Boston Calling [world Service]

Episodes

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20120922
2012102020121021 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2012110320121104 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

20121110

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2012120820121209 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2012121520121216 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2012122920121230 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013020220130203 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013020920130210 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013022320130224 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013030920130310 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013031620130317 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013041320130415 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013042720130428 (WS)
20130429 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013051120130513 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013051820130519 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013052520130527 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013060120130603 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013060820130610 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013070620130708 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

20130713

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013072720130729 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013080320130805 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013081020130812 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013081720130819 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013092820130930 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013113020131201 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013120720131208 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013121420131215 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2013122120131222 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2014010420140105 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2014011120140112 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2014011820140119 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2014020120140202 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2014020820140209 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2014021520140216 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2014022220140223 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2014032220140323 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2014032920140330 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2014040520140406 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2014041220140413 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2014050320140504 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2014051720140518 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2014061420140615 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2014062820140629 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2014070520140706 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2014071920140720 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2014081620140817 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2014090620140907 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2014091320140914 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2014092020140921 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2014101820141019 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

2014110120141102 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

20161203

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

20170107
20170128
20170204
20170211
20170225
20170304
20170318
01/10/2016 Gmt2016100120161002 (WS)
20161003 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

08/10/2016 Gmt2016100820161009 (WS)
20161010 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

10/12/2016 Gmt20161210
12/11/2016 Gmt20161112
13/10/201220121014
17/12/2016 Gmt20161217

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

19/11/2016 Gmt20161119
22/10/2016 Gmt20161022
22/12/201220121223
24/12/2016 Gmt20161224
29/09/201220120930
A Question Of Time2016081320160814 (WS)
20160815 (WS)

Some refugees, stuck in camps in Greece, are considering returning home

Conditions are so bad in refugee camps in Greece, some refugees are considering returning to the war torn countries they came from.

Also on the programme, residents of a disappearing island speak up; a former Pentagon official describes one moment that changed how she thinks about drones; a slam poet from Sudan shares her poetry; and a Silicon Valley entrepreneur thinks manufactured diamonds might replace real ones. Plus, some new emojis right some wrongs when it comes to gender equality.

Picture: A boy sits on a bus as he waits to be transferred to a refugee reception centre in Greece, Credit: Yannis Kolesidis/AFP/Getty Images

A Us Marine’s Iraq War Diary2013032320130324 (WS)

Tim McLaughlin's writings about the 2003 invasion of Iraq anchor a New York exhibit.

A US Marine's Iraq war diary goes on display in New York City; why there are more international journalists covering the Bradley Manning whistle-blower trial than Americans; Muscovites give American action film star Steven Seagal a big Russian welcome and marrying by proxy.

(Image: An armed US Marine with night vision goggles, in silhouette on night patrol in Iraq. Credit: Getty Images)

A Us Retailer Fights Off A Canadian Pirate2013062220130624 (WS)

A small shop in Canada is reselling goods from popular US store in, Trader Joe's

Aleppo's Ancient Souk20121014

Aleppo’s ancient souk, a Norwegian statesman's rock ballad and brave New York foodies.

This week, we tour Aleppo’s ancient souk.

Also, Norwegian statesman Jan Egeland gets his own rock ballad.

Plus, some Bostonians try to lift Indian kids out of poverty.

And we have the story of some New Yorkers who will tuck into any type of food - even duck embryo.

(Image: Shops are shuttered in the souk in the old city of Aleppo. Credit: MIGUEL MEDINA/AFP/GettyImages)

America’s Domestic Drones2013012620130127 (WS)

How unmanned aerial vehicles used for overseas missions are watching Americans at home

How unmanned aerial vehicles used for overseas missions are also tracking Americans at home.

Also, immigrant rights campaigners in Texas see an opportunity in President Obama's second term. And help comes to domestic abuse victims in California's South-Asian community.

(Image: A drone, Credit: Getty Images)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

America's Reliance On Drone Warfare2013050420130506 (WS)

US Senators meet a Yemeni man whose village was targeted by a drone

Yemenis question America's reliance on drone warfare: US Senators meet a Yemeni man whose village was targeted by a drone, and a made-up drone strike in Massachusetts goes viral in Pakistan.

Also, a reluctant fundamentalist jumps from book form to the big screen, and helping Mexican entrepreneurs get a leg up in the US market.

(Image: Air hangar and a drone, Credit: Getty Images)

An Act Of Faith20161015

Two Americans in Lebanon on a mission from God to teach Syrian refugee children

Two Texan missionaries built a school for refugees in Lebanon. But it’s unclear if they understand the risks.

Also: A Muslim doctor recalls when a patient refused to let him to treat her; ultra-Orthodox Israeli newspaper editors struggle to cover the US presidential race without printing pictures of women; writer Sabaa Tahir explains her vision of afterlife; and we learn about an ancient religion you've probably never heard of. Lastly, a Jewish family in New York sacrifices their first chicken.

(A woman walks past graffiti depicting a cross and reading 'we are here' in a Christian dominated suburb east of the Lebanese capital Beirut. Credit: Patrick Baz/AFP/Getty Images)

An Iraqi-american Family’s Sanctions Nightmare2013010520130106 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Assumptions... Assumptions20151114

The journalist Gary Younge tells us how his exposure to racism in the US changed his view on the world. Then we hear why activists for India's Dalits are taking cues from the Black Lives Matter movement. And the essayist Deepak Singh recalls the excruciating moments watching TV with his family in India when a condom ad would come on the screen.

Also: how a Latina with red hair and a Jewish last name challenges ideas about identity. We ask whether Orthodox Jewish women can become rabbis. And we meet a rising star on the Mexican music scene— El Compa Negro.

(Photo: Protesters gather at Union Square in New York City on April 2015. Credit: Getty Images)

America has no monopoly on racism, it's just 'more lethal'

Between 'immigrant' And 'citizen'2013112320131124 (WS)

A play about illegal immigrants in the US tries to humanise the immigration reform debate

How a play about the struggles of illegal immigrant youths in the United States is trying to humanise the national debate over immigration reform. We hear from the author of Citizenship: American Identity after Globalization about how the value placed on US citizenship has changed through the years.

Also, how Filipinos in the US who already send a lot of aid back home are trying to do more in the wake of Typhoon Haiyan. An American architect’s ambitious vision for a new public park in Russia’s capital moves ahead. And, what Fidel Castro said when he heard that President John F Kennedy had been shot in Dallas 50 years ago this week.

(Picture: The play Just Like Us follows four young immigrants from Mexico and looks at how their legal status impacts their futures, Credit: Jennifer M Koskinen, all rights reserved by Denver Center Theater Company)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Border Patrol2013092120130923 (WS)

A cat-and-mouse game intensifies with US Border Patrol as illegal crossings rise in Texas

Boston Goes To Hollywood20160213

We meet the American woman teaching US actors how to improve their African accents, and we hear why #OscarsSoWhite isn't very Latino. We look at the bicultural LA bakery that is breaking one of the unwritten rules of business. And, we speak to the Colombian film-maker behind the first feature shot in the Amazon rainforest in more than 30 years. We find out why American film studios are making more foreign movies specifically for foreign audiences. Plus, we remember Mary Fiumara, an icon of Boston's Little Italy.

(Photo: Actor Will Smith attends the Concussion premiere in New York, 2015. Credit: Mike Coppola/Getty Images)

Teaching American actors how to sound authentically African

Boston Marathon Bombing2013042020130421 (WS)

Views on the Boston Marathon bombings from some of the race's international runners, as well (should probably just be "and") war correspondents compare the scene in Boston to some of the worst they've witnessed. Also on the programme, praising tourniquets and an amputee marathon competitor offers hope to those injured in the attack.

(Image: A Boston police officer and floral tributes, Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

Boston Uncommon2014041920140420 (WS)

It’s been a year since the Boston Marathon bombings. As the city gears up for this year’s race, we hear from some of the people who’ll be on the course. One - an experienced runner and trauma surgeon - treated victims in last year’s blast. The second is an Iraqi diplomat who’ll be running to show solidarity with terrorism victims the world over.

Also in this edition, how the adopted hometown of the alleged bombing suspects is coming to terms with the events of last April. And the new generation of robots that are being deployed to protect high-profile sporting events like the Boston Marathon.

Picture: A man observes the Dear Boston exhibit at the Boston Public Library. The exhibit pays homage to the victims of last year’s Boston Marathon bombing, the survivors, and the resilience of Boston and the world of runners who consider this city their home, too.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Bridging The Divide20151219

A pastor and an imam 'programmed to hate one another' tell us how they bridged a religious divide and offer advice for Americans divided by faith and fear. Then we meet Bajhat Abdulwahed, a face familiar to many Iraqis but few Philadelphians. And we hear why Muslim women in America are being advised to ‘keep a baseball cap handy in the car’.

Plus, the dual life of a Somali-American teenager. And we ask: will hipsters erase the distinctive street art of Miami's Little Haiti?

(Photo: In decades past, Nigerian Imam Muhammad Ashafa (right) and Pastor James Wuye were leaders of militias that battled one another. Credit: PRI’s The World)

A pastor and an imam 'programmed to hate one another' bridge a religious divide.

Call Of The Wild2016070920160710 (WS)
20160711 (WS)

We speak to a Latino activist about why most of the visitors to US national parks are white and how that is not good for the future of the parks. We visit the largest naval base in the world, which is threatened by rising sea levels. Next, we visit the American south-west where some have to travel 20 miles for clean water.

Also, we search for what may be the world's most valuable fish, go undercover to find out where our old electronics end up, and overhear a group of Andean women sing in the back of an Inca temple on Machu Picchu.

(Photo: Tourists watch the The Old Faithful geyser at the Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. Credit: Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images)

Most US national park visitors are white. Some Latinos say they feel unwelcome

Change Of Plan20151010

Over the past decade, the US has poured billions of dollars into training and equipping foreign armies and rebels, from Iraq to Afghanistan to Syria. But this strategy has yet to prove a success, and we ask a former US Army officer why this is the case. Plus, how the Obama administration’s plan to increase the number of migrants the US takes in could be a boon for local businesses. And, the 'home' away from home that is helping young Haitians in Boston cope with the trauma of the 2010 earthquake.

Also, how Bolivia reframed the conversation about coca leaves, and took on the US Drug Enforcement Administration. Remembering the life of civil rights activist Grace Lee Boggs. And, how the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 changed America and seeded today's immigration debate.

(Photo: US Army paratroopers manoeuvre through a hallway as part of squad level training at Camp Taji, Iraq. Credit: US Army)

Is the US training and equipping of foreign armies and rebels money well spent?

