beats hackers at their own game. And we hear from Arnas Fedaravičius, the Lithuanian actor who played the fugitive intelligence analyst Edward Snowden on Russian TV. Plus, the legacy of the real Edward Snowden.

Also, video game designer Navid Khonsari tells us the inspiration behind his yet to be released game about Iran’s 1979 Islamic Revolution. We remember Ralph Baer, the serial inventor who became the ‘father of video games’. And we find out how a Buddhist shrine transformed a once-rough street corner in northern California.

(Image: A rendering of The Cyber Warrior. Credit: Rick Pinchera)

Entanglements2017072920170730 (WS)

How Putin learned to stop worrying and love internet espionage

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Until recently, Russian President Vladimir Putin was deeply suspicious of the world wide web. What changed his mind?

Also: the curious parallels between love and quantum physics; the Native American tribe that invented lacrosse gets nation status in the sport’s World Cup; fans of 'The Bachelorette' react when the reality TV show features a Sikh convert; two immigrant entrepreneurs create virtual reunions; and the Colombian rock star Juanes just wants to make his world better.

(Image: Russian President Vladimir Putin uses binoculars as he visits an air show outside Moscow on July 18, 2017. Credit: Alexey Nikolsky/Getty Images)

Entanglements2017072920170731 (WS)

How Putin learned to stop worrying and love internet espionage

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Until recently, Russian President Vladimir Putin was deeply suspicious of the world wide web. What changed his mind?

Also: the curious parallels between love and quantum physics; the Native American tribe that invented lacrosse gets nation status in the sport’s World Cup; fans of 'The Bachelorette' react when the reality TV show features a Sikh convert; two immigrant entrepreneurs create virtual reunions; and the Colombian rock star Juanes just wants to make his world better.

(Image: Russian President Vladimir Putin uses binoculars as he visits an air show outside Moscow on July 18, 2017. Credit: Alexey Nikolsky/Getty Images)

Entanglements20170729

How Putin learned to stop worrying and love internet espionage

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Until recently, Russian President Vladimir Putin was deeply suspicious of the world wide web. What changed his mind?

Also: the curious parallels between love and quantum physics; the Native American tribe that invented lacrosse gets nation status in the sport’s World Cup; fans of 'The Bachelorette' react when the reality TV show features a Sikh convert; two immigrant entrepreneurs create virtual reunions; and the Colombian rock star Juanes just wants to make his world better.

(Image: Russian President Vladimir Putin uses binoculars as he visits an air show outside Moscow on July 18, 2017. Credit: Alexey Nikolsky/Getty Images)

Face Value20180106

A pilot programme to use facial identification machines is underway at nine US airports

Flying out of the US? You might have to go through a facial scan at the airport. We discuss the implications of that.

Plus: we find out why a selfie app that drastically alters the way you look is all the rage in China; we get introduced to the women artists of the Renaissance who have been hidden in the archives; we meet a man who survived the Holocaust by drawing portraits of his Nazi guards; plus comedian Dean Obeidallah discovers that for a moment he was literally the face of fake news.
(Image: Passengers have their luggage screened at LaGuardia Airport in New York City. Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Face Value2018010620180107 (WS)

A pilot programme to use facial identification machines is underway at nine US airports

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Flying out of the US? You might have to go through a facial scan at the airport. We discuss the implications of that.

Plus: we find out why a selfie app that drastically alters the way you look is all the rage in China; we get introduced to the women artists of the Renaissance who have been hidden in the archives; we meet a man who survived the Holocaust by drawing portraits of his Nazi guards; plus comedian Dean Obeidallah discovers that for a moment he was literally the face of fake news.
(Image: Passengers have their luggage screened at LaGuardia Airport in New York City. Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Face Value20180106

A pilot programme to use facial identification machines is underway at nine US airports

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Flying out of the US? You might have to go through a facial scan at the airport. We discuss the implications of that.

Plus: we find out why a selfie app that drastically alters the way you look is all the rage in China; we get introduced to the women artists of the Renaissance who have been hidden in the archives; we meet a man who survived the Holocaust by drawing portraits of his Nazi guards; plus comedian Dean Obeidallah discovers that for a moment he was literally the face of fake news.
(Image: Passengers have their luggage screened at LaGuardia Airport in New York City. Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Face Your Fears2016102920161030 (WS)

How Donald Trump's anti-immigration rhetoric divided a city

Donald Trump's anti-immigration rhetoric has riled up one Massachusetts town. "It brought things to a head out here," says a Brockton city councillor, "people are going nuts."

Also on the programme: Canadians launch a campaign to tell Americans that they’re great; Zahra Noorbakhsh, a Muslim comedian, comes out as bisexual; and writer Deepak Singh returns to India and realizes that there is an aspect of life there he had forgotten about. Plus, we visit haunted places all over the world.

(Image: Craig Pina worries about Donald Trump cutting off funding to his city. Credit: Gabriela Saldivia)

Face Your Fears2016102920161030 (WS)

How Donald Trump's anti-immigration rhetoric divided a city

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Donald Trump's anti-immigration rhetoric has riled up one Massachusetts town. "It brought things to a head out here," says a Brockton city councillor, "people are going nuts."

Also on the programme: Canadians launch a campaign to tell Americans that they’re great; Zahra Noorbakhsh, a Muslim comedian, comes out as bisexual; and writer Deepak Singh returns to India and realizes that there is an aspect of life there he had forgotten about. Plus, we visit haunted places all over the world.

(Image: Craig Pina worries about Donald Trump cutting off funding to his city. Credit: Gabriela Saldivia)

Face Your Fears20161029

How Donald Trump's anti-immigration rhetoric divided a city

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Donald Trump's anti-immigration rhetoric has riled up one Massachusetts town. "It brought things to a head out here," says a Brockton city councillor, "people are going nuts."

Also on the programme: Canadians launch a campaign to tell Americans that they’re great; Zahra Noorbakhsh, a Muslim comedian, comes out as bisexual; and writer Deepak Singh returns to India and realizes that there is an aspect of life there he had forgotten about. Plus, we visit haunted places all over the world.

(Image: Craig Pina worries about Donald Trump cutting off funding to his city. Credit: Gabriela Saldivia)

Face-to-Face20170211

His parents were refugees. He\u2019s a Trump advisor. Sebastian Gorka talks US-Russia relations

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Before he became an advisor to President Trump, Sebastian Gorka was an editor at the far-right website Breitbart News. He discusses US relations with Russia. Plus, we speak to a journalist who faced death threats after writing an article critical of Trump.

Then, an American sheriff wants to help build a border wall, using the labour of inmates in Massachusetts. In New York City, Yemeni shop owners take to the streets. An historian uncovers the Arab origins of the Statue of Liberty. And a music producer who helped create the term “world music” looks back on the genre’s 30 years.

(Image: US President Donald Trump speaks calls Australia's Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, alongside Chief Strategist Steve Bannon (R) and National Security Advisor Michael Flynn. January 28, 2017. MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Family Ties2016072320160724 (WS)

A mother tells her son why she\u2019s choosing not to vote this year

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Does voting make a difference? We speak to two immigrants to the US. One is planning to vote this year. The other is not. They both explain why.

Also, a writer with something to reveal about her father; a Liberian refugee who feels safer in Liberia than in the US, and a visit to an American summer camp where the campers speak Russian. Plus, a chestnut pastry recipe so good it changed one woman’s life.
With special guest, Marjolijn deJager, host Marco Werman’s mum.

(Photo: Daniel Gross with his mother in Singapore, courtesy of Daniel Gross)

Family Ties20160723

A mother tells her son why she\u2019s choosing not to vote this year

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Does voting make a difference? We speak to two immigrants to the US. One is planning to vote this year. The other is not. They both explain why.

Also, a writer with something to reveal about her father; a Liberian refugee who feels safer in Liberia than in the US, and a visit to an American summer camp where the campers speak Russian. Plus, a chestnut pastry recipe so good it changed one woman’s life.
With special guest, Marjolijn deJager, host Marco Werman’s mum.

(Photo: Daniel Gross with his mother in Singapore, courtesy of Daniel Gross)

Family Ties2016072320160724 (WS)
20160725 (WS)

Does voting make a difference? We speak to two immigrants to the US. One is planning to vote this year. The other is not. They both explain why.

Also, a writer with something to reveal about her father; a Liberian refugee who feels safer in Liberia than in the US, and a visit to an American summer camp where the campers speak Russian. Plus, a chestnut pastry recipe so good it changed one woman’s life.

With special guest, Marjolijn deJager, host Marco Werman’s mum.

(Photo: Daniel Gross with his mother in Singapore, courtesy of Daniel Gross)

A mother tells her son why she’s choosing not to vote this year

Fifteen Minutes Of Fame2016091720160918 (WS)
20160919 (WS)

A 10-year-old girl makes her pitch to Western powers for peace in Yemen

"When my birthday comes, my wish is that war stops." A 10-year-old girl in Yemen pleads for peace. Also, how much information do politicians owe us about their personal lives? Will Ultimate Frisbee become an Olympic sport?

Plus, a man snaps a photo of a street cart vendor and the image goes viral; a baseball player in the US keeps fans glued to their TV screens in Taiwan, and DJ Shadow, an American music producer, releases a video that has got everyone talking in Ukraine.

Fifteen Minutes of Fame2016091720160918 (WS)

A 10-year-old girl makes her pitch to Western powers for peace in Yemen

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

"When my birthday comes, my wish is that war stops." A 10-year-old girl in Yemen pleads for peace. Also, how much information do politicians owe us about their personal lives? Will Ultimate Frisbee become an Olympic sport?

Plus, a man snaps a photo of a street cart vendor and the image goes viral; a baseball player in the US keeps fans glued to their TV screens in Taiwan, and DJ Shadow, an American music producer, releases a video that has got everyone talking in Ukraine.

Fifteen Minutes of Fame20160917

A 10-year-old girl makes her pitch to Western powers for peace in Yemen

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

"When my birthday comes, my wish is that war stops." A 10-year-old girl in Yemen pleads for peace. Also, how much information do politicians owe us about their personal lives? Will Ultimate Frisbee become an Olympic sport?

Plus, a man snaps a photo of a street cart vendor and the image goes viral; a baseball player in the US keeps fans glued to their TV screens in Taiwan, and DJ Shadow, an American music producer, releases a video that has got everyone talking in Ukraine.

Fight or Flight2016060420160605 (WS)

How an unauthorised immigrant became a US Marine\u2014and then a US citizen

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We speak with Daniel Torres, a former US Marine who was deported to Mexico. Then, we look back at a deadly 1942 U-boat attack in the Gulf of Mexico. And we take a bus ride with the children of Sudanese immigrants in California.

Plus, a group of American teenagers cause an uproar when they try to take part in World Hijab Day. A journalist learns the proper use for bananas in Somali cuisine. And an Ethiopian-American band records its own version of a Japanese folk song.

Image: Daniel Torres grew up in the US, but after a stint in the Marines he was deported to Mexico. (Credit: PRI’s The World)

Fight or Flight20160604

How an unauthorised immigrant became a US Marine\u2014and then a US citizen

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We speak with Daniel Torres, a former US Marine who was deported to Mexico. Then, we look back at a deadly 1942 U-boat attack in the Gulf of Mexico. And we take a bus ride with the children of Sudanese immigrants in California.

Plus, a group of American teenagers cause an uproar when they try to take part in World Hijab Day. A journalist learns the proper use for bananas in Somali cuisine. And an Ethiopian-American band records its own version of a Japanese folk song.

Image: Daniel Torres grew up in the US, but after a stint in the Marines he was deported to Mexico. (Credit: PRI’s The World)

Fight Or Flight2016060420160605 (WS)
20160606 (WS)

We speak with Daniel Torres, a former US Marine who was deported to Mexico. Then, we look back at a deadly 1942 U-boat attack in the Gulf of Mexico. And we take a bus ride with the children of Sudanese immigrants in California.

Plus, a group of American teenagers cause an uproar when they try to take part in World Hijab Day. A journalist learns the proper use for bananas in Somali cuisine. And an Ethiopian-American band records its own version of a Japanese folk song.

Image: Daniel Torres grew up in the US, but after a stint in the Marines he was deported to Mexico. (Credit: PRI’s The World)

How an unauthorised immigrant became a US Marine—and then a US citizen

First Person20150418

An American flees war-torn Yemen by small boat on the Red Sea

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We meet Mokhtar Alkhanshali, a San Francisco man who escaped war-torn Yemen by riding a small fishing boat across the rocky Red Sea. Then we learn about a privately-funded effort to rescue and feed imperilled migrants on the Mediterranean. And we take flight with US Marine Corps Capt. Katie Higgins, the first female pilot in America’s top aerial display team.

Also, a Los Angeles artist designs an Ebola protective suit that allows patients to see the faces of those helping. We meet another Los Angeles artist— ‘El Maestro’ — who is known for crafting some of the most intricate mariachi suits in the world. And an Indo-Guyanese musician who now lives in New York finds a niche bringing the city’s harmoniums back to life.

Image: Mokhtar Alkhanshali (left) and his boat helmsman make their way across the Red Sea after fleeing Yemen. Credit: Mokhtar Alkhanshali

Fish, France And Forgeries2014012520140126 (WS)

Some Americans on the Pacific Coast are worried that radiation-contaminated water from the Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan is tainting fish being sold in local markets. Scientists, though, say they need not worry. Also, why some Boston area students are so angry with the French Consulate, and why so many French technical innovators are heading to California’s Silicon Valley. We meet one of the world’s top legal counterfeiters of precious gems. And, we find out about the trousers worn by Norway’s National Curling team that are generating so much attention.

Fears that radiation-contaminated fish from Fukushima is turning up in US markets

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Fish, France and Forgeries2014012520140126 (WS)

Fears that radiation-contaminated fish from Fukushima is turning up in US markets

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Some Americans on the Pacific Coast are worried that radiation-contaminated water from the Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan is tainting fish being sold in local markets. Scientists, though, say they need not worry. Also, why some Boston area students are so angry with the French Consulate, and why so many French technical innovators are heading to California’s Silicon Valley. We meet one of the world’s top legal counterfeiters of precious gems. And, we find out about the trousers worn by Norway’s National Curling team that are generating so much attention.

Fish, France and Forgeries20140125

Fears that radiation-contaminated fish from Fukushima is turning up in US markets

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Some Americans on the Pacific Coast are worried that radiation-contaminated water from the Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan is tainting fish being sold in local markets. Scientists, though, say they need not worry. Also, why some Boston area students are so angry with the French Consulate, and why so many French technical innovators are heading to California’s Silicon Valley. We meet one of the world’s top legal counterfeiters of precious gems. And, we find out about the trousers worn by Norway’s National Curling team that are generating so much attention.

Flashpoint20151212

A Texas town stands divided, after armed men menace worshipers at a local mosque

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

When armed men in camouflage menace worshipers at a Texas mosque, the local community is divided. Then, a look back to the World War Two internment of Japanese-Americans, a move being invoked today in some US political circles.

Also, we go inside a halal slaughterhouse where the knives are sharp and tradition endures; we get a personal take on one of the thorniest issues between the US and Cuba right now -- property rights; and, we hear what California can learn from Israel about farming in the middle of a drought. Plus: could ‘climate fiction’ be key to addressing our climate change crisis?

Image: Armed protestors gather outside a mosque in Irving, Texas. (Credit: Avi Selk/ The Dallas Morning News)

Flashpoint20151212

When armed men in camouflage menace worshipers at a Texas mosque, the local community is divided. Then, a look back to the World War Two internment of Japanese-Americans, a move being invoked today in some US political circles.

Also, we go inside a halal slaughterhouse where the knives are sharp and tradition endures; we get a personal take on one of the thorniest issues between the US and Cuba right now -- property rights; and, we hear what California can learn from Israel about farming in the middle of a drought. Plus: could ‘climate fiction’ be key to addressing our climate change crisis?

Image: Armed protestors gather outside a mosque in Irving, Texas. (Credit: Avi Selk/ The Dallas Morning News)

A Texas town stands divided, after armed men menace worshipers at a local mosque

Follow The Money2014052420140525 (WS)

We hear about a new online tool that helps track the millions of dollars spent by foreign lobbyists in Washington. Also in the show, the California community that Toyota built and what might become of it when the car company pulls out. A new photo exhibit in Moscow offers an intimate portrait of New Orleans. What makes Americana so big in Japan? The tale of an American man who came to embrace his Ukrainian roots through his love of music. And a music student from Argentina who’d been studying in Boston nails Stairway to Heaven on graduation day.

(Photo: Man holding US 100 dollar bank notes. Credit: Corbis)

A new online tool tracks the millions of dollars spent by foreign lobbyists in the US

Follow the Money2014052420140525 (WS)

A new online tool tracks the millions of dollars spent by foreign lobbyists in the US

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We hear about a new online tool that helps track the millions of dollars spent by foreign lobbyists in Washington. Also in the show, the California community that Toyota built and what might become of it when the car company pulls out. A new photo exhibit in Moscow offers an intimate portrait of New Orleans. What makes Americana so big in Japan? The tale of an American man who came to embrace his Ukrainian roots through his love of music. And a music student from Argentina who’d been studying in Boston nails Stairway to Heaven on graduation day.

(Photo: Man holding US 100 dollar bank notes. Credit: Corbis)

Follow the Money20140524

A new online tool tracks the millions of dollars spent by foreign lobbyists in the US

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We hear about a new online tool that helps track the millions of dollars spent by foreign lobbyists in Washington. Also in the show, the California community that Toyota built and what might become of it when the car company pulls out. A new photo exhibit in Moscow offers an intimate portrait of New Orleans. What makes Americana so big in Japan? The tale of an American man who came to embrace his Ukrainian roots through his love of music. And a music student from Argentina who’d been studying in Boston nails Stairway to Heaven on graduation day.

(Photo: Man holding US 100 dollar bank notes. Credit: Corbis)

Follow the Money20161210

How corrupt is the US compared to other countries?