Chinese Characters2014042620140427 (WS)

Why workers who make American-brand footwear in China have walked off the job

We hear why some Chinese factory workers who make American-brand footwear are demanding more money and better treatment by their bosses. And, how American-style graffiti is allowed to thrive on the concrete walls of Beijing. Plus, what China can learn from America when it comes to building skyscrapers. The Chinese-American re-enactor taking on the British at the Battle of Lexington. We meet an American man who goes hunting for a Chinese name, and learn why more and more Chinese are adopting American-sounding names like 'Tom' and 'Cinderella'.

(Photo: Nike shoes displayed at an outlet in Jakarta. Credit: Adek Berry/AFP/Getty Images)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

'closed Until Further Notice'2013100520131007 (WS)

Both tourists and refugees in the US are feeling the impact of the government shutdown

Parts of the US government closed down this week when Congress failed to pass a new budget. We find out how the closures are affecting both tourists and refugees in the US. We also hear from a long-time American correspondent in East Asia who returns home to find the air cleaner and the crowds smaller than what she had grown accustomed to. Also, America’s relationship with Brazil takes a turn for the worse. And, how some immigrant actors in the US find that their accents have become assets when pursuing certain roles.

(Photo: The USS Constitution in Boston closed until further notice. Credit: Emily Files)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Collective Action2014092720140928 (WS)

The Russian punk rock collective Pussy Riot comes to Boston

The Russian punk performance art activists Pussy Riot comes to Boston. We chat with two of its members about Vladimir Putin, prison, and fugitive US intelligence analyst Edward Snowden. Plus, we learn why the United States and Europe are so far apart on climate policy. And, we meet two young Central American migrants who are facing a new challenge—starting school in the US. Also on this edition, we look at the push to get Muslim holidays on the school calendar in New York City. We hear from the American puppeteers who received a standing ovation in Tehran. And, we have a review the Ig Nobel Cookbook, Volume I.

(Photo: Nadezhda Tolokonnikova (left) and Maria Alyokhina. Courtesy of Pussy Riot)

Comfort Zone20150829

Subhi Nahas never felt safe as a gay man in Syria — and then IS took over his hometown.

Subhi Nahas fled the Syrian city of Idlib when Islamist militants started killing gay men there. Now he’s become one of the first people ever to address the UN Security Council on LGBT persecution. Meanwhile, Pope Francis prepares for a trip to the US– where gay rights activists hope to meet with him.

Then, we travel to Antarctica to hear how culinary creativity keeps up morale in the long winter months. Plus, the search for a cross-cultural dish made from a pinch of India, a spoonful of China, and a dollop of America. And researchers debut a flying robot called ‘Snotbot’ that helps scientists study whales.

(Photo: Subhi Nahas, a refugee from the Syrian city of Idlib. Credit: Furkan Hancioglu)

Coming Of Age2016090320160904 (WS)
20160905 (WS)

When she was six, her bus was stopped by armed Colombian rebels. Now, she’s learned that the conflict there might finally be over.

Also on the programme, two stories about life-changing summer jobs. Presenter Marco Werman tries breadfruit for the first time, not entirely by choice. Somali-American teens explain why the Black Lives Matter movement speaks to them, too. And Aki Kumar explains why he gave up his dream to be bigger than Bill Gates, for the blues.

The conflict in Colombia began before she was born. But it has affected her personally.

Coming To Terms2014101120141012 (WS)

The first person to be diagnosed with Ebola in the United States has died. Now, at least one African immigrant is finding herself on the defensive. We meet the young Liberian-American, and learn how she is trying to remain focused on the crisis back home.

Also on this edition, another immigrant recalls some early fashion lessons from her teenage class-mates. And, we hear from our listeners about whether the world is actually becoming a more peaceful place. Plus, a trip to Alcatraz Island to tour an unprecedented new exhibit by the Chinese artist Ai Weiwei. We learn how English became the language of science. And, from the Beyonce horse fly to the George Bush beetle, we find out how new species get their familiar names.

(Photo: Congregants at the Friends in Jesus African International Church, Sacramento, California. The church caters to the city's large Liberian-American community. Credit: Joe Rubin)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Compare And Contrast20151031

We take a closer look at the Iran nuclear deal, which has just officially gone into effect. Then, we talk with an American photographer who was astonished to find his photo in IS propaganda. And: you may not know it, but if you speak Spanish, you actually speak some Arabic too.

Plus: Italians see something familiar in Donald Trump's presidential campaign. We visit a school in Virginia that teaches Korean dads 'how to hug'. And we get a taste of the small, but mighty, soul music scene in Finland.

Image: Men work inside a uranium conversion facility just outside the Iranian city of Isfahan, March 2005. (Credit: Getty Images)

Iran starts to dismantle its nuclear infrastructure as part of an agreement with the West

Confronting A Sexual Harasser2013111620131117 (WS)

An American reporter living in Egypt says that after being sexually harassed on the streets of Cairo day after day, she’d had enough. Find out what happens when she asks one of her harassers for an interview. Also, Marvel Comics unveils its first Muslim superhero – the Pakistani-American Miss Marvel. A tech support worker in the Philippines who answers help requests from abroad finds something to laugh about in the wake of Typhoon Haiyan. A young, Asian-American woman embraces the cultural tradition of multi-generational living. And, tragedy strikes the members of an Iranian rock band in New York City.

An American reporter living in Egypt turns her microphone on a man who calls her 'Sugar'

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Corporate Diplomacy20151017

After battling the so-called Islamic State, Kurds find a new foe in Facebook

A Kurdish activist in Stockholm runs a popular Facebook page devoted to saving the Syrian city of Kobane from Islamic State militants. But the page is under attack from Facebook administrators. We find out why Facebook targets the Kurds, and hear how the social media giant determines what is appropriate to publish.

Also, the Volkswagen scandal as seen from an American dealer's point of view. We look at a new industry popping up in Guatemala that employs ‘searchers’ to connect adopted children with their birth parents. And we meet Christian Ray Flores, the man who supplied the soundtrack for Boris Yeltsin's Rock the Vote.

(Photo: The ‘Save Kobane’ Facebook page. Facebook routinely takes down its posts. Credit: Christopher Livesay)

Cream Of The Crop20161217

China is building its own replica of an Iowa corn farm

Grant Kimberley is a corn farmer in Iowa. The Chinese government is building a replica of his farm and his entire Midwestern town.

Plus, what some farm workers have to fear from a Trump presidency; why one hospital is training farm workers to also work as medical interpreters; how the history of Islamic Studies in the US began with a man falling off a donkey; and how one woman reconnected with her birth country through vegetables. Finally, we meet the world's most precious chicken.

(Image: A blue ribbon is displayed next to a display of ears of corn at the Iowa State Fair in Des Moines, Iowa. Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Detroit: Our Problem, Your Problem2013101220131014 (WS)

European banks dig in their heels over the largest municipal bankruptcy in US history

Detroit made history in July when it became the largest US city ever to declare bankruptcy. We hear why some European banks are now digging in their heels over the city’s drive to solvency. Also, we find out about the hardships faced by some migrants who sneak across the US/Mexico border after being picked up by the US border patrol. We meet a Somali-American imam in Minnesota who is determined to counter any extremist views being perpetuated in his community. And, words of warning for Americans who like to help those who are less fortunate - you may be doing more harm than good.

(Photo: The word 'Bankruptcy' is painted on the side of a vacant building on Grand River Avenue in Detroit, by street artists as a statement on the financial affairs of the city. Credit: Reuters)

Disunited States Of America2016071620160717 (WS)
20160718 (WS)

"I saw my brother in these boys. I saw my son in these boys.?

First, we talk to an activist speaking out against violence towards blacks in America. Then, we hear how the story of one police shooting in San Francisco has been turned into a stage play.

Next, we learn why the Bahamas issued a travel advisory to the US. Also, we hear about the perils of "walking while black" in New York City. Plus, a daughter figures out how to talk to her father about race for the first time.

We end the show with “American Tune,’’ a posthumous release by the New Orleans musician Allen Toussaint.

"I saw my brother in these boys. I saw my son in these boys,? Why one activist spoke out

Do The Right Thing2016052120160522 (WS)
20160523 (WS)

We speak with Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy, who is advocating on behalf of Syrian refugees as other American politicians try to turn them away. Then, we sit in on a cooking class that teaches people in Boston how to eat healthier with traditional African dishes. And, the US wants to give peanuts to malnourished kids in Haiti — we find out why that idea is so controversial.

Plus: a US army officer sues President Obama over the legality of the war against Islamic State; Italy’s most prominent transgender politician weighs in on North Carolina’s controversial ‘bathroom bill’; and a Sudanese human rights activist finds inspiration in America's civil rights movement.

Image: A refugee mother and son from the Syrian town of Kobani walk beside their tent in a camp in Sanliurfa, Turkey. October 19, 2014. (Credit: Gokhan Sahin/Getty Images)

A US governor advocates on behalf of Syrian refugees as other politicians turn them away

Face Your Fears2016102920161030 (WS)

How Donald Trump's anti-immigration rhetoric divided a city

Donald Trump's anti-immigration rhetoric has riled up one Massachusetts town. "It brought things to a head out here," says a Brockton city councillor, "people are going nuts."

Also on the programme: Canadians launch a campaign to tell Americans that they’re great; Zahra Noorbakhsh, a Muslim comedian, comes out as bisexual; and writer Deepak Singh returns to India and realizes that there is an aspect of life there he had forgotten about. Plus, we visit haunted places all over the world.

(Image: Craig Pina worries about Donald Trump cutting off funding to his city. Credit: Gabriela Saldivia)

Family Ties2016072320160724 (WS)
20160725 (WS)

Does voting make a difference? We speak to two immigrants to the US. One is planning to vote this year. The other is not. They both explain why.

Also, a writer with something to reveal about her father; a Liberian refugee who feels safer in Liberia than in the US, and a visit to an American summer camp where the campers speak Russian. Plus, a chestnut pastry recipe so good it changed one woman’s life.

With special guest, Marjolijn deJager, host Marco Werman’s mum.

(Photo: Daniel Gross with his mother in Singapore, courtesy of Daniel Gross)

A mother tells her son why she’s choosing not to vote this year

Fifteen Minutes Of Fame2016091720160918 (WS)
20160919 (WS)

A 10-year-old girl makes her pitch to Western powers for peace in Yemen

"When my birthday comes, my wish is that war stops." A 10-year-old girl in Yemen pleads for peace. Also, how much information do politicians owe us about their personal lives? Will Ultimate Frisbee become an Olympic sport?