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Sarah Chayes, an expert at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, says we need to talk about corruption in America.

Also, we visit a retraining programme for US steelworkers; we find out how Donald Trump’s plan to make Mexico pay for a border wall could backfire; we discover the secrets of the billion dollar hair trade industry; and we meet the guy who Venezuelans turn to when they want to know what their currency is worth -- when he’s not too busy helping customers at the hardware store he works at in the US.

(Image: A magnifying glass is used to inspect newly printed bills at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing in Washington, DC. Credit: Mark Wilson/Getty Images )

Follow The Money20161210

Sarah Chayes, an expert at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, says we need to talk about corruption in America.

Also, we visit a retraining programme for US steelworkers; we find out how Donald Trump’s plan to make Mexico pay for a border wall could backfire; we discover the secrets of the billion dollar hair trade industry; and we meet the guy who Venezuelans turn to when they want to know what their currency is worth -- when he’s not too busy helping customers at the hardware store he works at in the US.

(Image: A magnifying glass is used to inspect newly printed bills at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing in Washington, DC. Credit: Mark Wilson/Getty Images )

How corrupt is the US compared to other countries?

Friends And Followers2018033120180401 (WS)

Revelations about Narendra Modi\u2019s official app provoke outrage on social media.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

In India, revelations that Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s official app has been sending user data to a third party provoke outrage.

Also: Author Mona Eltahawy starts #MosqueMeToo to give Muslim women an outlet to speak out against abuse and it goes viral; two friends from Iran start a popular website about sexual health specifically for Farsi speakers; some researchers worry that we are not teaching our robots to be ethical enough; plus a woman named Ivanka Majic has an uninvited brush with fame.

(Image: Prime Minister Narendra Modi has his picture taken with a mobile phone on September 2, 2014. Credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)

Revelations about Narendra Modi\u2019s official app provoke outrage on social media.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

In India, revelations that Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s official app has been sending user data to a third party provoke outrage.

Also: Author Mona Eltahawy starts #MosqueMeToo to give Muslim women an outlet to speak out against abuse and it goes viral; two friends from Iran start a popular website about sexual health specifically for Farsi speakers; some researchers worry that we are not teaching our robots to be ethical enough; plus a woman named Ivanka Majic has an uninvited brush with fame.

(Image: Prime Minister Narendra Modi has his picture taken with a mobile phone on September 2, 2014. Credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)

Revelations about Narendra Modi\u2019s official app provoke outrage on social media.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

In India, revelations that Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s official app has been sending user data to a third party provoke outrage.

Also: Author Mona Eltahawy starts #MosqueMeToo to give Muslim women an outlet to speak out against abuse and it goes viral; two friends from Iran start a popular website about sexual health specifically for Farsi speakers; some researchers worry that we are not teaching our robots to be ethical enough; plus a woman named Ivanka Majic has an uninvited brush with fame.

(Image: Prime Minister Narendra Modi has his picture taken with a mobile phone on September 2, 2014. Credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)

Friends and Followers2018033120180401 (WS)

Revelations about Narendra Modi\u2019s official app provoke outrage on social media.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

In India, revelations that Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s official app has been sending user data to a third party provoke outrage.

Also: Author Mona Eltahawy starts #MosqueMeToo to give Muslim women an outlet to speak out against abuse and it goes viral; two friends from Iran start a popular website about sexual health specifically for Farsi speakers; some researchers worry that we are not teaching our robots to be ethical enough; plus a woman named Ivanka Majic has an uninvited brush with fame.

(Image: Prime Minister Narendra Modi has his picture taken with a mobile phone on September 2, 2014. Credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)

Friends and Followers20180331

Revelations about Narendra Modi\u2019s official app provoke outrage on social media.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

In India, revelations that Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s official app has been sending user data to a third party provoke outrage.

Also: Author Mona Eltahawy starts #MosqueMeToo to give Muslim women an outlet to speak out against abuse and it goes viral; two friends from Iran start a popular website about sexual health specifically for Farsi speakers; some researchers worry that we are not teaching our robots to be ethical enough; plus a woman named Ivanka Majic has an uninvited brush with fame.

(Image: Prime Minister Narendra Modi has his picture taken with a mobile phone on September 2, 2014. Credit: Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images)

From Russia with Love2017091620170917 (WS)

From Russia with Love

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

What impact did Russian internet “trolls’’ have on the 2016 US presidential election?

Also: we hear about wealthy Russians coming to America to give birth to US citizens; we learn why the poet Langston Hughes went to the USSR to work on a Soviet propaganda film in 1930s; we visit a Korean-Uzbek-Russian cafe in New York; we meet two science fiction writers who advise the US government on the future of warfare; and we find out why Tchaikovsky's concerto No. 1 had its world premiere in Boston.

(Image:The Kremlin stands in Red Square in Moscow on March 7, 2017 in Moscow, Russia. Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

From Russia with Love2017091620170918 (WS)

From Russia with Love

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

What impact did Russian internet “trolls’’ have on the 2016 US presidential election?

Also: we hear about wealthy Russians coming to America to give birth to US citizens; we learn why the poet Langston Hughes went to the USSR to work on a Soviet propaganda film in 1930s; we visit a Korean-Uzbek-Russian cafe in New York; we meet two science fiction writers who advise the US government on the future of warfare; and we find out why Tchaikovsky's concerto No. 1 had its world premiere in Boston.

(Image:The Kremlin stands in Red Square in Moscow on March 7, 2017 in Moscow, Russia. Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

From Russia with Love20170916

From Russia with Love

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

What impact did Russian internet “trolls’’ have on the 2016 US presidential election?

Also: we hear about wealthy Russians coming to America to give birth to US citizens; we learn why the poet Langston Hughes went to the USSR to work on a Soviet propaganda film in 1930s; we visit a Korean-Uzbek-Russian cafe in New York; we meet two science fiction writers who advise the US government on the future of warfare; and we find out why Tchaikovsky's concerto No. 1 had its world premiere in Boston.

(Image:The Kremlin stands in Red Square in Moscow on March 7, 2017 in Moscow, Russia. Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

From Russia With Love20170918

What impact did Russian internet “trolls’’ have on the 2016 US presidential election?

Also: we hear about wealthy Russians coming to America to give birth to US citizens; we learn why the poet Langston Hughes went to the USSR to work on a Soviet propaganda film in 1930s; we visit a Korean-Uzbek-Russian cafe in New York; we meet two science fiction writers who advise the US government on the future of warfare; and we find out why Tchaikovsky's concerto No. 1 had its world premiere in Boston.

(Image:The Kremlin stands in Red Square in Moscow on March 7, 2017 in Moscow, Russia. Credit: Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

Get It Off Your Chest2017082620170827 (WS)

Syrian president Bashar al Assad has become a darling of the American far right.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Bashar al-Assad seems to have a fan base in the United States. White supremacists and neo-nazis have worn pro-Assad T-shirts at rallies, while others have shown their support for the Syrian president on social media.

Also, white supremacists wear t-shirts emblazoned with a picture of a notorious Romanian fascist; and if you're in Turkey, leave your 'HERO' T-shirts at home; plus, if you lived in East Germany during the Cold War, it may have been verboten to wear a Frank Zappa T-shirt, but somehow his music made it in.

(Image: A photo taken on March 4, 2015 shows a banner bearing a portrait of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad in a street in the city of Damascus. (Credit: LOUAI BESHARA/AFP/Getty Images)

Get It Off Your Chest2017082620170828 (WS)

Syrian president Bashar al Assad has become a darling of the American far right.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Bashar al-Assad seems to have a fan base in the United States. White supremacists and neo-nazis have worn pro-Assad T-shirts at rallies, while others have shown their support for the Syrian president on social media.

Also, white supremacists wear t-shirts emblazoned with a picture of a notorious Romanian fascist; and if you're in Turkey, leave your 'HERO' T-shirts at home; plus, if you lived in East Germany during the Cold War, it may have been verboten to wear a Frank Zappa T-shirt, but somehow his music made it in.

(Image: A photo taken on March 4, 2015 shows a banner bearing a portrait of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad in a street in the city of Damascus. (Credit: LOUAI BESHARA/AFP/Getty Images)

Get It Off Your Chest20170826

Syrian president Bashar al Assad has become a darling of the American far right.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Bashar al-Assad seems to have a fan base in the United States. White supremacists and neo-nazis have worn pro-Assad T-shirts at rallies, while others have shown their support for the Syrian president on social media.

Also, white supremacists wear t-shirts emblazoned with a picture of a notorious Romanian fascist; and if you're in Turkey, leave your 'HERO' T-shirts at home; plus, if you lived in East Germany during the Cold War, it may have been verboten to wear a Frank Zappa T-shirt, but somehow his music made it in.

(Image: A photo taken on March 4, 2015 shows a banner bearing a portrait of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad in a street in the city of Damascus. (Credit: LOUAI BESHARA/AFP/Getty Images)

Get It Off Your Chest20170828

Syrian president Bashar al Assad has become a darling of the American far right.

Bashar al-Assad seems to have a fan base in the United States. White supremacists and neo-nazis have worn pro-Assad T-shirts at rallies, while others have shown their support for the Syrian president on social media.

Also, white supremacists wear t-shirts emblazoned with a picture of a notorious Romanian fascist; and if you're in Turkey, leave your 'HERO' T-shirts at home; plus, if you lived in East Germany during the Cold War, it may have been verboten to wear a Frank Zappa T-shirt, but somehow his music made it in.

(Image: A photo taken on March 4, 2015 shows a banner bearing a portrait of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad in a street in the city of Damascus. (Credit: LOUAI BESHARA/AFP/Getty Images)

Getting Down To Business20170121

Donald Trump cancels plans for a tower in Georgia. Is it business or geo-politics?

Before becoming President, Donald Trump pulled out of a plan to license a tower in the nation of Georgia. Now, many there fear being “forgotten and abandoned? by the US.

Also: the first legal commercial export from Cuba arrives in the US; a former Wall Street man comes up with a plan to save an Indonesian forest; farmers in Vermont are growing a new crop and its worth more than its weight in gold; a family in Mexico is trafficking in donuts; and we find out what country makes the fastest roller coasters (hint: not the US).

(Image: Donald Trump during a press conference to announce a real estate project in Georgia, at the Trump Tower in New York, March 10, 2011. Credit: Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images)

Getting down to Business20170121

Donald Trump cancels plans for a tower in Georgia. Is it business or geo-politics?

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Before becoming President, Donald Trump pulled out of a plan to license a tower in the nation of Georgia. Now, many there fear being “forgotten and abandoned” by the US.

Also: the first legal commercial export from Cuba arrives in the US; a former Wall Street man comes up with a plan to save an Indonesian forest; farmers in Vermont are growing a new crop and its worth more than its weight in gold; a family in Mexico is trafficking in donuts; and we find out what country makes the fastest roller coasters (hint: not the US).

(Image: Donald Trump during a press conference to announce a real estate project in Georgia, at the Trump Tower in New York, March 10, 2011. Credit: Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images)

Getting to Know Laura Poitras2013081720130819 (WS)

Meet the woman who helped Edward Snowden leak news of top-secret surveillance programmes

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Who is Laura Poitras? Hear about the crucial role this American film-maker played in helping Edward Snowden leak news of a top-secret mass surveillance programmes being operated by the US government. Plus, the tech-savvy Americans helping Vietnamese bloggers cover their tracks.

We investigate why some Americans are giving up their US citizenships and we find out about the 'November Project' - a growing fitness craze that is drawing huge early morning crowds in Boston and other cities across the US and Canada. And, Cuba gets its first English-language bookstore thanks to a New York City native.

(Image: Documentary film-maker Laura Poitras. Credit: Associated Press)

Getting to Know Laura Poitras20130817

Meet the woman who helped Edward Snowden leak news of top-secret surveillance programmes

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Who is Laura Poitras? Hear about the crucial role this American film-maker played in helping Edward Snowden leak news of a top-secret mass surveillance programmes being operated by the US government. Plus, the tech-savvy Americans helping Vietnamese bloggers cover their tracks.

We investigate why some Americans are giving up their US citizenships and we find out about the 'November Project' - a growing fitness craze that is drawing huge early morning crowds in Boston and other cities across the US and Canada. And, Cuba gets its first English-language bookstore thanks to a New York City native.

(Image: Documentary film-maker Laura Poitras. Credit: Associated Press)

Girl's Ballet School In Syria2013011920130120 (WS)

How life goes on for young ballerinas in a suburb of Damascus. A young Haitian woman rebuilds her life in New York after fleeing the 2010 earthquake in her homeland. We’ll also hear about Hollywood’s decades-old relationship with America’s top spy agency, the CIA.

(Image: Young ballerinas at their ballet class, Credit: Emma LeBlanc)

How life goes on for young ballerinas in a suburb of Damascus

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Girl's Ballet School in Syria2013011920130120 (WS)

How life goes on for young ballerinas in a suburb of Damascus

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How life goes on for young ballerinas in a suburb of Damascus. A young Haitian woman rebuilds her life in New York after fleeing the 2010 earthquake in her homeland. We’ll also hear about Hollywood’s decades-old relationship with America’s top spy agency, the CIA.

(Image: Young ballerinas at their ballet class, Credit: Emma LeBlanc)

Girl's Ballet School in Syria20130119

How life goes on for young ballerinas in a suburb of Damascus

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How life goes on for young ballerinas in a suburb of Damascus. A young Haitian woman rebuilds her life in New York after fleeing the 2010 earthquake in her homeland. We’ll also hear about Hollywood’s decades-old relationship with America’s top spy agency, the CIA.

(Image: Young ballerinas at their ballet class, Credit: Emma LeBlanc)

Global Nation2014071920140720 (WS)

Child migrants crossing the US-Mexico border face deportation and ignite protest

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

The humanitarian crisis at the US-Mexico border continues, as child migrants from Central America cross into the United States by the thousands. We ask if US immigration policy is playing a role in enticing these kids to head north, and we meet two young Guatemalans who say they had no choice but to make the dangerous journey. Also, we hear the story of a Salvadoran girl trying to find her way in America. And the tale of a nanny from Paraguay who looks forward to reuniting with her son, but does he share the sentiment? Also, we find out how superhero stories are really about the immigrant experience. And we learn the not-so-obvious difference between ‘hospice’ and ‘hospicio'.

Photo: A rally on immigration reform, Credit: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Global Nation20140719

Child migrants crossing the US-Mexico border face deportation and ignite protest

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

The humanitarian crisis at the US-Mexico border continues, as child migrants from Central America cross into the United States by the thousands. We ask if US immigration policy is playing a role in enticing these kids to head north, and we meet two young Guatemalans who say they had no choice but to make the dangerous journey. Also, we hear the story of a Salvadoran girl trying to find her way in America. And the tale of a nanny from Paraguay who looks forward to reuniting with her son, but does he share the sentiment? Also, we find out how superhero stories are really about the immigrant experience. And we learn the not-so-obvious difference between ‘hospice’ and ‘hospicio'.

Photo: A rally on immigration reform, Credit: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Global Nation Edition2013051820130519 (WS)

US immigration reform seen through the eyes of an undocumented immigrant

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

America’s immigration reform debate as seen through the eyes of someone who is waiting for citizenship. How the US counts its illegal immigrants, the politician who wants to give non-citizen immigrants the right to vote and a hospital that reflects America’s ethnic diversity.

(Image: Immigrant workers in protest at the United States Department of Homeland Security I-9 audits of their employment eligibility, San Diego. Credit: Reuters)

Global Nation Edition20130518

US immigration reform seen through the eyes of an undocumented immigrant

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

America’s immigration reform debate as seen through the eyes of someone who is waiting for citizenship. How the US counts its illegal immigrants, the politician who wants to give non-citizen immigrants the right to vote and a hospital that reflects America’s ethnic diversity.

(Image: Immigrant workers in protest at the United States Department of Homeland Security I-9 audits of their employment eligibility, San Diego. Credit: Reuters)

Go and Do Likewise20160220

From Lesbos to Flint \u2014 an Islamic relief group helps the poor get safe drinking water

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

From Lesbos to Flint, we follow an Islamic relief group helping the poor get safe drinking water. Then, an Evangelical pastor tells us why it's our moral duty to 'take the longer view' on refugees. And: where human life is precarious, Haitians look out for a rare Iguana.

Plus, the woman behind a Liberian bookstore where children can read about themselves. And the Ghanaian reggae star Rocky Dawuni’s quest to bring clean cookstoves back home.

Image: Volunteers from Islamic Relief USA deliver water in Flint, Michigan. (Credit: Ridwan Adhami/Islamic Relief USA)

Go And Do Likewise20160220

From Lesbos to Flint, we follow an Islamic relief group helping the poor get safe drinking water. Then, an Evangelical pastor tells us why it's our moral duty to 'take the longer view' on refugees. And: where human life is precarious, Haitians look out for a rare Iguana.

Plus, the woman behind a Liberian bookstore where children can read about themselves. And the Ghanaian reggae star Rocky Dawuni’s quest to bring clean cookstoves back home.

Image: Volunteers from Islamic Relief USA deliver water in Flint, Michigan. (Credit: Ridwan Adhami/Islamic Relief USA)

From Lesbos to Flint — an Islamic relief group helps the poor get safe drinking water

Good Neighbours20160227

The Flint water crisis leaves unauthorised immigrants in the dark in Michigan

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We travel to the Michigan city of Flint and learn why unauthorised immigrants are so imperilled by the city’s lead-contaminated water system. We consider whether a Scandinavian-style welfare state could ever work in America. And, why Canadians want to turn away from the US elections, but just can't help themselves.

Plus, the secret plot to destroy Syria’s weapons of mass destruction. How Russians and Americans have teamed up to rescue Sochi’s stray dogs. And, the soulful songs of a Mexican singer, who muses about the American dream.