Plus, a man snaps a photo of a street cart vendor and the image goes viral; a baseball player in the US keeps fans glued to their TV screens in Taiwan, and DJ Shadow, an American music producer, releases a video that has got everyone talking in Ukraine.

Fight Or Flight2016060420160605 (WS)
20160606 (WS)

We speak with Daniel Torres, a former US Marine who was deported to Mexico. Then, we look back at a deadly 1942 U-boat attack in the Gulf of Mexico. And we take a bus ride with the children of Sudanese immigrants in California.

Plus, a group of American teenagers cause an uproar when they try to take part in World Hijab Day. A journalist learns the proper use for bananas in Somali cuisine. And an Ethiopian-American band records its own version of a Japanese folk song.

Image: Daniel Torres grew up in the US, but after a stint in the Marines he was deported to Mexico. (Credit: PRI’s The World)

How an unauthorised immigrant became a US Marine—and then a US citizen

Fish, France And Forgeries2014012520140126 (WS)

Fears that radiation-contaminated fish from Fukushima is turning up in US markets

Some Americans on the Pacific Coast are worried that radiation-contaminated water from the Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan is tainting fish being sold in local markets. Scientists, though, say they need not worry. Also, why some Boston area students are so angry with the French Consulate, and why so many French technical innovators are heading to California’s Silicon Valley. We meet one of the world’s top legal counterfeiters of precious gems. And, we find out about the trousers worn by Norway’s National Curling team that are generating so much attention.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Flashpoint20151212

When armed men in camouflage menace worshipers at a Texas mosque, the local community is divided. Then, a look back to the World War Two internment of Japanese-Americans, a move being invoked today in some US political circles.

Also, we go inside a halal slaughterhouse where the knives are sharp and tradition endures; we get a personal take on one of the thorniest issues between the US and Cuba right now -- property rights; and, we hear what California can learn from Israel about farming in the middle of a drought. Plus: could ‘climate fiction’ be key to addressing our climate change crisis?

Image: Armed protestors gather outside a mosque in Irving, Texas. (Credit: Avi Selk/ The Dallas Morning News)

A Texas town stands divided, after armed men menace worshipers at a local mosque

Follow The Money2014052420140525 (WS)

A new online tool tracks the millions of dollars spent by foreign lobbyists in the US

We hear about a new online tool that helps track the millions of dollars spent by foreign lobbyists in Washington. Also in the show, the California community that Toyota built and what might become of it when the car company pulls out. A new photo exhibit in Moscow offers an intimate portrait of New Orleans. What makes Americana so big in Japan? The tale of an American man who came to embrace his Ukrainian roots through his love of music. And a music student from Argentina who’d been studying in Boston nails Stairway to Heaven on graduation day.

(Photo: Man holding US 100 dollar bank notes. Credit: Corbis)

Follow The Money20161210

Sarah Chayes, an expert at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, says we need to talk about corruption in America.

Also, we visit a retraining programme for US steelworkers; we find out how Donald Trump’s plan to make Mexico pay for a border wall could backfire; we discover the secrets of the billion dollar hair trade industry; and we meet the guy who Venezuelans turn to when they want to know what their currency is worth -- when he’s not too busy helping customers at the hardware store he works at in the US.

(Image: A magnifying glass is used to inspect newly printed bills at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing in Washington, DC. Credit: Mark Wilson/Getty Images )

How corrupt is the US compared to other countries?

Getting Down To Business20170121

Donald Trump cancels plans for a tower in Georgia. Is it business or geo-politics?

Before becoming President, Donald Trump pulled out of a plan to license a tower in the nation of Georgia. Now, many there fear being “forgotten and abandoned? by the US.

Also: the first legal commercial export from Cuba arrives in the US; a former Wall Street man comes up with a plan to save an Indonesian forest; farmers in Vermont are growing a new crop and its worth more than its weight in gold; a family in Mexico is trafficking in donuts; and we find out what country makes the fastest roller coasters (hint: not the US).

(Image: Donald Trump during a press conference to announce a real estate project in Georgia, at the Trump Tower in New York, March 10, 2011. Credit: Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images)

Girl's Ballet School In Syria2013011920130120 (WS)

How life goes on for young ballerinas in a suburb of Damascus

How life goes on for young ballerinas in a suburb of Damascus. A young Haitian woman rebuilds her life in New York after fleeing the 2010 earthquake in her homeland. We’ll also hear about Hollywood’s decades-old relationship with America’s top spy agency, the CIA.

(Image: Young ballerinas at their ballet class, Credit: Emma LeBlanc)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Go And Do Likewise20160220

From Lesbos to Flint, we follow an Islamic relief group helping the poor get safe drinking water. Then, an Evangelical pastor tells us why it's our moral duty to 'take the longer view' on refugees. And: where human life is precarious, Haitians look out for a rare Iguana.

Plus, the woman behind a Liberian bookstore where children can read about themselves. And the Ghanaian reggae star Rocky Dawuni’s quest to bring clean cookstoves back home.

Image: Volunteers from Islamic Relief USA deliver water in Flint, Michigan. (Credit: Ridwan Adhami/Islamic Relief USA)

From Lesbos to Flint — an Islamic relief group helps the poor get safe drinking water

Good Neighbours20160227

We travel to the Michigan city of Flint and learn why unauthorised immigrants are so imperilled by the city’s lead-contaminated water system. We consider whether a Scandinavian-style welfare state could ever work in America. And, why Canadians want to turn away from the US elections, but just can't help themselves.

Plus, the secret plot to destroy Syria’s weapons of mass destruction. How Russians and Americans have teamed up to rescue Sochi’s stray dogs. And, the soulful songs of a Mexican singer, who muses about the American dream.

(Photo: The City of Flint Water Plant is illuminated by moonlight on January 23, 2016 in Flint, Michigan. Credit: Brett Carlsen/Getty Images)

The Flint water crisis leaves unauthorised immigrants in the dark in Michigan

History In The Making20170114

Obama is the first US president to author an article in Science magazine.

US President Obama has published three articles in top academic journals in one week. Why?

Also on the programme: we look back on Obama’s complicated legacy in Kenya, the birthplace of his father; we examine some evidence that casts Richard Nixon’s presidential legacy in a different light; we meet one of the first female missileers; and we learn about a long lost musical, commissioned during World War II, by the US Army.

(Image: U.S. President Barack Obama signs bills at his desk in the Oval Office at the White House. Credit: Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Hole In The Wall20150905

The US built a huge wall along one-third of its border with Mexico. Now, while Europe debates its own border policies, some US politicians want to seal the entire border. Also, a French chef looks back at what he lost - and gained - after Hurricane Katrina struck. And, we hear how American snack foods are getting a Latin twist.

Guantanamo Bay prison remains open in Cuba, and it has become a matter of life and death for one prisoner from Yemen. Plus, now that US-Cuba relations are warming up, a food critic goes looking for real Cuban cuisine. And, how a Saudi singer left her home country to chase stardom in Los Angeles.

(Photo: A boy in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, clings to the border fence. Credit: Cecilia Ballí)

A border wall to keep migrants out - “a 14th Century solution to a 21st Century problem?

Home From Home20151003

Shireen Al-Adeimi, a doctoral student at Harvard University, channels the voice of her fellow Yemenis and calls for the US government to end support for Saudi-led airstrikes. Then, we hear how one refugee family from Syria is starting over in California. And, as part of our First Days series, an Israeli teenager tells us what it was like to move to Massachusetts.

Also: the story of a Honduran family divided between home and New Orleans. How a proper Englishman caught gold fever in the American 'Wild West'. And Omar Offendum, a Syrian-American rapper, offers up a sharp lament for his homeland.

Picture: Shireen Al-Adeimi, a doctoral student at Harvard University who has launched a petition calling on the US government to end American support for Saudi-led airstrikes in Yemen. (Credit: PRI’s The World)

A Yemeni student in America urges US officials to end support for Saudi-led airstrikes.

Identity Crisis20150822

Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump has laid out a controversial immigration plan that includes a call to end the principle that babies born in the US automatically qualify as citizens. We examine the origins and the effects of this principle, and we speak with Ricardo Aca— a Mexican immigrant who works at a Trump hotel.

Then, two Pakistani-American brothers from Minnesota explain why they created ‘Noor Kids’, a series of children's books intended for Muslim youth. The reporter Akiko Fujita retraces her grandfather’s uniquely Japanese-American past. And we mark the 100th anniversary of the US occupation of Haiti. Plus: Lipa Schmeltzer, the ‘Hasidic Lady Gaga’.

(Photo: Mexican football fans hold signs alluding to a June comment made by Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump. He said: ‘When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best... They’re sending people that have lots of problems…They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists. And some, I assume, are good people’. Credit: Ricardo Aca)

A Mexican immigrant who works in a Trump hotel calls out ‘The Donald’.

In A Day’s Work2016062520160626 (WS)
20160627 (WS)

We visit San Juan, where one man thinks that the plan proposed by US Congress to address the debt crisis, “treats Puerto Rico like a colony.?

Then, we go to Lebanon where a Syrian refugee teaches Arabic over the internet. And we hear from an Arabic student who's been studying the language for 25 years.

Plus, we meet a Yemeni beekeeper preserving his country's traditions, an artist who enlisted in the Marines to make better art, and an Egyptian jukebox repairman boogying to Elvis Presley.

Image: The central market in the Santurce neighborhood of San Juan is a popular gathering spot for people to talk about politics after work. (Credit: PRI’s The World)

Puerto Rico may be in debt, but Puerto Ricans don't want to give up their independence.

India’s Gender Troubles2013011220130113 (WS)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Iraq: 'like A Bad Relationship'2014062120140622 (WS)

With parts of Iraq that US troops once fought to defend now in the hands of Islamist militants, one US soldier who saw combat there tells us what he thinks America’s responsibility is now. We hear what's behind America’s longstanding suspicion of beards, how a tiny wasp from Pakistan might be able to save the US citrus industry and how group prenatal care is becoming more popular across America, leading to healthier babies.

Also, we hear why Americans call football soccer and we find out why legendary Top 40 DJ Casey Kasem is also a hero for Arab-Americans.

Image: Getty

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Joseph Kony’s War € In Graphic Novel Form2013040620130408 (WS)

A new graphic novel about the Ugandan warlord wanted by the International Criminal Court

A new graphic novel, Army of God Joseph Kony's War in Central Africa, shines a light on the Ugandan warlord wanted by the International Criminal Court.

Also on the programme: Guantanamo detainees go on a hunger strike; the troubles facing Boston's immigrant taxi drivers; Mayan baseball; and author Gish Jen discusses writing from a Chinese-American perspective.

Image: The cover for the book Army of God. Copyright: PublicAffairs

Learning English In The Workplace2013061520130617 (WS)

Businesses in the US are helping their immigrant workers to learn to speak English

Businesses in the US are seeing the benefits of helping their immigrant workers to learn to speak English and are teaching them language skills.

Also on the programme: some European universities go English-only in the classroom. And, in light of the US government surveillance scandal, we ask if we’re living in the future as predicted by George Orwell in his novel 1984.

(Image: Learning English in the workplace)

Learning To Succeed In South Africa2013122820131229 (WS)

The high school in a South African township that's lifting families out of poverty

Meet the students of Cape Town's Centre of Science and Technology (COSAT), a magnet school that serves the low-income township of Khayelitsha. We look at their challenges and successes over the past year. The school motto is “No Excuses, Just Success?, but one 17-year-old student faces a big hurdle when his mother dies and he finds himself as the head of the household, just before he is due to sit an exam. We also join the students as they celebrate Nelson Mandela’s 95th birthday and attend the annual school prom. And finally, there is some good news for that 17-year-old student.

(Photo: Students of Cape Town's Centre of Science and Technology (COSAT), courtesy of COSAT)

Let’s Go Viral2014111520141116 (WS)

Twitter co-founder Biz Stone on social media’s role in social movements

On the theme of global connectedness in the age of social media, we hear from Biz Stone, the co-founder of Twitter, on social media’s role in social movements around the world. Plus, we talk Twitter diplomacy and 21st Century statecraft. And, the origins of Nerd Nite, a monthly lecture series uniting the brainy and the boozy.

Also, the new hotline that fights Ebola-related stigma against African immigrants in the US. Boston Calling listeners from around the globe share their superstitions. And, a behind-the-scenes look at OK Go’s latest viral sensation—a drone-assisted music video shot in Japan.

Loaded Language20150815

Iranian hardliners have long chanted "Death to America" at Friday prayers and government rallies. But in the wake of a nuclear agreement, are the slogan's days numbered? Then, how a project to translate Henry David Thoreau’s Walden into Farsi became a global cultural exchange. And, are we witnessing the death of "uh"? Um, maybe — and not just in English.

Also, Trevor Noah's South African fans have advice for Americans who find some of his jokes offensive, New York's Metropolitan Opera announces its ‘Otello’ tenor will no longer wear "blackface", and Krussia may be the best Russian rapper in New York - but why isn’t he known back home?

(Photo: Iranian protesters burn an American flag during a rally in Tehran in 2013. Credit: AP)

Iranian hardliners chant ‘Death to America’ - but these days many Iranians wonder why.

Look Closer2014100420141005 (WS)

Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker argues that violence is actually decreasing globally

It has been a season of upheaval and bloodshed around the world. But Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker argues that deadly violence is actually decreasing globally, and that it has been for decades.

Also on this edition, we hear about the new propaganda wing of the militant group that calls itself Islamic State. We visit a community in California that is grappling with the Ebola crisis from afar. And, we take a deep dive into the largest marine sanctuary in the world. Plus, an American photographer documents life in the Fukushima exclusion zone. And the legacy of 1940s social clubs for Japanese-Americans.

Love And War20160102

Why is it so hard for a Sikh to serve in the US military?

The first observant Sikh of his generation to join the US military tells us why he’s campaigning against the Pentagon’s dress code. Then, a World War Two tale of a Jewish couple who survived the Holocaust by hiding behind a church organ. And, a Vietnam War-era love story that starts with nothing more than a discarded scrap of paper and a stranger’s address.

(Photo: Army Maj. Kamal Singh Kalsi testifies before the US Commission on Civil Rights in May 2013. Credit: Sikh Coalition)

Meaningful Words2014031520140316 (WS)

How President Ronald Reagan learned the valuable Russian proverb, 'Trust, but verify'

We hear from the historian who taught US President Ronald Reagan the Russian proverb, “Trust, but verify,? and about the role it played in helping to end the Cold War. Also on the program, why Russians can’t give a simple response to the question, “How are you?? How China’s “Green Fence? is cleaning up America’s dirty recycling. We meet the New York man who’s searching for the perfect pizza box. Europeans respond to a controversial American luxury car advertisement that mocks their work ethic. And, we explore Crimea’s rich cultural and historic beauty.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

New York Icons Remade2013110220131103 (WS)

America’s oldest licenced pizzeria thrives a year after super storm Sandy floods

One year ago this week, Super Storm Sandy ravaged New York City. The building housing the oldest licensed pizzeria in the United States was among those flooded in the storm. The granddaughter of the original proprietor, who reportedly introduced Neapolitan-style pizza to the US, talks about her hopes for the business going forward.

Also, a Syrian immigrant to the US recalls his amusing first days in America. How high tech workers from India are transforming California’s Silicon Valley. And how Orson Welles’s panic-inducing 1938 US radio drama, War of the Worlds, inspired copycat broadcasts around the world - with similar effects.

Picture: Totonno's Pizzeria in Coney Island, Brooklyn, Credit: roboppy/Flickr

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

New York Sikhs Organise Help For Sandy Victims2012112420121125 (WS)

New York’s Indian Sikh community has been providing free bowls of steaming lentils, rice and vegetables to some of those hardest hit by last month's Hurricane Sandy. What is has the response been so far?

Also, the growing need among emergency responders in the US for interpreters. And the Chinese girls adopted into American families who are asking: "Who are we and where do we come from?"

(Image: Sikh men walk between two yellow taxis, Credit: Getty Images)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

No Joke20170218

How do you make people laugh in Trump's America?

Cartoonists around the world have been poking fun at the US.

Also: An Iranian in a detention camp posts illustrations of his plight onto Instagram; a journalist thinks nonfiction comics can be a ‘gateway drug’ to learning about tough issues; two Somali brothers cope with the news of Trump’s travel ban in very different ways; cartoonist Lalo Alcaraz explains why drawing Latino characters is important to him; plus Russian musician, Pavel Lion, is on a mission to make you laugh.

(Image: Vladimir Putin and President Trump react to the resignation of Michael Flynn as National Security adviser. Credit: Marian Kamensky, Slovakia)

No Man Left Behind2014060720140608 (WS)

US Army sergeant Bowe Bergdahl was set free by his Taliban captors last weekend. Since then, a debate has been raging in the US over whether he deserted his outpost in Afghanistan when he went missing five years ago, or if he had been taken prisoner against his will, or if it was a bit of both? We hear how it is not the first time the US military has faced this conundrum. Bergdahl was released in exchange for five Taliban prisoners being held at Guantanamo. We get an update on some other detainees at the controversial US military prison in Cuba. Also, we meet a singer who was homeless in Nashville before making it big in Sweden. And we hear how cocktails get such memorable names.

(Photo: Signs of support with images of US Army Sergeant Bowe Bergdahl. Credit: Reuters)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

No Place Like Home2014082320140824 (WS)

A Yazidi community in America tries desperately to help friends and family in Iraq

Iraq’s Yazidis are on the run from militants of the Islamic State, and the threat of further violence looms large. We’ll hear how a Yazidi community in Nebraska is dealing with their group’s dramatic plight.

Also on the programme, we’ll visit ‘Little Kurdistan’, where we head out on patrol with the city’s only Kurdish-American cop. And, we’ll find out how protestors in Ferguson, Missouri connected with residents of the West Bank. Also in this edition, we’ll ask why the US refused to pay ransom demands for slain American journalist James Foley. We’ll learn the reasons an escalating number of migrants are being tried as criminals in US courts. And, we’ll listen to an avant folk-rock band that’s fusing Chinese and American sounds.

Picture: An Iraqi Yazidi woman and her baby, who fled their home when IS militants attacked the town of Sinjar, Credit: AFP/Getty Images

On A Mission2016043020160501 (WS)
20160502 (WS)

The story of a 20-something CIA officer who took on the Taliban.

A former CIA agent discusses his days undercover in Afghanistan and Syria, and the demons those days left behind. Then, we visit the spectacle that is Laredo -- a members-only Wild West town tucked away in the English countryside. And, America’s trucking industry faces a shortage -- we meet the immigrants helping fill the gap.

Plus, why Polish activists are borrowing images from the US in a push for a total abortion ban. And the Detroit watch company bringing its message of the gritty underdog to Europe.

Image: The CIA symbol is shown on the floor of CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia. (Credit: Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Only In Texas20160312

Why a Nicaraguan immigrant in Florida supports Donald Trump’s tough immigration policies

We meet a Nicaraguan immigrant to the US whose choice of president might surprise you. Then, workers in Mexico’s border factories are seizing an opportunity to unionise. And, the Texas city of Houston has become a premier tourist destination for Chinese travellers thanks to cowboys and basketball, of course.

Plus, the US Supreme Court hears arguments in what is being called one of the most important reproductive rights cases in a generation. The odd connection between America’s highest court and a secretive aristocratic hunting society. And, why if you ever find yourself in the Texas city of Killeen — you had better try the kimchee or bibimbap.

Image: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump exits his plane during a trip to the US-Mexico border on July 23, 2015 in Laredo, Texas. (Credit: Matthew Busch/Getty Images

Outside Looking In20160319

Two expat voters – a Republican in London and a Democrat in Stockholm – share their thoughts about watching the US election from abroad. Then: experts who study America's extremist white supremacist groups say there's clear evidence that many of them are supporting Donald Trump's candidacy for president.

Plus, why Cuban Americans are in such stark disagreement over President Obama’s historic trip to Cuba. And: there are more than 20 towns in the US called Moscow – why is that?

Image: An Alabama resident urges townspeople to vote. (Credit: Win McNamee/Getty Images)

A Republican and a Democrat share their thoughts about watching the election from abroad

Outsider20160206

We find out why St. Cloud has been called the worst place in the midwestern state of Minnesota to be Somali, and we head to the New England state of Maine where Somali youths are learning to navigate several cultures.

Then: a conversation with the smooth-jazz-new-age maestro, Yanni; a French chef’s love letter to Brittany; a transgender Cuban woman’s vow to never return home; and DJ Michael Brun’s new hit song from Haiti, ‘Wherever I Go’.

Image: Lul Hersi has lived in the Minnesota city of St. Cloud for 14 years, and told the newspaper City Pages that she often faces discrimination. Credit: Galen Fletcher

Is the city of St. Cloud ‘the worst place in Minnesota to be Somali’?