(Photo: The City of Flint Water Plant is illuminated by moonlight on January 23, 2016 in Flint, Michigan. Credit: Brett Carlsen/Getty Images)

Good Neighbours20160227

We travel to the Michigan city of Flint and learn why unauthorised immigrants are so imperilled by the city’s lead-contaminated water system. We consider whether a Scandinavian-style welfare state could ever work in America. And, why Canadians want to turn away from the US elections, but just can't help themselves.

Plus, the secret plot to destroy Syria’s weapons of mass destruction. How Russians and Americans have teamed up to rescue Sochi’s stray dogs. And, the soulful songs of a Mexican singer, who muses about the American dream.

(Photo: The City of Flint Water Plant is illuminated by moonlight on January 23, 2016 in Flint, Michigan. Credit: Brett Carlsen/Getty Images)

The Flint water crisis leaves unauthorised immigrants in the dark in Michigan

Goods and Services2015020720150208 (WS)

An Iranian-American woman creates an online marketplace for underground Iranian designers

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We meet Golshid Mola, an Iranian-American businesswoman who is trying not to fall afoul of US sanctions. Plus, the Afghan carpet makers who are weaving images of drones into their rugs. And a New York sommelier who spices up meals with personal stories of the wine he pours.

Also, US basketball teams break out special uniforms for the Chinese New Year. The green tech revolution leaves consumers in the dark. And the Florida auto repair shop specialising in Soviet-era cars.

(Photo: Earring design by one of Golshid Mola’s Iranian vendors. Credit: Liqe/Alangoo.com)

Goods and Services20150207

An Iranian-American woman creates an online marketplace for underground Iranian designers

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We meet Golshid Mola, an Iranian-American businesswoman who is trying not to fall afoul of US sanctions. Plus, the Afghan carpet makers who are weaving images of drones into their rugs. And a New York sommelier who spices up meals with personal stories of the wine he pours.

Also, US basketball teams break out special uniforms for the Chinese New Year. The green tech revolution leaves consumers in the dark. And the Florida auto repair shop specialising in Soviet-era cars.

(Photo: Earring design by one of Golshid Mola’s Iranian vendors. Credit: Liqe/Alangoo.com)

Great Escapes20150509

A former captive of the Taliban calls for an end to US \u2018signature\u2019 drone strikes.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We hear from David Rohde, an American journalist and former captive of the Taliban, who is calling for a halt to US 'signature' drone strikes. We examine the blurry line between vague and actionable government intelligence information.

Also, we tour the University of Texas at El Paso, a campus that looks just like the Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan. The journalist Jonathan Katz tells us how not to report on an earthquake. And, we visit a small town in El Salvador where migrants to the US are hotly debated folk heroes. Plus, a top-selling indigenous artist from Australia does not give interviews, but still wows audiences with his voice.

(Photo: A US Air Force MQ-1 Predator flies near the Southern California Logistics Airport. Credit: Reuters/US Air Force/Tech. Sgt. Effrain Lopez)

Grounded2015032820150329 (WS)

George Brant on turning drones into drama, and confronting the morality of modern warfare

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We talk with the playwright George Brant about his international hit Grounded - a one-woman show about a military fighter pilot sidelined by pregnancy and reassigned to duty as a drone operator. Plus, the story of Kenneth Rowe, a Florida man who in 1953 fled Communist North Korea in a MiG-15 fighter jet. And, why a former US undersecretary of defence and an Afghan doctor are both optimistic about Afghanistan’s future.

Also, we visit America’s first all-female mosque. And we ponder a challenge for young devout Muslims - if dating is not allowed, how are you to find love?

(Photo: Celeste Oliva starred in The Nora Theatre Company's production of Grounded. Courtesy of A.R. Sinclair Photography)

Grounded20150328

George Brant on turning drones into drama, and confronting the morality of modern warfare

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We talk with the playwright George Brant about his international hit Grounded - a one-woman show about a military fighter pilot sidelined by pregnancy and reassigned to duty as a drone operator. Plus, the story of Kenneth Rowe, a Florida man who in 1953 fled Communist North Korea in a MiG-15 fighter jet. And, why a former US undersecretary of defence and an Afghan doctor are both optimistic about Afghanistan’s future.

Also, we visit America’s first all-female mosque. And we ponder a challenge for young devout Muslims - if dating is not allowed, how are you to find love?

(Photo: Celeste Oliva starred in The Nora Theatre Company's production of Grounded. Courtesy of A.R. Sinclair Photography)

Have Faith2015022820150301 (WS)

Photojournalist Lynsey Addario captures the quiet moments of war.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We go behind the lens and onto the frontlines with war photographer Lynsey Addario. Plus, we learn why German atheists are seeking formal recognition for the 'Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster'. And we visit a museum in New York devoted only to animals mentioned in Hebrew scripture.

Also, the story of a wealthy businessman who has set up the first privately funded search and rescue operation for migrants lost at sea. Why the last remaining matzo factory in New York plans to close shop after 90 years of business. And a world-class bassist replaces frets with flags, and personifies what it means to be an international musician.

(Photo: Two women wait by the roadside for help in Badakhshan Province, Afghanistan. Credit: Lynsey Addario)

Have Faith20150228

Photojournalist Lynsey Addario captures the quiet moments of war.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We go behind the lens and onto the frontlines with war photographer Lynsey Addario. Plus, we learn why German atheists are seeking formal recognition for the 'Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster'. And we visit a museum in New York devoted only to animals mentioned in Hebrew scripture.

Also, the story of a wealthy businessman who has set up the first privately funded search and rescue operation for migrants lost at sea. Why the last remaining matzo factory in New York plans to close shop after 90 years of business. And a world-class bassist replaces frets with flags, and personifies what it means to be an international musician.

(Photo: Two women wait by the roadside for help in Badakhshan Province, Afghanistan. Credit: Lynsey Addario)

Here Today, Gone Tomorrow2015021420150215 (WS)

A New York artist sketches life inside Islamic State-controlled Mosul

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We meet the New York artist targeting Islamic State with her drawings. The renowned surgeon and writer Atul Gawande reflects on ‘Being Mortal’ and the death of his father. And an American undertaker describes ancient burial rituals and customs from around the world.

Also, we visit a California church trying to preserve the culture of Coptic Christians. Why the Florida cigar industry is looking over its shoulder at Cuba. And how the fruit and vegetable section of the supermarket looks to a migrant farmworker.

(Photo: An artistic rendering of the now destroyed Prophet Jirjis mosque, in the Iraqi city of Mosul. Credit: Molly Crabapple/Vanity Fair)

Here Today, Gone Tomorrow20150214

A New York artist sketches life inside Islamic State-controlled Mosul

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We meet the New York artist targeting Islamic State with her drawings. The renowned surgeon and writer Atul Gawande reflects on ‘Being Mortal’ and the death of his father. And an American undertaker describes ancient burial rituals and customs from around the world.

Also, we visit a California church trying to preserve the culture of Coptic Christians. Why the Florida cigar industry is looking over its shoulder at Cuba. And how the fruit and vegetable section of the supermarket looks to a migrant farmworker.

(Photo: An artistic rendering of the now destroyed Prophet Jirjis mosque, in the Iraqi city of Mosul. Credit: Molly Crabapple/Vanity Fair)

History in the Making20170114

Obama is the first US president to author an article in Science magazine.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

US President Obama has published three articles in top academic journals in one week. Why?

Also on the programme: we look back on Obama’s complicated legacy in Kenya, the birthplace of his father; we examine some evidence that casts Richard Nixon’s presidential legacy in a different light; we meet one of the first female missileers; and we learn about a long lost musical, commissioned during World War II, by the US Army.

(Image: U.S. President Barack Obama signs bills at his desk in the Oval Office at the White House. Credit: Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

History In The Making20170114

US President Obama has published three articles in top academic journals in one week. Why?

Also on the programme: we look back on Obama’s complicated legacy in Kenya, the birthplace of his father; we examine some evidence that casts Richard Nixon’s presidential legacy in a different light; we meet one of the first female missileers; and we learn about a long lost musical, commissioned during World War II, by the US Army.

(Image: U.S. President Barack Obama signs bills at his desk in the Oval Office at the White House. Credit: Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Obama is the first US president to author an article in Science magazine.

History Now20150718

Two brothers - one in Iran, one in the US - share their hopes post-nuclear deal

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We talk to two brothers - one in Tehran, the other in California - about what a nuclear deal means for a family separated by sanctions. Then, we head to Mike’s Place for a story about love, blues, and terror in Tel Aviv. And, we drop by Little Saigon to visit the office of the oldest Vietnamese language newspaper in the United States, the Nguoi Viet Daily News.

Also, why generations of Dutch citizens still trek to the graves of US World War Two soldiers. And ‘a man walks into a bar', or is it ‘a man walked into a bar’?

(Photo: Iranians took to the streets of Tehran to celebrate the announcement of a nuclear deal. Credit: AFP)

Hole in the Wall20150905

A border wall to keep migrants out - \u201ca 14th Century solution to a 21st Century problem\u201d

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

The US built a huge wall along one-third of its border with Mexico. Now, while Europe debates its own border policies, some US politicians want to seal the entire border. Also, a French chef looks back at what he lost - and gained - after Hurricane Katrina struck. And, we hear how American snack foods are getting a Latin twist.