Paying Tribute To President Barack Obama In Pastry2012102720121028 (WS)

We gauge President Obama's popularity through a sticky Turkish treat.

In this week's show, we gauge President Barack Obama's popularity based on a sticky Turkish treat. We also fact-check the phrase "horses and bayonets" from the final US presidential debate and ask what foreign policy issues the candidates are overlooking. Also, Mexico's Mormons.

(Image: A portrait of Barack Obama in pastry. Credit: Matthew Brunwasser, PRI's The World)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Questions Of Trust2016040920160410 (WS)
20160411 (WS)

A young Yemeni man wants you to know how war changed his life

A young university student in Yemen describes losing his best friend in the country’s civil war. Then, we learn all about America's role in the fast-deteriorating conflict.

Also: Why a US health clinic suggests Cambodian treatments for everyday maladies. How Donald Trump is fuelling a citizenship drive among immigrants in the States. And, the story of two distant stepsisters who fled violence in their homeland, and discovered a new found kinship along the way. Plus: the 'Tex-Mex, Gringa' musician proudly flaunting her heritage.

Image: Ahmed Algohbary (right) and his best friend, Bilal. (Courtesy of Ahmed Algohbary)

Raising The Bar20160130

What an American doctor learned when he visited a Syrian refugee camp

We hear what an American doctor learned when he visited a Syrian refugee camp in Jordan, and what a baker from Boston saw when she volunteered at a refugee transit camp in Macedonia.

Then, we find out how a school in San Diego is using hands-on and high-energy learning to help its low income students succeed. We step inside the fine Persian rug shop in LA that’s ready to profit from better Iran-US relations. And we learn how Cuba finally won control over the trademark, 'Havana Club' rum. Plus: a look at Maria Magdalena Campos-Pons' new show exploring Cuba's sugar trade and her own exile.

Image: Dr. Omar Lattouf’s daughter, Zeena, with a child called Samir at the Al-Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan. (Courtesy of Omar Lattouf)

Red Lines And Tipping Points2013083120130902 (WS)

The US role in chemical attacks during the Iran-Iraq War

According to US President Barack Obama, Syria’s alleged use of chemical weapons earlier this month crossed a red line. But a report in Foreign Policy magazine says the US actually helped Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein use chemical weapons against Iran in the ‘80s. We hear from one of the report’s authors.

We also remember Martin Luther King's "I have a dream" speech and the historic civil rights march on Washington DC 50 years ago this week.

And call centre workers in the Philippines who live on “American time?; and we speak to one of the photographers behind a new show at Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts depicting the bedrooms of teenagers in the US and Middle East.

Picture: Soldier in a gas mask, Credit: Pascal Guyot/AFP/Getty Images

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Remembering Orlando2016061820160619 (WS)
20160620 (WS)

We speak to an activist in Orlando helping her city to recover, after last week's mass shooting. Then, a gay Muslim tells us how it feels to belong to the community of the perpetrator, and of the victims.

Plus, the world's reaction to Orlando. A survivor of the Paris attacks notes similarities. A gay couple in Russia gets arrested, paying tribute to the victims. And a journalist in a favela in Rio de Janeiro says she'd never want to come to America.

Lastly, a reflection from Marco Werman on gun control.

Image: People hold up candles during a vigil for the victims of the Pulse nightclub shooting, at the Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts in Orlando, Florida. June 13, 2016. (Credit: MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

After the mass shooting, a community activist counsels the victims' families

Rerouted2016051420160515 (WS)
20160516 (WS)

We hear how the Migration Project is giving hope to the families of Guatemalan migrants who have gone missing en route to the United States. Then, how young migrant students from all across Central America are getting shut out of US schools. And, the Cuban Americans spending their own money to send others to Cuba.

Plus, we meet two Hmong American filmmakers who are shaking up Hollywood. We travel 8,000 miles in search of a Thai dish so delicious, it might be deadly. And an Indian writer living in the US curses his American doughnut habit.

Image: Indigenous family members walk into Mexico after illegally crossing the border from Guatemala on August 1, 2013. (Credit: John Moore/Getty Images)

The Migration Project helps Guatemalan families find missing loved ones.

Roundabout20160305

On ‘Super Tuesday,’ Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton stood out as clear front-runners in the US presidential election. We hear from a former director of the CIA and NSA, General Michael Hayden, who shares his concerns about both Trump and Clinton. Next, a reporter from Ghana describes African attitudes to America’s elections. Then, we head to Sweden, where innovations in urban planning have become as a model for cities across the globe.

Also, a reporter discovers that Catholic priests accused of molesting children in the US are still Church leaders in South America. A newspaper correspondent who made fun of the war in Afghanistan becomes the heroine of a bleak Hollywood comedy. And publishers of photo books face stiff competition from photographers who make their own books.

Picture: The headquarters of the US National Security Agency on the grounds of Fort Meade, Maryland.

Former CIA and NSA director General Michael Hayden criticises both Clinton and Trump

Russian Departures2014030120140302 (WS)

A gay Russian who fears persecution at home seeks asylum - and a new life - in the US

The story of a gay Russian man who fears persecution at home and heads to the US seeking asylum - and a new life.

Also on the programme, the out-going US ambassador to Russia reminisces about his time in Moscow and the active social media presence he nurtured while serving there. We also explore the Russian aversion to putting ice cubes in drinking glasses. And, we learn about a programme that teaches people how to prepare authentic ethnic cuisine in New York's immigrant kitchens. Plus, the challenges of keeping America’s ageing immigrant population connected to their communities.

Picture: Demonstrators wearing President Putin masks kiss as they take part in a rally, Credit: Lionel Bonaventure/AFP/Getty Images

Same Sex Marriage2013033020130331 (WS)

Immigrants offer their views on a contentious issue now before the US Supreme Court.

Immigrant views on America's same sex marriage debate now before the US Supreme Court; undocumented immigrants in New York City get their tax paperwork in order; Texas border residents argue against more security; an Iranian basketball sensation and yoga for military veterans.

(Image: Same-sex marriage ceremony. Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Seeking Sanctuary2016032620160328 (WS)

We step inside a California church that’s asking unauthorised immigrants to seek shelter from the law amid its pews. Then, we head to Kansas and meet a high school student from Guatemala who says he’s drowning in the debt he owes to smugglers who got him into the US.

Plus, how a helmet equipped with an ultrasound camera is demystifying the sounds of the Irish language. And, a young Syrian refugee tells us about her remarkable short film, ‘The Girl Whose Shadow Reflects the Moon’, which combines magical imagery and gritty reality.

Image: Beatriz Orduña Abarca at the United Methodist Church in North Hills in Los Angeles. (Credit: PRI’s The World)

The sanctuary church movement is on the rise again in California

Seeking Sanctuary2016040220160403 (WS)
20160404 (WS)

We step inside a California church that’s asking unauthorised immigrants to seek shelter from the law amid its pews. Then, we head to Kansas and meet a high school student from Guatemala who says he’s drowning in the debt he owes to smugglers who got him into the US.

Plus, how a helmet equipped with an ultrasound camera is demystifying the sounds of the Irish language. And, a young Syrian refugee tells us about her remarkable short film, ‘The Girl Whose Shadow Reflects the Moon’, which combines magical imagery and gritty reality.

Image: Beatriz Orduña Abarca at the United Methodist Church in North Hills in Los Angeles. (Credit: PRI’s The World)

Please note that due to a technical problem this episode is a repeat of the programme broadcast on the 26th/27th March. The correct episode for the 2/3 April is broadcast on the following weekend - 9/10 April.

The download file on this page is the file for the programme that will be broadcast on 9/10 April - Questions of Trust

The sanctuary church movement is on the rise again in California

Sequester: 'the United States Of Austerity'2013030220130303 (WS)

Americans and foreign visitors react to massive US government spending cuts.

The US government faces tens of billions of dollars in federal spending cuts. Ethiopia's economy benefits from its returning diaspora. An American journalist celebrates tweeting and photo-sharing from inside North Korea. And, the joys of a Mediterranean diet. (Image: US dollars. Credit: AFP:Getty)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Shutdown Resolution And Reverberations2013101920131021 (WS)

The US budget standoff is over, but memories of the weeks’ long impasse linger

The budget standoff that shut down much of the US government is over, but memories of the weeks’ long impasse will likely linger. We hear how one business - Interpreting Services - that does a lot of government contract work plans to scale back that part of its operations out of fear of future shutdowns.

Also, how history will view this ugly display of US government malfunction? We’ll also speak with an American reporter in Burma who got caught up in a mysterious bombing this past week, we’ll meet an Iranian-American woman who plays a serious game of dodgeball, and we’ll learn about a scientist who had a breakthrough moment when he got a tick stuck up his nose.

Picture: Antonio Guerra, Cetra's Director of Interpreting Services with his team of interpreters

Sliver Of Hope2014072620140727 (WS)

An American doctor on the frontlines of the Ebola crisis in West Africa

When an American doctor in west Africa encounters a nine-year-old boy with Ebola, he doesn’t give up hope that the child can be treated - but the odds are not in his favour. And, an Indian immigrant to the US laments the difficulty of finding a Hindi book in India. We find out why a Chinese game called Nine-Man is taking off in America. Also, we learn why the liquor baijiu has yet to catch on with American drinkers. We hear how a Russian writer got a street named after him in New York. And, we meet a classical music composer whose latest chart-topping album is inspired by climate change.

(Photo: Dr William Fischer wearing protective medical gear, courtesy of Dr. William Fischer)

So Long, America2014071220140713 (WS)

The US government warns against travel to more than one-third of Africa

The United States government is advising its citizens to “strongly consider not going? to more than one-third of Africa.

Also on the programme, the border-crossing Americans taking Mexican football by storm; the former Harvard footballer fighting for gender equality in Brazil; the man behind the steroid scandal that rocked American baseball and the men who make up an unlikely union of cabbies fighting discrimination in Washington DC.

And, we talk about French sweets - so unforgettable that they stir and soothe the soul.

Photo: An international air traveller at Los Angeles International Airport pulling her handluggage, Credit: Getty Images

So Many Questions2014051020140511 (WS)

We hear from a Ugandan man who is seeking asylum in the US. He says that his work as a gay rights activist has made him a target back home.

Also in the programme, we meet a group of Filipino-Americans in Southern California who come together over their shared love of guns. We connect the dots between New York comedians and jokes from Odessa. Why an Indian business model stumps a professor from one of America’s top business schools. An international circus performer talks about the perils and pleasures of her craft. And, the story of a letter from a Chinese prison that turned up in a New York shopping bag.

(Photo: Gay rights advocate John Abdallah Wambere says his life has been threatened in Uganda. He's now seeking asylum in the US)

The gay rights activist from Uganda who found himself the subject of a witch hunt

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Stars And Stripes2016070220160704 (WS)

In the US, gun culture permeates even everyday language

An anthropologist explains why Americans “stick to their guns? when it comes to the expressions and idioms they favour. And a South African actress struggles to learn how to speak with an American accent.

Plus, we learn where the hot dog got its name from, get a taste of Peking duck pizza at China’s first Disney theme park, and witness what may have been the world’s largest square dance.

Finally, we end with the story of how a British patriotic song became wildly popular in the US.

Image: American Revolutionary war re-enactor (and BBC producer) Chris Woolf, musket in hand. Credit: John Buckingham

Starting Over20150919

There is a new kind of asylum seeker fighting for refugee status in the United States - women fleeing their home countries because of violence from their own families. We meet a woman who felt her brothers’ beatings, only to find her case stuck in the American legal system. Then, we hear from a German journalist who left her home - reflecting on the way her country is accepting Syrians who left their homes.

We visit a Vietnamese engineer who was forced to start from scratch in the United States. Now he is reconnecting with his homeland through one of America’s favorite seafoods - shrimp. Also, the story of a poem that bears the name of a female Chinese poet, even though it was written by a white American man. Plus, an American baseball player explains how he helped make Haruki Murakami one of the most famous Japanese writers in history.

Photo: Many women like ‘Nina’, fled from Saudi Arabia after facing threats from her family. Credit: Alison Yin)

She fled Saudi Arabia after family threats but can US immigration laws protect her?

Summer In America2014083020140831 (WS)

Two young boys embark on a 4,000-mile journey to reunite with their parents in the US

We’ll hear the gripping tale of two young brothers’ 4,000-mile journey to reunite with their parents in America.

Also on the programme: we’ll find out how a Catholic church in Texas is helping Central American migrants during their first few minutes on US soil. Plus, we’ll meet the man who visited 30 different American mosques in a month, and we’ll ask what he learned during his Ramadan road trip. Also in this edition, we’ll find out what’s behind the magic of a deceptive illusionist named Honesty. We’ll meet a Vietnam veteran fighting to memorialize his lost comrades. And we’ll learn what’s so special about the rum called rhum.

Supreme Decisions2013062920130701 (WS)

What the US Supreme Court ruling in favour of gay rights means for other countries

The US Supreme Court backed gay rights this week. We explore how other countries deal with issues such as gay rights and same-sex marriage. Also, President Obama jumps into the climate change conversation by calling for cuts to US greenhouse gas emissions.

We go on board the world’s largest solar-powered vehicle while it’s docked in Boston. And, we talk to a disabled American who is making a documentary film about limited accessibility in Europe. Plus, we hear about cutting edge origami techniques from an origami master living in California.

(Image: Rainbow flags waving in front of the US Supreme Court in Washington DC. Credit: AFP/Getty images)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Syria Waits While America Debates2013090720130909 (WS)

Sadness, madness and the new normal; a Syrian in the US reflects on life in his birthplace

The debate over whether to take military against the Syrian regime for its alleged use of chemical weapons has been echoing around the hallways of Capitol Hill this week - and across the nation. We hear from a Syrian-born man who now lives in Massachusetts about why he opposes the Syrian rebels.

Also, two US military veterans of the war in Iraq take opposing views on potential US military intervention. We have a conversation with the American reporter who tracked down members of the Syrian Electronic Army which is waging war on some Western media. And while President Obama has promised no US boots on the ground in Syria, we’ll find out how, nevertheless, the US army is trying to build a better boot for its soldiers.

Picture: People demonstrate against a US-led strike on Syria in downtown Los Angeles, Credit: Joe Klamar/AFP/Getty Images

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the.

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Taco Trucks2016091020160911 (WS)
20160912 (WS)

“My culture is a very dominant culture. If you don’t do something about it, you’re going to have taco trucks on every corner.? Marco Gutierrez, one of the founders of Latinos for Trump, explains what he means by that statement.

Also, we get the most recent migration numbers, visit a mariachi summer camp, check-in with two first generation college students, and meet a Mexican immigrant who works at a Trump hotel. Plus, music legend Herb Alpert tells us where he found his signature sound.

"You’re going to have taco trucks on every corner" Marco Gutierrez of Latinos for Trump

Taking A Stand2016050720160508 (WS)
20160509 (WS)

Trump or Clinton? That's the question du jour in the US, so we have two stories on the leading presidential candidates. First, we head to East Boston, where Latino immigrants are pushing back against Donald Trump supporters in their neighbourhood. Then, we hear about the disconnect between the Hillary Clinton foreigners see, and the one Americans see.

Also, why novelist Ayelet Waldman is sending writers to the West Bank; the effort to keep Syrian refugees out of the midwestern state of Kansas; and how the cellist Leyla McCalla connects history, identity and song on her latest album. Plus: hundreds of thousands marched in the US for immigrants’ rights a decade ago. What's happened since?

Image: Latinos and European Americans live together in East Boston. But the politics of Donald Trump is resurrecting old racial wounds. (Credit: Phillip Martin/WGBH)

In Boston, Latinos push back against Donald Trump supporters in their neighbourhood.

Talk The Talk2016052820160529 (WS)
20160530 (WS)

We speak to Reverend Chris Antal who resigned from the US Army in protest against drone warfare. We also hear from a former gang member who is now a Muslim leader. We visit two schools that serve immigrants in the US - one where immigrants are kept separate from US-born students, and another where children study Somali.

Plus, Iranian-American comedian Maz Jobrani talks about why Middle-Eastern actors often end up playing villains on TV. And, why do Hollywood film-makers keep going back to Morocco for films set in the Middle East?

(Photo: A pilot conducts a pre-flight check of a MQ-1B Predator, a type of unmanned aerial vehicle that the US military uses for attacks on Islamic State and the Taliban. Credit: John Moore/Getty Images)

A US military chaplain resigns in protest against deadly drone strikes

Thanksgiving 201620161126

When this family got their deportation papers, a small town banded together to save them.

When Marie Myung-Ok Lee’s parents received deportation papers in the mail, her hometown banded together to save them.

Also, we visit a restaurant that only serves food from countries “in conflict” with the US, we sample a dessert inspired by early Mesopotamia andwe learn about one of the latest food fads in Las Vegas. We end with the story of a Chinese seamstress who started a famous Midwestern chain restaurant.

(Image: Marie Myung-Ok Lee’s family gathers around the dinner table. Courtesy: Grace K. Lee)

The Adoption Edition20150912

What if one day you found out you had an identical twin you never knew about? Well, it happened to two young women born in South Korea and we have their story. Plus, we dig deeper into the Cold War origins of international adoption.

Also, how volunteers in the US city of Seattle are helping Syrian migrants. The Pope’s plan to canonise Junípero Serra is met with protest in California. And, the story of Timur, a glam-rock opera singer from Kazakhstan who got his start in Kansas.

(Photo: Long-lost twins Samantha Futerman and Anaïs Bordier in London at their first reunion, May 2013. Credit: Ryan Miyamoto/Small Package Films)

Twins separated at birth reunite in the documentary film Twinsters

The Bite-size Edition20151128

To mark Thanksgiving in the US, we go wild mushroom hunting on Cape Cod; learn about an 18th century drink making a 21st century comeback; and hear why the next big thing in protein may make you squirm.

Plus: an American home baker goes in search of the perfect French baguette. We meet the pastrami taco king of New York. And we find out how to balance sugar and spice in a Sri Lankan love cake.

Image: Paul Sadowski of the New York Mycological Society helps fellow mushroom hunters identify their finds in the woods of Piermont, New York. (Credit: Alina Simone)

The (not so) secret lives of America’s wild mushroom hunters

The Design Edition20160924

An Afghan refugee is using drones to save other refugees' lives

A former refugee remembers his sea crossing. Now he wants to help others, by making a drone that collects life-saving information about migrant boats.

Also, we learn how a brewery converts waste into clean energy, and about the impact bike sharing programs have on their cities. Plus, Roberi Parra, a designer from Venezuela, tells us what it’s like to be on Project Runway, a reality TV show set in the US. And muralist Mona Caro tells us why we should pay attention to all plants, even weeds.

(Refugees and migrants arrive on a rubber boat on the Greek island of Lesbos. Credit: Dimitar Dilkoff/AFP/Getty Images)

The Drug Store Edition20151024

How the opium trade fuels militant extremism in Afghanistan

A former US Drug Enforcement Administration official discusses how to stymie the opium trade in Afghanistan. Then, why officials in Honduras have turned to community policing to counteract their drug and gang violence. And why the US has decided to withhold millions of dollars in anti-drug aid to Mexico.

Plus: Los Angeles tests new ways to keep unauthorised immigrants healthy. An American surgeon overwhelmed by the high rate of infant hydrocephalus in Uganda develops a life-saving technique that’s now helping kids in the US as well. And the magic of asosi, a ‘go-to cure-all’ medicinal plant that grows wild in Florida.

Image: Afghan farmers collect raw opium as they work in a poppy field in the Khogyani district of Jalalabad. (Credit: AP)

The Globalization Edition2013072020130722 (WS)

US law allowing citizens to defend themselves with deadly force attracts attention abroad

A controversial US law that allows citizens the option of defending themselves with deadly force has attracted attention abroad, since a high-profile court case in Florida where George Zimmerman was acquitted after shooting and killing an unarmed African-American teenager, Trayvon Martin.

We’ll also hear about the southern California city that’s ground zero in America’s war on methamphetamines. We’ll learn about what Spain is doing about dog owners who don’t clean up after their pets. Also, how Yiddish words like mazzel and mashuga went global. And a group of Indian-Americans in New York City take us on a hunt for the perfect dosa, that lentil-rice pancake that’s a favourite in South India.

Picture: A man holds a flyer that reads 'Justice for Trayvon', Credit: Getty Images

The Import Export Edition2016082020160821 (WS)
20160822 (WS)

Activists in France draw strength from the Black Lives Matter movement in America

“My brother was killed. He died in atrocious conditions, alone, without us.? In France, the death of Adama Traore, a young black man, while he was in police custody sets off protests.

Also, the Maker Movement, which began in California, comes to China; subway cars, made in China, come here to Boston; and an ultra-popular Norwegian TV show, about knitting, comes to Netflix. Plus, the US gets its first offshore wind farm. Etienne Charles, a Trinidad jazz trumpeter, closes out the show.