Guantanamo Bay prison remains open in Cuba, and it has become a matter of life and death for one prisoner from Yemen. Plus, now that US-Cuba relations are warming up, a food critic goes looking for real Cuban cuisine. And, how a Saudi singer left her home country to chase stardom in Los Angeles.

(Photo: A boy in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, clings to the border fence. Credit: Cecilia Ballí)

Hole In The Wall20150905

The US built a huge wall along one-third of its border with Mexico. Now, while Europe debates its own border policies, some US politicians want to seal the entire border. Also, a French chef looks back at what he lost - and gained - after Hurricane Katrina struck. And, we hear how American snack foods are getting a Latin twist.

Guantanamo Bay prison remains open in Cuba, and it has become a matter of life and death for one prisoner from Yemen. Plus, now that US-Cuba relations are warming up, a food critic goes looking for real Cuban cuisine. And, how a Saudi singer left her home country to chase stardom in Los Angeles.

(Photo: A boy in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, clings to the border fence. Credit: Cecilia Ballí)

A border wall to keep migrants out - “a 14th Century solution to a 21st Century problem?

Home from Home20151003

A Yemeni student in America urges US officials to end support for Saudi-led airstrikes.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Shireen Al-Adeimi, a doctoral student at Harvard University, channels the voice of her fellow Yemenis and calls for the US government to end support for Saudi-led airstrikes. Then, we hear how one refugee family from Syria is starting over in California. And, as part of our First Days series, an Israeli teenager tells us what it was like to move to Massachusetts.

Also: the story of a Honduran family divided between home and New Orleans. How a proper Englishman caught gold fever in the American 'Wild West'. And Omar Offendum, a Syrian-American rapper, offers up a sharp lament for his homeland.

Picture: Shireen Al-Adeimi, a doctoral student at Harvard University who has launched a petition calling on the US government to end American support for Saudi-led airstrikes in Yemen. (Credit: PRI’s The World)

Home From Home20151003

Shireen Al-Adeimi, a doctoral student at Harvard University, channels the voice of her fellow Yemenis and calls for the US government to end support for Saudi-led airstrikes. Then, we hear how one refugee family from Syria is starting over in California. And, as part of our First Days series, an Israeli teenager tells us what it was like to move to Massachusetts.

Also: the story of a Honduran family divided between home and New Orleans. How a proper Englishman caught gold fever in the American 'Wild West'. And Omar Offendum, a Syrian-American rapper, offers up a sharp lament for his homeland.

Picture: Shireen Al-Adeimi, a doctoral student at Harvard University who has launched a petition calling on the US government to end American support for Saudi-led airstrikes in Yemen. (Credit: PRI’s The World)

A Yemeni student in America urges US officials to end support for Saudi-led airstrikes.

Humanitarian Instinct2015012420150125 (WS)

A Syrian aid worker remains steadfast in her efforts, despite threats to her family

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We meet an activist-turned-aid worker from Homs, and learn about the perils of doing humanitarian work in Syria. And, we visit a US-funded housing development in Haiti called Village la Difference.

Plus, language barriers in Kenya and the effort by Translators without Borders to break those barriers down. Meals on wheels in India versus Meals on Wheels in America. And grabbing a latte at Meow Parlour, New York City’s very first cat café.

(Photo: A Syrian aid worker who asked that her identity not be revealed. Credit: PRI’s The World)

Humanitarian Instinct20150124

A Syrian aid worker remains steadfast in her efforts, despite threats to her family

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We meet an activist-turned-aid worker from Homs, and learn about the perils of doing humanitarian work in Syria. And, we visit a US-funded housing development in Haiti called Village la Difference.

Plus, language barriers in Kenya and the effort by Translators without Borders to break those barriers down. Meals on wheels in India versus Meals on Wheels in America. And grabbing a latte at Meow Parlour, New York City’s very first cat café.

(Photo: A Syrian aid worker who asked that her identity not be revealed. Credit: PRI’s The World)

I\u2019m on Your Team2017070820170709 (WS)

The US might never have gained its independence without help from Russia.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Russia, it turns out, accidentally helped the US win its independence.

Also: we meet two sisters who will go to the Olympics together but on competing teams; we remember when North and South Korea teamed up to beat China at table tennis; we go a few rounds with a boxer who’s inspiring young women in Jordan; we learn why an all-girl robotics team from Afghanistan is going to be competing virtually in a US competition; and we get the backstory to a popular baseball podcast hosted by three fans of the sport who also happen to be blind.

(Image: People watch fireworks as they celebrate US Independence Day on July 4, 2017 in Washington, DC. Credit: Brendan Smialowski/Getty

I\u2019m on Your Team2017070820170710 (WS)

The US might never have gained its independence without help from Russia.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Russia, it turns out, accidentally helped the US win its independence.

Also: we meet two sisters who will go to the Olympics together but on competing teams; we remember when North and South Korea teamed up to beat China at table tennis; we go a few rounds with a boxer who’s inspiring young women in Jordan; we learn why an all-girl robotics team from Afghanistan is going to be competing virtually in a US competition; and we get the backstory to a popular baseball podcast hosted by three fans of the sport who also happen to be blind.

(Image: People watch fireworks as they celebrate US Independence Day on July 4, 2017 in Washington, DC. Credit: Brendan Smialowski/Getty

I\u2019m on Your Team20170708

The US might never have gained its independence without help from Russia.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Russia, it turns out, accidentally helped the US win its independence.

Also: we meet two sisters who will go to the Olympics together but on competing teams; we remember when North and South Korea teamed up to beat China at table tennis; we go a few rounds with a boxer who’s inspiring young women in Jordan; we learn why an all-girl robotics team from Afghanistan is going to be competing virtually in a US competition; and we get the backstory to a popular baseball podcast hosted by three fans of the sport who also happen to be blind.

(Image: People watch fireworks as they celebrate US Independence Day on July 4, 2017 in Washington, DC. Credit: Brendan Smialowski/Getty

I’m On Your Team20170710

The US might never have gained its independence without help from Russia.

Russia, it turns out, accidentally helped the US win its independence.

Also: we meet two sisters who will go to the Olympics together but on competing teams; we remember when North and South Korea teamed up to beat China at table tennis; we go a few rounds with a boxer who’s inspiring young women in Jordan; we learn why an all-girl robotics team from Afghanistan is going to be competing virtually in a US competition; and we get the backstory to a popular baseball podcast hosted by three fans of the sport who also happen to be blind.

(Image: People watch fireworks as they celebrate US Independence Day on July 4, 2017 in Washington, DC. Credit: Brendan Smialowski/Getty

Icons and Artefacts2013121420131215 (WS)

When President Obama shook President Castro\u2019s hand was it premeditated, or just polite?

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

As President Obama arrived to deliver his eulogy at Nelson Mandela’s memorial service he shook the hand of the Cuban President, Raul Castro. The controversial moment threatened to overshadow coverage of the day in the US media. Was the seemingly friendly greeting between long-time foes premeditated, or was Mr Obama just being polite?

Also, we find out why the iconic American muscle car, the Ford Mustang, is going to be appearing in showrooms around the world and hear how iconic 20th Century American poet Robert Frost, came to fame while on a trip to Britain. And, we look at some other iconic artefacts: a set of Native American sacred face masks that are being returned to the Hopi tribe, thanks to some generous auction bidders, the Cyrus Cylinder which is wowing Iranian-Americans in California, and a rug woven by Armenian orphans that is too controversial to see, which is locked up in the White House.

(Photo: US President Barack Obama (L) shakes hands with Cuban President Raul Castro during the official memorial service for former South African President Nelson Mandela. Credit: Getty Images)

Icons and Artefacts20131214

When President Obama shook President Castro\u2019s hand was it premeditated, or just polite?

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

As President Obama arrived to deliver his eulogy at Nelson Mandela’s memorial service he shook the hand of the Cuban President, Raul Castro. The controversial moment threatened to overshadow coverage of the day in the US media. Was the seemingly friendly greeting between long-time foes premeditated, or was Mr Obama just being polite?

Also, we find out why the iconic American muscle car, the Ford Mustang, is going to be appearing in showrooms around the world and hear how iconic 20th Century American poet Robert Frost, came to fame while on a trip to Britain. And, we look at some other iconic artefacts: a set of Native American sacred face masks that are being returned to the Hopi tribe, thanks to some generous auction bidders, the Cyrus Cylinder which is wowing Iranian-Americans in California, and a rug woven by Armenian orphans that is too controversial to see, which is locked up in the White House.

(Photo: US President Barack Obama (L) shakes hands with Cuban President Raul Castro during the official memorial service for former South African President Nelson Mandela. Credit: Getty Images)

Identity Crisis20150822

A Mexican immigrant who works in a Trump hotel calls out \u2018The Donald\u2019.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump has laid out a controversial immigration plan that includes a call to end the principle that babies born in the US automatically qualify as citizens. We examine the origins and the effects of this principle, and we speak with Ricardo Aca— a Mexican immigrant who works at a Trump hotel.