Picture: People hold a banner reading 'Justice for Adama' as they attend a march organised in tribute to Adama Traore in Beaumont-sur-Oise, Credit: Thomas Samson/AFP/Getty Images

The Labels Edition20161105

Arab-Americans are divided over the consequences of a new US census category.

There may soon be a new ethnicity box to check on the US Census form. It’s for people of Middle Eastern and North African descent. But not everyone's sure it’s a good idea.

Also: From surgeon to hot dog vendor, the identity journey of one Iraqi refugee. Latinx writer Jack Qu’emi struggles to explain their gender identity to their mom. Plus, one woman’s struggle to put a name on a map. We end with music from Cuban pianist, Harold López-Nussa, who recently signed to an American record label.

(Image: A patriotic t-shirt hangs in front of Arabic signs at a strip mall in Dearborn, Michigan. Dearborn is home to one of the largest Arab communities in the US. Credit: Bill Pugliano/Getty Images.)

The Long View2016041620160417 (WS)
20160418 (WS)

We meet two young film-makers who grapple with their high school memories of convicted Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev in a new short film called ‘Jahar’. Then, how a two-time Boston Marathon champion is inspiring young Ethiopian runners at a Massachusetts school. Plus, the remarkable story of Sueko Hada, a Hiroshima survivor whose family now includes American in-laws.

(Photo: ‘Jahar’ is a film about three friends grappling with their high school memories of convicted Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. Courtesy of Henry Hayes)

Two young film-makers grapple with their childhood memories of the Boston Marathon bomber

The Next Big Thing2016073020160731 (WS)
20160801 (WS)

Victor Kruglov is a Russian agent in Hollywood. But he is no secret.

Everyone in Hollywood knows if you need a Russian actor, you call Victor Kruglov. We meet the man who has become a local institution. Also, Hari Kondabolu says he wants to be a “mainstream American? comic; the band Night Lights have to prove they have "exceptional abilities" to stay in the US; we delve into the backstory of Disney’s first Latina princess; and take a taste of a fruit that might save the world. Plus, CoCo Avenue, a stereotype busting K-Pop duo, closes out the show.

(Photo: Victor Kruglov is a talent agent in Hollywood. Credit: Alina Simone)

The Obamacare Learning Curve2013110920131110 (WS)

Efforts to help immigrants sign up for a new affordable healthcare plan in the US

Affordable healthcare has long been out of reach for many Americans. The Affordable Care Act, which was signed into law by President Obama, is designed to change that. But despite the publicity surrounding the recent roll-out of “Obamacare", many immigrants remain unaware of the new programme. We hear how outreach workers in some immigrant communities are trying to change that.

We also hear about why some Mexicans living along the Mexican side of the US border want to secede, sample a new documentary on the history of film that doesn’t focus on Hollywood, and get a first-hand account of pop artist Andy Warhol’s 1976 visit to Tehran.

(Photo: Riffat Rahman, a healthcare advocate, conducts outreach about the Affordable Care Act in a Los Angeles neighborhood called Little Bangladesh. Credit: South Asian Network)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

The Paris Connection20151121

US governors vow to bar Syrian migrants from resettling in their states

In the wake of the attacks in Paris, more than half of America's governors have publicly vowed to block the entry of Syrian migrants into their states. We hear from one Syrian immigrant in Boston who calls this move ‘reactionary’ at best, victim-blaming at worst. Then: Deah Barakat may be gone, but his dream to build a dental clinic for Syrian migrants in Turkey lives on. And, we take a visit to an Ohio supermarket where immigrants get a surprising crash course on the American pharmacy.

Plus: how the current concern over Syrians coming to the US echoes similar concerns over Jewish refugees during World War II. An American professional basketball player tells us why he refused to play a game in France. And we listen back to a legendary show at the Bataclan concert hall— a 1972 performance by The Velvet Underground.

The President Pivots2013091420130916 (WS)

George Packer’s déjà-vu: The American writer speaks about September 11th, Iraq and Syria

The Resilience Edition20150926

The big story behind a tiny object Marco Werman found in tsunami-ravaged Japan.

After the triple disaster hit Japan in 2011, Marco Werman went to the city of Ishinomaki to report on the recovery efforts. While there, he found a tiny object in the wreckage that he decided to hold on to— a ‘hanko’, or a rubber stamp engraved with a name on it. Four and a half years later, we track down the stamp’s owner—and hear what else the tsunami took from him. Then, the parallels between the disaster in Japan and Hurricane Katrina, which hit the US Gulf coast in 2005. And, we talk resilient cities and the role of a ‘Chief Resilience Officer’.

Also: Sudanese American parents look at ‘Clock Boy’ Ahmed Mohamed and think of their own kids. And we revisit the story of Sonita Alizadeh, a young Afghan rapper who’s building a new life in America.

(Photo: Stamp found by Marco Werman in the Japanese city of Ishinomaki, following the earthquake and tsunami of March 2011. Credit: PRI’s The World)

The Resilient Spirit2014030820140309 (WS)

The new film exploring Afghanistan's post-Taliban photo revolution

Banned in Afghanistan under the Taliban, photography has enjoyed a second life there after the 2001 US invasion. A new documentary film explores the hopes and fears of four Afghan photojournalists as the US prepares to pull out of the country at the end of this year. Also on the program, how cadaver sniffing dogs from the US are bringing relief to typhoon-ravaged Filipinos. We hear about an American scholar who set out to save Tibetan literature, and we discover why cinnamon rolls are so hot in Libya. Plus, American-style hip hop artist J-Me, celebrates the end of censorship in his native Burma.

(Photo: Najibullah Musafar, courtesy of Frame by Frame)

The Right Choice2016100120161002 (WS)
20161003 (WS)

Who would you want as your platoon sergeant, Clinton or Trump?

In the US, historically the military vote has gone Republican. But this election, many historical patterns have not held true.

Also, a Sikh American speaks with the man who killed his brother for wearing a turban, and two Honduran brothers face a shared problem, but make opposite choices. Plus, we try a new veggie burger on the market, and learn why a college professor in the US joined a rebel army in the Horn of Africa. Lastly, a taxi driver in Washington DC releases music he recorded almost 40 years ago in Addis Ababa.

(Photo: People wait for Donald Trump to speak on veteran's issues during a campaign stop. Credit: Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

The World In Words20151226

The language barrier that separates elderly immigrants in the US from their grandchildren.

A language special for you this week: Yowei Shaw gives herself a radio reporting assignment to try to have a meaningful conversation with her Mandarin-speaking grandparents. Let’s just say, it did not go as planned. Then, we’ll hear what a nineteenth century Scottish adventurer had to do with the birth of Spanglish, the English-Spanish hybrid language now common in parts of Southern California.

And, Alina Simone tells us the strange history of Siberians in Hawaii. Plus: Patrick Cox and Nina Porzucki highlight some of their favourite language stories of the year.

Image: Yowei Shaw and her grandfather. (Credit: Chris Shaw)

Their Music Lives On20161231

We remember those artists who may no longer be with us but will always be a part of us.

"She never gave up, she didn’t know how to." Documentary filmmaker Matt Rogers spent 15 years documenting the life of the late soul singer Sharon Jones from her lean days to her storybook success.

Plus, Kenyan electro-funk man Blinky Bill remembers Phife Dawg of a Tribe Called Quest; how Juan Gabriel “the king of Latin pop? is now remembered in Mexico; why Maurice White, of Earth, Wind and Fire, was obsessed with ancient Egypt; and what Prince meant to one gay Muslim kid growing up in England.

(Image: People take part in New Year celebrations at Times Square in New York City. Credit: Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images )

Plus, Kenyan electro-funk man Blinky Bill remembers Phife Dawg of a Tribe Called Quest; how Juan Gabriel “the king of Latin pop” is now remembered in Mexico; why Maurice White, of Earth, Wind and Fire, was obsessed with ancient Egypt; and what Prince meant to one gay Muslim kid growing up in England.

Then And Now2014080920140810 (WS)

The American Jewish community is split along generational lines over the conflict in Gaza

A generational divide in the US Jewish community has emerged over the last few years. We learn how the latest conflict in Gaza has really laid bare the split.

Also, we listen to a new hit song in Central America called La Bestia and we find out what compelled the US Border Patrol to produce it. We get a rare tour of the Texas detention centres that are housing migrant children at the US-Mexico border.

Also in this edition, we visit a vintage clothing shop in New York that sells castoffs from the American working poor, and we take a trip to Mars—on the volcanic slopes of Hawaii. Plus, the lavender’s in full bloom on a farm on Long Island in New York, and we hear why it’s such a hit with Asian tourists.

Image: A pro-Israel rally outside the UN building in New York in July. Credit: Getty

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

There’s No Place Like Home2016082720160828 (WS)
20160829 (WS)

Is Canada a safe haven for conscientious objectors from the US? It’s not yet clear.

Also, a group of Haitian soccer players pack for college. An Indian engineer, raised in the US, goes back and meets a stranger with a life lesson. And a reporter moves back to her hometown in France where medieval bells still dictate the pace of life. Plus, we meet a woman who has made the entire world her home. We end with a conversation about race, music, and homesickness with writer Teju Cole.

Picture: People in Canada stand in solidarity with US war resisters, Credit: War Resisters Support Campaign

In Canada, US war resisters are currently in limbo

Things Not Forgotten2014053120140601 (WS)

A US Army veteran too busy trying to stay out of jail to think about Afghanistan’s future

A US veteran of the war in Afghanistan, Matt Farwell, is “apathetic? about the presidential race there. He says he’s too busy trying to keep himself out of jail – or a psychiatric hospital – to focus on it.

We also hear about an American doctor working in Malawi who may have solved a lingering malaria mystery. Why talking about the events surrounding Tiananmen Square on 4 June, 1989, remain difficult for Chinese people, both at home and abroad. We visit a button shop in New York’s Chinatown that enjoys a double life.

Now cruising Boston’s streets, what might just be the world’s first Uighur food truck! And a cheese cake recipe that you don’t want to try at home.

Picture: Former US Army Sgt. Matt Farwell served 16 months in Afghanistan's eastern Paktika province in 2006 and 2007, Credit: Matt Farwell.

Thirty-five Years For Bradley Manning20130824

US military veterans react to the sentencing of Private Bradley Manning in WikiLeaks case

US Army Private Bradley Manning gets 35 years in prison for leaking classified documents to WikiLeaks. We get reaction from US military veterans.