Then, two Pakistani-American brothers from Minnesota explain why they created ‘Noor Kids’, a series of children's books intended for Muslim youth. The reporter Akiko Fujita retraces her grandfather’s uniquely Japanese-American past. And we mark the 100th anniversary of the US occupation of Haiti. Plus: Lipa Schmeltzer, the ‘Hasidic Lady Gaga’.

(Photo: Mexican football fans hold signs alluding to a June comment made by Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump. He said: ‘When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best... They’re sending people that have lots of problems…They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists. And some, I assume, are good people’. Credit: Ricardo Aca)

Identity Crisis20150822

Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump has laid out a controversial immigration plan that includes a call to end the principle that babies born in the US automatically qualify as citizens. We examine the origins and the effects of this principle, and we speak with Ricardo Aca— a Mexican immigrant who works at a Trump hotel.

Then, two Pakistani-American brothers from Minnesota explain why they created ‘Noor Kids’, a series of children's books intended for Muslim youth. The reporter Akiko Fujita retraces her grandfather’s uniquely Japanese-American past. And we mark the 100th anniversary of the US occupation of Haiti. Plus: Lipa Schmeltzer, the ‘Hasidic Lady Gaga’.

(Photo: Mexican football fans hold signs alluding to a June comment made by Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump. He said: ‘When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best... They’re sending people that have lots of problems…They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists. And some, I assume, are good people’. Credit: Ricardo Aca)

A Mexican immigrant who works in a Trump hotel calls out ‘The Donald’.

Immigrant Faces2014020120140202 (WS)

Why foreign video-gamers now have the same rights as professional athletes in the US

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Customs officials grant foreign video gamers the same rights to live and work in the United States as professional athletes from other countries. Meanwhile, the governor of the US state of Michigan tries to recruit 50,000 talented immigrants in an effort to boost the economy. An American man who fled civil war in Sudan as a child tells how he was transported back to that nightmare when he returned to South Sudan recently. And, the first Hmong-American to become a judge describes how he used to tell people he was Chinese because he was ashamed of his background. Plus, the California artist highlighting America’s unskilled immigrant work force.

(Photo: Kim Dong Hwan, a South Korean professional StarCraft2 gamer who goes by 'viOLet' in the gaming community wins first place at the Intel Extreme Masters 2012 gaming competition in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Credit: Electronic Sports League)

Immigrant Faces20140201

Why foreign video-gamers now have the same rights as professional athletes in the US

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Customs officials grant foreign video gamers the same rights to live and work in the United States as professional athletes from other countries. Meanwhile, the governor of the US state of Michigan tries to recruit 50,000 talented immigrants in an effort to boost the economy. An American man who fled civil war in Sudan as a child tells how he was transported back to that nightmare when he returned to South Sudan recently. And, the first Hmong-American to become a judge describes how he used to tell people he was Chinese because he was ashamed of his background. Plus, the California artist highlighting America’s unskilled immigrant work force.

(Photo: Kim Dong Hwan, a South Korean professional StarCraft2 gamer who goes by 'viOLet' in the gaming community wins first place at the Intel Extreme Masters 2012 gaming competition in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Credit: Electronic Sports League)

Immigration Crisis2014070520140706 (WS)

Central American exodus, as desperate parents send their children across the US border

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

An immigration crisis in the United States, as child migrants from Central America flood to the US-Mexico border. We look at why so many kids are making the perilous journey, and why their parents are staying behind. And, we hear what happens when a small US church offers sanctuary to undocumented immigrants. Also in this edition, we get reactions to a court ruling in Chile implicating US intelligence services in the 1973 murder of American journalist Charles Horman. And we consider a Scottish chef’s case for Americans to reconsider haggis.

(Photo: An advertisement from the government of El Salvador. It states "They say there are not that many people on the train with you." The country is working with the United Nation's Population Fund to create a campaign to encourage Salvadorians, especially youths, to be conscious of the dangers of migrating to the US.)

Immigration Crisis20140705

Central American exodus, as desperate parents send their children across the US border

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

An immigration crisis in the United States, as child migrants from Central America flood to the US-Mexico border. We look at why so many kids are making the perilous journey, and why their parents are staying behind. And, we hear what happens when a small US church offers sanctuary to undocumented immigrants. Also in this edition, we get reactions to a court ruling in Chile implicating US intelligence services in the 1973 murder of American journalist Charles Horman. And we consider a Scottish chef’s case for Americans to reconsider haggis.

(Photo: An advertisement from the government of El Salvador. It states "They say there are not that many people on the train with you." The country is working with the United Nation's Population Fund to create a campaign to encourage Salvadorians, especially youths, to be conscious of the dangers of migrating to the US.)

In A Day\u2019s Work2016062520160626 (WS)

Puerto Rico may be in debt, but Puerto Ricans don't want to give up their independence.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We visit San Juan, where one man thinks that the plan proposed by US Congress to address the debt crisis, “treats Puerto Rico like a colony.”

Then, we go to Lebanon where a Syrian refugee teaches Arabic over the internet. And we hear from an Arabic student who's been studying the language for 25 years.

Plus, we meet a Yemeni beekeeper preserving his country's traditions, an artist who enlisted in the Marines to make better art, and an Egyptian jukebox repairman boogying to Elvis Presley.

Image: The central market in the Santurce neighborhood of San Juan is a popular gathering spot for people to talk about politics after work. (Credit: PRI’s The World)

In A Day\u2019s Work20160625

Puerto Rico may be in debt, but Puerto Ricans don't want to give up their independence.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We visit San Juan, where one man thinks that the plan proposed by US Congress to address the debt crisis, “treats Puerto Rico like a colony.”

Then, we go to Lebanon where a Syrian refugee teaches Arabic over the internet. And we hear from an Arabic student who's been studying the language for 25 years.

Plus, we meet a Yemeni beekeeper preserving his country's traditions, an artist who enlisted in the Marines to make better art, and an Egyptian jukebox repairman boogying to Elvis Presley.

Image: The central market in the Santurce neighborhood of San Juan is a popular gathering spot for people to talk about politics after work. (Credit: PRI’s The World)

In A Day’s Work2016062520160626 (WS)
20160627 (WS)

We visit San Juan, where one man thinks that the plan proposed by US Congress to address the debt crisis, “treats Puerto Rico like a colony.?

Then, we go to Lebanon where a Syrian refugee teaches Arabic over the internet. And we hear from an Arabic student who's been studying the language for 25 years.

Plus, we meet a Yemeni beekeeper preserving his country's traditions, an artist who enlisted in the Marines to make better art, and an Egyptian jukebox repairman boogying to Elvis Presley.

Image: The central market in the Santurce neighborhood of San Juan is a popular gathering spot for people to talk about politics after work. (Credit: PRI’s The World)

Puerto Rico may be in debt, but Puerto Ricans don't want to give up their independence.

In Limbo2017090920170910 (WS)

The US is the only home they\u2019ve ever known. But now the \u2018Dreamers\u2019 fear being deported.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

President Trump is scrapping a programme that protects hundreds of thousands of young unauthorised immigrants. We hear two different perspectives on this decision.

Plus; we meet an immigrant from Northern Ireland whose troubled past is haunting his future; we learn why some evangelical Christians are speaking out against the President; we find out about a proposal from Canadian Senator Ratna Omidvar for Canada to open its doors to DACA recipients; plus we visit Quebec where immigrants fearing Trump are pouring in.

(Image: Julio Ramos is a medical school student and a DACA recipient in New York City. Credit: Reynaldo Leanos Jr.)

In Limbo2017090920170911 (WS)

The US is the only home they\u2019ve ever known. But now the \u2018Dreamers\u2019 fear being deported.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

President Trump is scrapping a programme that protects hundreds of thousands of young unauthorised immigrants. We hear two different perspectives on this decision.

Plus; we meet an immigrant from Northern Ireland whose troubled past is haunting his future; we learn why some evangelical Christians are speaking out against the President; we find out about a proposal from Canadian Senator Ratna Omidvar for Canada to open its doors to DACA recipients; plus we visit Quebec where immigrants fearing Trump are pouring in.

(Image: Julio Ramos is a medical school student and a DACA recipient in New York City. Credit: Reynaldo Leanos Jr.)

In Limbo20170909

The US is the only home they\u2019ve ever known. But now the \u2018Dreamers\u2019 fear being deported.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

President Trump is scrapping a programme that protects hundreds of thousands of young unauthorised immigrants. We hear two different perspectives on this decision.

Plus; we meet an immigrant from Northern Ireland whose troubled past is haunting his future; we learn why some evangelical Christians are speaking out against the President; we find out about a proposal from Canadian Senator Ratna Omidvar for Canada to open its doors to DACA recipients; plus we visit Quebec where immigrants fearing Trump are pouring in.

(Image: Julio Ramos is a medical school student and a DACA recipient in New York City. Credit: Reynaldo Leanos Jr.)

In Limbo20170911

The US is the only home they’ve ever known. But now the ‘Dreamers’ fear being deported.

President Trump is scrapping a programme that protects hundreds of thousands of young unauthorised immigrants. We hear two different perspectives on this decision.