We also hear from Egyptians living in the US about the violent events unfolding in their homeland… and about a grand scheme for Egypt’s Nile Delta.

Also, a Balkan music summer camp in New York State; the woman who catalogued a treasure trove of old photos depicting novelist Ernest Hemingway’s book The Dangerous Summer; and an American man adopted as a baby from Korea meets his birth family.

(Photo: Getty Images)

Tip Of The Iceberg2016042320160424 (WS)
20160425 (WS)

Scientists recently issued a dire new warning about global sea-level rise tied to the melting of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. We hear from a longtime NASA researcher, who takes us on an audio journey there. Then, we head to southern Florida, where rising seas are driving a wedge between Republican mayors and their national party. And we stay in the Sunshine State to learn about the murky link between a former Brazilian football official and a multi-million dollar Florida home.

Plus: the many uses of the word ‘inshallah’; a California dreamer’s plan for a feminist paradise in South America; and the piano man of Mexico’s famed Copper Canyon.

Image: An iceberg in the western Antarctic peninsula on March 04, 2016. (Credit: Eitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images

Don't let Antarctica's size fool you. It's melting fast

To Everywhere And Nowhere20151107

The Syrian diaspora now counts three families in the US state of Vermont

The Obama administration has promised to admit 10,000 Syrian migrants over the next year. We head to the tiny New England state of Vermont to get some idea of what that might look like. Then, New York Times correspondent Rukmini Callimachi has another migrant story to tell— her own. And, we learn why easy access to ‘community college’ is a boon to migrant students starting out in America.

Plus: why the US is sending students to Tajikistan to learn Farsi. And the three languages where ‘Texas’ has a new meaning.

Image: Anwar Diab Agha, a Syrian migrant living in the US state of Vermont, was a highly-regarded violinist and composer in Damascus. Credit: PRI’s The World

Top Of The Class2016061120160612 (WS)
20160613 (WS)

We hear from people who were put to the test. A student who excelled in school and earned a PhD, despite not being a legal resident. A teenager who secretly drew portraits of all 411 of his classmates as a parting gift on graduation day. And the Iranian-American comic, Negin Farsad, who struggled to fit in.

Then, we visit an international school in Texas where dozens of languages are spoken. Plus, we find out how much a vote costs a political campaign. And the celebrated Cuban trumpeter, Arturo Sandoval, recounts his hair-raising defection to the United States.

Image: Yuriana Aguilar is a researcher in a biomedical laboratory at the University of California, Merced. (Credit: Sasha Khokha)

She doesn’t have immigration papers—but that didn’t stop her from earning a PhD

Trading Places20151205

How the Iraq war caused a rift between Khadija Ouannane and her 'American family'

Aida Alami's mother, Khadija Ouannane, was a Moroccan exchange student in the midwestern state of Wisconsin in 1969. It was a life-changing year for Khadija, and she kept in touch with her American family for many years. But that all fell apart after the attacks of September 11th. Aida picks up the story from there, and tries to piece together her mother's past. Then, we check in with a Syrian refugee family who've resettled in California and are feeling a post-Paris chill. Plus: a brief history of America's hostility to a previous generation of Mediterranean migrants— Italians.

Also: a father and son find a way to compromise in real life and in the new Pixar short, 'Sanjay's Super Team'. And the story of Vahagni— a Los Angeles-based Armenian flamenco guitarist.

Image: A school yearbook photo of Khadija Ouannane and her American host family in Wisconsin. (Courtesy of Aida Alami)

Turning Point20160123

If you live in the French-speaking world, you've probably heard of Gad Elmaleh. He's a Moroccan-French comedian whose sell-out shows fill arena-sized venues. But Elmaleh recently left all that behind to pursue a stand-up career in the US. He tells us about the jokes that got lost in translation. Then: the famed Ringling Brothers circus will be phasing out the use of elephants in its shows. We find out why and hear how the move might reverberate around the globe.

Also: a transgender US soldier tells us why her superiors insist she is called ‘Sir’. We learn about a medical breakthrough that could be key to stopping one of the planet’s deadliest infections: cryptococcal meningitis. And, we have look at the alarmingly high rate of infant mortality in the United States. Plus, three Mexican women blazing a trail in the red-hot mezcal industry.

Image: The comedian and actor Gad Elmaleh. (Credit: Caroline Lessire)

French comedian Gad Elmaleh leaves fame, fortune and French behind

Unforeseen Circumstances20160116

The new year has ushered in new fears for unauthorised immigrants in the US, as the Obama administration kicked off 2016 with a new round of deportation raids. The journalist and immigration activist Sonia Nazario tells us why she believes these efforts are counterproductive, and then we hear how some immigrants prepare their children for the day that Mummy and Daddy don’t come home.

Plus: how a quirk in US law led to thousands of international adoptees becoming stateless. The wild tale of a US Hellfire missile that wound up in Cuba. The reasons you should think twice before bringing an avocado into the United States. And the massive global effort to supply rock salt to blizzard-prone Boston.

Image: A group of Guatemalans deported from the United States arrive at an air force base in Guatemala City on January 6, 2016. (Credit: Orlando Estrada/AFP/Getty Images)

How unauthorised immigrants in the US might prepare for deportation.

Vital Signs2016080620160807 (WS)
20160808 (WS)

A volunteer surgeon remembers running from one person to the next in the hospitals of rebel-held Syria. Also, two friends in New York, preparing to visit the Dominican Republic, study up on Zika; a man in Boston attempts to get insulin to his brother in Venezuela; a woman looks through a telescope and sees something that looks a lot like a UFO, and a former prisoner plans to open his own eye glass shop.

Plus, we hear from two winners of First Lady Michelle Obama’s kids only Healthy Lunchtime Challenge.

(Photo: Syrians evacuate an injured man following an air strike on the rebel held neighbourhood of al-Qatarji, Aleppo. Credit: Ameer Alhalbi/AFP/Getty Images)

A Chicago surgeon recounts a nightmarish journey through Aleppo

War Left Behind2014080220140803 (WS)

Iraqi Christians in California fear for family members back home

Iraqi refugees gather at a California coffee shop to discuss the decaying state of their home country. We hear about a US TV documentary that has traced Iraq’s current crisis back to the early days of the American-led invasion. Also, we meet an Israeli military reservist and a Palestinian peace activist living side-by-side in Washington, DC. And, we hear the story of a boy who fled violence in the Middle East, only to find a different kind of conflict in the American mid-west. Also, we learn about the linen armour that once protected ancient Greek warriors. And, we hear about one man’s career change, from military analyst to cheesemonger.

Was Hurricane Sandy A Climate Change Wake-up Call For America?2012120120121202 (WS)

This week, is the US finally ready to act on climate change? We'll hear from a reporter in Egypt about the challenges she faces there, and how the conflict in Mali is making it hard for that country's musicians to keep playing. Also, we tour Skyfall's "Ghost Island".

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

What Comes Next20161112

Donald Trump’s victory left half the nation cheering, and half the nation in tears

This week, some Americans woke up to a country they didn’t recognize. Donald Trump’s victory left half the nation cheering, and half the nation in tears. Now everyone has to figure out how to move on.

Also on the programme, a Latino voter explains why he voted for Trump; unauthorized immigrants wonder what this election will mean for them in the future; and we spend a day in the life of a woman living in immigration limbo. Plus, will Trump bring a U-turn on climate policy? We end with a musician’s view of growing up on the US-Mexico border.

(Image: The White House is seen at dusk. Credit: Saul Loeb/Getty Images)

What’s Going On With America’s Military Generals?2012111720121118 (WS)

Americans appear to have lost interest in the war in Afghanistan, despite there being some 68,000 US troops still deployed there. That conflict came roaring back into the headlines this week, though not for the reasons anyone could have anticipated. The top US commander in Afghanistan John R Allen and his predecessor, the highly respected General David Petraeus - now retired and serving as CIA director - are each embroiled in a scandal involving an extramarital affair, flirtatious emails and possible national security leaks. But what do people in Afghanistan think of the scandals?

Also on the programme: what happens when Americans loose interest in a war they’re still fighting? And a US woman who's embraced Thailand's national sport.

(Image: General David Petraeus (left) inspecting troops, Credit: AFP/Getty Images)

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

What’s The Big Idea?20170311

Want to avoid immigration raids? There may soon be an app for that.

Also: how Donald Trump’s election has boosted California’s independence movement; how the late Miriam Colon converted an old fire station into New York’s first Hispanic theatre; a Silicon Valley engineer has an ingenious plan to cut our electricity use without us noticing, and we learn about a terrible marketing campaign for Barbie typewriters. Plus, some party music from the alt-Latino band Chicano Batman.

(Image: Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), agents detain an immigrant on October 14, 2015 in California. Credit: John Moore/Getty Images)

A programmer is working on an app to warn unauthorised immigrants of likely raids

Who Wants To Be American?2013102620131027 (WS)

Becoming an American, from background checks to citizenship tests

Becoming an American citizen should be a straightforward process, but often it’s not. We hear about Tarek Hamdi, a legal resident from Egypt, who fought for 11 years to become a US citizen. We also meet an undocumented immigrant from Taiwan who’s leaning toward applying for her citizenship, but remains undecided. She tells us why. And, we explore ideas for a better citizenship test for would-be Americans.

We’ll also hear about a break in the case of the mystery graffiti artist who was terrorizing African refugees in a New England city… and the story behind a spicy Asian condiment that’s become ubiquitous on American tables.

Picture: Tarek Hamdi, from Egypt, received his US naturalization certificate in 2012. He first applied for citizenship in 2001 but faced more than a decade of delays and denials until he won his case, Credit: Tarek Hamdi

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the...

How the world looks through American eyes, and the myriad and unexpected ways that the world influences the United States.

Words Of Wisdom20160109

The US Library of Congress calls on a graphic novelist to encourage children to read

The guy chosen by the US Library of Congress as the new National Ambassador for Young People's Literature? He writes comic books. The graphic novelist Gene Luen Yang tells us why comics matter and why superheroes are just the beginning. Then: how a man who once fled Nazi Germany wound up discovering Adolf Hitler’s long-forgotten second book. And, a small-town obituary writer in Alaska shares the life lessons she’s learned on the job.

Plus: why loosened US marijuana laws have sent Mexican weed prices plunging. The two-country journey one student takes every day to get to school. And a champion of bilingual education remembers her mother's stories of being paddled in school for speaking Spanish.

Image: Graphic novelist Gene Luen Yang at the 2015 Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards ceremony. (Credit: Kendall Whitehouse)