Plus; we meet an immigrant from Northern Ireland whose troubled past is haunting his future; we learn why some evangelical Christians are speaking out against the President; we find out about a proposal from Canadian Senator Ratna Omidvar for Canada to open its doors to DACA recipients; plus we visit Quebec where immigrants fearing Trump are pouring in.

(Image: Julio Ramos is a medical school student and a DACA recipient in New York City. Credit: Reynaldo Leanos Jr.)

In Other Words2014122720141228 (WS)

How the Nuremberg Trials changed interpretation forever

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We find out what it takes to be a simultaneous interpreter. A foreign correspondent and his translator tell us how their relationship is about more than words. And the people who write film subtitles reveal the challenges of their craft.

Also, the linguist Dan Jarafsky tells us why American restaurants call a main course ‘the entrée’. And we leaf through the pages of the Dictionary of Untranslatables.

In Other Words20141227

How the Nuremberg Trials changed interpretation forever

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We find out what it takes to be a simultaneous interpreter. A foreign correspondent and his translator tell us how their relationship is about more than words. And the people who write film subtitles reveal the challenges of their craft.

Also, the linguist Dan Jarafsky tells us why American restaurants call a main course ‘the entrée’. And we leaf through the pages of the Dictionary of Untranslatables.

In Search of Solutions20150411

The city of Boston reacts to the conviction of Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

We hear reflections on the Boston Marathon bombing verdict from Juliette Kayyem, a Boston resident and former assistant secretary of homeland security. Then, a Somali-American activist tells us the tragic tale of his nephew - a 17-year-old honours student who left his Minnesota home to join al-Shabab. Also, we meet ‘Average Mohamed’, a petrol station manager who is using cartoons to fight Islamic State recruitment.

Plus, the US Secretary of Energy tells us about something he has in common with his Iranian counterpart and its role in securing the Iranian nuclear deal. We hear about the plot to overthrow North Korea’s leadership, one American sitcom at a time. And, we find out what happens when North Korean students watch ‘Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban’.

(Photo: A courtroom sketch shows prosecutor Aloke Chakravarty addressing the Boston Marathon bombing jury as Dzhokhar Tsarnaev sits nearby. Credit: Reuters/ Jane Flavell Collins)

In Times of Crisis2014091320140914 (WS)

Assessing American leadership in a troubled world

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

It is all crisis for US foreign policy right now. We find out how the United States is doing in these troubled times. Also, we learn why friends of executed journalist Steven Sotloff worked hard to scrub any mention of his Jewish identity from the web. And, we learn how polices in a post-9/11 America gave rise to the militarisation of US police forces. Also in this edition, we hear the remarkable story of a California rancher who hopes to provide sanctuary for an Eritrean torture survivor she read about online. Plus, we meet the African immigrants stepping into the political spotlight in the state of Colorado. And, we listen to the rhymes of an Afro-Latin hip hop duo gaining popularity here in the States.

(Photo: President Barack Obama delivers a prime time address vowing to target the Islamic State with air strikes. Credit:Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

In Times of Crisis20140913

Assessing American leadership in a troubled world

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

It is all crisis for US foreign policy right now. We find out how the United States is doing in these troubled times. Also, we learn why friends of executed journalist Steven Sotloff worked hard to scrub any mention of his Jewish identity from the web. And, we learn how polices in a post-9/11 America gave rise to the militarisation of US police forces. Also in this edition, we hear the remarkable story of a California rancher who hopes to provide sanctuary for an Eritrean torture survivor she read about online. Plus, we meet the African immigrants stepping into the political spotlight in the state of Colorado. And, we listen to the rhymes of an Afro-Latin hip hop duo gaining popularity here in the States.

(Photo: President Barack Obama delivers a prime time address vowing to target the Islamic State with air strikes. Credit:Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images)

India\u2019s Gender Troubles2013011220130113 (WS)

Indian-Americans on the treatment of women, welcoming Chinese tourists, and \u201cwar dogs\u201d

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the recent gang rape and murder of a young woman in India is resonating with Indian-Americans in the US.

Also, American businesses try to attract more Chinese tourists with a bigger welcome mat, and we hear about the special bond between military dogs and their handlers in war zones.

Image: A protest about women's rights in India in London

India\u2019s Gender Troubles20130112

Indian-Americans on the treatment of women, welcoming Chinese tourists, and \u201cwar dogs\u201d

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

How the recent gang rape and murder of a young woman in India is resonating with Indian-Americans in the US.

Also, American businesses try to attract more Chinese tourists with a bigger welcome mat, and we hear about the special bond between military dogs and their handlers in war zones.

Image: A protest about women's rights in India in London

India’s Gender Troubles2013011220130113 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Inside the Box2018050520180506 (WS)

Braces from home: The next stage in global dental care?

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

As traditional business models continue to break down, entrepreneurs have their sights on one more area to disrupt: traditional orthodontics.

Also: biodegradable six-pack holders finally go on the market; a former ambassador tells us what's in a diplomatic pouch; the French consider adopting 'le doggy bag' for restaurant leftovers; we ride along with 23 greyhounds across the US/Mexico border; and composer Idan Raichel performs a song for us using an assortment of improvised musical instruments.

(Image: Candid Co. sends customers a kit to take impressions of their teeth from home. An orthodontist then remotely comes up with a treatment plan. Credit: Candid Co.)

Inside the Box20180505

Braces from home: The next stage in global dental care?

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

As traditional business models continue to break down, entrepreneurs have their sights on one more area to disrupt: traditional orthodontics.

Also: biodegradable six-pack holders finally go on the market; a former ambassador tells us what's in a diplomatic pouch; the French consider adopting 'le doggy bag' for restaurant leftovers; we ride along with 23 greyhounds across the US/Mexico border; and composer Idan Raichel performs a song for us using an assortment of improvised musical instruments.

(Image: Candid Co. sends customers a kit to take impressions of their teeth from home. An orthodontist then remotely comes up with a treatment plan. Credit: Candid Co.)

Inside The Box2018050520180506 (WS)

Braces from home: The next stage in global dental care?

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

As traditional business models continue to break down, entrepreneurs have their sights on one more area to disrupt: traditional orthodontics.

Also: biodegradable six-pack holders finally go on the market; a former ambassador tells us what's in a diplomatic pouch; the French consider adopting 'le doggy bag' for restaurant leftovers; we ride along with 23 greyhounds across the US/Mexico border; and composer Idan Raichel performs a song for us using an assortment of improvised musical instruments.

(Image: Candid Co. sends customers a kit to take impressions of their teeth from home. An orthodontist then remotely comes up with a treatment plan. Credit: Candid Co.)

Iraq: 'like A Bad Relationship'2014062120140622 (WS)

With parts of Iraq that US troops once fought to defend now in the hands of Islamist militants, one US soldier who saw combat there tells us what he thinks America’s responsibility is now. We hear what's behind America’s longstanding suspicion of beards, how a tiny wasp from Pakistan might be able to save the US citrus industry and how group prenatal care is becoming more popular across America, leading to healthier babies.

Also, we hear why Americans call football soccer and we find out why legendary Top 40 DJ Casey Kasem is also a hero for Arab-Americans.

Image: Getty

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Iraq: 'Like a Bad Relationship'2014062120140622 (WS)

An American soldier who fought in Iraq wonders what his efforts mean now

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

With parts of Iraq that US troops once fought to defend now in the hands of Islamist militants, one US soldier who saw combat there tells us what he thinks America’s responsibility is now. We hear what's behind America’s longstanding suspicion of beards, how a tiny wasp from Pakistan might be able to save the US citrus industry and how group prenatal care is becoming more popular across America, leading to healthier babies.

Also, we hear why Americans call football soccer and we find out why legendary Top 40 DJ Casey Kasem is also a hero for Arab-Americans.

Image: Getty

Iraq: 'Like a Bad Relationship'20140621

An American soldier who fought in Iraq wonders what his efforts mean now

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

With parts of Iraq that US troops once fought to defend now in the hands of Islamist militants, one US soldier who saw combat there tells us what he thinks America’s responsibility is now. We hear what's behind America’s longstanding suspicion of beards, how a tiny wasp from Pakistan might be able to save the US citrus industry and how group prenatal care is becoming more popular across America, leading to healthier babies.

Also, we hear why Americans call football soccer and we find out why legendary Top 40 DJ Casey Kasem is also a hero for Arab-Americans.

Image: Getty

Is It Safe?2017071520170716 (WS)

An American relief worker brings his wife and children to Mosul.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

David Eubank, an American relief worker, decides to bring his whole family with him to Mosul.

Also: Choi Seong-guk, a North Korean refugee, draws a popular online comic strip series about his defection; presenter Marco Werman joins the US Coast Guard on patrol; scientist Milo Nordyke remembers a time when the US government tried to use a nuclear bomb as a bulldozer; and Mexican-American musician Lila Downs dedicates her latest album to “dangerous’’ women.

(Image: Smoke plumes billow in Mosul on July 10, 2017. Credit: Fadel Senna/AFP/Getty Images)

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